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BUILDING THE BRAND The transformation of the ‘U’ since 1973 page 6

DESIGN BY ALLISON GOODMAN


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Interested in Miami’s immigration history? Check out Assistant Photo Editor Cayla Nimmo’s photo brief. The School of Education has a new lab. Read Hyan Freitas’ story for details. Shiavani Thakkar is the first IndianAmerican President of the Society of Women Engineers. To learn more about her, read Daniela Rodriguez’s profile.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane

ON THE COVER The university’s “M” logo preceded the current split”U” logo. Image courtesy UM Archives. 2

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Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

A closer look at the campus road construction Miller, Memorial drives to connect BY JONATHAN BORGE SENIOR NEWS WRITER

After graduation next month, the biggest change to the University of Miami campus in decades will begin –– one that will impact thousands of students, faculty, staff and visitors by creating a new entrance along San Amaro Drive. The internal road project, which has been discussed for decades, will finally get underway with building a new roundabout at the intersection of Miller Road and San Amaro.The roundabout will replace the current traffic light. It will allow cars to still navigate onto San Amaro or enter the campus directly. Eventually, the entrance will be accompanied by new University of Miami signage and landscaping. ““It’’ll beautify an entrance for the campus,”” said Joe Natoli, senior vice president for business and finance and chief financial officer. ““It’’ll really be a very attractive way of entering the campus and bringing people into the Ring Theatre, Gusman Center and Student Activities Center (SAC). UM officials hope that by late August, commuters will be able to drive into what is now the parking lot behind the Frost School of Music. The new road will then turn left and run through the parking lots behind the Law School, Ungar Building and Cox Science Center before reconnecting to San Amaro at Robbia Avenue. Planning for the road began in 2006 after a ““very hasty and fast negotiation”” between the university and city of Coral Gables, said

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Janet Gavarrete, associate vice president of campus planning and development. She said Coral Gables officials wanted the work to begin in order to move forward with other UM projects such as the SAC. Coral Gables officials did not reply to repeated requests for comment on the project. In the past, they have said they hope the internal road will help ease traffic through residential streets adjacent to the campus. However, those streets will still be accessible to all motorists. The project’’s cost has not yet been determined. Still, it will result in the loss of hundreds of parking spaces in the effected lots. The lots, however, will provide more space. This summer, the parking permit holders in those lots will be able to use the Pavia parking garage, which recently added two floors and more than 300 spaces. Though many students are not aware of the road project, several think it’’s a good idea. ““I know that there’’s a lot of school traffic mixed with Coral Gables traffic, so I think having our own road would certainly be helpful,”” said Angela Clark, a third-year law student who parks in the purple zone behind Frost. Richard Sobaram, director of parking and transportation, said schedules and delivery routes have been developed to accommodate the Ring Theatre and Gusman Center’’s 37 summer events, deliveries to the University Center and ongoing construction of the SAC.

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Though shuttle routes will still run to the Fountain behind the Ashe Building, a new stop will be created near the post office in the University Center. That stop is expected to become a hub for pedestrians and future events. Also, the street in front of the Ring (Miller Drive) will no longer have metered parking. ““We think it’’ll also make the shuttles more efficient,”” Sobaram said. ““A round trip from Ponce to [Miller Drive] will be reduced by five to seven minutes.”” Officials hope the road will be completed in 90 days, but accommodations have been made for summer storms or other unpredictable factors that may slow down construction. The new Miller Drive plaza will not be completed until the spring of 2013, at the earliest. According to Gavarrete, Coral Gables suggested a roundabout in order to ease traffic flow and meet environmental standards. Gavarrete, who has been monitoring the university’’s traffic since 1992, expects the new traffic flow and upgraded parking lots to complement last fall’’s implementation of color-coded parking lots; the yellow zone, specifically, may be divided into smaller zones next fall. ““The objective is to always find a parking spot because we sell to

the amount that we have,”” Gavarrete said. The negotiation between the city and university called for the internal road to be built in two phases, but Gavarrete says she hopes the second phase may not be necessary because of the Miller Road changes. The second phase would involve extending the road through the Memorial Building and School of Communication lots and eventually linking with Stanford Drive near the School of Business Administration. In the past, students and others have raised concerns about the road cutting through the Arboretum. Current plans will not affect the Arboretum. ““The big issue for the arboretum is whether phase two is also approved, which will come later,”” said Steve Pearson, director of the arboretum. ““We are encouraged that the university is trying to solve this problem of a need for an internal road without it impacting the arboretum and we’’re fully supporting that the city approves the plan that way.”” In addition to the road and the SAC, campus changes will include the UHealth Center, a relocated Toppel Career Center, new classroom buildings for both Law and Frost, improvements to Cox and additional lighting for the intramural fields.


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For more information on campus construction, turn to page 5 for coverage of the Art Building’s renovation and WVUM’s plans for a new radio tower.

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CHANGES TO THE PARKING SYSTEM

Yellow parking zone to split after numerous comments, complaints Division to include pink, white zones BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR

In response to numerous complaints and suggestions, Parking and Transportation will divide the expansive yellow parking zone into three new colored zones next semester, making a total of eight zones. This year, the yellow zone was comprised of the areas near the BankUnited Center (BUC), Wellness Center, Pavia Garage, and Eaton and Mahoney-Pearson Residential Colleges. The new changes will make Pavia and its surroundings areas a pink zone, Mahoney-Pearson will be designated white, and yellow will maintain the areas near the Wellness Center and the BUC.

According to Director of Parking and Transportation Richard Sobaram, the decision to divide yellow into three zones had been discussed since October. The only problem was whether to enact the changes for this past spring semester or wait until next fall. Sobaram said another issue was reducing the number of cars ““hunting”” for spots throughout campus, espec i a l l y near

what Sobaram calls ““the academic core,”” or the University Center. This hunting problem was a major factor that initially led to the colored parking zones. ““In previous years, we sold people a hunting license, giving you the right to hunt for a parking spot,”” Sobaram said. ““That created a lot of intercampus trips.””

Students like senior Kevin Peterson chose the yellow zone because of its proximity to the Wellness Center. However, he will consider switching to the new Mahoney-Pearson zone to get assured parking near his classes. ““I usually park in front of the BUC because I don’’t like garages, and most spots are packed early,”” he said. ““I would try to get the white zone because it’’s near my classes at Merrick.”” Peterson, however, feels that the division of the yellow zone will not have much of an effect o n

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easing parking problems. Others like sophomore Karam Alawa believe that this may help. ““I think so, but only time will tell”” Alawa said. ““Last year it cost $400 to park in all areas when it now costs the same to park only in yellow.”” Though many seek to claim the new zones’’ close distance to classes and the central area of campus, freshman Stefania Pinto is worried that the division of yellow will affect the options she had within the yellow zone. ““I’’m probably going to switch to Pavia, so I’’m not happy with the division,”” she said. ““Because I’’m a psychology major, I take a lot of classes at Flipse, and I park next to the BUC and Rainbow Building to get to class.”” Pinto also felt that the new floors of Pavia should have been completed sooner. According to Sobaram, the new levels will open in late May and the first floor will be reserved for visitors.

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CAMPUS LIFE

NEWS BRIEFS HAPPY HOUR The Lowe Art Museum presents the last LoweDown of the season in conjunction with Miami Museum Month and Membership Appreciation Evening. In celebration of Cinco de Mayo, enjoy live Mariachi music, light Mexican fare and cocktails courtesy of Bacardi. Beverages provided by Vita Coco and Vitamin Water Zero. The event will be held at the museum on May 3 from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is $10 or free for Lowe members.

SENIOR MWAMBO The Senior Mwambo is an African rite of passage ceremony that marks the transition of black graduates from their lives at the University of Miami to advanced education and professional careers.The ceremony will recognize the accomplishments of black graduates and their families. Undergraduate and graduate students who have applied for graduation are encouraged to participate in the Senior Mwambo Ceremony on May 10 from 2 to 5 p.m. Cap and Gown are

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required in order to participate. Graduates must RSVP at miami.edu/msa/seniormwambo.

