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The Miami

HURRICANE Vol. 90, Issue 48 | April 12 - April 15, 2012

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

ILLUSTRATION BY CARLOS MELLA


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TRANSPORTATION

UBike program honored for cyclist support Bike safety award raises questions BY MARGAUX HERRERA EDGE EDITOR

The University of Miami was named a Bicycle Friendly University by the League of American Bicyclists (LAB) in March, just months after back-to-back cyclist deaths a few miles from campus on the Rickenbacker Causeway. The LAB recognizes universities that create a positive environment for cyclists as part of its Bike Friendly America program. The program also recognizes communities and businesses for their cyclist support. UM received a bronze award from the organization from the possible bronze, silver, gold and platinum distinctions. UM is the first in Florida and one of 35 universities in the country to earn the Bike Friendly distinction. UBike, UM’’s bicycle program, applied to Bike Friendly America earlier this year looking for tips on how to improve bicycle safety and education on campus. UBike hopes to prevent cyclist deaths like the one that occurred in February on the Rickenbacker Causeway. Driver Michele Traverso struck cyclist Aaron Cohen, who later died at Jackson Memorial Hospital after undergoing emergency brain surgery. UM’’s program will take measures to make both cyclists and drivers learn to share the road. The university is in the process of installing ““sharrows,”” or shared arrows, which will be painted onto the road as part of a county-wide project. It will indicate to drivers that

cyclists and drivers must share the road. ““Our goal in doing this was to get feedback,”” said campus planner Ricardo Herran, who put together the application with other members of UBike. The group was not expecting the recognition. ““It’’s a great honor for us,”” Herran said. The LAB bases its assessment on five categories: engineering, education, enforcement, encouragement and evaluation. Herran said that the LAB commended UM for lowering the speed limit to 15 mph on campus roads. The group also noted that UBike gives students, faculty and staff free locks for registering their bikes on campus. Despite the LAB’’s acknowledgement of the lowered speed limit, many students complain that they have not seen a change in campus road safety, including bicyclists’’ respect for pedestrians. ““I haven’’t noticed that it’’s taken effect,”” said Ph.D. student Luke Fitzpatrick, who bikes two miles to campus every day. Fitzpatrick parks his bike immediately on campus rather than ride it around because of the lack of bike paths. For those students who do bike on campus, the lack of bike paths is an issue. For sophomore Chloe Behar, having a bike on campus is ““great,”” but the struggle between pedestrians and bikers can be a problem. ““It would be great if they created a little path for bikes because people get in the way and walk so slowly that we can’’t move,”” Behar said.

UM medical students are working from a pedriatric mobile clinic for residents of Little Haiti. Check out Natalie Edgar’s photo brief.

CHLOE HERRING // Contributing Photographer

WHEELS: UBike, UM’s bicycle program, applied to Bike Friendly America looking for tips on how to improve campus safety. Behar uses her bike around campus and often takes to the streets when the paths are too congested. She sometimes worries about biking in the road because of inattentive drivers. ““People are distracted so they don’’t see us coming all the time,”” Behar said. One major suggestion from the organization was to extend bike paths into South Miami and Coral Gables for people who commute on bikes, and to expand bike safety education programs. The LAB also advised students to take advantage of the M-Path, which runs next to the Metrorail and parallel to US-1

in front of campus. The path is 31 miles and extends from Downtown Miami to Florida City. ““We’’re evaluating all of the feedback we got back from the league and trying to figure out what we should be doing,”” Herran said. He said that UBike is looking into widening paths and adding signs to trails to indicate where cyclists can and cannot ride. Fitzpatrick, however, did note that UBike’’s lock program is beneficial. ““It’’s a really good way to encourage people to ride,”” he said. For more information, email UBike at ubike@miami.edu.

NEWS BRIEFS

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PRIDE WEEK

WRITING

ARBORETUM

SpectrUM is hosting Marriages on the Rock on Thursday for Pride Awareness Week. Students can show support for marriage equality and marry anyone they want – friend, roommate or lab partner – regardless of gender or sex. Ring pops, cake, and marriage certificates will be awarded to participants.

The Writing Center 2012 Workshops present “Polishing your Prose” for all members of the university community. The workshops focus on some of the most significant writing concerns of students and faculty. Writers of all levels are invited to participate.The workshop will take place on Tuesday from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. in Hecht Residential College, Room 101. For more information, visit as.miami.edu/writingcenter/ or call 305-284-2956.

Earth Alert will be having a clean-up event Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Gifford Arboretum.All volunteers will meet at Stanford Circle and then walk over to the Arboretum to do some cleaning. Those who help out can also get a chance to try some fruit from the Arboretum as they clean.

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

April 12 - April 15, 2012

Lyssa Goldberg may be contacted at lgoldberg@ themiamihurricane.com.

Catherine Wong has a say on happy hours around Miami. Check out her blog. Dean Anthony Lake is a pretty interesting figure. Read all about him in his profile by Christine Keeler. UM medical students are working from a pedriatric mobile clinic for residents of Little Haiti. Check out Natalie Edgar’s photo brief.  Read all about Rhonda DuBord, the associate director at the Wellness Center in a profile by Greg Mendell.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


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ACADEMICS

Art complex fosters community Renovated building houses most art forms BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR

Once scattered across three different areas of campus, art students can now paint, glass-blow and sculpt in one central location on Levante Avenue, near the Alumni Center. A new art complex, housed in a previously unoccupied building, was commemorated on March 29 with a donation from celebrity art instructor Connie Gordon. ““With such a raw space, we did not have many limitations,”” said Lise Drost, chair of the Department of Art and Art History. The new complex has two f loors. On the first f loor, there are indoor and outdoor workshops for glassblowing, ceramics and sculpture. On the second f loor, there are studios for painting and 2D design. The building also has an in-house library and new computers and printers with the UPrint service. The ceramics and sculpture studios were previously located near the BankUnited Center (BUC) and Ponce Garage, and the painting studio was housed in the Rainbow Building, which is across the street from the new complex. Digital photography and electronic media for the time being will remain in the L-1 Buildings by the

STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Students join to advocate public education reform Group to focus on K-12 ‘achievement gap’ BY ISABEL BRADOR CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

PHOTOS BY MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

PENCIL ME IN: Professor Valeria Rocchiccioli sketches a light box example for sophomores Betsey Lupton and Maggie Fragel in their 3D design class. Memorial Building. According to Drost, housing most of the art forms in one building will aid in planning events and exhibitions. Drost also wants to create more interdisciplinary classes that combine the various art forms. Junior Gabriela Varley, a studio art and motion pictures major, particularly likes the openness of the second f loor painting studio’’s windows. ““I love that I am on the second f loor and can use such great lighting,”” she said.

ART: Professor Valeria Roccioccioli (left) helps sophomore Betsey Lupton build a box, which will contain a plaster mold over a plasticine sculpture. Roccioccioli’s 3D class will be making glass portraits out of these molds.

However, Varley, like other students and art professors, does miss the charm and appeal of the old studios in the Rainbow Building. She especially misses their paint-splattered f loors and high ceilings. ““The last place felt like home,”” Varley said. ““Having to keep the f loor clean feels like I am being censored.”” Associate professor of painting and drawing Brian Curtis also misses the ceilings but is glad that students can now visit each other and showcase their work in one space. He hopes that students will find inspiration and experiment with different mediums. ““It has worked out nicely,”” he said. ““It has given art students an identity, to be integrated in one building.”” Gerdi Tsesarskaia, an adjunct instructor for ceramics, finds the new building’’s ““efficiency”” important. ““I like the clearly defined and separated spaces, and that there is a library inside the building,”” she said. Tsesarskaia’’s only qualms with the new building is that it is more distant from nature and lacks windows in the ceramics room, which the art buildings by the BUC once offered. Tsesarskaia, however, hopes that future generations of professors and students will start to make the new location as ““artsy”” as the last ones. ““The potential is great,”” she said. ““Subsequent generations will make it livable.””

Starting next semester, the University will welcome its own chapter of Students For Educational Reform (SFER). Rooted in the national nonprofit of the same name, SFER is geared toward promoting policy change that will close the racial and socioeconomic ““achievement gap”” in K-12 public schools across the country. An achievement gap is the disparity between the success rates of children in underresourced schools and children in schools that are more affluent. Sophomore Aldric Ellis, the vice president of SFER, said the club is for those who are passionate about improving education in the United States. ““This is an awesome opportunity to help make a change,”” Ellis said. The chapter at UM will focus on informing students about educational equality through student rallies, film screenings and partnerships with other student organizations. One of the movies they hope to screen is ““Waiting for Superman,”” a documentary about a group of students waiting to see if they will win the lottery to enroll at a charter school. ““We’’ll be raising awareness through discussion panels and screenings of films that deal with education reform, such as the film ‘‘Waiting for Superman,’’”” said sophomore Jenna Boller, president of UM’’s SFER. SFER will also partner with Teach for America, a national teacher corps of recent college graduates who commit to teaching in underprivileged public schools for two years. ““We saw the need for an SFER chapter after talking with students who were committed to ending educational inequity and wanted to spread awareness about this issue,”” said Krista Szaflarski, the head of Teach for America’’s UM recruitment teams. Teach for America and SFER have partnered at a national level as well as at UM to provide students with an opportunity to impact the community. ““Many were excited to apply to Teach For America but were underclassmen and wanted to have an impact now, rather than after graduation,”” Szaflarski said. SFER will have a campaign during which students will write emails, make phone calls and write letters to ask Florida senators and legislators to vote for bills which support educational reform. The chapter will also be tutoring at local schools in order to supplement the education of disadvantaged students in the community.

