Page 1

MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

1

The Miami

Vol. 88, Issue 18 | April 1 - April 7, 2010

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

In it to win it

MELANIE MAXWELL // The Associated Press

HEADED TO THE TOP: Miami players celebrate after defeating Michigan 76-59 in the semifinal round of the Women’s National Invitation Tournament.

BEAT THE HEAT MILKSHAKES BRING ALL THE FANS TO THE BALL PARK PAGE 3

CORONA AND LIME SAE AND HURRICANE PRODUCTIONS PRESENT SHWAYZE FOR FREE PAGE 11

MAKING A RACQUET INTERNATIONAL STUDENT BRINGS TALENT TO TENNIS TEAM PAGE 17

Hurricanes advance to WNIT Championship game BY LELAN LEDOUX | SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

A

s they move into their final game, it seems like the Miami Hurricane women’s basketball team saved the best for last this season. The Canes (22-13) moved on to the the NIT championship game after their 76-59 blow out against Michigan on Wednesday. Just like they have done all season, sophomore sensations Shenise Johnson and Riquna Williams led the Hurricanes. Johnson accounted for 17

points, nine rebounds, seven assists and four steals in 36 minutes of action. Williams was dynamite, she had 26 points in 28 minutes of play. Williams connected on seven three-pointers and silenced the crowd at the Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor, Mich. Head coach Katie Meier has called this her greatest season and it has been an extraordinary run for her team. “It’s such a big honor,” Meier said. “There’s really nothing to say. It’s been a great run.” SEE CHAMPIONSHIP, PAGE 16


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

2

Come together under COISO Groups offer a week of events

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY NINA RUGGIERO ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

One student organization is trying to spread a message to the university community through a week of events: when love and cultural diversity join forces, anything is possible From next Monday through Saturday, the Council of International Students and Organizations (COISO) will take over the UC Patio with its biggest annual event, International Week. COISO is the mother organization to 20 smaller international student groups on campus. This year the event will extend over five nights instead of its usual four to include Asia Night, Caribbean/Pacific Islander night, Africa/Middle Eastern night, Latin night and a new event, Unity night, to bring all of the cultures together. The theme, “For the Love of COISO,” is based on VH1 reality love television series. This year the event will extend over five nights instead of its usual four to include Asia Night, Caribbean/Pacific Islander night, Africa/Middle Eastern night, Latin night and a new event, Unity night, to bring all of the cultures together. “We want the last night to culminate the theme of people from all different backgrounds coming together for the common love of COISO,” said Valerie Valero, the organization’s secretary and I-Week Chair. The week will kick off with a Chinese dragon parade from the Hecht-Stanford bridge to the UC on Monday night. A skit will then take place centering around a person searching for love in Asia. The Caribbean/Pacific Islander night show will feature dances and a skit where someone will go island hopping in order to find a suitor.

Did you miss the Greek Showdown step stroll salute? Check out Brittney Bomnin and Mariana Zapotilova’s photo slideshow. DOMINIQUE RIOFRIO // The Miami Hurricane

MEXICAN TUNES: One of the representations of the Latin American culture in last year’s Latin American and Middle East night was the show of Mariachis, a typical music from Mexico. Junior Lisa Davis, treasurer of the Organization for Jamaican Unity (OJU) and COISO cabinet member, is in the show and is also helping with operations of the week’s other events. “I love the idea that a bunch of students can put together such an extravaganza in spite of all the obstacles involved,” Davis said. “Last year there were dancers, fire breathers, stilt walkers- it was epic. I am looking forward to doing it again.” Different cultures are matched up each year to encourage different groups to work together. “The goal is to spread awareness about the cultural diversity on UM’s campus,” Valero said. The African/Middle Eastern Night show will incorporate both cultures by telling a story of love between people of two different backgrounds. There will be belly dancing and professional performers from the Miami area in addition to stu-

dent performers. Latin Night will include Flamenco and Tango dancing as well as a salute from the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO). DJ Sage will provide music for many of the events and plenty of free international food will be given out each night. “If nothing else attracts students, this could be a whole week away from Charties,” Valero said. A banquet will be held Saturday in the School of Communication Courtyard at 6 p.m. Tickets will be sold in the Breezeway throughout the week for $15. This annual end-of-theyear dinner will celebrate the work of the advisers, administrators and members and will signify the transition to COISO’s new executive board, which was selected Tuesday evening. Nina Ruggiero may be contacted at nruggiero@themiamihurricane. com.

IF YOU GO

MONDAY Asia Night, 7 p.m. UC Patio TUESDAY Caribbean/ Pacific Islander Night, 7 p.m. UC Patio WEDNESDAY African/ Middle Eastern Night, 7 p.m. UC Patio

NEWS THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 1 - April 7, 2010

Thursday is National Census Day. Find out more from Lila Albizu.  Evan Peskin thinks you should lose the sunglasses. Read his column online. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.

THURSDAY Latin Night, 7 p.m. UC Patio FRIDAY Unity Night, 7 p.m. UC Patio SATURDAY Banquet, 6 p.m. School of Communication Courtyard

LOG ON TO THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR FOOTAGE OF I-WEEK. 2

Miami beat FAU 12-5 on Wednesday. Steven Stuts captured it in a photo slideshow.

