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The Miami

Vol. 91, Issue 45 | April 4 - April 7, 2013

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HURRICANE

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STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

COLLEGE STRESS DRIVES DEPRESSION BY JORDAN COYNE COPY EDITOR

Freshman Katie Thompson moved into Stanford Residential College one month after her parents announced their divorce. The severe change in her home life and the already difficult acclimation to a new atmosphere caused her to feel unstable. “It felt like everything had been ripped out from under me,” she said. “I couldn’t talk about any aspect of family without crying.” Thompson learned she was experiencing depression, which recent studies have showed to be common in college

students. Depression is a medical illness that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest, according to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Though students’ rigorous course loads and jam-packed schedules are stressful enough, college also brings worries related to the transition to a new lifestyle. Nearly 19.3 percent of University of Miami students who have visited the oncampus Counseling Center this year are experiencing signs of depression. SEE DEPRESSION, PAGE 5

HAIL TO THE CHIEF

HOOT HOOT HOOT

MEET THE NEW FACES OF STUDENT GOVERNMENT PAGE 4

THE MIAMI HURRICANE TALKS TO UP-AND-COMING BAND OWEL PAGE 8

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR


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CAMPUS LIFE

Cuban blogger paints picture of Cuba Sanchez highlights lack of information

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY STEPHANIE PARRA NEWS EDITOR

Freshman Daniela Lorenzo immigrated to the United States from her hometown, Havana, Cuba, at the age of 6. “My parents wanted my little sister and I to have a good future, something hard to get in Cuba because of the government,” Lorenzo said. Lorenzo, who now serves as the secretary for the Federacion de Estudiantes Cubanos, or the Federation of Cuban Students (FEC), was among the few students and members of the student media who had the opportunity to sit down and speak to Cuban dissident blogger Yoani Sanchez at a private event Tuesday afternoon. The event was held at the University of Miami’s Cuban Heritage Collection (CHC), located within the Richter Library. Sanchez answered questions from the group and spoke about the lack of information and news within Cuba. Sanchez also took a tour of the CHC, which has an extensive collection of nearly 50,000 books and documents on Cuba. “Information to me is like a breath of fresh air,” said Sanchez, whose blog on Cuba is titled the “Generacion Y” blog. Lorenzo, who was the first person to ask Sanchez a question, was excited to be a part of the event. “It was an honor to meet her.

Missed the Hecht Studio Theatre’s production of “Toward the Sun?” Check out Yinghui Sun’s photo brief.

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR SPEAKING OUT: Yoani Sanchez introduces herself to students during the private meeting with student media held at the Cuban Heritage Collection on Tuesday afternoon. Sanchez is on an 80-day international tour.

I was familiar with her before and admired her strength and courage she had to speak up against injustices,” Lorenzo said. “I also admire her passion for spreading knowledge and information, something Cubans are unfortunately often deprived of.” Lorenzo expressed warm sentiments about the meeting. “She’s so down to earth and well-spoken, that I learned a lot from the short amount of time she was here,” Lorenzo said.

Junior Elan Aleman, who serves as the vice president of FEC, also enjoyed Sanchez’s visit. Though he was not born in Cuba, his family is Cuban. “I felt like it was a curtain lifting as to the reality down in Cuba,” he said. “I know the stories that are spun by politicians and the exaggerations from the exiles that either don’t remember or never witnessed the reality of the situation under the Castro regime.”

Aleman appreciated hearing her take on the state of Cuba. “She brought a genuine and honest illustration of the contradictions between what is said and what actually is,” he said. Sanchez’s visit formed part of her 80-day international tour. After her event at UM, Sanchez was scheduled to speak Tuesday evening at the Coral Gables Country Club. The event was hosted by the Foundation of Human Rights in Cuba.

Interested in learning more about Andrew Chappelle? Alysha Khan sat down with him for a Q&A. The Adrienne Arsht Center is presenting “Priscilla: Queen of the Desert” through Sunday. Check out Alysha Khan’s review. Subscribe for the email edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

NEWS BRIEFS

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CANELINK

CAREER

HUMANITIES

UM IT services emailed students a how-to guide earlier this week to aid with fall registration. Registration will begin on Monday, and students are assigned a registration appointment time that begins on this date. To access Canelink’s registration guide and training sessions, visit miami.edu/erpupk/students/index. html.

The Toppel Library will host a session at 3:30 p.m. Thursday called “Scholarships & Fellowships to Launch Your Career: An International Perspective.” The meeting will detail the scholarship opportunities at the national and international level that offer paid internships. For more information, visit hireacane. com.