April 12 - April 15, 2012

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NEWS

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RSMAS

ACADEMICS

Sinking city under observation

Creative fall courses to consider Looking for a fun elective to fill your schedule? Check out some of the course listings below.

Researchers study rise in sea level in Venice BY JACKIE SALO STAFF WRITER

An associate research professor of marine geology and geophysics believes Venice, Italy, may be in danger. The city, founded in A.D. 421, has been under observation for the past six years. Researchers have noticed a steady rise in its sea level –– it has been consistently rising 2 millimeters per year since the study started. In addition, the city is sinking at the same rate, resulting in a total 4 millimeters a year increase of water level rising in comparison to the land. ““Today it may not seem like it makes a big difference but in the long run it will with the accumulating effect,”” said Shimon Wdowinski, associate research professor of marine geology and geophysics. The study is among several others Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) research professors and graduate students undertake in order to examine the effects of long-term coastal living. In this particular study, RSMAS has collaborated with the University of California-Santa Barbara to install GPS instruments in locations across Venice. These monitored the movement of the Earth’’s surface. The American researchers conferred with Italy’’s Tele-Rilevamento Europa, a company that measures ground deformation. The company set up satellite radars to determine the elevation of the land in relation to other points. Using data collected from these two instruments, researchers were able to determine that Venice was still sinking despite that prior studies had indicated that it had stabilized. These earlier studies had only used satellite radars to collect data. ““The advantage to using both methods is that we got a very precise idea of the level of sea and land when we combined them,”” Wdowinski said. FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THE STORY, VISIT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM

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NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

GRAPHIC BY AMILYNN SOTO

SOURCE: MYUM.MIAMI.EDU

STUDENT PROFILE

Nonprofit honors student for work at YES Institute Institute teaches LGBT acceptance BY HYAN FREITAS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Joseph Zolobczuk’’s first day at work wasn’’t what he expected. Fifteen years ago, he arrived at the office of Project YES, looking for a job. Project YES –– now known as the YES Institute –– is a nonprofit, based at 5275 Sunset Dr., that seeks to educate and inform others on topics involving gender and sexual orientation. According to the project’’s founder, Martha Fugate, Zolobczuk expected to arrive at a big organization teeming with staff members rushing around the ofApril 12 - April 15, 2012

fice. Instead, there were carpets that needed to be pulled out. ““The first day he walked into the office, I was on the floor pulling up a disgusting carpet,”” Fugate said. Fugate told Zolobczuk that the income he would be ZOLOBCZUK receiving ““is not good.”” But Zolobczuk, a 33-year-old graduate student in the School of Education’’s Community and Social Change program, said he didn’’t care about pay. "Well the work isn’’t much fun either,”” Fugate told Zolobczuk. ““This is your job. This is gonna be our office.””

The hard work eventually paid off. On March 1, Zolobczuk learned that he had been chosen as the first student recipient of the Silver Medallion Award. The award is given by Miami Coalition of Christians and Jews (MCCJ), a nonprofit dedicated to eliminating intolerance. Past recipients include football icon Don Shula, Miami-Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho, and UM President Donna E. Shalala. Zolobczuk currently serves as the director of education, production and research at the YES Institute. He came out as gay after growing up in a Catholic household in Buffalo, N.Y. ““It was really hard on my mom and dad,”” Zolobczuk said. ““It took a couple of years letting

them learn about it and giving them some space to figure things out.”” Zolobczuk said that his sexual orientation is now a nonissue with his family, thanks in part to what he has learned through working at the YES Institute. ““I think the work we do at YES caught MCCJ’’s attention and that’’s why this award happened,”” Zolobczuk said. According to Rachel Sottile, the YES Institute’’s executive director, Zolobczuk’’s recognition came as no surprise. ““So much has to get done behind the scenes, so things go seamlessly when we’’re doing courses or presentations,”” Sottile said. ““And he makes that happen. I call him the anchor of the organization.””


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PHOTO BRIEF

New fraternity members unveiled during presentation ON THE FLOOR: The Iota Chi chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity crossed five freshmen Michael Delano Vante, Carey Green Jr., Noah Newman, Kamari Durley, and Christel Kemeni last Friday. The latest additions to the Iota Chi chapter were unveiled as “First Klass.” The chapter has been on UM’s campus for more than 32 years. The probate show was held in the School of Communication’s courtyard. Dean Ricardo Hall, a member of Kappa Alpha Psi, was in attendance. CHLOE HERRING // Contributing Photographer

Please drink and drive responsibly.

April 12 - April 15, 2012

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NEWS

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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Campus provides choices in matters of differing faiths Religious groups offer variety BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ STAFF WRITER

This weekend, some of the UM community observed Easter and Passover from experiencing the stations of the cross on the Green to attending the seder at the Hillel Jewish Student Center. The on-campus celebration of the two major religious holidays exposed students’’ religiosity, an aspect of college culture that is often overlooked. In fact, 32 percent of the undergraduate students identified as Catholic, 45 percent identified as Protestant, 10 percent are Jewish, 2 percent are Muslim, 2 percent are Hindu, and 9 percent identify with another faith, according to a study of 4,860 students published in UM’’s Factbook for fall 2011. ““There are a lot of religions here, there is no choice but to be open,”” said sophomore Djevelyn Phileus, a member of Intervarsity Christian Fellowship. ““Just look at the number of churches here, you don’’t see that at UF or FSU’’s campuses. The churches here provide a lot of resources for kids that are spiritual and want to reach out.”” Hillel Jewish Student Center Hillel is a place for students to explore the many aspects of Jewish life, from their cultural roots to their religious foundations. They offer weekly Shabbat dinners on Friday nights. Shabbat is a the day of rest in the Judaic religion and is also known as the Sabbath. Recently, the group hosted president Donna E. Shalala at

a Shabbat dinner. ““I find it much easier to be involved in Jewish life and observe Jewish holidays because of the great work that the UM Hillel does,”” senior Margaret Goldgof said. ““I grew up in a community with few Jews which made being Jewish harder. Being around such a strong, Jewish community has made me more proud to be a part of it.””

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NEWS

In a poll published in the University of Miami’s Factbook for fall 2011, 4,860 undergraduate students stated their religious affiliations.

Catholic Student Association Every Thursday night, the CSA has dinner at 7 p.m. at the St. Augustine’’s Catholic Student Center. The meal is followed by group discussions and worship. The group also has a lecture series that takes place every Tuesday night. During the season of Lent, CSA held an Ash Wednesday service on the UC patio and held a reenactment of the stations of the cross on the Green on Good Friday. The reenactment featured the events that led to Jesus’’s death on the cross. ““The community, along with learning about the background and history of our traditions, has made it possible to dive deeper into holidays and see the true beauty of why we are celebrating,”” said sophomore Kimberly Bremer, a member of CSA. ““Through retreats, formation, small groups, and fellowship, I have learned the basics of Catholicism, increased my knowledge of scripture, learned of the Church’’s social teachings, and practiced living a more virtuous life.”” Muslim Students of the University of Miami MSUM hosts weekly Friday prayer in the UC ballrooms, and provide a musallah, or room, for students to pray in and store their religious

OTHER RELIGIOUS GROUPS ON CAMPUS Campus Crusade for Christ (CrU) Chabad Episcopal Students Organization Hindu Students Council Orthodox Christian Fellowship Baptist Collegiate Ministry Christian Science Organization

Religion by the numbers

Lutheran Campus Ministry Wesley Foundation United Methodist Secular Humanists, Atheists, and Agnostics for Reason, Knowledge and Service Visit miami.edu/ myumgroups for more and to get involved.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

GRAPHIC BY AMILYNN SOTO

SOURCE: UM FACTBOOK

books. They also host meetings every other week in the musallah, which is located in room 21-Q in the Student Services Building. During Ramadan, a month when Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset, the group provides iftar dinners and food donated by restaurants because the dining halls are usually closed when it is time to eat for Muslims. ““Finding friends with the same opinions of things and the same values makes you feel comfortable,”” sophomore Masood Mohammed said. ““It’’s a relief to know you’’re not alone. It gave me that missing piece I was afraid I wouldn’’t find at UM.””

porn addictions and sex trafficking. ““It’’s controversial, that’’s the point,”” Phileus said. ““We want to make people do a double-take, stop and take pictures with their phone, and have people stop by. If they hear two words, we’’ve done our job.”” According to the group, their main goal is to spread the love of Jesus. The group also welcomes diversity in all forms. The group meets on Mondays at 5:15 p.m. for small group discussions in the UC Ballrooms, on Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m. for a prayer walk at the Rock, and on Fridays at 8 p.m for a prayer group in Mahoney-Pearson Residential College, room 614.