COMMENCEMENT Students participating in the May 2012 commencement ceremonies on May 10 and 11 should pick up regalia at the Toppel Career Center on May 8-May 10 from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. This excludes students in the School of Law and Miller School of Medicine. The official UM stole will be available for purchase. For more information, visit miami.edu/ commencement, call 305-284-1824 or email commencement@miami.edu.

OFF THE WIRE Be a part of the audience during a taping of Off The Wire, UMTV’s awardwinning late night comedy show, on Thursday at 8:30 p.m. in Studio C in the School of Communication Wolfson Building. Lyssa Goldberg may be contacted at lgoldberg@themiamihurricane.com.

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EXTENDED HOURS OF OPERATION C-STORE  Open 24 hours from Wednesday to May 3 Open 24 hours from May 6-May 9

STARBUCKS  Saturday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.  Monday-May 3 from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m.  May 4 from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.  May 5 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.  May 6 from 9 a.m. to 2 a.m.  May 7-8 from 6 a.m. to 2 a.m.

SUBWAY  Saturday from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m.

 Sunday from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m.  Monday-May 3 from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m.  May 4 from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m.  May 5 from 8 a.m. to 11 p.m.  May 6 from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m.  May 7-May 8 from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m.

VILLAGE MARKET AT UV  Saturday-Sunday from 10 a.m. to 1 a.m.

RICHTER LIBRARY  Open 24 hours a day through May 8

WELLNESS CENTER  Saturday-Sunday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.  Monday-May 4 from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m.  May 5-May 6 from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.  May 7-May 11 from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Note: Saturday is the last night of Late Night Dining in Hecht/ Stanford Dining Hall of the semester. All other dining locations will be open during their regular hours for the reading days and finals period.


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STUDENT ORGANIZATION

CONSTRUCTION

Historic Art Building to be renovated Structure to receive major facelift after decade BY ELIZABETH DUFFY CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

RACHEL STEINHAUSER // Contributing Photographer

DROP BEATS: Kevin Mason and Amber Robertson host a special episode of Electric Kingdom Live, with DJ sets by Seapunk, Zombelle and Ultrademon on March 15 earlier this year. DJ Zombelle (far right) drops a beat.

WVUM aims to drop beats farther away Station uses funds for new equipment BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ STAFF WRITER

After three years of trying to extend their range coverage, WVUM will finally be able to upgrade their antenna and transmit how far they can broadcast. The current transmitter can broadcast in a 15-mile radius. This includes Coral Gables and Miami. With the upgrade, the transmitter will be able to broadcast as far north as Fort Lauderdale and as far south as Florida City, according to senior Alex Zinn, WVUM’’s chief engineer. With the upgrade, the station will be able to reach a 1.5 million more people, which will bring in more advertisers, according to senior Micheal Matthieson, WVUM underwriting director. ““A bigger audience is more appealing to various companies,”” Matthieson said. ““Hopefully we will be able to attract and secure more sponsors. Getting big corporations allows us to do so much

more.”” The station will also be able to make contacts in the new areas and gain access to new artists, venues, and concerts. The last transmitter upgrade was in 1998, when the station could only broadcast in Coral Gables. ““Right now, compared to other stations, we’’re the little kids on the block,”” Zinn said. ““All of a sudden, we’’re going to be competing with commercial stations.”” The station had some difficulty getting approval from the school and finding the money to pay for the equipment. Because the current transmitter is situated on top of the Hecht Residential College, this upgrade will change the structure of the building. Aside from installing the tower, antenna, and the transmitter, there will also need to be upgrades to power supply systems and connections. The station received the antenna and tower from a donor who was a part of the radio station in the sixties and now sponsors it. To raise money for the transmitter, the station has held several fundraisers, including Radiothon, which is an annual weeklong fundraiser where they ask view-

ers to pledge money to support the station. This year, Radiothon began on April 22. The event will run until Sunday. The fundraiser includes giveaways for the listener who pledges the most in an hour. The event will also be distributing giveaway items for the listener who pledges the most money in an hour. For $5, any listener will be allowed to enter the studio to record a sweeper –– known as a transition that is played between the songs. Radiothon will also be hosting the Dubstep Pool Party, which will be taking place Friday at the UC pool. The party will begin at 8 p.m. and will end at midnight. With fundraising events like Radiothon, the small station will be able to raise sufficient funds to expand and reach a larger audience. ““The further we expand, the greater our knowledge of the underground stuff will expand,”” said sophomore Ashley Gonzalez, promotions director elect. ““Yes, it’’s more pressure, but it’’s also great that more people get to hear my voice and music that deserves to be heard over top 40. These are bands that are just as good.””

After more than a decade in dilapidation and disrepair, the historic Art Building at the north end of campus is undergoing a tedious renovation process. The two-story, wooden building was built after World War II to accommodate returning veterans. After nearly 20 years of complaints by students and faculty, however, the structure was deemed unsafe in 2003. As a result, the building had been fenced off until the renovations began last November. The construction is expected to take about a year, said Richard Phillips, who works for the general contractor, Turn Key Construction. The goal is to make the building structurally sound. ““We are reusing the historic wood as much as we can, but because of hurricane requirements, we have to replace certain structural elements of the building with new materials,”” Phillips said. Once the work is done, the building will house several College of Arts and Sciences departments, according to Mark Diaz, associate vice president for budget and planning, through the UM media relations office. It is unlikely that art will be one of the departments that moves into the renovated building, said Lise Drost, the chair of the department of art and art history. This is because the art department is now housed in the new Studio Arts Complex, near the Alumni Center. ““While we were all very fond of the tropical wooden buildings, the faculty and students are really pleased with the new facilities because it brings so many of the studio areas into close contact,”” she said. The painting annex, also known as building 3, will mostly likely be demolished soon, according Drost. The remaining building, which houses the photography and graphic design departments, will continue to be used. The project stems from a 2010 decision by the Coral Gables Historic Preservation Board, which required the university to preserve and maintain the historical integrity of the building. The Art Building is a part of a collection of wooden structures informally known as ““the shacks.”” Constructed from disassembled military barracks, the shacks were intended as temporary classrooms for the many students who enrolled at UM after the passage of a 1944 law that provided benefits to returning World War II veterans. Over the years, the Art Building was used by campus administrators and later, the art department. It is the only one of the three remaining ““shacks”” designated as historic.

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CAMPUS LIFE

History reveals iconic ‘‘U’’ logo’’s meaning Original logo ‘M’ becomes a ‘U’ BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT EDITOR

There are thousands of universities across the nation but only one gets to be ““The U.”” Here’’s a look at how U logos and traditions have evolved. 1973 – Split-U Logo is born Miami athletics had gone through several years of uniform and helmet changes, with inconsistent logos ranging from an M to UM. The Athletic Federation –– now the Hurricane Club, the student-athlete scholarship fund –– commissioned a logo re-design that brought about the split-U logo in 1973. The athletic department was looking for something that would symbolize the University of Miami without having to say those words, according to Evelyn Schwartz, a former assistant athletic director with the Athletic Federation. The letters UM were not enough because they could have represented many other schools. Miami-bred publicist Julian Cole, who was the first graduate of UM’’s radio and television department, worked with graphic artist Bill