CORRECTIONS In the March 25 cover story, Tod Landess’s name was incorrectly spelled and he was identified as faculty, not a member of the staff. Also, the group’s Web site mentioned is KozeAyiti.org.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

3

Tasty treats are a home run Advising doesn’t

mean graduating Important to have 4-year plan BY ELENA SCHMIDT CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

YUM: Former baseball player Neil Carson lets his son, Hayden, sip from his milkshake during Wednesday’s game. The Carson family attends a couple games a year and purchases shakes.

Milkshakes a staple at A-Rod park BY MICHELLE SALOM CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

At baseball games, fans always eat the traditional food that complements America’s favorite pastime. Hot dogs, peanuts and cracker jack are the typical snacks of choice. But at Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field, milkshakes are the hot commodity. Milkshake vendor Mitch Freedman has been making his delicious frozen treats at Miami Hurricane games for over 25 years. His stand, called The Home Plate Creamery, has been cooling people off longer than most of the students at UM have been alive. Battling the South Florida heat is tough, but a Freedman milkshake is just the thing to cool you down. Freshman outfielder Michael Broad is a big fan of the milkshakes. He even drinks them before games to get a boost. “Those milkshakes have been at the field for as long as I could remember,” Broad said. “When I was little I would always come to the games and have them, but now that I am a player and he is still here making them and I can enjoy them before a game is so cool.”

Freedman says that his milkshakes are the best in town because he uses only natural ingredients and does it all by hand. “We use the same mentality as Papa John’s pizza; better ingredients, better pizza,” he said. Freshman Kimmi Epstein thinks it’s worth walking all the way down San Amaro Drive just for the milkshakes. “They are so rich and taste great, probably the best I’ve ever had,” she said. Fourth-year pitcher Eric Erickson believes milkshakes could even be a recruiting tool. “Being able to have a quality milkshake from A-Rod Park is an added benefit of being a Hurricane ball player,” the southpaw said. Due to the new stadium, Freedman has had to make a few adjustments in location and appliances. According to Freedman, however, the changes have been positive. Having a good workspace and a lot of appliances that help him produce milkshakes faster has been better for business. Now his customers don’t have to wait a long time to get their shakes. Freedman said he couldn’t be happier because the new location has solved his number one problem. “People always used to have to

wait and now this location has cut down the waiting time for all my customers,” he said. Freedman could not disclose how many he sells per game but he did say the most popular flavors are chocolate and Oreo. He uses real Oreo bits, whole milk, Haagen Dazs ice cream and frozen yogurt. He said the fresher the ingredients, the better the taste. Sophomore Emily Makynen thinks these famous shakes live up to their reputation. “I would go to the baseball games and hear all about these famous milkshakes,” she said. “So finally I went and tried one and now I see what all the hype is about. They are delicious because the ingredients are so fresh.” Michelle Salom may be contacted at msalom@themiamihurricane.com.

“THE LIGHT” FAMOUS MILKSHAKES $4.50 Rag Arm Strawberry and hot sauce Jayro - Everything chocolate Omaha Express Chocolate mint

“If you’re in a course that is a prerequisite we make sure there are enough teachers,” Hererra said. “We also look at past class attendance. We look into adding classes but we also need the resources which are harder to come by with the economy.” Herrera also stresses the importance of faculty advising for students looking for direction. “Faculty are advisers are mentors; many are professors

Marian Dahman, director of senior advising, answers one main question these days: “Can I graduate?” For students who do not already come in with their degree audit form, Dahman prints it out and makes a groWEATHERING THE REGISTRATION cery list on the STORM back of the student’s remaining  Make an appointment with classes required to graduate. At your adviser. the last minute,  Check out course students at risk descriptions, capacity and times of not walking in in relation to your schedule and graduation due to registration time. a missed class or  Have a back-up plan for classes scramble classes that fill up. for a solution. “Some are upset because they think they were misadvised that have been in the industry somewhere along the way,” Dah- and can give students a better man said. “The bottom line is look at what to expect," Hererra it is incumbent upon you, the said. students, to make sure you have Since the fall of 2009, the what you need to graduate.” university has also made online Registration for fall 2010 registration available to some begins April 12, and many stu- students, though underclassmen, dents are making appointments depending on their school, may to speak with advisers before require a pin number from their choosing their classes. adviser first. Advising can be frustrating Associate Registrar Karen for students at all grade levels, Beckett said students must have which is why the student govern- several back-up options and pay ment recently drafted an advising attention to when courses are ofcompact that states expectations fered. However if a class is filled to facilitate the process. to capacity, not all hope is lost. “[The advising compact] “Registration is open all holds us both accountable and summer, so I would say to peserves as a way to continue to im- riodically check back because prove advising. Some examples people can drop and add classes would be printing and bringing throughout the summer,” she your ace to your advising ap- said. pointment [or] helping map out With spring coming to a 4-year plans,” said Lionel Moise, close, preparing for a new semesstudent government president. ter can be overwhelming. According to Luis Herrera, “You know that old saying, assistant dean of admissions in ‘it takes a village,’” Hererra said. the School of Communication, “Advising and mentoring is not and Barbro M. Vergara, director just a one-person job.” of admissions, the availability of courses that students either want Elena Schmidt may be contacted at or need to take is the primary is- eschmidt@themiamihurricane.com. sue. April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

3


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

4

4

ADVERTISEMENT THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 1 - April 7, 2010

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

5

Become engaged with Give Back Week Committing students to community service BY COLLEEN DOURNEY STAFF WRITER

Monday will kick off the first annual Give Back Week in the UC lower lounge with several events and opportunities for the University of Miami community to receive information from organizations on how to volunteer and give back to the local community. Dr. Donn Tilson’s public relations campaign class developed the idea for Give Back Week. The class based the structure of the event according to CanesFest, a major event that promotes freshmen involvement in the fall semester. Give Back Week aims to allow students, faculty and other volunteers to choose which organizations fit with their needs. Natalia Yepes, a student organizer, views the event as a historic opportunity that will offer something for everyone. “Monday through Wednesday we have themes for the organizations represented. We categorized them in this way so that each person could find their preference and give back doing something they enjoy,” Yepes said.