Intervarsity Christian Fellowship Intervarsity hosted the event Porn Exxxposed, which shed light on

Tibetan Buddhist Student Association TBSA meets Mondays and

April 12 - April 15, 2012

Wednesdays to meditate on the University Green. Last semester, they also brought in a group of monks from India to perform a sand mandala ceremony in the lower UC lounge. The ceremony consisted of seven monks spending several hours a day for five days putting together an elaborate work of art made completely of sand. Then on the last day they destroyed it and spread the sand throughout campus and the lake. ““I really enjoy having the club on campus,”” Dominic Vita said. ““It allows us to show people something completely new that most college students don’’t get to experience. Almost every member we have is completely new to the practice with the exception of reading about Buddhism in a text book.””


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PHOTO BRIEF

Renowned film producer talks to students on campus LEGENDARY: Jon Landau, an American film producer known for his work for “Titanic” and “Avatar,” spoke at the University of Miami’s School of Communication on Monday afternoon at 5 p.m. Both movies are two of the highest grossing films of all time. Currently “Avatar 2” and “Avatar 3” are in preproduction and there is a plan for an “Avatar”-themed world in Disney World’s Animal Kingdom. Landau brought the Oscar Award he received for Best Picture for “Titanic” in 1998. “A movie is a pebble being dropped in a pond and we pick the movie based on which ripple will go farthest,” Landau said.

HOLLY BENSUR // Staff Photographer

April 12 - April 15, 2012

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NEWS

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OPINION speak

UP!

What is your favorite study food?

JAKE WASSERMAN Junior “Gummy bears because they are chewy, delicious, and bright and fun colors.”

KARA KERSTING Freshman “Nutella because it’s chocolaty and delicious, and it helps me focus.”

The Miami

Carrying out your entrepreneurial ideas is the strongest business plan you can have.

HURRICANE

Founded 1929

Christopher Ivory, Contributing Columnist

STAFF EDITORIAL

ments could be considered inappropriate and were disrespectful to those who endured Castro’’s regime, the First Amendment is all-inclusive. Guillen, along with every U.S. citizen, is entitled to his own opinion and has the right to speak freely and openly. The right to free speech should be applied to all situations regardless of the person, situation, status and location. Many do not agree with Guillen’’s negligent and ignorant comments, and that is understandable. But he cannot take back what was said. In fact, if members of the Cuban community want to target their feelings of distress and anger at someone, it should be at Fidel Castro. He is the man that destroyed Cuba, not Ozzie Guillen. The Marlins’’ manager is known for being outspoken and, at times, controversial. He has been criticized in the past for a gay slur he made to a Chicago-area sports columnist, and for praising Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez. Clearly, he’’s a repeat offender, and

should seriously consider using his frontal lobe before speaking and offending half of his team’’s fanbase. But his comments, nonetheless, are protected. We live in the United States, not in Cuba. There is no doubt that Guillen’’s comments were uncalled for, irrational and offensive. He is a public figure in the Miami community who has assumed the role of a leader in his new city. Guillen should be a role model for children, fans and his team. As an important person in a predominantly Cuban community he has the responsibility to maintain his professionalism, which he failed to do when he blurted out comments he said he deeply regrets. However, as student journalists, it is difficult to deny Guillen his right to voice his beliefs, even if they come with a price. Guillen is already paying his. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Business execution should be a priority KEVIN LIU Junior “Keebler cookies because they are easily accessible while studying.”

NEVILLE PATEL Freshman “Chipotle because it gives me the energy I need to power through.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Jennifer Levine

M

ost people who have conceived a new business idea have been told, ““Make sure you have a good business plan.”” The elements of the ideal business plan are fairly common and cliche: marketing and CHRISTOPHER advertising strategies, identiIVORY fying the target audience, reCONTRIBUTING search of the target audience’’s COLUMNIST consummation trends, and the list goes on. While it sounds good, this often has an adverse effect. It contributes to what is known as the analysis paralysis. Analysis paralysis ensues when people spend so much time thinking about their business plans that it hinders the actual work of bringing the business into fruition. The made-up financial projections, target audience surveys and exploration of competing busi-

NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Marlins manager’s words rash, but protected On Tuesday, the Miami Marlins’’ manager, Ozzie Guillen, was suspended for five games without pay after comments he made about Cuban dictator Fidel Castro were featured in Time magazine. ““I love Fidel Castro,”” Guillen told Time. ““I respect Fidel Castro, you know why? A lot of people have wanted to kill Fidel Castro for the last 60 years, but that motherf****r is still here.”” Guillen’’s comments came just one week after the grand opening of the new Marlins Park, which is located in the heart of Little Havana, a neighborhood predominantly made up of Cubans, many of whom were born in the island nation. He caught a flight from Philadelphia back to Miami just days after his comments were released to apologize to the fans. Guillen apologized a countless number of times in English and Spanish, and said that his comments about Castro were ““the biggest mistake of his life.”” Although Guillen’’s com-

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nesses are time consuming and expensive. The following entrepreneurs did not have a business plan, but still went on to experience entrepreneurial success: businessman Robert Croak encountered animal-shaped rubber wristbands on a business trip to Japan and decided to market the bands as kids’’ accessories in the U.S. creating Silly Bandz; engineer Lonnie Johnson had the idea to make a water gun after noticing the force at which water shot out of a nozzle during an experiment in his sink and that water gun later became known as the Super Soaker; Mark Zuckerberg is self-explanatory. Execution of a business should not take a back seat to developing an extensive business plan. Don’’t let the extensive analysis of these elements bog down the execution of your future business plans. Carrying out your entrepreneurial ideas is the strongest business plan you can have. Christopher Ivory is a first-year law student. April 12 - April 15, 2012

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexa Lopez

BUSINESS MANAGER Isabel Vichot

MANAGING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

ACCOUNT REPS Danica Jones Tara Kleppinger Misha Mayeur

ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman PHOTO EDITOR Marlena Skrobe

ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo

PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers ONLINE EDITOR Daniel Cepero

NEWS EDITOR Alysha Khan

WEBMASTER Amanda Zacharkiewicz

OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas

DESIGNERS Carlos Mella Mariah Price Amilynn Soto

EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

ASST. EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

COPY CHIEF Stephanie Parra

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

COPY EDITORS Spencer Dandes Nicky Diaz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2012 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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Persistence, hard work can lead to kindness

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n the hustle and bustle of modern life, we often get caught up in ourselves and lose track of those around us. Work, classes and other obligations take up huge chunks of our time. ANDREW BLITMAN In this omnipresCONTRIBUTING ent struggle to find out COLUMNIST who we are, we also try as hard as possible to tune out the things that make life difficult. While we juggle everything going on in our own lives, we often find it challenging to improve the lives of others. At least I do. Somehow, some people manage to do it despite the pressures of their upbringing, finances and circumstances. Kindness is a special quality. Whether you’’re helping an old lady cross the street, donating money to charity, or doing something in between, being nice encompasses a wide variety of benevolent actions. However, being kind goes a step further than being nice. To be kind is to invest a part of yourself in the act of magnanimity, to do something nice for someone because you meant to help that person. When you’’re kind, you do nice things without the expectation of reward. Don’’t get me wrong, it is important to be nice to people, but being nice by itself is unfulfilling. It is shallow and reinforced by some sort of external gratification like praise or a reward. Kindness is niceness internalized. It is the state of mind in which you’’re nice for the sake of being nice as part of some internal code that tells you that you’’re doing the right thing. Anybody can be kind, but fewer people have achieved this unconventional state of mind. Though I don’’t think it’’s particularly difficult to think this way, I do find it challenging to think outside myself on a consistent basis. That is the secret to its rarity. I think defeatism and fear need to be conquered before this philosophy becomes something visceral and something attainable. Through hard work, persistence and a genuine passion for others, anyone can be truly kind. Andrew Blitman is a senior majoring in marine affairs and biology. 10

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Families are not always perfect W

e've all seen those P u b l i x commercials, the ones with children sitting around a beautifully set table and minding their own business. ISABEL BRADOR CONTRIBUTING Grandma is COLUMNIST seated at one end sharing words of wisdom, while Dad tells a supermodel, whom we will assume is Mom, ““Dinner looks great, honey!”” The camera then pans to a perfectlooking casserole, which would give Emeril a run for his money. I don’’t know about you, but my last family dinner went a little differently. The steak was a little tough, my

mom was not serving the mashed potatoes in her pearls, my dad was blasting a new techno-rock-opera band on his iPhone asking me if I liked it and my grandmother’’s words of wisdom were, ““Who farted?””In case you were wondering, the blame was placed on my brother. But here is the kicker. Even without f lickering candles or a fancy china set, we all managed to have a great time together as a family. Last time I checked, that's all that matters. Television commercials try to sell this idea that happiness only comes when everything is perfect, but that's not true. Every family has that taboo topic that makes everyone scream and rant about their opinions, but that's OK. Conversation can’’t always happen within the normal range of decibels.