Bodenhamer to develop the green and orange split-U logo. In the middle of the U, different images for each sport were inserted, like a baseball player, football player or tennis player. The U was then used for slogans like ““U gotta believe,”” ““U is great,”” and ““U is moving forward.”” Schwartz said that the Athletic Federation ultimately wanted people who saw the split-U to automatically think of the University of Miami. ““Beyond our wildest dreams, this is what happened,”” Schwartz said. Coupled with the excitement of the growing sports program, there was a hype surrounding the U and it really stuck, said Schwartz. Schwartz said that if the splitU weren’’t created, people probably wouldn’’t have even thought about calling Miami ““The U.”” Simply saying The U did not cause any confusion because there was only one university in Miami, said John Routh, executive director of the UM Sports Hall of Fame. ““If some was referring to the university, you knew it was UM,”” he said. 1979 – The Great U Logo Debate Former UM President Henry King Stanford set up a committee to find a replacement for the ““U”” logo,

but students launched a ““Save the U”” campaign in response, according to an article in The Miami Hurricane in August 1979. The article reported that Peter Zorn, the university’’s Graphics Department chair at the time, felt the ““U”” could have represented any university. He wanted a logo to represent the whole university rather than individual departments. Walter Etling, a former Board of Trustees representative, said that many departments adopted the ““U”” as a university symbol when the logo was developed, according to the article. c. 1980s – It’s All About The U Today, the phrase ““It’’s All About the U”” is seen on T-shirts and overheard daily, but it originated in the Athletic department. John Routh came to UM in 1983. He was known for his role as both Sebastian the Ibis and the baseball team’’s Miami Maniac. Routh said that the Athletic department coined the phrase ““It’’s all about the U,”” but they used it for a very different purpose. Athletics employees who felt they worked hard and for little pay would express their dedication by saying It’’s all about the U. The implication was that, ““We’’re just doing this for the athletes,”” said to Routh. ““It’’s ironic that, years later, it

was actually the slogan and adapted,”” Routh said. 1992- Throwing up the U The U hand gesture was created in 1992 for a home football game against Florida State. Former UM cheerleader Bill Tigano, B.S.C. ’’93, introduced the U hand motion for football fans to use as the Band of the Hour played the Star Wars ““Imperial Theme.”” ““FSU has the chop, and the Gators have their chomp, so I wanted to come up with something to identify us,”” Tigano told Miami Magazine in 2007. The hand gesture is recognized around the country. ““Over the years, it grew and grew,”” Routh said. ““Everyone now knows when you do the U, they know exactly what you’’re talking about.”” 2008 – UHealth The University of Miami Health Systems adopted the UHealth name and logo after research showed how well recognized the U brand was, according to Joanne Leahy, assistant vice president of marketing for UHealth. The research showed that people who saw the U thought of the University of Miami and not just its

athletics program. The study went beyond the local community, with around 40 percent of people in the Northeast also recognizing the U, according to Leahy. ““People just knew what the U was, and they not only knew what it was but also thought very highly of it,”” Leahy said. 2009 – The U goes universitywide Prior to the prevalent split-U, the university used the Miami bar logo on university documents and supplies. But in 2009, the split-U was adopted as the new identity of the University of Miami. ““It’’s kind of an unusual step for a university to use an athletic logo as its overall logo for the institution,”” Todd Ellenberg said. This change came after conducting focus groups in Los Angeles, Chicago and New York. The public relations consulting firm hired by UM surveyed high achieving high school juniors and seniors as well as parents, alumni and high school guidance counselors. The split-U is one of the most recognizable collegiate marks nationally and may the most pervasive graphic symbol throughout South Florida, according to the University Communications website.

PHOTO BRIEF

Fraternity raises funds to aid annual philanthropy, brother in need BALLS UP: First-year grad student Shari Gurkin signs the giant ball for Zeta Beta Tau’s philanthropy, Children’s Miracle Network. Junior Michael Jacobson is the philanthropy chair for ZBT and he was rolling the ball around campus to gather more signatures. “We do this every Spring,” Jacobson said. In addition to raising money for Children’s Miracle network, which improves the lives of children in hospitals, some of the proceeds will also go to a brother of the fraternity who was diagnosed with Leukemia.

PHOTOS BY CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

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SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION

School tries to meet student rental demands Equipment room aims to address supply needs BY KYLIE BANKS SENIOR NEWS WRITER

MONICA HERNDON // Staff Photographer

FLASH: (From left to right) Luke Pukatch and Sarah Olsen find equipment for checkout on a busy Friday afternoon. Students’ demands cannot always be met.

Lights, camera, action! That is, if you reserve a camera before Thursday. The School of Communication equipment room houses everything from HD cameras to extension cords and is the one-stop shop for SoC students who need equipment to complete assignment and final projects. The cost of the equipment runs anywhere from several hundred to several thousand dollars, which means that not many students can afford to purchase their own equipment. However, for some students, getting equipment can be a challenge. With final project due dates looming, the equipment room’’s shelves are nearly empty on by the end of the week. ““We find that the shelves are empty on Thursdays and Fridays,”” said Tod Landess, the production equipment supervisor. ““This is the crunch now.”” Equipment is allocated to students on a first-come, first serve basis. Students can reserve equipment online or visit the equipment room, located in room 1014 in the Wolfson Building. Visual journalism classes especially struggle to get required cameras. Three introductory visual journalism classes, which have up to 16 students each, must share 21 Cannon Rebel XT cameras. Additionally, there are only five Cannon T3i cameras available for the 14 students enrolled in the video journalism class. Film students have 38 HMC 150 cameras to choose from but visual journalism students also often request these cameras. Missing and broken equipment poses yet another problem. Junior Hadley Jordan, a visual journalism major, had trouble getting batteries to operate a camera. ““I went in there on Thursday and I checked out a camera. They said, ‘‘We don’’t have any batteries for you,’’”” she said. ““In visual journalism, the news happens when it happens. I had to leave my job early to get another battery.”” Equipment that is broken cannot be rented out to students, which reduces the amount of equipment available to students. ““Inventory can show we have more available then we do because we may have a new round of broken stuff,”” said April 26 - May 9, 2012

Tod Landess, the production equipment supervisor. ““The common issues are wireless mics that get damaged because students close them in the case or tripods that get damaged.”” However, the SoC is making strides in acquiring more equipment for rental. Each year, the school allocates a certain percentage of its budget to cover the expenses of new equipment. ““We’’ve been adding new equipment on a consistent basis,”” said Tom Ortiz, the director of technical operations and engineering for the School of Communication. ““Last budget cycle, I was able to add 20 new HD (high definition) cameras to our fleet.”” For the past three years, the equipment room has been in the process of transitioning to high definition cameras for all disciplines, since this is the direction the communications industry is headed in. ““We’’re in the transition of going from acquiring on tape to acquiring on an SD card,”” Landess said. ““We’’re working on one main fleet. Eventually it will be over 40 [cameras].”” Broadcast journalism students have not seen this transition due to the studios they currently use. According to Ortiz, the studios only use tape and broadcast students would not be able to use any HD equipment even if the SoC purchased it. Some, like senior Ryan Aquilina, a motions pictures major, have purchased their own cameras to keep up with the industry. ““DSLRs are becoming very popular to film with right now,”” he said. ““You see a lot of students buying their own cameras. I have 4 film friends that have their own cameras.”” Still, Aquilina acknowledges that it is simply not feasible for students to purchase all the equipment they need. ““I still have to go in for sound equipment, for a tri-pod, for lighting,”” he said. ““That’’s something that not all of us can invest in. Tripods can be several hundred dollars.””

We find that the shelves are empty on Thursdays and Fridays. This is the crunch now Todd Landess, Production equipment supervisor THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Alexa Lopez, Editor-in-chief

The Miami

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OPINION

Once you integrate yourself into the Hurricane family, college will be a rewarding and meaningful experience.

Founded 1929

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexa Lopez MANAGING EDITOR Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman PHOTO EDITOR Marlena Skrobe

CURIE VILLARSON Junior

ELIE NEHME Senior

DANIEL COWARD Senior

AINSLEE JACOBY Senior

“I learned what true friendship is and I learned that not everyone has your best interest in mind. It has made me stronger and aware. Academically, I just wish you could do more things outside of your major. I haven’t been able to explore many other options that I would want to.”

“Being 19 years old, a transfer student, and taking 20 credits a semester is quite a struggle, but this year has been a very memorable year. Being the president of OASIS, I was able to make new relationships. I am very proud to call UM my university. Basically, UM is the shit.”

“I have grown in a lot of different ways. One of the coolest things is looking back on it. It’s not a conscious thing, it just happens. I have found that I have the ability to multitask like crazy. I spent four years in this place. I live here, my friends are here. I don’t know anyone who can be a senior and not claim that UM is home.”

“Being born and raised in New York, I never thought I’d live anywhere else. I chose to come to Miami on a whim and haven’t regretted a day of it. The people, weather and culture are a completely different world. Miami, if you will, is a gateway city, and I’ll miss it when I’m gone.”

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo NEWS EDITOR Alysha Khan ASST. EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez COPY CHIEF Stephanie Parra COPY EDITORS Spencer Dandes Nicky Diaz

BUSINESS MANAGER Isabel Gonzalez ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls ACCOUNT REPS Danica Jones Tara Kleppinger Misha Mayeur PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers ONLINE EDITOR Daniel Cepero WEBMASTER Amanda Zacharkiewicz DESIGNERS Carlos Mella Mariah Price Amilynn Soto ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page.