IF YOU GO MONDAY Social Services Agencies, 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. UC Lower Lounge TUESDAY Arts & Culture Agencies, 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. UC Lower Lounge WEDNESDAY Environmental Agencies, 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. UC Lower Lounge Give Back Week Goes Hollywood, showing of the award-winning film about fighting social injustice,“Entertaining Angels,” 6:30-9 p.m., LC 120 FRIDAY Give Back Rally, 11 a.m.- 2 p.m., the Rock

Monday will feature social service organizations like the Clinton Global Initiative which sponsored a homeless assistance center in South Miami. Arts and culture associations will get the Tuesday spot and environmentally-oriented organizations will occupy the space Wednesday. All days will last from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. The week will end in a celebration called “I’m Engaged” with food, live music and raff les at 11 a.m. Friday at the Rock. The event's message is that the "engagement" will exist between the person pledging their service and the charity they have agreed to assist. “Now, more than ever, especially with the way the economy is, charities are in desperate need of our help and we hope people will see this need and get engaged,” Tilson said. The phrase "I'm Engaged" will be printed on T-shirts that will be worn in support by President Donna Shalala, Vice President of Student Affairs Patricia Whitely and Sebastian the Ibis, as well as all who participate. Tilson’s senior-level class is working in cooperation with the William R. Butler Center for Volunteer Service and Leadership Development to not only use this event to strengthen their portfolios, but also to leave a legacy behind after they graduate from UM. “For such a long time, it’s not been the easiest situation to find out about volunteer programs," Yepes said. "Now, we’re hoping to provide a chance for students to find out about how they can help at one time in one location." According to Tilson, the goals of the week extend beyond the booths set up in the UC. “It is our intention that students and teachers all over campus will start thinking of other ways they can give back," Tilson said. "During this week we hope that teachers from all disciplines will get students talking about ways to give back. For instance, architecture students might consider designing and building homes for Habitat for Humanity." After people start discussing ways they can help the community, Tilson believes that the actions of his class will serve as a Give Back Week blueprint for many years to come.

Poetry in motion

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

REPRESENT!: Sophomore Jonathan Hoffman performs at “Greek Showdown” Monday night. Sigma Lambda Gamma and Lambda Theta Alpha put together the event which allowed its participants to showcase their organizations’ respective step, stroll and salute. A “stroll off” is dancing synced with music, while a salute is poetry in motion; each show portrayed a different tradition. This philanthropic event raised money from each of the participants involved while bringing together for the first time the collaborative efforts of Sigma Lambda Gamma and Lambda Theta Alpha. The winners of the competition were the brothers of Sigma Lambda Beta fraternity.

LOG ON TO THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM TO VIEW A PHOTO SLIDESHOW FROM THE EVENT.

Colleen Dourney may be contacted at cdourney@themiamihurricane.com. April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

5


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

6

NEWS BRIEFS WANT TO BREAK INTO THE MOVIE INDUSTRY?

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY WEEK FINALE

Charles Vignola, director of development for Jerry Bruckheimer Films and a 1988 University of Miami graduate, will visit the Coral Gables campus on Tues., April 6, from 11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in LC room 230. The event will be open to everyone in the university community.

On Thursday, the UM Honor Council will conclude their Academic Integrity week with a cake cutting and tabling in the breezeway. Applications to take part in the council will be distributed in the breezeway.

Jerry Bruckheimer has produced major movie titles such as “National Treasure: Book of Secrets,”“Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” and the upcoming “Prince of Persia: Sands of Time.”

6

NEWS THE MIAMI HURRICANE

The week, which is meant to raise awareness of the Honor Council and academic standards at the university, invites students to catch up on some advice to ensure a clean academic record

April 1 - April 7, 2010

from the university.

Center.

Overlapping with International Week is the council’s book, food and supply drive, being collected in the UC Breezeway and the Butler Center for Service and Leadership, UC 224, until April 12. All proceeds with will be sent to the South Miami-Dade Center for the Homeless.

The annual event is held by the Committee on Student Organizations to recognize organizations for all the hard work conducted throughout the academic year. The theme this year is “SOARing to the Top: Awarding the Best of the Best in Student Organizations.”

NOMINATE FOR SOAR

All nominations are due Fri., April 2 by midnight. E-mail coso_arc@miami.edu with questions.