Spend money on entertainment rather than steal others’’ work

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went to the library recently to rent a movie I have been trying to watch for a while. I have been told ““A Beautiful Mind”” is phenomenal, and I thought EDWARD BURNS CONTRIBUTING to myself, ““Why COLUMNIST not?”” When I saw it was missing from the shelf, I went to the front desk. The library assistant was a young male, probably in his early 20s, leaning back in his chair behind the desk. ““Just get it off the Internet dude,”” he said. ““That’’s illegal,”” I replied. He just laughed in response. He thought I was kidding, until he really looked at me and saw the expression in my eyes. What did he take me for? ““Wait, are you serious?”” ““Yeah,”” I said.

Without a peg-leg, gold tooth and parrot, do I look like a pirate to you? ““Wow. I mean, it doesn’’t even matter, it’’s not like they don’’t make any money. How do you get music? You pay for that too?”” he asked with contempt. ““Yeah, or I listen to the radio, where I know the musician gets royalties for their work. There’’s no such thing as a free song,”” I said in reply and walked away. I wasn’’t able to watch the movie I wanted and I was OK with that. Who am I to steal someone’’s work? I’’m not a thief. Since when is it OK to take something without paying for it? It does not matter if the musician is filthy rich. That is their work. They spent time and money to create their product. I need to spend money to reap the fruits of their labor. Edward Burns is a freshman majoring in political science and broadcast journalism.

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It rarely does at my house and somehow I've managed to turn out fine. As the semester winds down and family dinners loom on the horizon, don’’t cringe at the fact that dinner will be late or burnt. Don’’t let your family members' opinions on your significant other, haircut or clothes get to you. Embrace the crazy individuals that make up your family and try to smile when they ask you awkward questions like, ““How are you going to get a job with a major in that?”” No family is perfect, but that doesn’’t mean that there aren’’t any happy families. Isabel Brador is a freshman majoring in journalism.

Live your one life responsibly

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ou’’ve probably heard D r a k e ’’ s ““The Motto”” which repeats you only live once (YOLO) several times. Now, evTAYLOR DUCKETT eryone’’s shouting CONTRIBUTING out YOLO. COLUMNIST YOLO is in a sense this generation’’s ““carpe diem.”” While taking advantage of what life has to offer is important, some people may be taking YOLO too far. It has become common to use YOLO as an excuse to make decisions. Some people go around using it to explain rash choices they’’ll probably regret later. We have to enter the professional world one day. Every action has a consequence. I like to follow a lesser-known trend, YOGO, which stands for You Obey God Only. A rapper named Jin created a song entitled YOGO in response to Drakes song ““The Motto.”” Whether you believe in YOLO or YOGO, you need to live responsibly. Taylor Duckett is a freshman majoring in political science.


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BY SPENCER DANDES COPY EDITOR

You stumble back from the Grove at 3 a.m. desperate for nourishment. Can you really stomach another drive-thru? Come on, treat yourself to some high-class dining. And by high-class we mean Denny’’s and by dining we mean the Grand Slam breakfast, served 24 hours a day. But if you want to take even more of a risk while marred in your druken stupor, order the Fried Cheese Melt. Listen closely: grilled cheese on sourdough bread, with four mozzarella sticks INSIDE. Enjoy it, because it may be the last bad decision you ever make. Denny’’s is located at 1150 S. Dixie Hwy., Coral Gables, right across from campus.

VINCENT FUNG // Staff Photographer

BY ALLISON NOVACK CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

With one of the world’’s largest selection of drafts, Yard House always has the beer you’’re looking for. Watch out though! It’’s hard not to make your way to the huge food menu, listing everything you could be looking for too. The combination of the two is alCAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

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ways bound to grow out that belly…… happily. Luckily, Yard House is located in Merrick Park, so you can feel classy with your beer belly. This bar and restaurant has locations in more than 10 states, but the one in Merrick Park has become a hot spot for University of Miami students. Yard House has a threehour happy hour beginning

at 3 p.m. on weekdays, and another at 10 p.m. for late night drinkers. If you’’re feeling risky, try the beer floats for dessert –– a combination of ice cream and your selection of a cold one. Yard House is located at 320 San Lorenzo Ave., Coral Gables.


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As the wise Kid Cudi once said, ““crush a bit, little bit, roll it up, take a hit.”” And then go see a laser light show at the Planetarium. If you’’re tired of getting baked only to sit around drooling at the Food Network, head over for an $8 show and choose from such featured music as Jimi Hendrix, Radiohead, The Doors, and more. The lights are insane, and the people-watching is equally entertaining. There are so many hippies hotboxing in the parking lot, it’’s a wonder they don’’t wear matching T-shirts that say ““South Miami Stoners.”” Another highlight? The kick-ass light refracting glasses are yours to keep. The Planetarium is located in the Miami Science Museum at 3280 S. Miami Ave., Miami.

BY BRITTANY WEINER CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Two words: stone crabs. If you are craving seafood and want to be treated like a celeb (your waiter will be decked out in a tux), Joe’’s is simply the best place to go. And as the ultimate catch you get to wear a bib. Joe’’s is only open when the stone crabs are in season from mid-October to midMay. Order your pre-cracked jumbo claws in one of four portion sizes different sizes,

all for market price. Make sure you try the famous mustard dipping sauce. As for sides, pair these babies with hashed browns, grilled tomatoes smothered with cheese, or their Skinny Fried Sweet Potatoes ($6.95). Top it off with Joe’’s Original Homemade Key Lime Pie ($6.95) per slice) and your set for a meal in heaven. Joe’’s Stone Crab is located at 11 Washington Ave,, Miami Beach.

BY ALEXA LOPEZ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

There’’s no better place to get your fix for authentic Cuban delicacies than Versailles, just a 10-minute drive from campus. Versailles is wellknown for its late night hours and its ability to attract political candidates on their campaign trails. The restaurant, which recently celebrated its 40th anniversary, is basically the salsa-infused Cuban ver-

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sion of the Versailles Palace in France, complete with the aroma of cafecito, or Cuban expresso. Decked out with mirrors, glass mosaics and gold-encrusted chandeliers, the Cuban favorite features its own Hall of Mirrors. But don’’t let your reflection distract you from the delicious ham croquetas, vaca frita and tres leche. Versailles is located at 3555 SW 8th St., Miami.

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BY NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR

Ultra Music Festival is probably the most popular music event in South Florida. For some, it’’s the chance of a lifetime to see all their favorite DJs perform in one venue. For others, it’’s just an excuse to wear as little and colorful as possible. Regardless, if you haven’’t had the chance of catching David Guetta or Avicii live, you should untzh-untzh your way to Ultra next March. And you never know, maybe the Material Girl herself, Madonna, will make an appearance again next year. Ultra Music Festival is an annual event in Downtown Miami. Next year, it will be celebrating its 15th anniversary –– so the party will be all out.

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

BY ALLISON NOVACK CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

This hole in the wall bar holds the title of Miami’’s oldest bar. It’’s a great spot for some cheap beer and live music. Men in biker jackets getting their rock ‘‘n’’ roll fix make up the regular crowd.While jamming to the classics and ordering beer from tatted up bartenders, don’’t be

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afraid to check out the bar grub. The menu includes a variety of greasy food include some incredible burgers. Not to mention, Monday night is all you can eat ribs and wings night, something actually worth damaging your eardrums and inhaling constant cigarette smoke for. Tobacco Road is located at 626 South Miami Ave., Miami.

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BY SPENCER DANDES COPY EDITOR

Is there anything better than frozen lemonade? Well, yes, and it’’s sitting in a truck in Kennedy Park. A.C.’’s Icees has been serving unbelievably delicious frosted lemonade for more than 30 years from the same trusty parking spot. There’’s really nothing more satisfying when it’’s 146 de-

grees outside and another slurpee from the C-Store just won’’t cut it. Plus, it’’s kind of exciting to order your drink from the same man whose face is emblazoned on the cups. Throw in one of A.C.’’s hot dogs and perhaps a frisbee to complete a relaxing afternoon at the park. Kennedy Park is located at 2400 S. Bayshore Dr., Miami.

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

BY ALLISON NOVACK CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

There’’s beer. On campus. Need we say more? The Rat –– while not currently in its permanent location by the lake –– is still the best place for students to mingle over a pitcher after (or before) class. The sports bar food and plentiful flat screens to catch the game complete the perfect place to drink your troubles away. Once construction on the new Student Activities Center began,

students kind of freaked out. They feared that change would suck the life out of it. However, it seems like the Rat is back on the map of the best places to hang out on campus. The menu even features a new addition for those who would prefer to avoid the beer belly: Sangria! The Rathskeller is located in the University Center.