CONNIE FOSSI Junior

JONATHAN YUNES Senior

“The value of this education is priceless. My dreams have turned into a reality. I have been able to meet people from different backgrounds. Since I came here without my parents or family, UM is home for me.”

“There’s no other place to spend the best four years of your life. Even the weather is like living a fake life. What else is there to say besides it’s Miami?”

What has UM done for you personally and academically this year? What does UM mean to you? COMPILED BY ELIZABETH DE ARMAS, DESIGN BY ALLISON GOODMAN

CRISTIAN BENAVIDES Junior “Every day I walk through the halls at the U and there is nowhere else I’d rather be. Even though I get little sleep – I know at the end it’s all worth it. The school makes it a great environment so you can socialize by the pool and trampoline in the morning, and study late at Richter by night. It’s great.”

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“Personally, it has been amazing. I have met the most amazing boy in the world. Academically, I am getting my bearings and I am ready with an attack strategy for senior year. But, I am excited to almost be out in the real world. UM to me is continuing a legacy. Both my parents came here and it has changed a lot since they’ve been here, but I still feel their NICHOLAS LEY presence. Even though my dad was Junior an offensive linemen for the football team and I’m in the theater department studying acting, I’m carrying out my family tradition.”

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TIFFANY FORD Junior “UM has opened its doors for me. I didn’t realize how many resources were available for me to use freely on campus and now is when I’m finally taking advantage of them. We have so much assistance here. I feel like the different organizations on campus have helped me make a lot of friends. Because of the relationships I have built with people, I have been able to adjust well.”

©2012 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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Iran could put U.S. in danger Nuclear Iran proves to be threat

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death. Since the Iranian Revolution in 1979, Iran has been a state sponsor of terror. Hezbollah and Hamas, recognized terrorist organizations, have received arms and money from Iran and have carried out attacks against innocent civilians with Iran’’s blessing. In 1983, Hezbollah bombed a Marines barrack in Beirut, Lebanon. Two hundred forty-one Marines died in the attack. Eleven years later, in 1994, Iran directed Hezbollah to bomb a Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Eighty-five people died. More recently, Iran has set up training camps in America’’s backyard: Venezuela and Brazil. They have supported insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan who fight against our troops. In October, Iran recruited a Mexican cartel, Los Zetas, in an assassination attempt on the Saudi Ambassador on American soil. Later that week, Iranian proxies set up deadly bombings in India and Georgia. Iran has sought to weaken democratic states and has killed innocent civilians. Now, Iran is in the process of acquiring nuclear capabilities. However, the world community has almost universally condemned Iran’’s actions. Congress and the European Union have passed crippling sanctions against Iran’’s economy and petrochemical industry. President Obama said that he would not tolerate a nuclear Iran. I have a lot of faith in you, Mr. President. Don’’t let us down. The consequences would be too grave.

he threat of Iran is imminent. Most dismiss the reality that a nuclear-proliferated Iran will be a real threat to America. It’’s not like they could ever drop the bomb on American soil right? It’’s not an attack on American soil that we should fear. It’’s our economic longevity. Let us think back to December VINCENT FOSTER and March when Iranian President CONTRIBUTING Mahmoud Ahmadinejad threatened to COLUMNIST shut down the Strait of Hormuz. This would have stifled the world’’s oil supply from Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Iraq, Qatar and Bahrain. The oil coming out of this strait amounts to about 40 percent of world sea-borne oil and almost 20 percent of the entire world oil supply. The mere threat to close the strait raised the cost of a barrel of oil by almost a dollar. When a leader threatens to choke the world of 20 percent of its oil supply, he is not sane. Iran’’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, is no less erratic. We cannot allow such irrational leaders to wield nuclear weapons. Contrary to other nuclear-armed countries like North Korea, Iran would have no check on its power. The United States and many allies across the world agree that Iran is engaging in nefarious activities. The U.S. and the European Union have passed multilateral sanctions against Iran in attempts to get it to halt its quest for nuclear proliferation but to no avail. I paid $4.04 per gallon at the pump last week. How much will gas be with a nuclear-armed Iran? A nuclear Iran will create political instability in the Middle East and with instability comes a rise in oil prices. The cost of every product transported in America is dependent upon oil prices. This is what I am worried about. Not being bombed, but being economically choked. The United States needs to send Iran a stronger message. Iran must know that if they develop the capability to become nuclear-armed, the United States will retaliate with overwhelming force. The longevity of our economy depends on it.

Jordan Lewis is a sophomore majoring in political science. He is the president of the UM Young Democrats.

Vincent Foster is a senior majoring in political science and philosophy. He is the former president of the UM College Republicans.

JORDAN LEWIS CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

ran must not get a nuclear weapon. It would completely reshape the power balance in the Middle East and put the United States in danger. Iranian President Ahmadinejad is an unstable and vicious tyrant. When his people rebelled against what was thought to be a corrupt electoral victory, Ahmadinejad’’s regime hunted down the protestors and silently killed them and their families. Today there is no dissent in Iran out of fear of certain

Iran may economically choke U.S.

Summertime opens up doors, offers opportunities

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chool’’s out and we're now faced with three months of vacation time. Don't spend the summer stuck at home all day. There are a variety of other TAYLOR DUCKETT CONTRIBUTING options for students. COLUMNIST One way to have a productive summer is to get a part-time job. Many people don’’t want to work during the summer because they think it may be boring, but work doesn’’t have to be boring. If you like kids, there are summer

camps that you can work at. Having a little extra money on the side is always a plus. Internships are another possibility. Although most are unpaid, there are paid internships as well. Regardless, they can be rewarding. Internships look great on resumes and many times, help land you that first job after graduation. Networking and hands-on experience are key. Employers like to see that you have experience in the field you're getting into. Studying abroad or taking summer classes are other ways to keep busy. Studying abroad can be a fun and life-changing experience. Many schools offer summer abroad programs where you can spend a few weeks to a month in another country

and immerse yourself in a different culture. In many cases you can also earn college credits. Summer classes can help you get ahead or catch up. These classes are typically smaller so you are able to get more help from your professor. If none of these options is your cup of tea, you can always engage in community service. Some scholarships require this for eligibility and it is a good way to help out and make a difference in someone’’s life. No matter what you do this summer, just make sure that you enjoy it. Taylor Duckett is a freshman majoring in political science. April 26 - May 9, 2012

A WORD FROM THE EDITOR

Embrace new experiences, embrace the U

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s I reminisce about my four years at the University of Miami, countless memories and lessons learned race through my head. I didn’’t dream of attending UM because I went to elementary and high ALEXA LOPEZ school less than three miles from campus. I wanted change and a real ““college experience.”” Now, I truly can’’t imagine myself anywhere else. The life lessons, friends, experiences and opportunities I have gained from this university, as well as from its students, faculty and administrators, are absolutely invaluable. I’’ve studied literature from around the world, and how to be a thorough and ethical journalist. I’’ve run through the sprinklers on the intramural fields in the middle of the night. I’’ve sung the alma mater during Homecoming at the old Rat. I’’ve traveled to Tallahassee to see the Canes defeat the Seminoles. I’’ve seen the Dalai Lama, President Barack Obama and (best of all) Billy Joel walk beneath our campus’’ palm trees. But most of all, I can’’t believe how blessed I was to be the editor-in-chief of an award-winning student newspaper, to work three years with an incredibly talented staff, or to learn the lessons that I have while working at The Miami Hurricane. None of these incredible memories would have been possible if I remained the unabatedly shy freshman that I was in 2008. But thanks to a memorable summer program called Great Start and the helpful friends I made there, I began to step outside of my comfort zone. It’’s never too late to make the best of your experience here at UM. Once you integrate yourself into the Hurricane family, college will be a rewarding and meaningful experience. Join a student organization that celebrates your culture, serves the community, or helps make UM a better place. Forge relationships with your professors, who can help lead you to a bright future. Embrace the green and orange culture and don’’t feel too cheesy when you cheer for our Hurricanes. But most importantly: Don’’t be afraid of new experiences or new people. Thank you to our readers, the phenomenal newspaper staff and our adviser for an amazing college experience at The Miami Hurricane. Alexa Lopez is a senior majoring in journalism and English literature. She will be a reporting intern at The Miami Herald after graduation. She may be contacted at alopez@themiamihurricane.com. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Music genre may be this generation’s rock ‘n’ roll House music in the mainstream is here to stay