The Center for the Humanities Stanford Distinguished Professors lecture series concludes with Anthony Grafton. Grafton’s first talk titled “How Jesus Celebrated Passover” will be held at 4 p.m. Tuesday at the College of Arts & Sciences Gallery. His second lecture titled “Apocalypse in the Stacks: The Transformation of Books, Libraries, and

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Reading” will be at 7 p.m. April 11 at the CAS Gallery as well. Grafton’s interests include the cultural history of Renaissance Europe and the history of books and readers. For more information and to register for either event, visit humanities.miami.edu. Alexander Gonzalez may be contacted at agonzalez@ themiamihurricane.com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


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STUDENT ORGANIZATION

COMMUNITY

Relay For Life brings awareness, unity

SunSmart raises funds

Fundraiser aids cancer research

Event provides free skin cancer screenings

BY BAILEY MURRAY CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Sophomore Alexa Dowell did not expect to get so involved in her sorority and hold a board position just a year after joining Delta Gamma. She’s glad she did, though. “I’ve learned how to be a positive leader among peers, while also improving my communication skills,” she said. In addition to serving as DG vice president for member education, Dowell, 20, is captain of the Delta GammaSigma Chi team for Relay For Life – a cause that she’s passionate about. The annual event, which benefits the American Cancer Society, is coming up on Saturday. Each Relay team must have one member walking at all times. This rule is symbolic of the phrase, “Cancer never sleeps.” Hailing from West Lafayette, Ind., Dowell is a sports administration and public relations double major who started volunteering for Relay For Life in high school. “I wanted to get involved in something and help a good cause,” she said. But just a week after the Relay of her senior year, Dowell learned that her mother had been diagnosed with Stage 4 colon cancer. Dowell and her sisters decided to continue participating in Relay For Life as a way to support each other and help the cause. Last year as a UM freshman, Dowell’s team in the Relay exceeded its goal of raising $2,000. But she was not able to attend the event because her mother, Trish, 45, lost her battle with cancer the day before. “My mom was one of the most positive people I have ever known. She was

BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR

REMEMBER: Sophomore Alexa Dowell lost her mother, Trish, to cancer last year the day before Relay For Life. Here, she poses with a photo from her childhood of her and Trish. a fighter, too,” Dowell said. “Even though the only news we got was bad news, she remained positive the entire time and wanted life to continue as normal as possible.” When Dowell flew home to be with her family, her friends stepped up to the plate at UM’s Relay For Life. Dayna James, another sophomore in DG, was one of the team members who helped fill in for Dowell. “Alexa is one of the most dedicated people I know,” she said. “Whether it be to her family, work ethic or contribution to Delta Gamma, she continues to inspire me and most of the people who have the pleasure of getting to know her every day.” Relay For Life is an

event that Dowell holds near to her heart, James said. “Even when she was unable to be here last year, she was still as involved as any student could have been,” she said. Senior Katie Wanner also participated in UM’s Relay last year. She said it was a memorable experience. “It was so empowering to see the amount of people who showed up to celebrate lives, hear survivor stories and prove that when everyone comes together, we have an extraordinary amount of strength to fight against the horrible disease,” Wanner said. Relay For Life is the biggest fundraising event for the American Cancer Society.

IF YOU GO WHAT: Relay For Life WHERE: 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday WHEN: The Green HOW: To form a team, get eight to 10 friends and register at relayforlife.org/umfl and start fundraising. For additional information, email URelay at miamirelay@gmail.com or visit cancer.org.

It was started in Tacoma, Wash., in 1986 and has spread around the country. A Relay has been held at UM since 2002. This year, it will take place from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday at the Green. James said she is looking forward to participating again. “Seeing our university come together for such a great cause on the day of Relay For Life last year was one of the most inspirational feelings I have ever experienced,” she said. “Everyone has in some way or another been affected by cancer, and walking every minute of the day at the Relay opened my eyes to how much many students here have truly been through.” With this year’s event around the corner, Dowell said she has mixed feelings. “Hearing my mom’s name read on the list of those we have lost to cancer will certainly be more emotional,” Dowell said. “However, I am using this emotion to motivate myself. Knowing I am doing Relay For Life in memory of my mom is only giving me more strength to help fight this awful disease.” April 4 - April 7, 2013

Runners wearing sunglasses, a dab of sunscreen and a visor will join Sebastian the Ibis for the SunSmart 5K Run/Walk. Students in the Miller School of Medicine organize SunSmart to help raise awareness about skin cancer and public access defibrillation, the process of applying electric currents to the chest wall or heart during medical emergencies such as a heart attack. SunSmart will be held at 8 a.m. on April 13 at Crandon Park. Participants can register and donate online. The early registration fee for a UM student is $15, and the same-day student fee is $20. Last year, 700 participants attended SunSmart and raised about $10,000. Proceeds collected benefited skin cancer research at the Miller School as well as a program called Team for Life, which places Automated External Defibrillators in public locations throughout the Miami area, said Joe Kaplan, a first-year medical student at Miller. “SunSmart promotes overall wellness by getting active through running,” Kaplan said. Kaplan organized the SunSmart runs while he was an undergraduate student at UM. The event was formerly called the Golden Key 5K Gets SunSmart. According to Kaplan, the event used to be less difficult to organize because he would receive funding from the Student Activity Fee Allocation Committee (SAFAC). Without SAFAC, Kaplan is trying to find sponsors that provide prizes for participating in the run. “It has been a huge blow,” he said. “We’re working to make SunSmart an official organization at the Miller School.” Despite its reduced funding, SunSmart continues to be a nonprofit organization that is completely student-run. Kaplan hopes to move forward from this “transition year” and have SunSmart recognized by the beginning of next year in order to access funding that Miller allocates to its student organizations. The organization is currently part of a dermatology interest group. This year’s SunSmart will feature special guests such as the Miami Heat Cheerleaders; Pascal Goldschmidt, dean of the Miller School; and Sebastian the Ibis. Miller School dermatologists will also attend and provide free skin cancer screenings in private booths. According to Kaplan, 150 to 200 screenings are performed each year and doctors have identified potential cancerous growth at prior SunSmart events. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

