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The Miami

HURRICANE Vol. 90, Issue 51 | April 23 - April 25, 2012

com

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STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929


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CAMPUS LIFE

Smokers fail to comply with new policy Enforcers expect some improvement

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY ISABEL BRADOR CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

As the spring semester comes to an end, so does the first phase of UM’’s three-part effort to create a smoke-free campus. The first phase, which was implemented this year, restricted smokers to designated areas on campus. The university’’s previous smoking policy only banned smoking inside buildings. Nonsmoking and smoking designated areas around campus were not in place, but a smoking cessation program, which is still in place now, was available. According to Gilbert Arias, the vice president of student affairs, the transition has gone over smoothly, with designated smoking areas marked around campus and on-campus maps. The university has also implemented a Smoking Ambassador program, where designated individuals politely ask smokers who aren’’t complying with university policy to put out their

FOR MORE INFORMATION WHAT: Be Smoke Free Tobacco Education & Treatment Services WHEN:  Tuesdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. and on Thursdays from 11 a.m. to noon at the Miller School of Medicine  Wednesdays from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m. at the Coral Gables campus  Visit miami.edu/sa/ index.php/smoke_free for more information.

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NEWS

 Can’t get enough coverage of the Seminole Okalee Indian Village in Hollywood? Be sure to check out Adrianne D’Angelo’s video of alligator wrestler Daniel Beck.

FILE PHOTO

LIGHTING UP: University of Miami graduate students smoke cigarettes while socializing on campus. “It’s segregation,” Melyssa said. “We smoke outside, we’re not harming anyone.” cigarettes. ““Almost all the students who smoke outside designated areas are compliant and polite when asked to please follow campus policy,”” Arias said. However, not all students comply with the new policy. On Friday, The Miami Hurricane recorded 31 different people violating the smoking policy during a one-hour observation period at the nonsmoking area outside of the Richter Library and Starbucks. Ryan, a sophomore, violates the policy and feels that this will not stop students from smoking. ““I think it’’s pretty ignorant of the school,”” he said. ““It is making it harder for anyone who smokes and goes here. I don’’t care about the rules.”” Ryan’’s last name was withheld to protect his identity. According to Arias, if a student is caught repeatedly violating the policy, he or she can be referred to the Dean of Students and could be subject to disciplinary action. This noncompliance can have sometimes serious consequences.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

““I have asthma so too much smoke makes it act up,”” sophomore Julie Picciones said. ““If I’’m outside and there’’s a lot of smoke around, I start sneezing and could potentially have an asthma attack.”” According to Arias, there has been a noticeable decline in the number of smokers spotted in prohibited areas. ““Since the implementation of the policy there’’s been a significant reduction in the amount of people smoking outside designated areas,”” he said. ““Unfortunately, we can’’t be everywhere at once and you’’ll always have a percentage of individuals who won’’t comply.”” The second phase of the policy, which will be implemented in August 2012, will seek to cut the designated smoking areas in half. However, students are unsure if this phase will work if smokers are following the current policy. ““There’’s a possibility that reducing the number of designated areas could cause less compliance with the policy, but all in all there are more people who don’’t smoke than do …… there

April 23 - April 25, 2012

will be more compliance if there are more ambassadors telling people about the policy, ““ freshman Blake Slater said. The university hopes to be completely smoke free by 2013, completing the three-stage transition. A smoke-free initiative for the Coral Gables campus may seem problematic. ““I’’m not a chain smoker, so the idea of a smoke-free campus doesn’’t bother me,”” said Gregory Cosby, assistant to the director and office manager of the College of Arts and Sciences. ““I think it’’ll be difficult to enforce, because you have a lot of students who smoke. I’’ve seen some who will smoke right in front of a no smoking sign.”” The problem of enforcement has a simple solution, according to Arias. ““In order to have more people following the policy we need to all share the responsibility,”” he said. ““This isn’’t the University of Miami’’s smoking policy. It’’s everyone’’s policy, and we all need to work together and encourage each other to comply.”” If you’’re a smoker who’’s looking to quit, be sure to take advantage of UM’’s program.

Missed the Earth Harvest Festival in Homestead on Sunday? Be sure to view Photo Editor Marlena Skrobe’s photo slideshow. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane

ON THE COVER Juniors Thien Van Tran (left) and Joyce Yager posed for a photo illustration by Photo Editor Marlena Skrobe.


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RESEARCH

Skin cancer by the numbers

At UM, formerly known as Suntan U, it may sometimes be hard for students to remember the dangers that may come as a result of overexposure to harmful sunrays.

In a population of 2 million, more than 3.5 million skin cancers are diagnosed.

Estimated Annual Deaths in the U.S. 35000

68,720

30000

The estimated number of cases of MELANOMA that were diagnosed in 2009.

25000 20000

Each year, more people are diagnosed with skin cancer than are diagnosed with lung, prostate, breast and colon cancers combined.

Skin Cancer Deaths in the U.S.

25%

25% OTHER

15000

75%

10000 5000 0

One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime.