The Student Organization Achievement and Recognition (SOAR) awards ceremony is being held on April 21 at 6 p.m. at the UM Fieldhouse next to the BankUnited

Compiled by Ramon Galiana who may be contacted at rgaliana@themiamihurricane. com.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

7

Practice makes perfect iN SYNC: Sophomore Peter Cianelly rehearses with the Jazz Vocal Ensemble of the Frost Music School. Just a week before their performance in Gusman Hall, the members ran through three of their songs in an effort to perfect their routines. “I’m a little nervous, but we’ll definitely pull together, we always do,” junior Julia Keefe said. The vocal ensemble class is required for all jazz vocal majors, and they have been practicing all semester for this performance, which will take place Thursday evening at 8 p.m. in the concert hall. Each semester, the music school puts on a performance and freshman Elvin Negron is not worried for this show at all. “Last semester’s went well so this one will hopefully go as well or better,” he said. CAYLA NIMMO // The Miami Hurricane

The Miami Hurricane is holding Elections! The positions of Editor In Chief and Business Manager for the Fall 2010 semester are up for election. Elections will take place through the Board of Publications on Tuesday, Apr. 13 at 7:30 am. Applications are due Apr. 6. To apply for Editor In Chief, contact Bob Radziewicz at: bobr@miami.edu. To apply for Business Manager, contact Bob DuBord at: rdubord@miami.edu.

April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

7


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

8

OPINION STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

UP!

If you could bring any musician back to life, who would it be?

LUIS MONTOYA Junior “Miles Davis.”

California has a right to legalize marijuana Forget about the negative persona marijuana received in the 1936 movie “Reefer Madness.” Dismiss those articles debating the social implications of weed, (including those that have appeared in this newspaper for the past few issues.) For pro-reefer residents of California, now it’s all about cash. In California’s November ballots, a voter initiative will be presented that, if passed, would make possession and sale of marijuana legal. The taxing of this drug could raise almost $1.4 billion advocates say. Currently, national groups are raising money on the internet, asking donors to give $4.20 at a time to pass this bill. Over 56 percent of Californians support this legislation and this issue will affect the gubernatorial race. However, opponents of this bill are holding onto the negative perception of the

drug, such as being the cause of increasing tardiness and absenteeism. But what is worse, taking a moral stance on a recreational drug that is less addictive than nicotine or California paying its vendors with 29,000 IOUs totaling $53 million? From a simple economic standpoint the answer is obvious: legalize it. Just take a look at Greece. In an article titled “State Debt Woes Grow Too Big to Camouflage,” The New York Times compared California’s situation to this bankrupt country. The similarities, among others, included both having unbalanced budgets and public workers whose benefits are getting harder to pay. In addition to being a money source, legalizing marijuana would also cut cost. The illegal status of the drug has lead to an underground economy that law enforce-

ment spends millions fighting against with few results. The trend toward legalization is appropriate. Since 1996, 14 states have legalized marijuana for medical use. In other states, the use of the drug by anyone has been decriminalized. The ability to decide if marijuana is appropriate for the people of California should be decided by its state government. In reality, the legalization of weed will probably not increase the amount of pot heads in California. The evidence? Just look at prohibition, if people really want to do something, they will find a way around the barriers. If so, the state of California might as well be getting their cut from it. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial staff.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR ELISE CATALDO Sophomore

A Cane till the end

“Freddie Mercury.”

LAWRENCE LAMONDIN Sophomore “Lil Wayne!”

On Tuesday, a true Hurricane passed away. Words cannot describe the pain I feel, but I believe that his story must be told. For a moment, we should remember Steven Guarin. I met Steven when I was 11 years old and he quickly became the most popular kid in our grade. Throughout middle and high school, he was the class clown and the life of our class. His humor was infectious and his talent for music made him stand out even more. About two years ago, he was diagnosed with lymphoma. Last June he was

on the brink of death, but a treatment administered by our very own Miller School of Medicine helped vanquish his disease and brought new life into Steven, who was then 21. After this miraculous recovery he became the Hurricanes’ number one fan. I watched as he transferred into UM, personally met with Shalala, attended every single football game he could and truly savored every minute he thought he would never see. He was always so positive, so thankful for the life that was given back to him.

About a month ago, the cancer came back and he began his fight all over again. I’m heartbroken to say that he passed away this morning, exactly one week after his 22nd birthday. Today, I want to remember someone who fought so hard, someone who truly left a mark not only in my life but in countless others. Someone who saw the positive in everything, even as his own life slipped away. Rest in peace, my friend. Natalia Yepes is a senior majoring in public relations and international studies. She may be contacted at nyepes@themiamihurricane.com.

POLL RESULTS: Should employers use Facebook as a way to judge potential employees?

No

Yes

I hope not

44%

40%

16%

SARI LIBBIN Freshman “Elvis Presley.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. compiled by

Total Voters: 70

Kyli Singh

8

OPINION

WHAT’S YOUR STANCE ON ORGAN DONATION? TAKE OUR POLL AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 1 - April 7, 2010


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

9

Like anyone else who has looked at the actual provisions of the bill, I’m at a loss to explain what’s behind all the imaginative distortions and terroristic violence. - Tony Paretes, Contributing Columnist

The Miami

HURRICANE

Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

Keep democracy alive, get involved

F

or this first ever opinion piece on behalf of the UM Young and College Democrats, I initially debated whether to deal with the hot topic of the just-passed health care reform bill TONY PARETES CONTRIBUTING or to simply give an COLUMNIST overview of why you, as a student, should pay attention to politics and join our organization. Luckily, I’ve realized it’s impossible not to do both at once. The passage of this bill, which eliminates the danger of Americans having their policies cancelled after getting sick or being denied coverage due to pre-existing conditions and which the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office calculates will save the country an enormous amount of money, has inexplicably

NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404. EDITOR IN CHIEF Chelsea Matiash

managed to elicit from many Republicans the kind of anger typically reserved for the most disgusting criminals. Congressmen who voted to save American lives while reducing the budget deficit have been spit on, called vile racist and homophobic names and have received death threats. Bricks were thrown through the windows of several Congressional offices and the home of one member’s family was even vandalized after the address was posted on the internet. So why are some reacting this way to such a positive step for our country? The unfortunate truth is that Republican politicians and talk show hosts have convinced a large number of people that a bill regulating private insurance companies, just like the government currently regulates food or transportation safety, is an unprecedented “government takeover” and the first clear sign of communist dictatorship. Like anyone else who has looked at the actual provisions of the bill, I’m at a loss to ex-

plain what’s behind all the imaginative distortions and terroristic violence. But we don’t need to explain it to fight it; if you realize the only way for our country to survive is through peaceful, honest debate, even if you have never paid much attention to politics before, I urge you to do two very simple but important things to keep the ideals of democracy alive: 1.) Start supporting Kendrick Meek, the only Democrat running for the open Florida U.S. Senate seat in November. Go to kendrickmeek.com, and donate or volunteer. 2.) Come to our meetings! We’ll be focused on the Meek campaign for the next few months, but I promise we do a lot of other cool things as well. Come by LC180 on Tuesday, to see what we’re all about. Hope to see you there!

MANAGING EDITOR Christina De Nicola

Tony Parets is a second-year law student at the University of Miami. He may be contacted at tparets@themiamihurricane.com

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Lindsay Brown

Cartoonsbymatt.com

BUSINESS MANAGER Jessica Jurick WEBMASTER Brian Schlansky COPY CHIEF Laura Edwins

ART DIRECTOR Felipe Lobon

COPY EDITORS Amanda Gomez Alexa Lopez Kyli Singh

NEWS EDITOR Ramon Galiana PHOTO EDITOR Brittney Bomnin

ADVERTISING EDITOR Emma Cason-Pratt

SPORTS EDITOR Justin Antweil

PUBLIC RELATIONS Jacob Crows

EDGE EDITOR Danielle Kaslow

ADMINISTRATOR ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

OPINION EDITOR Ed S. Fishman ONLINE EDITOR Megan Terilli ASST. NEWS EDITORS Lila Albizu Nina Ruggiero ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Calvin Cestari

ACCOUNT REPS Shoshana Gottesman Misha Mayeur Katie Norwood Brian Schuman Jack Whaley GRADUATE ASSISTANT Nick Maslow

DESIGNERS Allison Goodman Demi Rafuls

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2010 University of Miami

Don’t forget to voice your own opinion and vote for

The Best of Miami according to you!

Go to THEMIAMIHURRICANE. COM and let us know what you think.

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

MATT ROSEN // The Miami Hurricane

April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

OPINION

9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

10

10

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 1 - April 7, 2010

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

11

edge

Celebrate Easter like you did as a kid. Check out the “Kiddie Bunny Bash” Saturday from noon until 4 p.m. at America’s Backyard in Fort Lauderdale.

Buzzin’ to BY CLAUDIA AGUIRRE CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Sigma Alpha Epsilon is about to do it again, this time by bringing Shwayze to the University of Miami for their third annual Paddy Murphy Benefit Concert. Shwayze, famous for their hit single “Corona and Lime,” will be performing Thursday night at the UC Patio. Marking the beginning of SAE’s Paddy Murphy Week, the concert will benefit their philanthropy, the Children’s Miracle Network. With Grind Mode (“I’m So High”) opening the act at 8 p.m., this year’s show promises to be the biggest of them all. “The fact that we put on a concert each year that is fun but at the same time helps such a great cause really sets a good example for our fraternity,” said Matt Baren, SAE’s Paddy Murphy Chairman. “Fraternities are not all about beer and sports, we pride ourselves on our contributions to the community.” All donations will benefit the Children’s Miracle Network, a non-profit organization that raises funds for more than 170 children’s hospitals. Donations to the institute are put toward medical care, research and education, all promoting the improvement of children’s lives. Students will be able to give donations to the Children’s Miracle Network tonight as they enter the UC patio. Additionally, throughout the event, SAE brothers and pledges will circulate with donation buckets for any additional contributions students are willing to make toward the cause. Last year, the Ying Yang Twins’ performance raised about $2,500, bringing the grand total of SAE’s donation to the Children’s Miracle Network to $11,000. This donation surpassed the 300 other SAE chapters around the country; with the help of the attending community, SAE hopes to top last year. “It’s a great way for everyone on campus to get involved without even noticing and still support a great cause,” freshman Daniella Anderson said. This year, SAE was able to attain a higher budget to hire a more widelyknown artist in the hopes of attracting even more students to the event. After months of hard work, SAE Vice Presi-

d Micchael hael e Eisenstein Eisen isen dentt Michael and Hurricane Productions’ Phil Muellerschoen are happy to see their efforts come to fruition. “Going back and forth getting contracts signed and approved for both Shwayze and the opening artist Grind Mode has been busy work,” Eisenstein said. “However, it will all definitely be worth it in the end.” Claudia Aguirre may be contacted at caguirre@ themiamihurricane. com.