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BY BRITTANY WEINER CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

BY CASEY GASINOWSKI CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

At Heat games, you can catch a glimpse of Miami’’s biggest celebrities casually enjoying some basketball. Drake, Rick Ross, Trey Songz, Lil Wayne and others are frequently spotted sitting courtside, easy to identify with their glowing jewelry and dark sunglasses worn inside. But even with $20 tickets and seats all the

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way up in the nosebleeds, DJ Khaled’’s gleaming watch will still be noticeable . If you’’re a big basketball fan, you need to attend a game while you’’re in Miami –– you never know who you’’ll run into. Go Heat! American Airlines Arena is located at 601 Biscayne Blvd., Miami.

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Want to woo your date? Bring them to Perricone’’s. The romantic restaurant is situated in the heart of Mary Brickell Village and has indoor and outdoor seating. If the intimate seating is not enough, there is also live music. Start off with the Mozzarella Caprese Napolean, thick slices of homemade mozzarella, fresh basil, and vine ripened tomatoes and the Baked Brie En Croute, for

a baked brie. For dinner favorites, try the Fiocchi Gorgonzola, purseshaped pasta stuffed with fresh pair and gorgonzola, or the Veal Parmigiana. If you’’re feeling traditional, you can never go wrong with Grandma Jennie’’s Meat Lasagna. Last but not least, complement this meal with a nice bottle of wine. If you’’re on a budget, Perricone’’s features their Pasta Thursdays’’ with $10 pasta dishes. Perricone’’s is located at 15 SE 10th St., Miami.


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BY DANIEL CEPERO ONLINE EDITOR

Pack your cars with friends and family, and drive yourselves down to Key Largo. A beautiful island in the Keys that’’s known around the world for kayaking, diving, and fishing. The island also boasts great restaurants with fresh and delicious meals, especially seafood. The hour-long ride itself can be an adventure, but once you get to the island, you will never want to leave the beautiful sunsets and gorgeous water. HOLLY BENSUR // Staff Photographer

BY V DEAR V COLUMNIST

You wait until the security guard has made her final rounds and you’’re home free for a full hour or more. Now you face a choice: Go to the ninth floor and into the stairwell for a more private powwow, or get down to

business in a random study nook where the commoners still lurk close by. It’’s important to note, intimacy in the stacks will not be your most passionate affair. These floors aren’’t like books –– you can’’t exactly reserve them. But this experience will be one of the most unique during your time at UM. Hit it, Barry White.

MONICA HERNDON // Staff Photographer

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BY ALEXA LOPEZ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Tailgates at UM are notorious for being so rowdy, you may not even make it into the game. The innocent game of beer pong is transformed into a full on parking lot beer Olympics, complete with funnels and f lip cup. You’’ll make tons of new friends as you walk up and

down the rows of cars, pickup trucks and frat buses. Expert advice: people f lock to the most obnoxious (yet awesome) tailgate groups, often those who blast Pitbull the loudest and pour Patron most generously. Don’’t forget the red Solo cups. Sun Life Stadium is located at 2269 Dan Marino Blvd., Miami Gardens.

NATALIE EDGAR // Staff Photographer

BY SPENCER DANDES COPY EDITOR

On those mornings when the room is spinning out of control and you literally can’’t imagine being anywhere but your bed, give a little effort and drag yourself to Bagel Emporium. It’’s so close to campus, you could probably still log onto WirelessCanes. Among the ritzy throngs of elderly Jews, you’’ll find a large number of other UM students com18

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miserating because they’’re in your exact same position. Try a sandwich or matzo ball soup, or stick with a fresh bagel and cream cheese. You really can’’t go wrong. Just be ready to wait 10-15 minutes to be seated, or call ahead and pick it up to avoid the line. Bagel Emporium is located at 1238 S. Dixie Hwy., Coral Gables.


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BY ALEXA LOPEZ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Take your appetite for fresh fish and succulent Asian flavors to Akashi, the most delicious Japanese restaurant in Miami –– just a 15-minute walk from campus. Try the memorable Alex #2, stuffed with shrimp tempura and topped with spicy mayo, avocado and

tempura flakes, or the Mariano roll, a variation of Alex #2 that is garnished with fresh salmon. What’’s even better than the food is the wait time after you place your order, which is less than 20 minutes on average. Akashi is located at 5830 S. Dixie Hwy., South Miami.

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

BY CASEY GASINOWSKI CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

The islands of Key Largo, Islamorada, Marathon, Big Pine Key and Key West are each a slice of tropical paradise. In the Florida Keys, the waters are crystal blue, beaches are less crowded than Miami, and snorkeling and scuba diving is at its best. If you’’re craving adventure,

you can embark on a fishing trip, go boating or kayaking, or explore one of many sunken shipwrecks. If you’’re in the mood to unwind, you can eat at a delicious seafood restaurant, walk the beach, or go shopping/people watching downtown on Duval Street. The drive from Miami to the Keys is about four hours, so your iPod with upbeat tunes for the trip.

COURTESY MEAGHAN PELLETIER

BY NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR

With more than 25 TVs and Southern Californian-style food, what else could make Sandbar stand out? Oh yeah, its dance floor. If you just want to dance with somebody or feel the heat with somebody, jump on the drunk April 12 - April 15, 2012

bus and make your way to the Grove to stop by Sandbar. DJs play Thursdays through Saturdays, and Thursdays are ““College Night.”” SandBar Grill is located at 3064 Grand Ave., Coconut Grove.

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BY SPENCER DANDES COPY EDITOR

Allow us to paint you a mental picture: Grilled sourdough bread, thick slices of cheddar and perfectly crispy bacon. Salivating yet? Get yourself to Ms. Cheezious, the reasonably-priced grilled cheese truck that makes its rounds

through the whole city of Miami. Follow them on Twitter (@MsCheezious) for their current whereabouts. Additionally, they get bonus points for the puntastic name. But if you don’’t feel like tracking down Ms. Cheezious, UM has its own delectable food truck right on campus. Uragano –– Italian for ““hurricane”” –– serves freshly made pizzas and subs for around $6 or $7. Good news: you can pay with your Cane Card, so be sure to thank mom and dad later. Try the barbecue chicken pizza or the meatball sub. Uragano is also on Twitter, @UraganoUM.

CHARLOTTE CUSHING // Staff Photographer

BY NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR

Forget FroYo; that’’s so last year. If you really want to satisfy your craving for ice cream, this is the place for you. Swensen’’s is, for the most part, stuck in the ‘‘70s, as its forest green carpets and bizarre stained glass lamps would make your grandmother proud. With a vast variety of fla-

BY NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR

There’’s no doubt you’’ve tried every pizza place within a threemile radius from campus. If you still haven’’t found the perfect slice you’’re looking for, take a bite at the Big Cheese. And although the pizza is definitely a highlight, the menu’’s other options don’’t fall far behind. Start off your meal with garlic rolls (a CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

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vors and irresistible sundaes, you’’ll find the one you’’re looking for. And if you want something that’’ll really blow your mind, try the bubblegum ice cream. It doesn’’t hurt that the milkshakes are to die for, too. Swensen’’s is located at 1586 S. Dixie Hwy., Coral Gables.

dozen for just $3.25) and make sure to take a good look at the styles of pizza they offer. With more than 10 choices, you can’’t go wrong. And not only is the food great, but the restaurant is also covered in UM memorabilia. Need proof? Art Kehoe himself has an original indulgent entree on the menu. Big Cheese is located at 8080 SW 67th Ave., Miami.


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SPORTS

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the number of recruits signed by the women’s basketball team for the 20122013 season

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the number of errors committed so far this season by the baseball team, second most in the ACC

BASEBALL

PHOTOS BY ZACH BEEKER // Staff Photographer

STRIKE: UM starting pitcher Javi Salas faces a Florida Gulf Coast batter during Wednesday’s game. The Hurricanes lost 4-2, despite 6.2 solid innings of work from Salas.

CLEAN CATCH: Freshman second baseman Jarred Mederos field a grounder during Wednesday’s game against the Eagles.