Skin Motor Cancer Vehicle

Type of Death

MELANOMA MELANOMA is the most common form of cancer for adolescents and young adults between 15 and 29 years old. Total Number of Deaths: 11,500 GRAPHIC BY AMILYNN SOTO

SOURCE: THE SKIN CANCER FOUNDATION AND THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

Summer sunrays pose threats of skin conditions Proper care may protect from cancer BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ STAFF WRITER

Summer is the perfect time to head outside, soak in the sun, and increase the chances of damaging your skin. The effects of not properly caring for skin during the summer may include wrinkles, early aging, spots, melanoma and skin cancer, according to James Grichnik, a dermatologist and professor at the Miller School of Medicine. The main culprits in sunlight are ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. UV radiation damages the skin’’s cellular DNA, and in excessive amounts can produce the genetic mutations. These mutations can lead to skin cancer. UVA penetrates the skin more deeply than UVB, which is the main cause of skin reddening and sunburn. A tan is the result of an injury to the skin’’s DNA. The skin darkens in an attempt to prevent further DNA damage. These imperfections, or mutations, can also lead to skin cancer. Another more prominent sign of skin cancer is a mole, which is how junior Gina Gittler discov-

ered that she had skin cancer. Gittler’’s family had a history of skin problems. Both parents had melanoma. Still, Gittler spent her summers in her hometown, Los Angeles, surfing, swimming, and occasionally forgetting to wear sunscreen. This year, however, she noticed a mole on her lower calf and monitored it. The mole grew, but eventually stopped growing. It didn’’t have irregular borders, so Gittler didn’’t go to the dermatologist until just two months ago. Her results showed that the mole was precancerous. Fortu-

nately, it was in the early stages and could be surgically removed. But even though the mole was smaller than a pea, her whole calf will be perpetually scarred. ““People don’’t understand skin cancer spreads just like other forms of cancer,”” Gittler said. ““The good thing is it comes up on the skin. It’’s not inside like other cancers where you can’’t see the symptoms. Because of that it’’s pretty preventable.”” Prevention is easy, according to professor Grichnik. Go outside early or late in the day. UVB rays peak in the middle of the day and

ABCDs OF MELANOMA A for Asymmetry One half is different than the other half. B for Border Irregularity The edges are notched, uneven, or blurred. C for Color The color is uneven. Shades of brown, tan and black are present. D for Diameter Diameter is greater than 6 millimeters.

Other warning signs: The appearance of a new bump or nodule Color spreads into surrounding skin Redness or swelling beyond the mole Pain Tenderness Itching Bleeding Oozing Scaly Appearance

SOURCE: AMERICAN MELANOMA FOUNDATION

75 percent of those rays hit the Earth during a four-hour period around noon. Another precaution to take is to wear more clothing, which may help prevent further exposure to sun damage. ““People in the desert don’’t run around in bikinis. They cover up to reflect the light away, it’’s even cooling,”” he said. ““People in the desert have learned that and we’’re still figuring that out.”” The most common precautionary measure is to use sunscreen. Those with SPF of 15, 30 or better are recommended. However, be sure to apply it well and reapply when it gets washed off. Sun blocks with zinc or titanium are the best, but aren’’t as cosmetically appealing. The results of improper skin care vary, but the most common one is sunburn. Shasa Hu, another dermatologist and assistant professor at the Miller School of Medicine, said that a burn may pose a higher risk of developing skin cancer. Though some may try to remedy the situation by putting on sunscreen after a sunburn, sunscreen doesn’’t heal burns. Instead, a proper remedy entails staying indoors until the burn heals, staying hydrated, and taking ibuproApril 23 - April 25, 2012

fen. ““I don’’t normally put on sunscreen. If I get burned the previous day, I’’ll put something on that, but I don’’t burn that easily,”” said sophomore Emmett Torney, a marine affairs and policy major. ““My grandfather died of skin cancer, and I guess it should have an effect on me, but I still don’’t wear it.”” It is important to frequently check for other signs of sun damage, like moles. Hu recommends searching for funny-looking, or ““ugly duckling”” moles. ““This is one of those things that prevention really pays off,”” Hu said. ““Some cancers you can’’t prevent, like breast or prostate, but we know by having a strict sun protection routine it can reduce wrinkles and other skin problems.”” Gittler does regret not going to see her doctor sooner, but is glad she was able to catch it and avoid skin cancer. The important thing, she said, is to regularly search for unusual growths on the skin. ““It’’s better to be safe than sorry,”” Gittler said. ““And yes, it may cost some money to get it checked, but you’’d rather it get checked and it turns out to be nothing than not, and find out you have cancer. There’’s no loss in doing it. Go right away, don’’t wait.””

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NEWS

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RESOURCES

PHOTO BRIEF

Coming together for nature

Campus offers health, wellness opportunities Here is a list of on-campus resources available for students and faculty to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Student Health Center Student Health Center is located at 5513 Merrick Drive. Students are not required to have UM health insurance in order to use the services provided by the clinic. The center offers the following:  Primary care  Women’s health  Sports medicine  Specialty care/referrals  Allergy injections  Travel medicine  Lab/X-ray

Counseling Center Located at 5600 George Merrick Drive, Building 21-R, the Counseling Center supports students’ emotional health and houses psychologists and trained interns. It also offers these resources:  Help with personal concerns  Support with academic success  Individual counseling  Career testing and counseling  Crisis intervention  Psychiatric consultation

Wellness Center HOLLY BENSUR // Staff Photographer

BIG EMBRACE: Students form a circle around Lake Osceola on Friday afternoon during Hug the Lake. The event is hosted annually by Random Acts of Kindness to show solidarity with nature.