IF YOU GO WHAT: SAE and HP present Shwayze featuring Grind Mode to benefit the Children’s Miracle Network WHERE: University Center Patio WHEN: Thursday at 8 p.m. COST: Free admission, donations accepted COURTESY MOODSWING360S

April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

EDGE

11


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

12

From club promoting to entrepreneurship BY NICOLETTE ROQUE SENIOR EDGE WRITER

For University of Miami juniors Nikolay Nedyalkov and Jordan Weinkle, organizing a sold-out nightclub event on the weekend of Ultra, Miami’s largest music festival, is all in a day’s work. Featuring a DJ set by Passion Pit, UM student Troy Kurtz and Pirate Stereo, Nedyalkov and Weinkle’s “WMC Safe House” event in Miami’s downtown strip Saturday was a highly successful event. With more than 750 guests in attendance, including press, celebrities and general admission, the eventplanning power duo earned their stripes in the local entertainment industry. “It was our first big event, so we tried to not shoot too high, so we aimed for about 500 guests,” said Nedyalkov, a double major in management and Spanish. “On the same day, our online sales rocketed and we had about 100 more guests. We had previews written in more than four newspapers, so it was heavily marketed.” With proximity to Ultra and ticket prices as low as $20, their competitive advantages earned the duo a sizeable turnout and unanimously positive reviews in “The Miami New Times” and “Yelp.” But how exactly did these two make their names in the event planning industry at such a young age? The answer: networking. Working as a club promoter since high school, Miami native Weinkle built up his reputa-

12

EDGE

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

tion in the nightlife scene early. “I went to high school in Miami, and when I got into college I realized there was a much higher demand for event promotion,” said Weinkle, a marketing major with law aspirations. “At one point, I was doing seven to eight parties a week with 15 promoters working for me at a given time. That’s how we created our reputation.” Though Weinkle himself began the duo’s working group, Legion Entertainment, at the age of 18, he and Nedyalkov now consider the trademark to be a business partnership in event and concert planning. “It started as a promotion company with clubs like Mokai, Set, Mynt, Cameo, etc.,” Weinkle said. “Then we got into event production, and now we’re doing marketing, advertising, design and talent booking.” The business partners, who became fast friends as soon as they met, consider the success of the “WMC Safe House” only a first in their careers. Working on more cost-efficient business models, managing seven full-time employees and several part-timers, Legion Entertainment has intentions of growing bigger and better- after dedicating some time to schoolwork, of course. “We’re trying to be more entrepreneurial than other people,” Nedyalkov said. “Our goal is to be successful, but we also want to be our own bosses.” Nicolette Roque may be contacted at nroque@ themiamihurricane.com.

April 1 - April 7, 2010

COURTESY JORDAN WEINKLE

EARNING THEIR STRIPES: Juniors Jordan Weinkle and Nikolay Nedyalkov planned a successful event.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

13

‘The Bounty Hunter’ fails to capture chemistry

COURTESY SONY PICTURES

BY DAVID SARGENT CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

“The Bounty Hunter” is another example of how two famous actors costarring in a movie (Jennifer Aniston and Gerard Butler, in this case) doesn't always ensure a big success. Despite Aniston’s reliable charm, she and Butler fail to show any real chemistry. The film begins with Nicole (Aniston), a news reporter and Milo (Butler), a former cop turned bounty hunter, as a divorced couple who find themselves unexpectedly reunited when Milo is assigned to bring Nicole to jail. While scooping a murder cover-up, she fails to show up to traffic court. The relational tension quickly mounts in their initial exchange. He handcuffs her and throws her into his car, but then she doesn’t really seem too upset. To keep things rolling, Nicole and Milo have to elude a handful of thugs and solve her murder case before they can realize that they’re meant to irritate each other as a married couple again. Furthering the audience’s disappointment, the violence from some of the characters is a little disconcerting and adds a bitter cynicism to the comedy. While their initial interactions are funny at points, both actors never really get close to exploring the complex and deep love/hate emotions that would presumably (and in this case hopefully) accompany such a situation. They just banter back and forth from a mutual and unshakable nonchalant annoyance that endures encounters with tasers, car crashes, kidnappings and shootouts.

Perhaps Aniston, who seems as though she could employ some kind of personal alliance to this role in light of her divorce with Brad Pitt in 2005, chose to play up the strong and guarded side of her character too much. Only a handful of moments- a smile she gives Milo and some nostalgic tears over seeing their honeymoon cabin- remind the audience that she actually cares for her ex. Butler did the same thing. In his attempt to play up a defensive tough masculine front, hiding Milo’s presumed true love, he is a little too brutish with too few moments of affection. This creates nothing more than a f leeting suspicion that he may still care for his exwife. The two stars missed each other. The question of their relationship’s future remains up in the air until the very end. It’s just that by that point, it’s hard to really care. David Sargent may be contacted at dsargent@themiamihurricane.com.