New Cabinet prepares to serve student body BY STEPHANIE PARRA | NEWS EDITOR

On Wednesday, the new Student Government (SG) Executive Board members assumed their new posts during the annual SG banquet. Along with the three members of Power of U, the Executive Board Cabinet is comprised of five appointed positions. There will also be two positions elected by Senate, along with representatives from Category 5, the Elections Commission, the Supreme Court and the ECO agency. Here’s a look at some of the new members of the Executive Board.

VICE PRESIDENT | JUSTIN BORROTO Junior Justin Borroto will serve as the vice president. Borroto, who is majoring in marketing, plans to achieve several goals. Among them, he hopes to create ways to have students get involved in SG throughout the school year, rather than just at the beginning of each semester. “We want to create ways so people could constantly be involved in the process,” he said.

PRESIDENT | BHUMI PATEL Junior Bhumi Patel will serve as the president of SG. She previously served as the executive-at-large external under the “Inspired by U” ticket. Patel, who is majoring in exercise physiology and working on a business administration minor, expressed her excitement about her new position. “I’m excited for the year, our initiatives and our team,” she said. She emphasized the importance of communication within the several SG branches, as well as the importance of teamwork. “We all have one goal: to make the university better,” she said. Externally, she hopes SG will have a large presence on campus. “We want to make sure that everyone is reaching out to SG, and that SG is reaching out to them,” she said. “Our mission is to serve the students.”

TREASURER | ROBBY CHISTE

PRESS SECRETARY | ADAM ORSHAN Adam Orshan will serve as the liaison between SG and the media. He hopes to spread awareness about SG events and hopes students will keep informed about its projects. Orshan, who is a junior majoring in international finance and marketing, has served on Category 5 since his freshman year. He is excited to take on this larger role within SG next year. “With exec, I’ll kind of be spreading my wings a little,” he said. “Instead of being in one small area, I will be able to touch and help a lot of parts of SG and therefore have a greater impact on the student body.”

EXECUTIVE-AT-LARGE EXTERNAL NICOLE GARCIA Sophomore Nicole Garcia previously worked on the programming advisory board under the former executive-atlarge external. In her new position, she will be responsible for programming campus-wide events. Garcia, who is double majoring in human and social development and psychology and minoring in business administration, said she has several ideas in mind for events students can look forward to attending next year. “I hope to keep on the tradition of keeping SG studentfocused, with things students can look forward to going to,” she said.

CHIEF OF STAFF | MIKE PIACENTINO Junior Mike Piacentino will serve as the chief of staff. He will help coordinate all internal and external appointments, which includes appointments within SG and on external boards, like the Board of Trustees. Piacentino, who is majoring in public relations and political science, hopes to further unify SG to maximize efficiency. “I think my goal is to work to make SG one organization,” he said. “If we could operate as one larger organization and be more strategic in the way we approach different projects, we’ll be much more successful.” 4

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Junior Robby Chiste previously served as the chair of Category 5. As treasurer, he will take on a larger role within SG, and will take on many tasks, including making sure funding is available to all the branches within SG that need it. He will also keep the organization financially in check. The accounting major talked about his goal for next year. “I really want to make this campus a place that is always reflective of the student voice or what the students want,” he said.

EXECUTIVE-AT-LARGE INTERNAL ALESSANDRIA SAN ROMAN Sophomore Alessandria San Roman is not a stranger to the Executive Board. Recently appointed as the executive-atlarge internal, she served as the executive secretary for the “Inspired by U” ticket. San Roman, a political science major working on minors in business law and geography, hopes to facilitate communication among SG. “I want to make sure that all the branches are aware of what each branch is doing and that they could communicate easily,” she said. “I want to make sure that everyone is aware of what is planned.”

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY LORENA GUARDIA Junior Lorena Guardia, who is majoring in human resources management, served on last year’s SG cabinet. She has worked on several projects, including a new mural project in the new Student Activities Center. As executive secretary, she will keep the Executive Board organized and put together agendas for their meetings. She also has plans to keep better records of SG’s activities. “I want to make an effort to keep records of what the E-Board is doing, what other branches are doing, and whether they’re keeping their own records,” she said. “That way, if someone 10 years down the road wants to know what SG as a whole did, they’ll be able to look back on that and see what we did.”