The Wellness Center not only offers various exercise programs, but also the following health programs:

 CPR courses  Cooking classes  BeSmoke Free program  Massage Therapy  Meditation  Computerized dietary analysis  Brain Gain “neuro-wellness” program

Center for Alcohol and Drug Education Housed in 5600 George Merrick Drive, Center for Student Services, Building 21-E, the William W. Shandler Jr. Center for Alcohol and Drug Education offers PIER 21, a substance education program that works to educate students through Prevention, Intervention, Education and Referral. It helps students with these features:  Peer education  Support groups  Confidential referrals  Alcohol Edu

Sexual Assault Response Team The Sexual Assault Response Team (S.A.R.T.) is a telephone response line for students available 24/7. If you believe someone you know is being sexually assaulted, call S.A.R.T. at 305-798-6666, the UM Police at 305-284-6666 or 911. For a full list of student organizations that promote awareness of relevant health issues, visit the Committee on Student Organizations online at um.collegiatelink.net. Information compiled from miami.edu/studenthealth.

NEWS BRIEFS

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FLORIDA HABITAT

BIOLOGY SEMINAR

FINALS FIESTA

ALUMNI RECEPTION

On May 2, at 7 p.m., in Room 166 of the Cox Science Center, Steve Woodmansee, biologist and president of the Florida Native Plant Society, will discuss one of Florida’s most sensitive ecosystems, the pine rockland. For more information, visit bio.miami.edu/arboretum/ Calendar.html.

Michigan State Assistant Professor C. Titus Brown will present a lecture called “Genomics Without a Reference – Dealing with Sequence Data from Ecologically and Evolutionary Interesting Organisms” on Monday, in Room 166 of the Cox Science Center, at 12:20 p.m. For more information, email Bill Browne at wbrowne@bio.miami.edu.

Hurricane Productions in partnership with Canes Night Live, Multicultrual Student Affairs, Alliance of Latin American Students and the Filipino Students Association will host Finals Fiesta on Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. at Stanford Circle and the Rock. For more information, visit hurricaneproductions.org.

The Alumni Association will honor upcoming graduates and present them with lifetime memberships on Wednesday from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Newman Alumni Center. To reserve your seat, call 305-284-2872 or email alumni@miami.edu.

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 23 - April 25, 2012

Alexander Gonzalez may be contacted at agonzalez@themiamihurricane.com.


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REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

Different lifestyles call for varying contraceptives Doctors recommend research before decisions BY JACKIE SALO STAFF WRITER

While the primary purpose of birth control is to prevent pregnancy, some teenagers and college students opt to use it to clear up acne, regulate their menstrual cycles or alleviate cramps. UM’’s Student Health Center helps women on campus weigh the pros and cons of using birth control and understand the differences among them. Nahida Chakhtoura, an assistant professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology at the Miller School of Medicine, said that the first step is for students to understand that there are different options for using birth control. ““They should consider their lifestyle and if the birth control is just for conception when choosing which one,”” Chakhtoura said. There are several types of contraception with different risks for women. These include the oral birth control taken daily; the Nuvaring, a vaginal ring inserted for three weeks a month; the patch placed directly on the skin; and the Depro-Provera, a shot administered every three months. Megan Williams, a registered nurse

at the health center, advises students to consider personal and family history with their physicians when deciding the type of birth control that is right for them. For example, some of the options containing hormones put patients with history of blood clots or cardiovascular disease at greater risk of stroke, high blood pressure or blood clots she said. ““Several different types of birth control, such as the pills, the patch and the Nuvaring have estrogen, which puts women with these predisposing conditions more at risk,”” Williams said. For women who take a low-dose hormonal birth control, the risk of blood clot or stroke is six in 10,000, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This is compared to the three in 10,000 of women who do not take birth control. Patients often make their decisions on birth control based on how much they want to spend and how frequently they want to take it. ““I had to switch to a different pill because my insurance covered it, which costs only $10,”” freshman Kristen Schlotzhauer said. Some options, like the patch and vaginal ring, need less maintenance than the daily birth control pill. The Depro-Provera shot only needs to be administered once every three months, but this requires a visit to a physician.

When deciding on a birth control, make sure to ask all the questions necessary and know that there are different options. Nahida Chakhtoura, Assistant professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology Considering these pros and cons, college students tend to prefer the pills, said William. ““They are inexpensive and are easy to use, very simple and straightforward,”” she said. Schlotzhauer prefers the pill because she can control and track its progress. ““The pill is not such a hassle because I set a daily alarm,”” Schlotzhauer said. ““I have considered the three-month option, but I feel safer and more comfortable because I know how many I take.”” Though some think birth control usage may come with risks, several people feel comfortable using the medications. ““Sometimes you will see that there are certain studies that show that a birth

control might be dangerous, but the FDA may not consider it to be, so you should do that research yourself,”” senior Ryan Walker said. She is a chair of A Week 4 Life, a student organization which helps promote education about reproductive health. While these main risk factors are pretty rare, there are other general side effects that some patients experience, said Williams. They include mood swings, nausea, vomiting and abnormal bleeding. Williams recommends that if a patient experience any of these symptoms, then they should continue the pill for three months before evaluating what to do with their physician. These general symptoms often subside after that period. ““However in emergent situations, where you are experiencing chest pain, shortness of breath, or abdominal pain, seek help,”” Williams said. Students considering birth control should speak with a physician. The health services at UM can be a help to anyone who wishes to move forward with the decision. ““When deciding on a birth control, make sure to ask all the questions necessary and know that there are different option,”” Chakhtoura said. ““The birth control pills are not the only option, so the patient should try to find the option that suits their life best.””