Message from popular genre must be refined

ouse music is this generation’’s rock 'n' roll. Get used to it. Just like the rock movement, house inspires a feeling. There is a physical, chemical or emotional reaction to TAL LIFSHITZ CONTRIBUTING whatever auditory stimCOLUMNIST ulus blasts out of nearby speakers. It’’s that thing that the melodic vocalist in Avicii’’s hit, ““Levels,”” is singing about when she lets everyone know that, ““sometimes, I get a good feeling, yeah.”” The feeling is just as real for this generation as it was for any other generation, drug-induced or not. House is a movement and it’’s growing. Developing underground during the early 1980s in Chicago, the genre made its way to Europe, penetrated the mainstream, and completed the cross-Atlantic voyage home. But rock ’’n’’ roll traditionalists (those forever loyal to the Beatles) resist the impact and existence of the movement. There is no modern analog to the unifying power of the 1960s sexual revolution, Vietnam, and the civil women’’s rights movements. The

respect the argument that house music is tantamount to rock ’’n’’ roll in the 1960s. The rock ’’n’’ roll movement fostered the advancement of the civil rights moveTODD FRIEDMAN ment, the women’’s CONTRIBUTING rights movement, the COLUMNIST sexual revolution and anti-war protest. But in all candor, house music lacks similarly substantive messages. If house unites the masses under a nondescript feeling, what does that say about who we are as individuals and how the youth identifies as a generation? Paul McCartney’’s ““Blackbird”” struck a chord with African-American women suffering from iniquitous oppression. "Take these broken wings and learn to fly. All your life, you were only waiting for this moment to arrive," he sings. His words conjured images in the minds of the youth of Rosa Parks and Daisy Bates. He brought people together with a message of empowerment. Yet, house music reminds today’’s zombie hoard that we have feelings? That’’s deep. Unlike house, rock ’’n’’ roll cultivated a movement.

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truth is that rock represented youth, freedom and resistance to authority. However, house music represents something too. Rising to prominence in the early 1980s, only a decade and a half after rock took shape, the genre represented the political voice of black, Latin, and gay youth. It spread throughout the dance floors of underground New York and Chicago clubs, and with DJs like David Guetta and Tiesto consistently topping popularity polls, the movement has reached full speed. Why does house or any genre need a revolutionary backdrop to be legitimized? Didn’’t the Beatles and Rolling Stones all wish for the day where the music was enough to bring people together? Isn’’t that day here? Ultra Music Festival is just one example of how house music manages to bring together diverse crowds without the unifying strength of the war and revolution of the 1960s. The bottom line is the same: People like this music. House is home now. Skeptics take notice. Tal Lifshitz is a third-year law student. FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THE STORY, VISIT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM

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Rock ’’n’’ roll altered the fundamental social composition of American society. Congress commissioned the Committee on UnAmerican Activities to combat rock ’’n’’ roll’’s effectiveness. In contrast, a film of a girl making out with a tree at Ultra has gone viral. Back away from that oak. Rock ’’n’’ roll conscientiously crafted counterculture. Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert advocated drug use as a way to ““think for yourself and question authority”” whereas Madonna encouraged fans at Ultra to take ecstasy for no reason. I am not advocating drug use, but there is a critical distinction between taking a stand and seeking a thrill. Humanity has made undeniable progress since Jim Crow and La Leche League, but we are far from utopia. Rock ’’n’’ roll facilitated the ability to reduce abstract ideas into articulable goals of equality, peace and love. The abstract aspirations of house music have not materialized into ascertainable goals. If house music is the medium then the message must be refined. Todd Friedman is a third year law student. FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THE STORY, VISIT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM

MTV should restore its identity

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ou've been living under a rock, oblivious to MTV’’s existence, but while channel surfing you come across ““Music Television”” and get excited about the idea of watching MELANIE KLEINER music videos, interCONTRIBUTING views with artists, and COLUMNIST the inside scoop of the music industry 24 hours a day. What a dream network. But MTV’’s current airing schedule consists of shows by the name of ““16 and Pregnant," ““Punk’’d" and ““Jersey Shore." MTV’’s original identity has disintegrated in accordance with the reality television craze. As Justin Timberlake said in his 2007 VMA acceptance speech, ““Play more damn videos [MTV].”” According to the TV Guide listings, in a 12-hour day, MTV airs music-related shows for five hours from 3 to 8 a.m. (because so many people are awake, let alone looking to watch music videos at that hour). What’’s on during the remaining seven hours? Reality television. In 2008, MTV reached a turning point upon the cancellation of one of its longest running shows, ““Total Request Live.”” ““TRL”” 12

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aired from Monday to Thursday for one hour, showing the top-10 voted music videos and featured special guests. ““TRL”” was one of MTV’’s most signature music-based shows. Since the end of ““TRL,”” MTV has resorted to Snookie and The Situation as its signatures, caving to their outrageous social antics and stereotypical appearances. I hope the executives of MTV feel good about themselves. It’’s entertaining and revenue boosting, but where’’s the substance, not to mention the music? Other than a laugh, it is detrimental to music and society. The general public has ironically lost touch with reality, forgetting that MTV stands for Music Television. What has Snookie done for the music industry? The music industry needs a hand and the role of MTV is key to its recovery. There are endless ways MTV could restore its true music-oriented identity and still thrive. Take Timberlake’’s advice and play more videos to support the artists and re-establish MTV’’s reputation. Not only is reality television encouraging young adults to emulate outrageous behavior, but its takeover of MTV is contributing to the downward spiral of the music industry. Either formally change the network name to RTV (Reality Television) or bring the music back. Melanie Kleiner is a junior majoring in economics.


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Ready to drop a beat?

Check out WVUM’s Dubstep Pool Party on Friday at 8 p.m. All the action takes place at the UC Pool. For more information, search for the event on Facebook.

It’’s hard to imagine that beer enthusiasts wouldn’’t find something they enjoy here. Sporting more than 140 different beers, Yard House is great for both the experienced beer drinker and those looking to find something they like. It’’s difficult not to be impressed walking by the bar area and realizing it’’s surrounded by different drafts. The staff is welleducated and the menu offers descriptions categorizing what kind of beer you are selecting from (ambers, pale ales, craft beers) and what kind of flavor to expect. For those overwhelmed by the choices, Yard House makes it a little easier by offering a sampler plate of six different beers, selected each day by the staff, to give patrons a few different tastes. Though kind of pricy during regular hours, happy hour is the best time to visit, with great discounts on all serving sizes. If you’’re feeling adventurous, purchase the half-yard, a foot-and-a-half tall glass of your favorite brew. Just don’’t try chugging it (or do). Yard House is located at 320 San Lorenzo Ave., Coral Gables.

Though not quite as extensive as the other locations on this list, Burger and Beer Joint earns a spot due to both its selection of beer and pairings with great burgers. With two locations, one in Brickell and the other in Miami Beach, B&B offers 99 different beers including some more well-known brews (Yeungling, Guinness, New Castle) to some more interesting, lesser-known selections (Golden Monkey, Red Brick Blonde). The selection is diverse enough so that you won’’t get bored anytime soon. With all the beer and burgers you could ask for (and you can draw on the tables), B&B warrants a visit next time you’’re looking to reward your palate. Burger and Beer Joint is located at 1766 Bay Road, Miami Beach, and at 900 S. Miami Ave. in the Brickell area.

The Epcot theme park at Walt Disney World in Orlando is interesting in that it offers guests the opportunity to go around several different countries and ““Drink Around the World.”” Although this location certainly lacks mice and rides, the Democratic Republic of Beer is just as worldly. With more than 500 beers from 69 different countries, the extensive menu is updated weekly, making it a challenge to even make a dent in it. DRB even offers a passport you can apply for which keeps track of everything you’’ve drank, with badges and different prizes based off several different drinking criteria.