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Depression stigma deters effective treatment DEPRESSION FROM PAGE 1 Alyson Aylward, a pre-doctoral intern at UM’s Counseling Center, said the most noticeable symptoms include excessive sadness, loss of interest or motivation, suicidal thoughts, a change in sleep patterns and a decrease in sex drive. “It’s a big adjustment when people come to college,” she said. “There’s a lot of positive changes, but there’s also a lot of negative things that come with that.” A study performed by PsychCentral, which serves as an online independent mental health social network, found that 44 percent of college students in the United States reported feeling symptoms of depression. Similarly, the American College Health Association discovered that 30 percent of college students reported that in the past year, they have at some point felt “so depressed that it was difficult to function.” Thompson was facing big changes. Six months later when the pain hadn’t let up, her psychologist, who had diagnosed Thompson with clinical depression, suggested she see a psychiatrist, who prescribed her Zoloft. “I’ve used some of the on-campus resources, but it’s a big reason why I joined Zeta,” Thompson said. She feels the tight-knit community of Zeta Tau Alpha has helped her to regain some of her happiness and joy. Since August, 592 students have utilized UM’s Counseling Center. Of the 19.3 percent of them who have felt depressed, the majority exhibit symptoms of major depressive disorder, or major depression, according to Carolyn Cleveland, who also serves as a pre-doctoral intern at UM’s Counseling Center. These diagnoses are not unique to the UM community. Teresa Ferraro, a senior at the University of Maryland, was diagnosed with anxiety-related depression, among other disorders, at the age of 19, four years after her therapist first suspected it. At UMD, she joined the campus theater group and has since been able to overcome the majority of her depressive behaviors and thoughts. “I am [happy] now, but it definitely took me the better part of two and a half years to get here,” Ferraro said. “It took me a while to admit that I needed them because in high school there was such a stigma.”

Major depression, also called clinical depression, is marked by a depressed mood most of the day, particularly in the morning, and a loss of interest in normal activities and relationships. These symptoms are present every day for at least two weeks, according to WebMD. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students, behind accidents including drunk-driving and drug overdoses. The No. 1 cause of these suicides is undiagnosed depressive disorders, according to Suicide.org. Four out of every five young people who attempt suicide exhibit clear warning signs, and more than two-thirds of this population do not talk about their feelings. At UM, students are encouraged to talk to the psychologists and psychiatrists at the Counseling Center if they are feeling down, and to use Canes Care for Canes if they wish to anonymously alert the university of a struggling peer, Cleveland said. Aylward also suggested talking to a close friend, parent or residential assistant. Students can also schedule a same-day appointment if they are having a crisis by calling the office at 305284-5511.

FOR MORE INFORMATION If you are thinking about harming yourself or having thoughts of suicide, or if you know someone who is, seek help right away:  Call your primary doctor or mental health care provider  Call 911 or go to a hospital emergency room to get immediate help, or ask a friend or family member to help you do these things  Call your campus suicide or crisis hotline at 305-284-5511  Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) or TTY: 1-800799-4 TTY (1-800-799-4889) to talk to a trained counselor  Call your college counseling center or student health services  If you are in crisis, make sure you are not left alone  If someone else is in crisis, make sure he or she is not left alone

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OPINION UP!

How do you think society views depression?

VICTORY DANDANELL SOPHOMORE “Living here in the U.S. has taught me that people generally don’t view depression as that big of an issue since it’s your problem, not mine. Why should I help you?”

MELANIE WEINSTEIN SENIOR “We definitely need to focus on how to treat individuals who suffer from depression and realize it’s a real health disorder that needs to get real attention.”

When people get sick, they are advised to go see a doctor. When people want to lose weight, they are advised to go to a gym. However, when people are depressed, they are advised to let it pass. Society has unfairly stigmatized mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, which leads many college students to feel embarrassed about seeking help. Experiencing these emotions doesn’t make you crazy. It makes you human. Although college is said to be one of the greatest moments in our lives, many stresses come with the heavy workload and extracurricular activities. Being depressed is a legitimate mental health problem that many people suffer from. It isn’t a weakness. It isn’t something that goes away on its own, or that your friends can save you from.

Many college students are currently suffering from these mental health problems, but they are scared to tell anyone because of the negativity surrounding the disease. But, help is available. Psychologists and psychiatrists are the only professionals who can help someone suffering from any form of depression: major depression, dysthymia or bipolar disorder. If you’re suffering from persistent sadness, feelings of guilt, lack of energy, trouble concentrating, changes in appetite, trouble sleeping or fatigue – you are not alone. Mental health is just as important as physical health. Individuals need to know themselves enough to realize when something is not right. They also need to know when they’re stretching themselves too thin, which is common in college.

ISHTPREET SINGH FRESHMAN “For students who have been diagnosed as clinically depressed, I think that’s a very serious problem that often times isn’t recognized by teachers, by students, by people in general.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com.

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OPINION

Figure out what you can and cannot handle as an individual. If there comes a point in time where you cannot handle the workload or stress in your life, admit you need help and go get it. College students need to open up to the idea that depression is a mental health problem that doesn’t need to be hidden. The faster we are willing to accept the legitimacy of depression, the faster we can eliminate the stigma. We live in a society where going to therapy is looked down upon, but drinking your troubles away or popping pills isn’t. However, talking to a professional can be the safest, and most helpful, form of medicine. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

UM should defend Chartwells workers n today’s globalized world, our social relations with other people are sometimes simple and sometimes hidden and complex. You relate simply and directly to the Chartwells food service workers when you buy a sandwich or a cup of coffee at many places on campus. These workers are paid, on avSIMON EVNINE CONTRIBUTING erage, $9.50 per hour. This is well COLUMNIST below what Miami-Dade County determines is a “living wage.” For a single adult, a living wage is considered to be $12.06 per hour. Since campus food service workers are furloughed when classes are not in session and have had their hours cut back, many of them make around $10,000 a year. Your friendly food service workers on campus are paid poverty wages. To try and improve their situation, many of these workers have signified their desire to join a union. Chartwells is refusing to respect this choice. You may be asking yourselves what it has to do with UM, and hence with you. Is this not a matter between

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The Miami

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Stigma stunts healing process

I

Daniel Cepero

The Miami Hurricane

STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

compiled by

College students need to open up to the idea that depression is a mental health problem that doesn’t need to be hidden.