Offense falls flat in weekday loss to Gulf Coast Eagles Salas efficient in second career start BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

Last weekend, the Hurricanes took three big steps forward after sweeping the then-third ranked UNC Tar Heels at Mark Light Field. On Wednesday night, they took a step back. Despite a strong outing from starting pitcher Javi Salas, the Hurricanes’’ offense fell flat in a 4-2 loss to the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles. Miami (24-9, 11-4 ACC), ranked sixth following the weekend sweep, was held to just four hits on the evening. ““I’’m not a psychologist, but the real deal is, we pitched well and our hitters were awful,”” coach Jim Morris said. ““They did not show up. It was one of the worst hitting performances

that I’’ve seen from a Miami club in 19 years.”” The Eagles got off to a quick start in the first inning when, after shortstop Stephen Perez bobbled what could have been a double-play ball, FGCU first baseman Sean Dwyer sent a double into centerfield to drive in the two baserunners. Miami would strike back in the bottom of the first after an RBI single into centerfield by Chantz Mack allowed Dale Carey to score from second to cut the deficit to 2-1, but against freshman starter Zack Tillery, who was making his first career start, the Canes were unable to get any momentum. ““Our problem was simple. Everyone just kept hitting under the ball,”” Mack said. ““It was just contagious. Just fly ball after fly ball out. It’’s disappointing.”” The Eagles scored another run in the seventh, after Alex Diaz got on first after a payoff pitch got away from Salas in the dirt. Florida Gulf Coast got back-to-back hits off Adam

Sargent, the final being an RBI single by Ryan Gebhart. Florida Gulf Coast added one more insurance run in the top of the ninth when an error by Perez –– his second of the night –– allowed Diaz to score. Perez leads the team, which is ranked next-to-last in errors within the conference, this season with 15. Miami’’s bats showed some signs of life in the bottom of the inning when Mack drove in O’’Brien on an RBI single to make it 4-2. After reliever Brady Anderson walked Jarred Mederos to put runners on first and second, Perez represented the tying run at the plate. He grounded out to second base to end the game. ““It’’s a huge letdown. We just came off a huge sweep of the number three team in the country,”” Mack said. ““The team plays hard, we just didn’’t come up with it. Disappointing is the word for it.”” Despite the offensive struggles, one positive the team came away with was the perforApril 12 - April 15, 2012

mance from Salas. In his second career start, he went 6.2 innings, giving up three runs (two earned) on three hits with a career-high nine strikeouts and just one walk. ““I felt great out there. I felt like I was able to throw my fastball, my curveball, my slider, all three for strikes on any count and change speeds effectively,”” he said. ““I was a little wild in the first inning, wasn’’t hitting my spots, but I feel like I settled down after that and was just able to pitch to the glove. I felt like I was in the zone today.”” Coming up, the Canes hit the road on Thursday for a weekend series against Virginia Tech. Despite the letdown on Wednesday, Mack believes the team just needs to get their sense of urgency back. ““We’’ve got to get the intensity back up. Today it was just lackadaisical,”” he said.”” We just have to get ready for a big series against Virginia Tech and can’’t have any more letdowns.”” THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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COACH PROFILE

Long journey lands Rincon in the Canes’’ court Success has helped shape teaching style BY ADAM BERGER SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

When Mario Rincon was growing up in the small town of Duitama, Colombia, he and all of his friends played soccer. That was the game; that was the sport, until the day that Mario’’s father, channeling his inner Ray Kinsella from ““Field of Dreams,”” built a tennis court in the family’’s backyard. ““It wasn’’t a fancy court or anything, just some flat land with a tennis net. It worked,”” Rincon said. ““From there we played tennis all day long.”” But Rincon’’s life didn’’t play out like a typical sports movie. He never went on to become a tennis legend. He never fell to his knees in celebration after winning a major. But he did have a modest professional career, cracking the top-200 in the mid-1990s during his nine-year stint on the ATP World Tour. According to the ATP’’s website, Rincon won $132,921 in prize money through singles and doubles competitions in his time as a pro. He played in all the major tournaments, on the courts of the U.S. Open, Wimbledon, the French Open and the Australian Open. Heading to school Most aspiring tennis players would sign up for that resume immediately. Take the money and the memories, then ride off into the sunset. But that wasn’’t enough for Rincon. ““I played for the University of Kentucky a long time ago and I remember thinking to myself that I wanted to play professional tennis and then when I finished …… I wanted to become a college coach,”” said Rincon, who also played for his country as a member of the Columbian Davis Cup Team from 1989 to 1998. ““The whole concept of playing together as a team in college, the whole concept of enjoying a victory together, to me that was the ultimate experience,”” he said. Rincon, who turns 45 later this month, is the head coach for the University of Miami men’’s tennis team. He began coaching at Miami in 2004 and won ACC Coach of the Year honors in 2006. He has stayed in the game for this long because tennis is what he loves, and tennis is what he knows. Growing Up But when you talk to Rincon about the man who introduced him to the racket and ball back in Duitama all those years ago, he tenses up. So you press him on the subject. 22

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““My dad never let me know that he was happy about my achievements but I think he was really proud. He was always pushing and pushing and pushing and asking for more,”” Rincon recalled hesitantly. Sitting in his office at the Neil Schiff Tennis Center in Coral Gables, with pictures of his daughters Laura, Daniela and Gabriella proudly displayed on a filing cabinet above his desk, Rincon would rather talk about match strategy or one of the eight Hurricanes on his young Miami roster than his relationship with his father, Victor Mario. ““His father was so demanding,”” said Laura Rincon, Mario’’s wife. ““If he lost, it was the end of everything.”” Nevertheless Rincon stresses that his father was a critical figure in his life and a positive one who got him to this point in his career. ““As a 16-, 17-year-old kid, when you have to play and practice so many hours there are more things that you would enjoy doing than playing tennis,”” Rincon said. ““To play at a high level I think somebody else needs to push you and my dad was that figure for me. But I liked it. I loved it. I was very competitive …… I’’m really glad that he was there for me.”” And then of course there is Rincon’’s late mother, Erneftina. ““She was just the most lovely person ever, in the world. She was always very supportive,”” Rincon said. ““Of course my dad was more results oriented; my mom was more feelings oriented. That’’s a side that I always appreciated and I think it was a great mix.”” It’’s no surprise that this balance of discipline and nurture comes out in Rincon’’s coaching style. Keeping his balance During a recent home meet against the University of Central Florida, Rincon could be seen slowly pacing the center aisle that sits between the first and second groupings of courts. Arms crossed, he peers through his dark sunglasses with an unreadable stare, overseeing every one of the six singles matches taking place simultaneously. Somehow Rincon keeps tabs of every point, no matter the court. It’’s this aisle that offers him the best vantage point for a meet and serves as a nerve center of sorts, a place where he can feel the pulse of his team. ““In college tennis it is very different than professional tennis, when in singles you have six matches going on and the different matches have different momentums,”” said Rincon, whose Canes would end up beating UCF 5-2. ““Sometimes the whole momentum swings as a team and that’’s a very interesting aspect of it. For us coaches to try to catch that wave, that momentum going our way …… that’’s what we want.””

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 12 - April 15, 2012

ZACH BEEKER // Staff Photographer

LEADER: Mario Rincon, coach of the men’s tennis team since 2004, encourages his players during Sunday’s match against Duke. Miami was swept in that match. Rincon could write a dissertation on the unique aspects of college tennis, and the challenges of coming up with a strategy to win a meet. He enjoys trying to out-think his opponent, and doesn’’t have a problem telling you he’’s good at it. But there are the other responsibilities that come with being a college coach, the ones that a tennis court can’’t prepare you for; the skills and lessons that Rincon took

from his mother. ““You’’re an important figure in their lives when they’’re away from home, trying to get their degree and become better tennis players,”” Rincon said. ““It’’s a huge responsibility to be their coach, and I take that very seriously and I love it.”” FOR THE FULL VERSION OF THE STORY, VISIT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM


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BASEBALL

COMMENTARY

Hurricanes vs. Hokies

Canes must quickly move past loss to Gulf Coast

Following the Hurricanes’ 4-2 loss Wednesday to the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles, the team travels to Blacksburg to take on Virginia Tech in another ACC matchup. On paper, Miami has the advantage, but the Hokies are on a five-game winning streak.

A

Dale Carey has been one of the more consistent hitters on the team so far this season, currently sitting at a .286 average. Michael Palmer is just above him at .287, and both have shown they can come up with the big defensive stop. Chantz Mack has his on and off days, but had the only two RBIs against Florida Gulf Coast on Wednesday and could look to pick up some momentum.

The main issue for the Miami infield is finding a way to limit the errors. Stephen Perez has 15 on the season; Esteban Tresgallo has nine. That’’s 43 percent of the team’’s total mishaps coming from two players. Tresgallo has cooled off offensively since his hot start, but has shown that he can provide a big hit when needed.

Though he’’s slowed down slightly in ACC play, catcher Peter O’’Brien has been the focal point of the offense all season. The leader at the plate in most statistical categories, many times the team’’s success has come from how well O’’Brien has done. Regarded by many as one of the top three catchers in the nation, unless he’’s not playing there’’s no reason the Canes shouldnt have the advantage here.

Eric Erickson has been the ace the staff has hoped he would be. Overall, Miami is second in the ACC in ERA, Virginia Tech 10th. With Javi Salas now assuming weekday starting duties, that’’s one less arm in the bullpen available over the weekend. Still,this might not hurt the team too much. Closer E.J. Encinosa was masterful through six innings of shutout ball on Saturday night against UNC.