Applications for wireless devices promote health WORKOUT

HEALTHY EATING

RELAXATION

Runkeeper – Free Runners will be able to track outdoor runs and treadmill workouts with this app.

Fooducate – Free This app allows shoppers to scan the barcode of any product to determine healthier alternatives.

Relax Melodies - Free With this app, unwind to the sound of the rain, wind chimes, and more than 40 other sounds.

Nike Training Club - Free With more than 80 workouts from celebrity trainers, this app helps those who dislike exercising at the gym.

Harvest - $1.99 This app helps users determine the freshness of produce being purchased at your local grocer.

Simply Being - $0.99 Meditation is simplified with this app that offers instructions as well as soothing music.

Fitocracy – Free This app turns getting healthy into a competitive video game, where workouts translate to points, achievements, and quests.

Epicurious Recipes – Free This app helps users purchase healthy food options to make meals at home.

Authentic Yoga - $1.99 Bust out the mat for this yoga workout app that is perfect for students of all levels.

April 23 - April 25, 2012

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ADVERTISEMENTS

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April 23 - April 25, 2012

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OPINION speak

UP!

What do you think are the most common health problems among college students? Have any of them affected you?

LAWRENCE AUNG Sophomore “Colds and sinuses because a lot of students aren’t used to the humidity in Florida and it really affects you when you are trying to take an exam and you have really congested sinuses.”

NATALIE DOMMERS Freshman “Insomnia. I take naps during the day to keep my energy going for class and then I stay up all night, so I am really tired for class in the morning.”

MATTHEW STARK Senior “Stress because of all the obligations and time constraints put on us.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Jennifer Levine

As we wait for the Supreme Court’s final decision, we should realize that mandatory health care will affect us all.

Christopher Ivory, Contributing Columnist

STAFF EDITORIAL

swear by the Garden Sensations salad option at Wendy’’s. Many order the popular Baja Salad, which contains 730 calories, 1,920 milligrams of sodium, and 47 grams of fat. This does not include a soft drink or a Frosty for those looking to satisfy their sweet tooth. For students who stroll through the School of Law, Subway is another popular location that claims to be healthy. However, eating fresh does not mean eating right. A foot-long tuna sandwich, which is one of the healthier subs on their menu, contains 940 calories, 48 grams of fat, and 1,240 milligrams of sodium. We can’’t forget to mention Starbucks, a typical hot spot for students to purchase a snack between classes or during a long night of studying. A cheese and fruit box from Starbucks contains 480 calories,

O

Founded 1929

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexa Lopez

28 grams of fat, and 470 milligrams of sodium. If you pair that with the scrumptious grande white chocolate mocha, you’’ll have to add another 470 calories, 18 grams of fat, and 260 milligrams of sodium. And that’’s just a snack. All of these food options seem healthy because it is assumed that having salad, nonfat milk and fruit means you’’re eating well, but that is not entirely true. Although college students lead busy lives, they should take a few minutes out of the day to research the nutritional facts of the food they’’re eating. What you choose to eat now will affect your health later. Don’’t wait until it is too late to make the right choice. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Health care ruling could have powerful impact ral arguments were recently made at the Supreme Court for and against the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Opponents of the act do not believe the federal government has the authority to mandate the purchase of health insurance under the Constitution’’s CHRISTOPHER IVORY Commerce Clause. CONTRIBUTING Conversely, proponents beCOLUMNIST lieve the act will adequately live up to its intended purposes: extending health care to uninsured individuals at an affordable price, reduce the cost of health insurance, and prevent insurers from denying coverage to consumers with preexisting medical conditions. Like most legislation, there will be presumed winners and losers. Some people will save money and others will pay. The presumed winners are more than 30 million uninsured Americans who will now have access to more affordable health care. The presumed losers are the big companies and higher income individuals who will see increased taxes and greater out-of-pocket spending for health care to pick up the slack of lower income individu-

HURRICANE

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Don’t judge foods by their labels In recent years there has been a trend toward healthier eating habits, especially among the college crowd. Restaurants are promoting healthier options on their menu and this can also be noticed on UM’’s campus. Being conscientious of your food intake is important, but you should not be so quick to believe something is healthy just because it is placed under ““light menu”” options. If you take a moment to browse through the nutrition facts of some ““healthier meals,”” you’’d be shocked at the results. On campus, most students grab a bite to eat at the Hurricane Food Court, Subway or Starbucks. They may think that ordering the healthier alternatives on the menu may meet the standards of the trending health craze, but this is not the case. Students who are in a hurry but don’’t want a greasy burger