Chartwells and its employees alone? Well, imagine that your drain is blocked and you need a plumber. Suppose that some of those plumbers mistreat and underpay their assistants, while others do not. Will you be indifferent to witnessing an abusive relationship as they work on your sink? Or will you find a different plumber next time? As human beings, we have all sorts of views about the kind of world we wish to live in, all sorts of conceptions about moral responsibilities for fairness, justice and dignity. Why should any of these ideals disappear just because you are making an economic decision? UM believes in fairness, justice and dignity for all. These values cannot be segregated and excluded by the university because it does not employ those workers directly. The university should make known to Chartwells the value it places on allowing those who work here to pursue the legal means at their disposal to remedy, as quickly as possible, the poverty wages and other workplace problems they face. Simon Evnine is an associate professor in the Department of Philosophy.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Mariah Price PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon NEWS EDITOR Stephanie Parra OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes ASSISTANT EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez COPY CHIEF Nicky Diaz COPY EDITORS Jordan Coyne Erika Glass Ashley Martinez

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger ACCOUNT REPS Halima Dodo Kristyna Fong Jaydev Hemrajani Carlos Parra ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan DESIGNERS Ali Fishman Carlos Mella Amilynn Soto SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Rob Finn ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

WEBMASTER Kateryna Gontaruk To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2013 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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ILLUSTRATION BY ALI FISHMAN

BY HUNTER WRIGHT CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Hurricane Productions’ latest feat involves turning the Green into a utopia on Friday. The organization is hosting U-topia as its spring concert. It features two live shows, plenty of food and entertainment for a memorable night. Alternative rock band Surfer Blood and the experimental hip-hoppers of The Cool Kids are gracing the Green with their talents to pump up UM’s student body with the campus’ first outdoor concert of the year. Surfer Blood started up in West Palm Beach and includes members John Paul Pitts, Thomas Fekete, Kevin Williams and Tyler Schwarz. The group has appeared on “Late

Night with Jimmy Fallon” and are releasing their new album “Pythons��� in June 2013. The Cool Kids is comprised of Sir Michael Rocks and Chuck Inglish from Chicago and Detroit, respectively. You might know them for their hits like “Swimsuits,” “Black Mags” and “Mikey Rocks.” This combination of rock and rap offers you something you won’t find anywhere else, and VIP passes will be raffled off in the UC breezeway all week. If the two concerts aren’t enough to get you out of the dorms or out of having to pay for a taxi to the Grove, consider the lineup of international food trucks. You can grab some Latin, Asian, Italian or American cuisine to chow down on while you enjoy the entertainment.

With a huge variety of options, no matter what you’re craving, you’ll leave happy. “I’m very excited to go to U-topia,” sophomore Stefania Pinto said. “I’m looking forward to seeing the bands.” In honor of our Canes’ successes this year, there will be a huge basketball bounce house right outside the Richter Library. That’s right. No one can prohibit you from your fun just because you’re older than 12. Along with this you’ll find an LED graffiti wall, which is a flat screen that event-goers can write and illustrate their own virtual graffiti on and share it through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. LED stands for light-emitting diode, and when you add water, you get light, April 4 - April 7, 2013

art and creativity. Lastly, there will be a robo-surfer. For those of you who don’t know what that is, it’s pretty much a mechanical bull, but better. The event is not ticketed, so no lines and no waiting – a nice break from the Ultra madness earlier this month.

IF YOU GO WHAT: U-topia WHERE: The Green WHEN: 9:30 p.m. to midnight Friday Admission is free for everyone For more information on the event, visit facebook.com/hpmiami.

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PHOTO BRIEF

All around the world IT’S A SMALL WORLD: Junior Raul Velarde, a committee member of COISO, plays foosball in the Columbia tent Tuesday night. This event was the South American-themed night for International Week. The annual event hosted by COISO is a week-long celebration of cultures around the world. Booths open at 7 p.m. for students to get a taste of the different countries, and there is a performance every night at 8 p.m.