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DRB is located at 255 NE 14th St., Miami.

r e e b BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

Homer Simpson once said that beer is “the cause of, and solution to, all of life’s problems.” There’s no doubt that many students enjoy the occasional brew (or 10), but there’s only so many Natty Ice or Keystone Lights someone can take before it all just begins to pass as water. Thankfully, there are plenty of locations close to campus where students can get good beer without breaking the bank. Even better, many of these places have so much variety that there’s something available for everyone. DESIGN BY MARIAH PRICE

April 26 - May 9, 2012

When it comes to beer selection, there aren’’t too many places with as much variety as the World of Beer. Located across from Dadeland Mall, the diversity is obvious as soon as you walk in, with the walls of refrigerators categorizing the more than 500 beers by country of origin. World of Beer, which updates its beer selection regularly, encourages patrons to become a ““beer legend”” by signing up for their loyalty card, which can be used to gain points for prizes after every different kind of beer purchased. Prizes include anything between T-shirts to mugs to plaques, even a party with a $500 bar tab if you get to 500. Weekly happy hour specials include Tuesday night’’s Yappy Hour ($1 for all dogrelated beers) and Thursday night’’s ladies night. But the best time to visit is on Wednesday, when all college students and faculty get half off all drafts. With live music playing every Thursday through Saturday, this bar locale is a beer connoisseur’’s playground. World of Beer is located at 9010 SW 72nd Pl., Suite F-101, Miami.

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‘Craft beer renaissance’ takes Miami area BY ALEXA LOPEZ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

There is no denying that a craft beer trend is brewing in Miami. Since the ‘‘70s, beer drinkers in the United States have started to give up mass-produced favorites from Anheuser-Busch and the Miller Brewing Company for new tastes by American-bred craft breweries, from Dogfish Head to Magic Hat. Now, Miami is home to a handful of microbreweries, which offer new tastes of the token college beverage. ““It sort of engages people in the spirit of the city. People can make their beers as unique a flavor as Miami,”” said Jason Lecker, a University of Miami graduate student. ““When you drink Anheuser-Busch or Miller, you’’re getting something that’’s marketed to the common denominator.”” One local microbrewery is Titanic Restaurant and Brewery down the block from the UM’’s Coral Gables campus. ““The beer culture is blowing up right now,”” said Brackie Bryant, one of Titanic’’s general managers. ““The creativity is through the roof and the sky’’s the limit now. Craft beers are becoming the forefront in Miami.”” Titanic is a brewpub, which means that the beer brewed in-house must only be sold on its property. Every month, Titanic brews six kinds of beer, which are offered on draft. But some local microbreweries are seeking to spread their creations beyond their brewhouses. Before 2001, Florida breweries were wary of mass-producing their beer because of strict Florida laws, including one that restricted beer packaging to 8-, 12-, 16- or 32-ounce bottles, according to the Broward Palm Beach New Times. Craft breweries, however, are known for oddly-sized bottles, like the 22-ounce ““bomber.”” Now, however, microbreweries are popping up across Florida. ““Florida is at the beginning end of the curve of a craft beer renaissance,”” said David Kristen, the marketing chairman of the Miami Area Society of Homebrewers (MASH). For example, Schnebly’’s Winery and Brewery in Homestead is the first microbrewery in South Florida to start distributing wholesale.

PHOTOS BY CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

BLAME IT ON THE ALCOHOL: The Titanic Restaurant and Brewery, which is close to UM’s Coral Gables campus, is a local microbrewery. Customers can get a glance of the brewery (left) and a grab a meal in Titanic’s main dining area. Schnebly’’s offers ales and lagers infused with starfruit, mango, guava, passion fruit and coconut, which are all grown on the property. ““Everything we grow, we’’re going to make some beer with it,”” said Peter Schnebly, co-owner of Schnebly’’s. ““We’’re going to have fun with it.”” Soon to join Schnebly’’s in the production microbrewery business is Wynwood Brewing Company, which is in the planning process. Founder Luis Brignoni said that he’’s been dreaming about opening a brewery since college, when he didn’’t want to drink ““cheap yellow fizzy beer,”” and instead ““wanted something good with the money I had available.””

GET A TASTE OF CRAFT BEER BREW YOUR OWN BEER: Learn brewing techniques and buy ingredients and equipment at BrewBox Miami, 8831 SW 129th St., Miami. Join MASH by visiting miami-homebrew.org. TASTE LOCAL CRAFT BEER  Abbey Brewing Company: 14

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1115 16th St., Miami Beach Gordon Biersch: 1201 Brickell Ave. in Brickell area Schnebly’s Winery and Brewery: 30205 SW 217th Ave., Homestead Titanic Restaurant and Brewery: 5813 Ponce De Leon Blvd., Coral Gables

April 26 - May 9, 2012

Brignoni said he thinks the craft beer movement has been ““a long time coming and now it’’s just more noticeable.”” ““Before you had to go to specific places to get craft beers," Brignoni said. "Now it seems like any reputable establishment is carrying at least a small portfolio of craft beers. I truly believe Miami has in it to be a great craft beer town and I’’m looking forward to it.”” While the wave of Miami microbreweries slowly develops, many local residents have been building breweries in their own homes. ““The previous accessibility to good beer, or lack thereof, led to a lot of homebrewers creating their own suds, which in my view has really fueled the current local beer culture we see today,”” said Brignoni, who started homebrewing in college. For example, Kirsten, who graduated with his bachelor’’s and master’’s degrees from UM, brews 5-gallon batches in kegs. The whole process takes between three weeks and a month. The members of MASH, including Kirsten, experiment with their brews. According to Kirsten, they have used spices, wood, chocolate and peppers in their beer concoctions. Kirsten’’s favorite beer creation so far is his last batch of beer, a dark stout aged in an old oak whiskey barrel. ““The joy about craft beer is that you’’re not

being told what beer to like. It’’s about creating and experiencing the entire spectrum of flavor,”” said Kirsten, who said he used to drink whatever cheap beer was available when he was at UM. ““But students today are being exposed to more than I had the opportunity to be.””

DRINK UP: Titanic brews six beers every month, which are offered on draft.


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SPORTS

Thank you to our three graduating sports writers for their hard work and dedication over the last few years. Good luck in your future endeavors.

BASEBALL

ZACH BEEKER// Staff Photographer

TEAMWORK: Freshman Julian Santos fist bumps senior Rony Rodriguez as he comes up to bat in Tuesday’s game against Florida Atlantic. Midweek starter Javi Salas had a strong outing for the Hurricanes, pitching six innings with a career-high 10 strikeouts en route to a 3-1 win. Miami will start a series against Virginia on Saturday.

Salas dominates with 10 strikeouts in win over FAU Miami provides offensive support in 3-1 victory BY ADAM BERGER SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

The University of Miami baseball team came into Tuesday night’’s matchup against Florida Atlantic University needing a win in the worst way. The previous weekend saw the Hurricanes lose three straight games to in-state rival Florida State up in Tallahassee, causing Miami to plummet in the polls. Apparently Javi Salas got the memo. Miami’’s midweek starter was brilliant during his six innings of work versus the Owls, surrendering one earned run while recording a career-high 10 strikeouts in a 3-1 victory. ““I’’ve never really been a strikeout pitcher at all in any level in my life, I’’m more of a contact guy,”” Salas said. ““The strikeouts are welcomed. I’’m not really used to doing that.”” Miami (27-14, 12-9 ACC) needed Salas to be dominant. The Hurricanes lineup is de-

pleted at the moment due to a variety of injuries. Regulars like Peter O’’Brien, Esteban Tresgallo, Jarred Mederos and Dale Carey, who recently got his wisdom teeth pulled, were all on the bench on Tuesday. In the top of the first inning Salas surrendered a leadoff single to Mike Abaledeja, and then struck out the next two batters. But Corey Keller laced a single to right field in front of Julian Santos, who threw home but was cut off by Tyler Palmer, with the relay throw coming late to catcher Garrett Kennedy. The Owls took an early 1-0 lead, but it would be their only run of the game. With the Hurricanes as banged up as they were, Alex San Jaun stepped to the plate to lead off the third inning in what was only his third at bat of the season, and he made it count. The junior hit an Austin Gomber fastball just past the diving reach of third baseman Kyle Newton for a double, the Hurricanes’’ first hit of the night. A Garret Kennedy sac bunt moved San Jaun to third. Tyler Palmer then hit a weak, high-