Following the team’’s loss to Florida Gulf Coast on Wednesday, coach Jim Morris called it the worst offensive showing he has seen in his 19 years at Miami. The team travels on Thursday night, but the Canes have a propensity to bounce back after a disappointing game, evidenced by the UNC sweep last week. Don’’t expect the bats to be as quiet as they were against the Eagles. ANALYSIS BY ERNESTO SUAREZ

GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

fter the N o r t h Carolina sweep and then the midweek loss to Florida Gulf Coast, baseball at the University of Miami continues DAVID FURONES SENIOR SPORTS to be difficult to WRITER gauge. Just last week it appeared as if the wheels were about to fall off. The team had lost three of its last four, and four of six, heading into a home weekend series with No. 3 UNC. With the team struggling with the aluminum and the leather, rumblings from Cane fans were that the team’’s season would simply end at the hands of one of its state rivals, either UF, which had eliminated the Canes each of the last three seasons, or FSU. The two were ranked No. 1 and 2 respectively. The consensus was the only thing the Canes are fighting for is whether the elimination happens in a regional or a super-regional. Then, the team made about as sharp a U-turn as its turn radius allowed back on the road to Omaha. The team swept the third-ranked team in the nation, which was also atop the ACC in earned run average, and did it with some newfound energy and flare. ““It was definitely a different attitude with the team,”” said Peter O’’Brien, the team leader in virtually every offensive category. ““There was definitely a different intensity with the guys, and you felt it walking in to the locker room. Guys were a lot more excited to be here.”” First the Hurricanes rode workhorse Eric Erickson to a Friday night shutout and revitalized the offense in the process, defeating UNC 8-0. Then Miami won a 14-inning marathon behind Esteban Tresgallo’’s walk-off and six stunning innings from closer E.J. Encinosa in which he retired all 18 batters he faced en route to ACC Pitcher of the Week honors. Sunday, fueled by Steven Ewing and the bullpen, the Canes shut out the Tar Heels once again, completing the sweep with a 4-0 victory. ““It’’s a great series and what we accomplished in that series is good,”” coach Jim Morris said. ““But it can April 12 - April 15, 2012

be destroyed very easily in the next series if we don’’t come out and play well and play every day. It’’s a game about being consistent.”” But the Wednesday night debacle, losing to lowly Florida Gulf Coast, now has the team swerving off that road again, at least momentarily. The bats Wednesday were quieter than the crowd at Augusta for the backswing of Bubba Watson’’s Masters-winning putt. Offensively, the Canes managed two runs off four hits against the 1420 Eagles. The Hurricanes look to get back on track this weekend with a trip up to Blacksburg, Va., to face Virginia Tech. With the halfway point of the season in the rearview mirrow and the home stretch looming, it’’s critical that Miami doesn’’t let the midweek loss spoil the momentum it’’s been building. ““It’’s always the second half of the season that really counts,”” Encinosa said. ““You want to come into the playoffs nice and hot. So I guess it’’s a good time to turn things around here.”” Don’’t let the Hokies’’ 5-10 conference record fool you. The team that started 2-10 against the ACC is coming off a three-game sweep of Boston College last weekend and has won five consecutive games overall. ““Every weekend’’s tough in this conference,”” Morris said. Miami goes into the series in Blacksburg looking to improve its 3-3 record in road ACC games. The Hokies are a powerful offensive club. They’’re hitting .303 on the year and have crushed 31 homers. Where Miami has its advantage is in the arms race. All three of Miami’’s weekend starters boast a lower ERA than Virginia Tech’’s best starter. The Canes’’ team ERA is 2.73 while the Hokies give up 4.23 earned runs per nine innings. ““We just want to keep proving everybody wrong and show everybody that we’’re the best team in the nation,”” O’’Brien said. It starts again this Friday. After all, Florida Gulf Coast had gone out and beaten No. 2 FSU and No. 28 FAU in the week leading up to the win against Miami. The loss might not be anything to be too ashamed of.

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COMMENTARY

Guillen’s comments hurt, but he deserves forgiveness

S ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

outhwest Airlines has a ““Wanna Get Away”” slogan they advertise throughout their commercials. For a certain ballclub in the downtown Miami area, that may not have seemed like a bad idea this week-

end. One week into the new season, the Miami Marlins have found themselves as the topic of conversation for all the wrong reasons. Just days after the regular-season opening of their brand new ballpark and new team name, the team has fallen under a PR nightmare following comments made by head coach Ozzie Guillen regarding Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. The comments, originally published by Time Magazine, stated ““I love Fidel Castro. A lot of people have wanted to kill Fidel Castro for the last 60 years, but that motherf****r is still alive.”” Ever since the comments have been made public, Guillen –– and to some extent, the Marlins –– have come under a great deal of scrutiny. The fanbase is outraged, local organizations and supporters of the team have called for Guillen’’s firing, and national media looks on, trying to understand what the big deal is. It’’s never a good situation when a public figurehead, one whose day-today activities don’’t involve political involvement, decides to dabble in it a little bit and give his or her opinion. In any normal situation, the cons outweigh the pros. Among a fan base in a city made up of Cuban-Americans, any mention of Castro not damning him would be catastrophic. I can appreciate and understand the reason our community would be this upset. Though I have not experi-

enced the pain and strife that many go through to make their way out of Cuba firsthand, I’’ve grown up hearing enough about it, be it from direct family to close friends to the older, cigar smoking, laughing gentlemen at the barbershop to understand the pain they have been through. This is a man who is responsible for the deaths of thousands of people in Cuba, whether through the sights of a firing line or those lost attempting to cross the 90 miles of ocean between there and Florida. He has caused suffering amongst generations of Cubans and Cuban-Americans, and their right to be outraged is just and well deserved. That being said, I don’’t think the calls to fire Guillen and exile him from here are warranted. Reading and rereading the original quote, it seems to me his message was lost in translation. I first took it as being in awe that a man who has caused that much suffering could, not only still be alive, but also be in the position that he’’s in. Whatever the reasoning for his saying it, Guillen has gone through leaps and bounds to explain his thoughts, and more importantly, apologize to the city. This is an apology coming from a man who does not make a habit of asking for forgiveness. A man who once called himself the ““Charlie Sheen of baseball without the drugs and a prostitute”” came back to Miami in the middle of a road trip to apologize ““on his knees.”” The damage has been done. Guillen was suspended for five games by the Marlins (the first game being served during their 7-1 loss to the Philadelphia Phillies on Wednesday) but more importantly, he has to work to regain the trust of a community he has wounded. Some may never forgive him. That would be a shame. We’’ve all had that moment where we wish we could take back and erase something we said. Guillen just has more microphones around him.

GAMES SUSPENDED FOR: Thursday @ Phillies Friday vs. Astros

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SPORTS

Saturday vs. Astros Sunday vs. Astros

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 12 - April 15, 2012

SPORTS BRIEFS FOOTBALL The Hurricanes football team will hold its annual spring game at Sun Life Stadium this Saturday. Both parking and the event are free to the public, with kickoff slated for 2:00 p.m. However, there will be plenty of events taking place throughout the stadium leading up to the game itself. The parking lots to the stadium will open at 10 a.m., with gates inside the stadium opening up at 11:30.The team will also be hosting Select-A-Seat for those interested in purchasing season tickets. An autograph session will also be held inside the stadium from 12:15-1 p.m. on the north side 100-level concourse. Fans are asked to bring one item to be autographed.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The women’s basketball team has announced the signing of its 2012 signing class. The team will welcome Caprice Dennis, Keyona Hayes and Macy Keen to the team for the 2012-2013 season. Keen, a 6-foot-5 center out of Tamarac, Fla., has

been ranked as high as No. 37 in the nation and the seventh-best center in the nation. Dennis is a four-star prospect who is ranked as the No. 47 all around prospect in the nation. Hayes is a 6-foot-1 forward from Alpharetta, Ga., who is ranked as high as No. 31 overall and the No.11 forward in the nation. Acording to head coach Katie Meier, all three are expected to have “an immediate impact.”

WOMEN’S TENNIS Following back-to-back losses on the road against Duke and North Carolina, the Hurricanes women’s tennis team returns to Coral Gables for the final two matches of the regular season. The team will take on Virginia on Friday beginning at 3 p.m. before facing Virginia Tech on Sunday at noon. Ernesto Suarez may be contacted at sports@themiamihurricane.com Information compiled from hurricanesports. com


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CLUB SPORTS

Quidditch team rides brooms to unprecedented heights Team ranked second in IQA BY VICTORIA HERNANDEZ CONTRIBTING SPORTS WRITER

The UM Quidditch team is the real deal. It is ranked second in the International Quidditch Association, just under Ball State University in an association currently composed of 66 teams. Alex Locust, a senior and cofounder of the club, is the headmaster of MQUM, which stands for Muggle Quidditch at the University of Miami. It is based on the game from the Harry Potter series. ““I am speechless to see the progress that we’’ve made,”” he said. Locust, ““an avid Harry Potter fan,”” started MQUM with fellow classmate Samantha Sutliff. They thought it might be a fun idea, so they held meetings and received a surprising amount of interest. The club was initially envisioned as a relaxed recreational club

that would play pick-up games on the weekends. Instead, the team competed in the 2011 World Cup in only its second year of existence. ““I thought this would be a fun way to blow off some steam," he said. ““We were approved as a club sport last semester." The team has about 15 members competing and 25 students that come for the fun of the sport. MQUM is beginning the process of dividing the club into two teams, one competitive and one recreational so that more people can get involved. Freshman Michelle Lock first joined MQUM because of her love for the Harry Potter series. She likes the idea of two teams because she enjoys playing Quidditch for fun. "The recreational league opens up the group more. They can get more people to play,”” she said. "Quidditch is intense because there are so many things going on at the same time. It's difficult to watch, but once you know the rules and get used to it, it's really fun."