HOLLY BENSUR // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Q&A

Owel lead singer talks recording, new album BY MARLEE LISKER CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Owel is a new band breaking away from traditional sounds. The New Jersey quintet, which originally performed under the name Old Nick, released their debut album Tuesday. The band’s music has been featured in Spin Magazine’s Must Hear CD Sampler. With sounds reminiscent of Radiohead and Sigur Ros, Owel mixes striking lyrics with haunting music that goes beyond the normal, guitar-heavy sound. The group incorporates a variety of instruments, including strings, establishing an ambiance similar to that of a movie soundtrack. The Miami Hurricane caught up with lead singer Jay Sakong about how the band got together, the inspiring quality of music and his experiences producing, as well as recording, the band’s new album. The Miami Hurricane: When did you realize you wanted to pursue music? Jay Sakong: As far as I can remember, I’ve always wanted to be a musician … it sort of developed into an identity; it was like that was who I am. There was never really a doubt of whether or not I wanted to do this; 8

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it was just always a part of me. TMH: How did you guys decide to work together and start making music? JS: I met Jane [Park] when I was a little kid … we were in the same youth group. It’s funny though that years later we actually formed the band. Ryan, I knew through high school ... even though I’ve known him for so long, I’ve never played music with him because we were in two different scenes. Seamus … I met on the train on the way to school. Pat joined the band recently because our old bassist had to drop out. TMH: Was there something in particular you would cite as a turning point for forming the band? JS: I don’t know if there was a conscious decision to be a band. I think it just naturally happened that way. It’s funny because … I met Seamus on the train on the way to school. After a couple months, all we would do was talk about music. He seemed to understand the aspect of music that I loved and so, even before hearing him play, I asked him to join on guitar. I kind of jumped the gun on that one; I’m a little impulsive. [It was] the same thing with Jane … before she even played with us in the band she came to one of our shows in Brooklyn April 4 - April 7, 2013

… with her violin strapped to her back, and I was like, “You gotta join the band.” TMH: You said Seamus loved the same aspect of music that you did. What aspect is that? JS: I guess it’s not fair to say that there’s one aspect of music that I love. What draws me in more is atmospheric, textured music that can get big. Also, it’s kind of embarrassing … I love pop. I don’t think pop is a dirty word. Other people might think [our music] is this very complex, weird type of music, but I think, at the heart of it, it is pop. TMH: What was it like recording a full-length album? Did you find it to be a different experience from previous recording projects? JS: Not really because this record and the last record I produced myself. That’s actually the reason why I went to audio school … as a musician there’s always this middleman between you and your vision, and sometimes that man makes your vision better and sometimes … he doesn’t. I just wanted to cut out that middleman and just be able to do all of this myself. I remember being in earlier bands, and producers taking what I was and fitting it into the little box … of what they were used to, and I was just

never comfortable with that or satisfied with the outcome. TMH: Moving forward, where do you see the band going? JS: I just want to write more music. We’re about to put out the record soon, and I’m already writing new songs. Working at the studio, I see bands that come in with no songs and they’re like, “Okay, now it’s time to write,” and they bust out all these songs. That’s a really cool, productive way of doing it, but I just could never do that. Whenever I have an idea, I have to document it. For me, I would have to say just writing songs and being in the studio, that’s my favorite part. So yeah, just writing more songs and trying to get as many people to hear the band as possible. For more information, visit owelmAusic. com.

TO READ MORE ABOUT OWEL, CHECK OUT THE ALBUM REVIEW ONLINE AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.


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golfers who finished under par at the SDSU Farms Invitational this week in California, where the Miami women’s team placed ninth.

players from the ACC selected for the Senior All-Star Game at the Final Four this weekend, including Miami’s Durand Scott.

FITNESS Whether you’re still going strong on your New Year’s resolution, feeling fresh off spring break, or just enjoying the South Florida sun, when the calendar turns to April road race season begins. Behold, a list of five challenging races around Miami to put your training to the test this spring.

Beach Beast 5K, Fort Lauderdale Beach

A season for racing

Unleash your inner beast this Saturday at Fort Lauderdale’s Beach Beast. This 5K obstacle race along the water will call on your inner-animal. The Beach Beast is a bit on the expensive side at $79 per person, but with two or more racers, the price drops to $74 per runner. The competitive race will begin at 8:45 a.m. Also, there is a 10 percent registration discount available for students, teachers, military personnel and first responders at beachbeast.com.

Miami Mud Mingle, Miami This strictly singles-only event involves mud, mud and more mud. The all-terrain 5K race at historic Virginia Key Beach Park, set for April 20, will take mingling singles over walls, up cargo nets and across monkey bars in pursuit of a finisher’s medal, and maybe even a hot date. The added perks of all that mud? A T-shirt, a free post-race beer, a free after-party with food and music by DJ Mister Gray, and free entry with two drinks at the official Mud Mingle event held at The Hollywood Hard Rock. Runners ages 18-99 are eligible to register as an individual ($69) or as a team ($64) at mudmingle.com.

Color Mania 5K, Miami BY KRISTEN SPILLANE SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

Having Ultra withdrawals? Get your neon adrenaline fix at the Color Mania 5K at 9 a.m. April 13 at Amelia Earhart Park. This family-friendly 5K is for runners from all walks of life and all fitness levels to get out, get active and get colorful. The only rule: You must start the race wearing white and cross the finish line as a human rainbow. Registration costs $35.

SunSmart 5K, Key Biscayne Sunshine, sandy shores and sneakers are all part of the fourth annual SunSmart 5K, scheduled for April 13 at Crandon Park South on Key Biscayne. Need more reasons to register? The race is hosted by students from the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine and offers a discounted registration price ($15) for UM, FIU and Nova Southeastern students with a valid ID. Sign up by April 12 to secure your spot and discount. Visit sunsmart5k.com.