bouncing groundball to shortstop Mitch Morales. San Jaun charged home on contact. Morales’’ throw to catcher Mike Spano beat the slow running Saun Juan, but he somehow managed to angle his body away from Spano’’s tag, touching home safely to tie the ballgame 1-1. San Jaun pumped his fists emphatically after home plate umpire Olinda Mattia signaled that he was safe. It was the first time San Jaun was on the base paths all season, and the unlikely source of production brought a sense of calm to a struggling Miami offense. In the bottom of the fourth with one out, Rony Rodriguez hit a groundball double down the left field line. Michael Broad hit what looked to be a potential home run, but the high fly ball drifted just wide of the left field foul pole, and he ended up striking out. But Brad Fieger came up with a clutch double to right field that scored Rodriguez and gave Miami a 2-1 lead. ““I think today we had a great defensive outing, but we also had key hits,”” Salas said of his teammates. ““Against Florida State we April 26 - May 9, 2012

really couldn’’t get that big hit.”” Fieger’’s RBI double would prove to be the difference for the Hurricanes. After Salas exited the game, Christian Diaz pitched a perfect seventh inning, and Miami used a combination of Diaz, Eric Nedeljkovic and AJ Salcines to navigate through the eighth. Broad, who narrowly missed home runs twice earlier in the night, provided some insurance for Miami’’s bullpen in the bottom of the eighth when he connected for a solo shot to left field, one that hit the palm trees on the football team’’s Green Tree Practice Fields. Fittingly enough, in a game that saw solid, fundamental defense from the Hurricanes, Julian Santos ended the night by making a spectacular diving catch in right field with two outs in the top of the ninth to end the game and secure the victory. Salcines earned his third save of the season. Miami must now try to improve its ACC record after last weekend’’s disappointing showing against the Seminoles. Virginia will visit Coral Gables over the weekend for a three-game series. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Going off of Tuesday night’’s starting lineups, this is a Hurricane team that has been decimated by injuries over the past few games. With Dale Carey sitting against FAU, the outfield was relegated between Chantz Mack, Julian Santos and Rony Rodriguez. Mack didn’’t have a hit against the Owls, but has been hitting well since the series against North Carolina, picking up 11 RBI since then.

Infielder Esteban Tresgallo, after a hot start to begin the season, has cooled down over the past few weeks. After sitting on Tuesday night, it is unclear whether he was taken out for precautionary measures or if there is a lingering injury. If that’’s the case, Tyler Palmer will likely make the shift to first base again. The defense in the infield is the biggest liability, especially if Tresgallo does play, as he and shortstop Stephen Perez have combined for 25 errors this season.

The loss of starting catcher Peter O’’Brien has not helped the Hurricanes’’ cause at all. Since losing him to a hand injury after being plunked with a pitch against Virginia Tech two weeks ago, Miami’’s offense has scored more than three runs just once and looks to find an offensive spark. For Virginia, catcher Nate Irving enters the weekend hitting .282 with 29 RBIs.

The Hurricanes’’ starting pitching has had a few hiccups every few games, but overall they are the strongest part of this team and continue to give keep the offense in games with the chance to win. After a rough series against FSU last weekend, the rotation will look to rebound this weekend. The bullpen, which has struggled against top-tier teams this season, also will need to rebound from Sunday’’s extra-inning loss to the Seminoles.

So far this season, the Hurricanes have been a tale of two teams. When they’’re on their game, they show how they are one of the tougher teams to take down on a nightly basis in all of college baseball. But the team has as many valleys as it does peaks, and is trying to find its groove once more after losing five of the last eight games. 16

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CLUB SPORTS

FOOTBALL

Dedicated coach leads team from few wins to potential playoff berth FILE PHOTO

YEAR TWO: Football coach Al Golden spoke via teleconference on Wednesday. The Hurricanes recently finished their spring practice season.

Golden discusses spring progress, new talent NCAA ruling expected before season begins BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

Miami football head coach Al Golden spent a few moments discussing the direction of the program heading into the summer. Speaking to media members via teleconference on Wednesday, Golden brushed on topics including the status of junior quarterback Stephen Morris, players who made an impression on him during the spring, and what will happen once the remaining incoming freshmen make their way to campus. ““Clearly, we have an infusion of young talent coming in a large group that’’s going to create some competition and certainly has at certain areas already,”” he said. ““We’’re excited about that.”” Arguably one of the bigger storylines heading into spring camp was the situation at the quarterback position. With Morris not participating due to injury, the duties were split between transfer Ryan Williams and freshmen Gray Crow and Preston Dewey. While Morris has not fully recovered from back surgery just yet, according to Golden, it’’s only a matter of time. ““I think he’’s throwing and everything now. So I think it’’s not going to be for too long,”” he said. ““I don’’t know exactly when he’’s going to get the absolute green light to do everything, but it’’s not going to be very long now because he’’s already pushing it.”” Throughout the spring scrimmages and the Spring Game, the overall theme was the way the defense dominated against the Canes’’ offense. Though there were individuals who stood out (Golden noted sophomore receiver Rashawn Scott and junior tight end Asante Cleveland, among others) there are

still areas of concern, namely at the receiver and cornerback spots. ““I think no one would be satisfied with our wide receiver situation in the spring just by numbers specifically. There have to be some guys who come in and help us out there,”” Golden said. ““I’’m not trying to diminish what the kids that were there did. It was just a huge task for minimal players asking three or four wideouts to carry a load for a group that had 10 in it. Same thing at corner.”” The big news that everyone is awaiting is the ruling by the NCAA on the Nevin Shapiro scandal that struck the program just weeks before the 2011 season. Though there’’s been no update over the past few months, it is expected that the ruling should be announced sometime over the summer, and certainly before the start of the season. Generally, cases such as these take about a year for the NCAA to finish the investigation and mull it over before making a ruling. The University of North Carolina, which found itself under accusations of academic fraud, association with sports agents and lack of institutional control in June 2010, had its penalty laid out in March. Though it is not expected to take quite as long in this case, there is ultimately no time table as to when any word should be expected. With so many players graduating and leaving for the NFL draft, Golden admitted that the Canes were light at some positions during the spring. But with the incoming freshmen arriving on campus soon, a starting spot in the spring won’’t guarantee one once the games actually count. ““Just because your competition may not be in this room, just understand that he’’s coming,”” Golden said. ““I believe that we did recruit well. I’’m very pleased with the 10 that are here now, and I’’ll be anxious to see the next wave that comes in.””

four games against FIU and has even beaten the University of Central Florida, which figures to be ranked in the top 25 by year’’s end. North’’s influence on the winning season has not been lost on the team. BY DYLAN BENSINGER Ryan Solow, the club’’s current presiCONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER dent, worked closely with North all year The University of Miami club baseball after convincing him to return to coaching coach, Mike North, has instilled in his play- after a one-year hiatus. ers a ritual he views as absolutely necessary ““He knows how to communicate to both the success and the morale of his baseball to a group of college kids who all team. have their own ideas about how to play the And it couldn’’t have less to do with game,”” he said. ““He perfectly straddles that baseball. line between coach, friend and mentor.”” ““He demands to go to Hooters on evSolow credits North for the progress of ery road trip in the name of tradition,”” for- the pitching staff in particular. mer club president Robbie Shiver remem““Our pitchers have won a number of bers. ““No matter how inconvenient it was, Conference Pitcher of the Week awards, and how little everyone else wanted to go, and our staff is up there with the nation’’s we always ended up there.”” leaders in innings pitched,”” he said. ““We celebrated in Melbourne at HootSolow and Shiver agree that if not for ers after sweeping Florida Tech,”” North their coach’’s steady leadership and fairness recalls wryly. ““But it was more commis- in observation of the game, the club’’s vast eration in Tallahassee after dropping some improvement would not be reflected in the close, hard-fought games to Florida State.”” win column. However, be““I really like tween the lines, coaching this team North is far from because they want FOR MORE INFORMATION a reflection of his to be great so badON THE CLUB TEAM favorite road-trip ly,”” North said. watering hole. The ““Everyone hates Email miamiclub former Penn State losing more than pitcher and UM baseball@gmail.com they like winning. grad carries much That’’s why Sunday more experience losses to FSU are so Or visit leaguelineup. than a typical club tough; nobody likes com/miamicanes sport coach. His driving eight hours club coaching days home in a baseball began only after he uniform after a had served as the loss.”” director of baseball operations at Daytona As for the future of the club, North State College, where he says he ““earned his plans to be ambitious in trying to schedule master’’s in baseball.”” the best competition available. It was that opportunity that allowed UM is part of the National Club Basehim to lead a UM club team that he re- ball Association, which includes teams members ““had not won a total of 10 games from more than 100 colleges and universiin three years”” to 11 wins in his first year ties across the country. calling the shots. The competition level of the NCBA This season the team sits at 10-6 with is comparable to that of Division II and III series against the University of Florida and college programs. Florida International University remainUM is in the NCBA’’s South Atlantic ing. North is still hopeful about a playoff Conference –– South with state rivals Floriberth. da Tech, University of Central Florida, UF ““We need to win all our upcoming and FSU. games and probably get a little help from North says he has begun talks with other teams, but we are definitely still various varsity junior college and Division alive,”” he said. II schools for games in the fall. UM has swept the season series ““If you want to beat the best, do what against Florida Tech, has won three out of they do,”” North said.