The Miami

als and families. Nonetheless, we will all be affected by Obamacare in at least two ways –– the government’’s power will be expanded and employers might engage in health discrimination. If Obamacare is held constitutional it will be another way of the government telling us what we can and cannot do. The act will reduce some of the freedom individuals have when choosing their health care provider. Some argue that the government should not forcibly burden all Americans with the health costs stemming from health risks of preventable conditions and habits such as obesity and smoking. Health discrimination may also increase. This means that employers may have the right to investigate prospective employees’’ pre-existing health conditions before hiring them. Imagine being denied employment because an employer found out that you have Type II Diabetes or because you have an autistic son? Let’’s hope that does not become a reality. As we wait for the Supreme Court’’s final decision, we should realize that mandatory health care will affect us all. Only time will tell. Christopher Ivory is a first-year law student. April 23 - April 25, 2012

BUSINESS MANAGER Isabel Vichot

MANAGING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

ACCOUNT REPS Danica Jones Tara Kleppinger Misha Mayeur

ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman PHOTO EDITOR Marlena Skrobe

ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo

PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers ONLINE EDITOR Daniel Cepero

NEWS EDITOR Alysha Khan

WEBMASTER Amanda Zacharkiewicz

OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas

DESIGNERS Carlos Mella Mariah Price Amilynn Soto

EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

ASST. EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

COPY CHIEF Stephanie Parra

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

COPY EDITORS Spencer Dandes Nicky Diaz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2012 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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Tunnel of Oppression sparks disagreement Racism exists within the tunnel’s own walls

T

unnel of Oppression has been created on UM’’s campus every year with the goal of promoting awareness of and encouraging students to speak out against oppression. Each year, JORDAN BALKE CONTRIBUTING it features statistics COLUMNIST designed to shock students. However, I was shocked and saddened to see that the same oppression that Tunnel seeks to eradicate was perpetuated within its very walls. Midway through the tunnel, in the room about racism, is where I found this oppression. It was on a single piece of paper hanging from a wall in the corner. There was a sentence about the Trayvon Martin killing. Like many media outlets, it told the story of the big and bad white man who killed the poor and innocent black boy. In a single sentence, this paper in the Tunnel vilified a

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OPINION

man, presumed innocent until proven guilty. More appalling than the sentence itself was its location, passively asserting that the killing was done as an act of racism. Though I certainly have no desire to defend George Zimmerman –– killing is almost never justified and his lawyers will have a tough time in court trying to prove it so –– but the amazing and saddening part was that the media, the general public, and now Tunnel, are all portraying this case as an issue of race. There is little to no evidence of this killing being racially motivated. If there were evidence of it, prosecutors would have charged Zimmerman with a hate crime, not second-degree murder. Rather than wait to comment on this issue until after the trial, Tunnel and those in charge of the racism room made the ruling themselves. Oppression will never end if we continue to paint ourselves as victims. Jordan Balke is a senior majoring in biochemistry and biology.

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April 23 - April 25, 2012

Tunnel aims to challenge views of current issues

T

unnel of Oppression seeks to challenge people’’s thoughts and perceptions on issues dealing with oppression and hatred. Before entering the Tunnel, individuals hear and read a disclaimer. NATANIA WIDENSKY ““The experience is CONTRIBUTING not intended to offend COLUMNIST or bring about tension,”” it states. ““The Tunnel is meant to be an educational experience and the views expressed in the Tunnel are not the views of the University of Miami, any department or the individuals involved.”” Tunnel portrays different forms of oppression through the use of statistics, stories, videos and acting. While planning the Tunnel, we draw on current issues to challenge people’’s views on what is happening in the world. This year a Tunnel participant questioned a reference to Trayvon Martin’’s case in the racism room. What appeared in the room

was a statement saying, ““17-year-old Trayvon Martin was visiting a relative’’s house in a Florida gated community when he walked to the store to get Skittles and iced tea for his little brother. Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by a self-styled neighborhood watch leader, who told police he thought Trayvon was ‘‘suspicious’’ in the mostly-white community.”” This statement sought to highlight racial issues raised by the shooting. It was not meant to levy any judgment on the case itself. By creating a dialogue, we hope that people will begin to stand up to the injustice present in society and continue alleviating oppression. It is this kind of dialogue that Tunnel tries to bring about, but the notion that Tunnel perpetuates racism is an insult to the integrity of the event. Natania Widensky is a senior majoring in economics. She served as co-chair on the Tunnel of Oppression’’s Executive Board. Haley Gordon and Ryan Schooley contributed to this report.


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Lyssa Healthy Foods

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

FRESH PRODUCE: Verde Farm held its annual Earth Day celebration on Sunday. The Earth Harvest Festival included a tour, a farmers market and cooking classes. BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT EDITOR

Although many people know organic food is healthy, not everyone realizes that eating locally-grown produce can be just as important. The advantages of local produce are threefold: it helps the environment, stimulates the local economy, and benefits the human body. The closer a product is grown to where it is eaten, the less transport, energy use and greenhouse gas output involved, according to Kenneth Broad, the director of the Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy at UM. ““Nutritionally, foods that travel over distances typically lose essential vitamins and minerals, especially those affected by light and heat, like the water soluble vitamins,”” said Lisa Dorfman, the director of the Master’’s in Nutrition for Health and Human Performance Program. The average meal travels 1,500 miles from a farm to a dinner table, said Elena Naranjo, the program director of Earth Learning. This means that fruits and vegetables are picked before they are ripe and sprayed with artificial chemicals to make sure they last. Earth Learning is an organization whose mission is to re-localize the food economy by connecting farmers and consumers in the Greater Everglades region. ““Why are we shipping food from Chile and Mexico when we have it right down the road?”” said Lydia Mackie, Earth Learning’’s market manager, who arranges harvest markets in South Miami and Downtown Miami. Almost all the fresh produce at UM’’s