Lock described Quidditch as a combination of dodgeball, hide-andseek and basketball. Sophomore David Moyer, a seeker on the team, joined MQUM because he wanted something fun and athletic to do. After watching a practice for the first time, he was convinced. ““This is too ridiculous for me not to be a part of,”” he said. As a seeker, his job is to catch the snitch, who is a neutral player dressed in yellow who runs around the field waiting to be caught. The team that catches the snitch is awarded 150 points and the win. Moyer describes the team as ““an awesome combination of athletic and nerdy.”” As for learning to run with a broom between their legs, he notes that it takes a brave individual to be able to do that regularly. ““It takes a specific type of person that has the guts to do something like that,”” he said. Once Locust graduates in May, he will leave behind a legacy through MQUM. He accomplished

VINCENT FUNG // Staff Photographer

MUGGLES: Colin Francis (left) and David McCarthy Moyer play for UM’s muggle Quidditch team, ranked No. 2 in the nation. one of his main goals for the club when Quidditch became an official club sport. His other goal is ongoing. ““Convincing everyone else of the legitimacy of our sport is another goal,”” he said. ““A lot of people find it easy to point and laugh. Honestly,

April 12 - April 15, 2012

I see the difficulties of it when we’’re running around on brooms and playing a sport derived from a children’’s book.”” But, he said, ““Quidditch has been an integral part of my time here at UM.””

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Please drink and drive responsibly.

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Dear V: When the sun comes up, she shoots me down... , I broke up with my girlfriend a few months ago, and so I’’ve started going clubbing a lot with some of my friends. I meet a girl, we dance, and things are going good. I get their numbers, sometimes they get mine, but the next morning, they ignore me after a few texts or just completely. What’’s gives? Why do girls give out their numbers if they’’re not going to be interested anymore later on? Signed, What’’s up with the ladies? Dear More Attractive Through Drunk Goggles, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, so don’’t shoot the messenger, but they were never interested. They were probably just drunk.

I’’m sure you know the feeling. You see a girl across the club, and she’’s HOT. But you’’ve also had a bit too much to drink. And the next day, when you are chatting it up with your bros about how you almost got with a really attractive girl, they tell you the truth. She may have looked like a 9 drunk, but she was definitely a 4 at best. And your friends had to stop you from taking her home. Well, my friend, you are that 4 at best. And her friends stopped her from going home with you. Because friends don’’t let friends get with 4’’s. Your Armani Exchange outfit and your blow-out hair looked sexy after several rounds of shots, but your girl’’s ““sober sister”” was unfortunately there to save the day. But perhaps V is being too generous. Maybe you’’re not even attractive when girls are shitfaced. Maybe she just gave you her number so you would buy her another drink. And she gave you her real number because she felt bad. Pity numbers aside, you really should stop looking for love in as hopeless a place as a club. You’’re not Rihanna. Girls aren’’t dressing up in skimpy, tight black dresses and

dear ... wearing heels so tall not even a drag queen can walk in them so that they can find Prince Charming. Girls just wanna have fun! That’’s all they really want. What you need to do is start going places where other 4’’s hang out. Like Richter. Or Cox. Or the Engineering School. That way, when you and a girl exchange numbers, there won’’t be the buyer’’s remorse hangover you’’ve been falling victim to the next day. But in all seriousness, like I always tell people who are having trouble finding love, stop looking. Love will find you. That, or you could try to find someone who spends a little bit too much time at the Rat and might not ever sober up enough for you to stop spinning long enough to realize what you really look like. I’’m sure they have a 1-900 number you could text for your enjoyment? V

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miami.edu/calendar Thursday, April 12 Patio Jams featuring The Big Tasty 12:15 p.m. •• UC Patio Start a new Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the live band!

RAB Custom Street Signs 4 p.m. •• Rathskeller Bring your friends and enjoy happy hour as you make your own street sign at the RAT! This event is free for Rathskeller customers.

Attenberg 7 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema Stuck in her boring factory town, 23-yearold Marina is at the mercy of both her father’’s impending death and her distaste for other human beings.

HP Presents: Diplo 8:15 p.m. •• BankUnited Center Doors open at 8:15 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Diplo is a Philadelphia-based American DJ, producer, and songwriter. During his rise to notability, Diplo worked with British musician M.I.A., an artist who is credited with helping expose him in his early career. Later, he and fellow M.I.A. producer Switch created a Jamaican dancehall project titled Major Lazer.

Since then, Diplo has worked on production and mixtape projects with many other notable pop artists, such as Beyoncé and Usher. Opening the show will be Troy Kurtz and Miami Chainsaw Massacre. This is a private ticketed event for students, faculty and staff. No re-entry, large bags, food or drink.

Frost Woodwind Ensemble 8 p.m. •• Clarke Recital Hall Director: Luciano Maganini, Free Admission.

Kappa Alpha Psi Pageant 8:30 p.m. •• Storer Auditorium The brothers of the Iota Chi Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc would like to present our group of the most beautiful, elegant, sophisticated, and talented women that this campus has to offer. With talents ranging from singing and dancing to speed painting, this is one pageant that you denitely do not want to miss out on. Tickets will be $5 in advance and $7 at the door. Please contact any brother or pageant girl to obtain tickets. The pageant girl who sells the most tickets will be crowned our Miss Popularity. Doors will open at 7 and there will be a catered pre-pageant reception between the hours of 7:30––8:45. This will be included with the purchase of your ticket.

Friday, April 13 Butler Center Awareness Day 11 a.m. •• UC Rock

Monday––Wednesday, April 16––18 •• 4-10 p.m. UC Ballrooms Tunnel of Oppression is a multimedia, sensory-based program designed to educate participants on various acts of oppression occurring today. This year, there are 10 rooms themed around the following issues: Tools of Oppression, Human Trafcking, Disability Issues, Sexual Assault, Body Image, Education, Classism, Religion, Racism, Gender, and Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual-Transgender Issues. Tours run every 20 minutes.

Come out for free Miami Scoops, new promo material, and a spotlight on National Volunteer and Social Justice Week!

Women’s Tennis vs. Virginia 3 p.m. •• Neil Schiff Tennis Center

Exhibition Preview: Darby Bannard 7 p.m. •• Storer Auditorium & LOWE Art Museum Artist Lecture begins at 7 p.m. Reception at 8 p.m. Throughout his career Darby Bannard has made original contributions to the eld of art. In 1970 he began to use the new acrylic medium, which evolved into his groundbreaking paintings of colorful expanses of richly colored gels applied with squeegees, rakes, and brooms. In 1987 Clement Greenberg proclaimed him one of the best ve or six living painters. Also Opening: Annual Juried Student Competition Exhibition. Free and open to the public.

Attenberg 9 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

Saturday, April 14 Track: Hurricane Alumni Invitational All Day •• Track Fields

Attenberg 4 p.m. & 8 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

Football Spring Game 2 p.m. •• Sunlife Stadium Join the 2012 Miami Hurricanes for their annual BankUnited CanesFest and Spring Game! Admission and parking is Free and Open for everyone. Stadium gates open at 11:30am. For more information on the BankUnited CanesFest and Spring Game visit HurricaneSports.com.

CAC Presents: The Descendants 10 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema A land baron tries to re-connect with his two daughters after his wife is seriously injured in a boating accident, featuring George Clooney.

Sunday, April15 Women’s Tennis vs. Virginia Tech 12 p.m. •• Neil Schiff Tennis Center

Attenberg 6 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

CAC Presents: The Descendants 8 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

Hug the Lake

Friday, April 20 •• 12 p.m. Lake Osceola Come out to the lake this Earth Day to participate in what could be the biggest hug UM has seen yet! The rst 600 students who come out to hug the lake will receive free t-shirts. The actual hug will take place promptly at 12:10 pm. Don’’t miss out on this chance to be a part of something great! For more information, email UMRAKmail@yahoo.com.

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 28

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April 12 - April 15, 2012

Next week...

Tunnel of Oppression

Friday, April 13 •• 8 p.m. Foote Green Bring your favorite lawn chair or towel and come be a part of the last Screen on the Green for the semester! First ““Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol at 8:00pm! The IMF is shut down when it’’s implicated in the bombing of the Kremlin, causing Ethan Hunt and his new team to go rogue to clear their organization’’s name. Immediately following will be ““Erin Brockovich.”” The story of an unemployed single mother becomes a legal assistant and almost single-handedly brings down a California power company accused of polluting a city’’s water supply, cosponsored with HealthCanes. There will be limited free Uragano Pizza at each movie showing!

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

CNL Screen on the Green


The Miami Hurricane -- April 12, 2012