Club holds wins over Florida Tech, UCF

April 26 - May 9, 2012

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SPORTS BRIEFS COLLEGE GAMEDAY For the first time ever, ESPN will be filming a College Gameday commercial on a university campus and fans have an input as to where it is shot. Up until May 2, fans can vote once per day for their university at gamedayvote.com, either through smartphones or through a computer or the facebook app at facebook. com/collegegameday. More than 120 FBS football programs are expected to participate. The winning campus will have its spot filmed over the summer with students expected to play a big part in the commercial.

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FOOTBALL Earlier this week, the team announced a new three-game series against the Florida Atlantic University Owls beginning in 2013.

has been selected as the coach for the 2012 Under 18 women’s USA national team. She will be joined by LSU head coach Nikki Caldwell and Gonzaga coach Kelly Graves.

Miami will host the Owls for the first time on Aug. 31, 2013 before traveling to FAU Stadium in 2015. The final game will take place in 2016 at Sun Life Stadium.

The team will compete in the 2012 FIBA Americas U18 Championships in San Juan, Puerto Rico in hopes of earning a berth in the 2013 FIBA U19 World Championships for Women.

Although the teams have never met before on the field, they both have ties to former coach Howard Schnellenberger, who led the Canes to their first national championship and was the forerunner to helping FAU build its own football stadium.

Trials to select the 12-member squad will take place on May 18 at the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Ernesto Suarez may be contacted at sports@ themiamihurricane.com. Information compiled from hurricanesports.com.

Miami head coach Katie Meier

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April 26 - May 9, 2012

SUCKER FOR SPORTS? THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS LOOKING FOR A TEAM OF SPORTS WRITERS. YOU COULD COVER A BEAT, PROFILE UM ATHLETES AND COACHES, AND GET PAID FOR EVERY ARTICLE. NO EXPERIENCE IS NECESSARY.

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dear ...

Dear V: Our sexual passion is just out of fashion... Dear Old Married Couple, , The love is gone. Or at least it feels like it is. My boyfriend and I just don’’t have as much sex as we once did when the relationship first started. It’’s not like I ask him and he tells me no, but it’’s just that the passion and desire are gone when we do make love. What happened? How do I fix this? Signed, Cleaning out the cobwebs

What is wrong with you two!? You’’re in your sexual prime. You should be going at it like rabbits at least once or twice a day! The time you wasted writing to me could have been used making sweet, sweet love. In all honesty, of course this is going to happen. What’’s new at the beginning is exciting. But what was once exciting becomes routine and boring. Not that I’’m saying sex between you two puts him to sleep (although it may), but your sex life can go stale if you don’’t keep spicing it up every once in a while. Try a new position. And I don’’t mean, ““Well we usually do missionary, but tonight we can try doggie or me on top.”” I mean bent over the sofa, hanging onto the shower rod, sitting on top of the washing machine, tickling the keys on a piano while he tickles your ... kind of positions! Get creative! Sometimes people in relationships just get so used to having sex that it becomes commonplace. The thrill

icipation of bedroom recreation no of the hunt and anticipation longer exists. But it doesn’’t have to go away! Send a saucy text during the day that tells him exactly what you want to do to him later ... without saying what it is. You know what I’’m talking about. That pretend-innocence that all females have. Use it, girl! Just don’’t be sending any pictures you don’’t want a future employer to potentially see. Besides, you don’’t want to give it all away in a poorly-lit, pixelated phone photo. The tease of it will really bring back some excitement. Don’’t stress it. If you worry about how little sex you’’re getting, you’’re headed for a vicious circle. Nothing will put you or your boyfriend less in the mood than complaining about how you aren’’t getting any. Now off to the Health Center for enough free condoms to get you through an entire night of nonstop pleasure! V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

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Friday, April 27 •• 6 p.m. UC Rock and Foote Green Come out to Foote Green from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. to celebrate the end of the semester! The Food Trucks are back one more time to end the semester off right, so bring a few bucks, all of your friends, and an appetite! While you eat, starting at 7 p.m. there will be a Headphone Disco party going on at the UC Rock! This party includes two different DJs playing music at the same time through FM radio headphones, so be sure to bring your ID!

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, April 26 Patio Jams featuring SUNBEARS! 12:15 p.m. •• UC Patio Come out and enjoy the last Patio Jams of the semester! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the live band!

RAB Finals Relaxation Day 4 p.m. •• Rathskeller Enjoy a different kind of ““bar”” at this week’’s RAB event! Oxygen Bars have been shown to strengthen the immune system, improve concentration, and increase alertness. Visit the Oxygen Bar at the Rat and pick up some giveaways that will help relieve your nals stress!

Interviewing Skills 5 p.m. •• Toppel Library This program is essential before attending an interview for an internship, graduate program, or full-time job! Topics that will be covered include how to prepare for the interview, questions

the interviewer will ask, and the most effective ways to follow-up. We will also provide an introduction to networking and negotiating your salary

Love, Gloria 7 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema Washed up child star Gloria Green thinks her life can’’t any worse when she nds herself kidnapped by a deranged stalker and held captive with her biggest fan, Dawnee, who seems intent on making Gloria relive the past she’’s tried to forget.

Frost Salsa Orchestra 8 p.m. •• Gusman Concert Hall Join the Frost Salsa Orchestra as they celebrate their 20th anniversary season! This concert extravaganza showcases salsa vocalist Ruben Trillo and trumpet virtuoso Brian Lynch performing new arrangements by Alberto de la Reguera, Murciano, Lynch and others. They will be joined on stage by Taylor O’’Donnell, student vocalists from the Frost JV1 Ensemble, Chad Bernstein on trombone and ve-time collegiate

Downbeat winner Jose Valentino Ruiz on ute. The concert will also highlight Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition nalist Emmet Cohen on the piano. Adults $15 Seniors $10 and UM students free with valid ID, pending availability on concert night

Friday, April 27 Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers Certification Class 1 p.m. •• Herbert Wellness Center The Basic Life Support class for healthcare providers covers core material such as adult and infant CPR, foreignbody airway obstruction and automated external debrillation (AED). The cost is $45 for student members, $55 for non-student members and $65 for nonmembers. To register, call 305-2845433 or go to the Wellness Enrichment Suite located on the second oor of the Herbert Wellness Center.

We Have a Pope 9 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema A story centered on the relationship be-

tween the newly elected Pope and his therapist.

Saturday, April 28 We Have a Pope 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

CAC Presents: Hugo 10 p..m •• Cosford Cinema Set in 1930s Paris, an orphan who lives in the walls of a train station is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton.

Sunday, April 29 Free Men 4 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema In Paris during WWII, an Algerian immigrant is inspired to join the resistance by his unexpected friendship with a Jewish man.

CAC Presents: Hugo 8 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

GOOD LUCK ON FINALS Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 20

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Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

Finals Fiesta featuring Headphone Disco & Food Trucks!


The Miami Hurricane -- April 26, 2012