weekly farmers market comes from farms in Homestead. This excludes the grapes, pineapples, mango and bananas. But many grocery stores surrounding UM get their produce straight from farms in Homestead and other locations throughout South Florida as well. Publix Supermarket At the Publix on Monza Avenue in Coral Gables, premium tomatoes, zucchini, yellow squash, and yellow and white corn all come from farms in the Redland. The average time from being picked on the farm to being placed on shelves at the store is 24 to 48 hours, according to Publix Produce Manager Alex Carattini. Once it is processed at the warehouse, it is transported to the supermarket. Whole Foods Market Whole Foods prides itself on providing customers with the widest possible selection of locally-grown produce in efforts to not only supply fresh, high-quality products but also to support strong relationships with local farmers, said Melissa Jacobs, the marketing team leader at the Whole Foods Market next to Sunset Place. Tomatoes from Borek Family Farms and Alderman Farms, squash and zucchini from Lady Moon Farms, and sprouts from Fullei Fresh and Green Garden Organics, are currently on the shelves at Whole Foods, Jacobs said. All the organic produce is labeled. This means the fruit or vegetable has been certified organic by an independent third-party certifier following the U.S. Department of Agriculture’’s standards. April 23 - April 25, 2012

The Fresh Market At The Fresh Market in Coconut Grove, shoppers can identify locally-grown and regionally-grown produce with the labels ““Grown Round Here”” and ““Miles Fresher,”” indicating farms within 100 miles and 300 miles from the store, respectively. Most of The Fresh Market’’s organic produce is not local because there are not many organic farms in South Florida. Fresh Market only takes tested and certified organic produce. Currently, Anderson Farms is one of The Fresh Market’’s few local organic suppliers. Produce like zucchini, yellow squash, and grape and cherry tomatoes are on sale at the store. Endlessly Organic Community-supported agriculture (CSA) is a system that allows people to support local farmers and enjoy fresh produce. Customers purchase a share of produce from farms in the area and have it delivered on a weekly or biweekly basis. The CSA Endlessly Organic offers discounts to the UM community. Each produce share has about eight to 10 vegetables and four to five fruits. Delivery to UM begins the week of May 2. Produce is selected from local organic farms and delivered every other week. Everything is fresh, chemical-free and ready to eat, according to a flier. For more information or to sign up, visit endlesslyorganic.com. Select UM as your site and use coupon code UM15 during checkout to receive 15 percent off your first box. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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LIFESTYLE

Drinking in moderation can reduce health risks BY ALEXA LOPEZ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Alcohol is unquestionably part of the college lifestyle. What isn’’t typical of a college student, however, is drinking in moderation. While excessive drinking can lead to obesity, heart disease and infertility, small amounts of alcohol every so often can benefit one’’s health. Drinking one or two servings of alcohol, not just wine, every day can reduce risks of developing heart disease, strokes and diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic. But serving sizes are often disregarded. A serving of wine is 5 ounces, which is about half a wine glass; a serving of beer, which is 12 ounces, is equivalent to a beer can; a serving of liquor is equal to the amount that fills a standard-size shot glass. Here are some options that won’’t hurt you if you have more than two drinks.

Wine

Hard liquor

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Beer

Drink this: Pinot noir (about 120 calories)

Drink this: Whiskey on the rocks (about 90 calories)

Drink this: Rum and diet coke (about 65 calories)

Drink this: Beck’s (64 calories)

Not that: Sweet Riesling (about 250 calories)

Not that: Champagne (about 130 calories)

Not that: Long Island Iced Tea (about 550 calories)

Not that: Yuengling (135 calories)

Fun fact: Red wine may prevent heart disease.

Fun fact: Whiskey has zero carbohydrates.

Fun fact: Mixed drinks dilute alcohol, keeping you from drinking too much.

Fun fact: Beer has high levels of vitamin B6, according to the USDA.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY MARIAH PRICE

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Cocktails

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football games to be played between the Canes and FAU after their recent scheduling agreement

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final ranking for the men’s tennis team. The season ended on Thursday with a 4-0 loss to FSU in the ACC Tournament.

FITNESS

ILLUSTRATION BY CARLOS MELLA

Late-night campus runs become exercise trend BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

Imagine a late night around campus. Typical sights include the caffeineinduced library dwellers fighting to stay awake, students making snack runs to the C-store or stumbling to their rooms after that final round at the Rat. Look a little closer, and you might come across the midnight runner. Like many other students, sophomore Mikayla Vielot makes a habit of running the loop around campus as a way to stay in shape. But what’’s different about her routine is the time she chooses to run.

At the same time most people are sound asleep (or wish they were), Vielot finds herself making the trek anywhere between midnight and 2 a.m. ““I’’m usually pretty busy during the day,”” she said. ““By the time I get out of all my meetings and work and finish homework, that’’s usually around the time I can go.”” Vielot first started this routine during the fall semester, but the runs had been sporadic until two weeks ago. Once the semester began to wind down, she found herself motivated to run every day for two weeks, saying it ““helps with the end-of-year stress.”” And Vielot doesn’’t even like to run. ““I actually hate running,”” she said. ““Doing it at night when it’’s cooler outside makes me more willing to go. I’’ve never run outside during the day.””