Merrell Down & Dirty Mud Run, Miami

DESIGN BY CARLOS MELLA

On May 5, the Merrell Down & Dirty Mud Run returns to Zoo Miami. Through April 14, runners can choose their mud- and obstacle-filled fate – the 5K is $65 and the 10K is just $10 more. The fast, flat course takes racers through moats and forests in and around Zoo Miami. Register as an official team with 10 or more runners to receive $5 off the entry fee. Looking for an added challenge? Try an alternative training style and race in Merrell Barefoot shoes, Vibram Five Fingers or go completely barefoot in a separate race division. First place winners in each age group/division will receive a gift certificate for Merrell Barefoot shoes. April 4 - April 7, 2013

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PHOTO BRIEF

Canes fall to Bethune-Cookman 5-3

NICHOLAS GANGEMI // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER TAKE ME OUT TO THE BALLGAME: Senior outfielder Michael Broad is greeted by his teammates after hitting a home run during Wednesday night’s game against Bethune-Cookman. The Canes lost the game 5-3.

VOLLEYBALL

Clubs set sights on gold medal, victory Teams prepare for national tournament BY KEVIN RODRIGUEZ CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

University of Miami club volleyball players are gearing up for nationals. The team will compete at the National Collegiate Volleyball Federation’s tournament in Dallas, Texas, beginning Saturday. “I’m excited about nationals,” junior Andre Abadin said. “This is the best team we’ve had since my freshman year.” At the tournament, teams compete against each other in their respective pools, and depending on how many games a team wins, it is placed into one of three divisions, Abadin said. The goal is to be in the gold division, because those teams will play for the national title, while the other two divisions, silver and bronze, are for showcase. 10

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“Nationals is the biggest tournament around the country,” said sophomore Jesus Melendez, who is inactive from the club this semester to focus on academics. “Even schools from Europe and Canada come to participate.” In 2012, the men’s team placed fifth overall, losing only two games to the University of Florida and to eventual champion UCLA in the semifinals. The women’s team has placed second in each tournament they’ve played in this year, and Miami took first place at a Florida Atlantic University tournament. “Playing in the club is great because we still get to compete without the huge commitment of playing on a varsity team,” freshman Alexandra Rios said. When asked of their expectations for nationals, Abadin and Rios said they expect both teams to compete for the championship. Men’s coach Dan Marinberg, a lawyer who played club volleyball in college, is a large factor behind the con-

tinued growth and success of the volleyball club. The club was founded at UM in the early 1980s with barely enough members to fill each position on the court. It slowly grew to more than 50 members throughout the 1990s, and has become one of the strongest club sports on campus. The UM club has also competed in tournaments at the University of Florida, Florida Atlantic University, Florida Gulf Coast University, University of South Florida and Florida State University. Usually, men and women do not participate in the same tournament, with the exception of the national competition. Current players hail from Brazil, France, Australia and all over the United States. “Volleyball is fun,” Abadin said. “It’s a great stress reliever, and you build friendships with people you don’t normally see.”


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Dear V: I am a strong woman and I don’t need no man... Dear Adjective Hoarder, , I cannot believe that somebody gonna f*** wit me that way. I ain’t workin’ no eight hours to be played by a fool. He come into my house and ask if I pay his rent because we be soul mates. No one not gonna tell me to be his soul mate and then be his ho. I ain’t nobody’s ho. What should a powerful, amazing, sexy, independent and chic girl supposed to do? Nobody Messes Wit Me

I refer to you as this because you insist on so many descriptive words to describe your refreshing, vibrant and singular personality. See how annoying being an adjective hoarder is? I actually have to give you props because you’re taking a strong stance against the fools of this world. Many in your position would whine, cry or belabor their stupid predicaments and come to me for advice about obvious situations. Normally these are the same people who feel depressed when the gluten-free section no longer carries an obscure brand of South African jumping beans. I respect everyone, but let’s face it, South African jumping beans are as stupid as the person that called you his soul mate. And I am wondering what kind of relationship involves soul mates and whores. I have standards and believe that ho is a vulgar term. My list of vulgar terms include “make it rain,” “shorty” and that scene from “Ghost” with the

dear ... ceramics and Patrick Swayze. I have to agree with you. You are right to refuse him after, I assume, he broke up with you. You don’t need to be surrounded by pathetic people. You’re a rebel without a cause, using multiple adjectives and avoiding the normal conventions of grammar and syntax. Speak the truth! Your fresh personalities needs to be fostered for philosophical and entertainment purposes. Reality television lives off this stuff. Once you lose this loser, get that hard work’s pay, grab an agent and start working the comedy scene. The easy way is to make a sex tape, but that’s only ever happened once. It only takes a few takes on “The Real World” and special appearances on the Today Show’s YouTube segment to be on your way to stardom, kid. In the words of every Hollywood schmuck in town, you’re going to be a star. So keep kicking those exs out of your apartment and never stop being your sassy self. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

Exotic and Unique Jewelry Made in South America at whole sale prices with minimum investment Call Elliot 305-653-1969

THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS HOLDING ELECTIONS! The positions of EDITOR-IN-CHIEF and BUSINESS MANAGER for the Fall 2013 semester are up for election.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS IN THE MARKET FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS, BLOGGERS, CARTOONISTS, REPORTERS AND VIDEOGRAPHERS.