The Bounty Hunter

Starring: Jennifer Aniston and Gerard Butler Directed By: Andy Tennant MPAA Rating: PG-13

April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

EDGE

13


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

14

Holly Miranda’s debut album makes ‘Waves’ BY NICOLETTE ROQUE SENIOR EDGE WRITER

Add one part Feist and two parts Cat Power to imagine the airy folk vocals and minimalist sound of Holly Miranda’s debut studio album, “The Magician’s Private Library.” Miranda, who has toured with bands Nada Surf, The XX, The Antlers and Friendly Fires, is currently touring with Canadian folk duo Tegan & Sara to promote her album’s recent release. “The Magician’s Private Library” is the kind of CD you need when you’ve reached rock bottom, when the aching has numbed you down and when getting out of bed seems unfeasible. It’s the beauty in the breakdown, the morning you know you’re over it: pastel colors and Montauk. If the adjectives “dreamy” and “whimsical” are not revealing enough, the album’s single, “Waves,” is an enjoyable forecast of the rest. Her lyrics, focusing on themes like love, dreams and journeys, are supplemented with ambitious synths, strings and beats to create a definitive sound. Other songs, like “Joints” and “No One Just Is,” give listeners a darker complement to the rest of the upbeat, informal tracks. The contrast between nonchalant and enigmatic gives “The Magician’s Private Library” a surprisingly polished finish for a debut album.

COURTESY OF XL RECORDS

14

EDGE

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 1 - April 7, 2010

Nicolette Roque may be contacted at nroque@ themiamihurricane.com.

COURTESY XL RECORDS


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

15

SPORTS

33

number of points for Shenise Johnson last Sunday against Providence. It was a career high.

5

only five losses for the UM baseball team all-time against Wake Forest in 24 games played.

BASEBALL

Canes rally midweek to beat Owls 12-5 Miami finds offense in time for Wake Forest BY CHRISTINA DE NICOLA MANAGING EDITOR

In midweek losses to Fordham and Central Florida in consecutive weeks, the baseball team scored just six runs. On Wednesday night at Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field, there was no shortage of power as the 15th-ranked Hurricanes rallied from an early deficit to beat Florida Atlantic 12-5. The entire lineup had at least one hit and five batters collected multiple hits and RBI. As a team, the Canes (17-7) notched 16 hits and scored in five straight innings. “I kind of challenged them,” head coach Jim Morris said. “I said I wanted 10 runs today. You guys are good enough to do that. I want to see you guys get after it and reach back and get it done.” Things started well for FAU (15-9) as freshman right-hander R.J. Alvarez pitched three scoreless innings. But trailing 3-1 in the fourth, the Hurricanes responded with eight unanswered runs. Junior right-hander Taylor Everist (2-5) failed to get an out and faced four batters after surrendering three runs on two homers, including junior left fielder Chris Pelaez’s two-run shot. “You get those runs when you’re down and it definitely changes the momentum,” Pelaez said. “Everybody’s up and we just took off from there as a team.” Freshman left-hander Steven Ewing struggled in his third straight outing as he allowed three runs on five hits and three walks in just 2.1 innings. “Steve’s got to throw better if he wants to stay in the rotation,” Morris said. “That’s the reason why we’re giving some other guys a chance to throw too.” After striking out the first batter of the game, Ewing gave up a single, walk and two-run double to junior first baseman Dan Scheffler. That was just the beginning of Ewing’s trouble. When he allowed a double, single, walk and then hit a batter, he was pulled

STEVEN STUTS // The Miami Hurricane

HE’S IN THERE SAFE: Freshman center fielder Zeke DeVoss slides safely into third base against the Florida Atlantic Owls on Wednesday night at Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field. The Hurricanes went on to win the game 12-5. from the game with the bases loaded. Freshman right-hander E.J. Encinosa (1-0) struck out the next two batters and earned his first collegiate victory by pitching 3.2 scoreless innings. “I want to go in there and throw strikes and give our defense a chance to turn a double play or something,” Encinosa said. Miami has now won seven of nine heading into a three-game home weekend series against Wake Forest (9-17, 2-7). “The last two weeks we haven’t played good in the middle of the week,” Morris said. “Midweek games are just as important. They’re a young club and they’ve got to understand that.”

MATCHUPS: MIAMI VS. WAKE FOREST POSITION

ADVANTAGE

POSITION

Starting Pitching

Infield

Bullpen

Outfield

Catcher

Intangibles

ADVANTAGE

David Furones may be contacted at dfurones@themiamihurricane.com.

Christina De Nicola may be contacted at cdenicola@themiamihurricane.com.

LOG ON TO THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR DAVID FURONES’ ANALYSIS OF EACH POSITION.

April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

15


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

16

CHAMPIONSHIP FROM PAGE 1 Leading 37-33 at halftime, the Hurricanes dominated the Wolverines even more after they took the court in the second half. The Hurricanes connected on 16-for-34 from the field and shot from the three-point land 45 percent of the time. The defense was stifling as the Canes held Michigan to nine shots in the second half. Miami out scored Michigan 39-26. Senior Charmaine Clark had all of her 10 points in the second half and collected 10 rebounds as well. For the game, Michigan was held to 39 percent shooting and just 23 percent from beyond the arc. From the moment Williams came off the bench, she was a spark. Miami out scored Michigan’s bench 34 to 12 and out-rebounded the Wolverine’s 45-36. Miami has had plenty of dilemmas this season. The Canes lost 11 ACC games and total of 13 losses. Now, the Canes are in the NIT Championship game and the only ACC team still playing.