Though there are no known health advantages to running at night as opposed to during the day, there are some benefits that could appeal to those looking to start. While the South Florida heat can be overwhelming for many during the day, an evening run could reduce the risk of dehydration and heat exhaustion. It also presents an opportunity to focus on the run itself, rather than all the obstacles that could be problematic during the day. Weaving through students walking to class, stopping mid-run because the intersection has a red light, or struggling to hear your music over the city’’s noise, are no longer issues. However, certain safety precautions should be taken late at night. Wearing reflective clothing, choosing a well-lit location, making yourself visible and running April 23 - April 25, 2012

with a friend are good ways to ensure that a late-night run is as safe as it is effective. ““I don’’t really come into contact with too many people at that time,”” Vielot said. ““It’’s very peaceful. I look forward to that.”” Although it has its advantages to some, for others it simply works out better to exercise during the day. ““I used to run late in the night to avoid the summer heat,”” senior Joseph Diaz said. ““Until I felt it was too unsafe.”” But for those struggling to find time in a hectic day for a good time to fit a workout in, the after-dark hours could be a viable –– and necessary –– option. ““It’’s very good to keep yourself in shape. I don’’t sleep very much but exercising makes me feel a lot better,”” Vielot said. ““I feel more refreshed. It really does help you out.”” THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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ROWING

Supportive coach leads rowers with ambitious vision Team grows to become faster, more competitive BY SPENCER DANDES COPY EDITOR

He reached into the cabinet behind his desk and pulled out the object that best demonstrated his point: a tissue box. ““See?”” he asked. ““This is the evidence. You never know.”” Andrew Carter never knows what his rowing team will need from him, be it a coach who can talk his rowers through their next race or a father figure who’’s standing by to help them through a rough patch in a relationship. The tissues often come in handy. Since arriving on campus in 2010, Carter has embraced many roles at once. He employs the values he learned from his family to make sure his team acts by the same high standards. The University of Miami’’s head rowing coach is a meticulous leader whose vision for the program has it destined for success. He takes great pride in the team’’s attitude and outlook, and has worked to transform those qualities during his tenure. ““The sociology of our team is light-years ahead of what I found when I got here,”” Carter said. ““And where their heads are will help us tremendously.”” Life before the U He came here from Clemson, a school that he felt was not headed in the direction of competitive success. Before that, he directed the men’’s and women’’s rowing programs at Bates College in Maine. Entering his third season as the UM coach, Carter is thrilled to report that recruits have remarked how impressed they are with Miami’’s eagerness to ““move forward aggressively.”” And even though his team operates on a strict training and practice schedule, he hesitates to define a typical day on the job; instead, Carter references a piece that he wrote in 2006, when he was at Bates. ““4:30 to 4:40 a.m. Grabbed a bowl of cereal and turned on the TV to trusty old Channel 33, the Weather Channel,”” he wrote. ““As I munch on my Mini Wheats, I wait for the ‘‘Local on the 8s’’ which will, of course, determine whether we row or not, which is sure to affect my mood.”” So begins a day that often carries on for 16 hours or more. Every minute is occupied, because to Carter, no minute can be wasted. Carter is Canadian, as is his wife, Kim, but he has spent the majority of his coaching career in the United States. He did spend two years coaching at the National Rowing Center in Ontario. Carter also took a one-year 12

SPORTS

ZACH BEEKER // Staff Photographer

IN SYNC: (From left to right) Hannah Meister, Maggie Fragel, Hannah Hawks and Courtney Keller row during practice last Thursday in Miami Beach. UM’s rowing team, which has 35 members, comprises mostly freshmen and sophomores. sabbatical from Bates to coach in New Zealand, where he seriously considered staying permanently. Hints to his heritage peek through in different ways, from the Canadian flag pennant that hangs behind his desk, to the subtle accent that permeates his speech. ““He’’s so Canadian,”” said senior Maria Siemann, a four-year member of the rowing team. ““Eh?”” Siemann is one of just two seniors on the roster of more than 35 rowers. The overwhelming number of freshmen and sophomores on the team reinforces why Carter’’s leadership responsibilities extend beyond those of a typical coach. ““He coaches like a teacher,”” Siemann said. ““He’’s laid back, puts the ball in our court, and doesn’’t like to dictate. But he builds the foundation for us to push ourselves, which makes him more effective.””

sistant Rowing Coach. ““He’’s never thrown a tantrum in his life, but when he found out he wasn’’t on the payroll, he absolutely lost it,”” Carter said. In a remarkably organized office that is decorated by little more than two large trophies and a seat from an antique racing boat, Carter keeps two frames on his desk. One is a photo of him with Mason on the beach. The other is a note scribbled by what could only be a child’’s hand. ““Our family was at Crandon Park, and I got a call from an athlete that I coached at Clemson. She wanted to join the national rowing team,”” Carter explained. ““I talked to her about goal setting and structure. My son was listening, and he asked my wife for paper while I was on the phone.”” What did he write? Top 3 ACC. Win ACC. National Champions.