Elections

SAVVY IN SALES? SALES REPRESENTATIVE POSITIONS ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE. ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT TARA AT 305-284-4401 OR TARA@ THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

will take place through the Board of Publications on Thursday, April 11 at 7:30 a.m.

HIRING HURRICANE HOODLUMS

To

apply for editorin chief, contact Bob Radziewicz at bobr@miami.edu.

ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT EDITOR@ THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

To

apply for business manager, contact Bob DuBord at rdubord@miami.edu. April 4 - April 7, 2013

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Friday, April 5 • 9:30 p.m. Foote Green Hurricane Productions at the University of Miami is proud to present UTOPIA featuring Surfer Blood and The Cool Kids performing LIVE! UTOPIA is a festival-inspired Spring concert with two live acts, a bounce house, international food trucks (in celebration of I Week with COISO), and more!

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, April 4 Patio Jams ft. Justina Handler 12:15 p.m. • UC Patio Continue your Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the sounds of Justina Handler! For more information on the event or how you can participate, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305284-4606.

RAB Pub Trivia 7 p.m. • Rathskeller Think you have what it takes to be crowned trivia champion? Well come out and enjoy an evening full of fun at Pub Trivia and win a Rat gift card! This event is brought to you by the Rathskeller Advi- sory Board. For more information please contact Hurricane Productions at 305- 284-4606. International Week: Asia Night 7 p.m. • UC Rock Come out to International Week 2013, The Kid in []_[]: Growing Up Around the World brought to you by the Council of International Students and Organizations! This year, COISO is celebrating it’s 45th anniversary and it will

be bigger and better than ever! Each night will feature a different region. The theme for this night being Asai Night! Activities will start at 7:00 PM and the stage show and performances will start at 8:00 PM. There will be FREE, delicious food, fun, activities and performances each night. Bring your friends and come out to support COISO! You won’t want to miss out!

Friday, April 5 Baseball vs Florida State 7:30 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your Men’s Baseball team as they take on our biggest rivals and ACC foes the Florida State Seminoles! Be one of the first 500 fans there and be a part of the rally towel giveaway.

Saturday, April 6 Relay for Life 9 a.m. • Foote Green Relay For Life is the largest fundraising event for the American Cancer Society. Every year at UM, students, staff, alumni, and families come together to form teams, raise money, and walk the track while enjoying entertainment, food, and fun. We celebrate can-

Next week...

Tunnel of Oppression

Monday, April 8 • 4 p.m. UC Ballrooms Tunnel of Oppression is a 3-day long, sensory-based, multimedia program designed to expose participants to various acts of oppression taking place in society today. Tours run 4-10PM on April 8-9 and 4-6 and 9-11p.m. on April 10 in the UC Ballrooms. Be sure to go through the tunnel! Its an amazing and powerful experience.

cer survivors, remember those we’ve lost, and fight back against this awful disease. UM’s Relay for Life is at the Foote Green! The theme is Famous Cities and the slogan is “There’s No Place Like Hope!”

Baseball vs Florida State 7 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your Men’s Baseball team as they take on our biggest rivals and ACC foes the Florida State Seminoles! Be one of the first 750 fans there and be a part of the team card set giveaway. CAC Presents: Mean Girls 10 p.m. • Cosford Cinema Raised in African bush country by her zoologist parents, Cady Heron thinks she knows about survival of the fittest. But the law of the jungle takes on a whole new meaning when the home-schooled 16-year-old enters public high school for the first time and encounters psychological warfare and unwritten social rules that teenage girls face today.

Sunday, April 7 Men’s Tennis vs Boston College 12 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your ‘Canes as

they take on ACC foes the Boston College Eagles!

Baseball vs Florida State 12 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your Men’s Baseball team as they take on our biggest rivals and ACC foes the Florida State Seminoles! Cosford Cinema Presents: Disconnect 6 p.m. • Cosford Cinema Explore the destructive potential of the internet in this ensemble drama starring Jason Bateman, Hope Davis, and Alexander Skarsgård. A hardworking lawyer, attached to his cell phone, can’t find the time to communicate with his family. A couple is drawn into a dangerous situation when their secrets are exposed online. A widowed ex-cop struggles to raise a mischievous son who cyber-bullies a classmate. An ambitious journalist sees a careermaking story in a teen that performs on an adult-only site. They are strangers, neighbors and colleagues and their stories collide in this riveting dramatic thriller about ordinary people struggling to connect in today’s wired world. CAC Presents: Mean Girls 8 p.m. • Cosford Cinema

CAC Presents: Pain and Gain Sneak Peek Screening

Tuesday, April 9 • 8 p.m. Cosford Cinema We told you there’d be more, and so here it is! This time its an on campus sneak of the upcoming Mark Wahlberg - Dwane Johnson flick, Pain and Gain, a full 2 weeks before you can see it in theatres! For more information on ticket distribution check out facebook. com/hpmiami.

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 12

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Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

HP Presents: UTOPIA: Surfer Blood and the Cool Kids


The Miami Hurricane - Apr. 4, 2013