Family ties It’’s fitting that Carter approaches his job with equal emphasis on coaching, teaching and parenting. He has a 9-year-old son, Mason, and the lessons Carter has learned from raising him have translated directly to the team. Mason, whom Carter described as ““sports-crazy,”” meets all of the Miami recruits. He attends meetings regularly. And he has a stack of handwritten business cards on his dad’’s desk that read: Mason Carter, As-

Facing the future These days, as the spring season winds down and the Hurricanes have grown stronger, faster and more competitive with their conference rivals, Carter knows those goals will be within reach soon enough. His confidence stems from his most fervent strategies, which are simple enough for even Mason to grasp. Carter relies on routine, focus and clarity. So pedantic is Carter that he has studied his sleep cycles to learn how to wake up with-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 23 - April 25, 2012

out an alarm clock. Two minutes before it would typically ring, he is awake. Every day. His team practices in North Miami Beach most mornings, and Carter drives there alone, adamantly refusing to carpool because ““it’’s the only hour of alone time I get all day.”” Widely regarded as an expert in the technical and mechanical aspects of rowing, Carter’’s knowledge has afforded him the opportunity to add an interesting title to his already full plate: consultant. Equipment companies looking to refine their latest products, authors seeking clarification for the information in their rowing books and articles –– yes, he confirms, people do write books about rowing –– and major rowing conferences that search for the best in the business to hire as their speakers all turn to Carter for his skill. But at the end of each day, when Andrew Carter has returned to bed with enough time to squeeze in four or five 90-minutes sleep cycles, it’’s Miami on his mind. ““We’’re in a stage of development,”” he said of his young squad. ““To call it rebuilding could belittle the effort we’’re putting in. Rebuilding to me says ‘‘I resolve myself to subpar performance.’’”” Yet Carter said the team’’s ““long-term strategy is on –– if not a little ahead –– of schedule.”” For that, they have a coach, a teacher, and a self-proclaimed surrogate dad to thank.


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SPORTS BRIEF BASEBALL SWEPT Miami nearly avoided a sweep at the hands of Florida State this past weekend, but EJ Encinosa couldn’t extend Sunday’s game past the 10th inning. With the game tied at 7-7 in the bottom of the 10th, there were two runners on and one out. Encinosa allowed a base hit to Sherman Johnson, scoring Giovanny Alfonzo for the walk off win. With Peter O’Brien out with a hairline fracture in his wrist, Miami needed its pitching and defense to be top notch against the second-ranked Seminoles. They weren’t. On Friday night, Eric Erickson went five innings, allowing nine hits and six runs – all earned. The bullpen didn’t fair much better and Miami was blown out 11-2. On Saturday, Eric Whaley was undone by an error-filled second inning that saw Florida State score four runs, only one of which was earned.

After allowing the leadoff batter to reach on a base hit, Whaley got Jose Brizuela to hit a grounder to first base, but a throwing error from freshman Esteban Tresgallo prevented a potential double play and both runners were safe. A balk, a walk and a base hit followed, scoring two. Runners advanced on a throwing error from Dale Carey, and two sacrifice flies later the Seminoles had a 4-0 lead, and would go on to win 6-1. The sweep marked the second time this season that the Canes failed to win a game against an in-state rival ranked in the top five. Miami was swept by the top-ranked Florida Gators at the beginning of March, a three-game set that also ended in Sunday heartbreak, with Encinosa blowing a save and a two-run lead in the top of the ninth. Adam Berger may be contacted at aberger@themiamihurricane.com.

April 23 - April 25, 2012

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dear ...

Dear V: I can’t perform unless it’s in public...

, My girlfriend and I have been getting it on in semipublic places. Not like the middle of Sunset or on the Rock, but places where there is a potential for us to get caught. And now I can’’t finish when we’’re not in a place we might be walked in on. What’’s the deal? Signed, Needs it to be Risky Dear Pee-wee Herman, Careful, buddy. Having sex in public is still illegal, even if you’’ve never actually been caught. I don’’t know what you look like, but even if you are a

looker it’’s still called indecent exposure. If doing it in ways that might mean someone walks in on you turns you on, why not? Students voted the stacks (specifically the mezzanine level) as the best place to get laid on campus, but everyone’’s doing it there. Be a little hipster. Don’’t ignore the other nominees like the arboretum, student organization offices, or the roof of Ungar. And if you’’re feeling particularly risky, the UC Green can leave a pleasurable grass stain as well. But why can’’t you get off if you know you’’re not going to get caught? Were you always worried as a kid that Mom was going to walk in on you playing with yourself and now you don’’t know how to finish without the fear of it? Or do you secretly want someone to catch you guys and join as a third? Whatever it is, I don’’t see any ethical problem with getting it on in semi-private places, although I’’m

pretty sure V is not allowed to advocate for places that would be illegal. So consider that my disclaimer. Look, there are far stranger fetishes. Just don’’t start walking around in nothing but a long trench coat and flashing strangers. As long as you’’re not trying to be seen, what’’s the problem? Maybe just crack the blinds a bit and give the neighbors the option of a show. If it’’s really a straining issue on your relationship and sex life that you cannot finish otherwise, try stopping your adventures. I promise that if you’’re denied long enough, your body will physically fix the issue by itself. Now back to the search for another secluded storage closet! V

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Want to help improve our website? We’re also looking for a webmaster. Email editor@ themiamihurricane.com. April 23 - April 25, 2012

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