16

SPORTS

“We could have folded a long time ago,” Meier said. “We had some tough losses. But these girls have taken advantage of being able to rewrite the script. It’s been beautiful.” Throughout the NIT, Johnson and Williams have carried the Canes, who had never won two postseason games in the same season before this incredible run. The duo combined for 57 of the team’s 73 points against Providence in the semifinals. Johnson scored a career-high 33 points and had 10 rebounds and Williams accounted for 24 points off the bench. The two combined for 11-for-16 in the first half while the rest of the team was 0-for-13 from the field. Meier has guided the Canes to their ninth 20-win season in program history and the first since the 2003-2004 season when the Canes advanced to the NCAA Tournament. Miami will play the winner of California and Illinois State who square off Thursday at 7:05 CST. Lelan LeDoux may be contacted at lledoux@themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

MARISSA MCCLAIN// Daily

JUMP SHOT: Michigan guard Veronica Hicks (3) reaches for the basket in the 75-59 loss to Miami at Crisler Arena in Ann Arbor on Wednesday. The Canes move on to the NIT Championships.

April 1 - April 7, 2010


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

17

MEN’S TENNIS PROFILE

A professional in Germany, a Cane in the United States Bringing experience to the tennis court BY CHRISTINA DE NICOLA MANAGING EDITOR

Junior Christian Blocker wakes up in his apartment to the sound of the ocean every day. It’s a far cry from the mountains of his hometown in Hamburg, Germany. “I live right on the water, which is probably the greatest thing in the world,” he said. Blocker is one of eight international players on the University of Miami men’s tennis team. The accounting and finance major first visited the United States at the age of 12 when his family vacationed near Tampa. Soon after, he traveled with the German Federation to international tournaments and learned to book his own hotel, locate practice courts and eat healthy. “I think it’s a great experience to be self-reliant at a really young age, especially because at those tournaments you have to take care of your own stuff,” Blocker said. “At an early age, you act professional.” That’s what he did for a year and a half out of high school until he decided to continue his studies in Miami. Now 24 years old, the AllACC Men’s Tennis Academic Team member enjoys the difference between college tennis and the pros. “Tennis is an individual sport usually,” Blocker said. “Here we have a team that plays together all year and we practice together every day. Tennis isn’t really a team sport, but it’s made into one, which is a great thing.”

RACHEL STEINHAUSER // The Miami Hurricane

POISED FOR GREATNESS: Junior Christian Blocker moved to Miami from Hamburg German, where he played tennis professionally with the German Federation. At UM, Blocker is just one of many international students that make up the men’s tennis team. In terms of playing style, he said that the hard court surface is the main difference. “Here in Florida you play all around on hard court,” Blocker said. “The style isn’t really different, just the environments you play in are pretty tough. You play away and then you have to fight against your opponent and the crowd.” Since his family in Germany

has yet to attend his college tennis matches at the Neil Schiff Tennis Center, Blocker updates relatives via Skype calls. It’s an experience that his head coach, Mario Rincon, can relate to. A native of Colombia, Rincon played tennis at the University of Kentucky. “Being away from my family was very hard,” Rincon

NO. 30 WISCONSIN 4, NO. 51 MIAMI 3 SINGLES

DOUBLES

1. Michalicka def. Blocker (UM) 6-4, 6-1 2. Baumann def. Sundberg (UM) 6-3, 6-4 3. Pohlmann def. Crowley (UM) 6-4, 6-1 4. Simon (UM) def. Bertha 6-3, 7-5 5. Chin (UM) def. Freeman 4-6, 6-2, 6-4 6. Martin def. Taboada (UM) 6-4, 6-4

1. Blocker/Simon (UM) def. Baumann/ Michalicka (WIS) 8-5 2. Crowley/Nieto (UM) def. RassowKantor/Dierberger (WIS) 8-4 3. Sundberg/Carrega (UM) def. Pohlmann/Bertha (WIS) 8-7 (7-3)

said. “Nowadays when the kids get homesick, they get on their BlackBerrys. I remember calling home would cost me $12 for three minutes, so I wrote a lot of letters.” Of the top 125 singles players in the latest Intercollegiate Tennis Association poll, 79 are international, including Blocker’s Norwegian teammate, junior Carl Sundberg. Sundberg, who is ranked No. 90, believes that having an international team is advantageous. “I think it works out pretty well. You see how it is with different cultures and languages,” Sundberg said. “We have a couple of Americans. We just need one from Australia now.” Sophomore Ignacio Taboada is one of the Americans and appreciates his opportunity. “I think it’s an important role for me with the fact this program has been pretty good over the years but hasn’t had really good Americans April 1 - April 7, 2010

come through,” he said. “For me to represent is very important.” Blocker admits that his teammates have turned him into an American football fan. He now follows the Miami Dolphins and Miami Hurricanes. “When I came here I never thought I’d ever be interested in football because we just don’t have it,” he said. “Now I actually got really into it.” With a little over a year until graduation, Blocker intends to take his time in deciding whether he wants to try professional tennis again. “I definitely want to do my master’s in either accounting or business,” he said. “I really like South Florida so I’m probably just going to stay here and hope that I get a good job.” Christina De Nicola may be contacted at cdenicola@themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

17


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

18

COMMENTARY

Why coaches sometimes get a bad rap from the media A head coach’s main responsibility is to maximize all the talent on his or her team. He or she also scouts the opposing team, organizes a staff that makes sure each player knows his or her responsibility and JUSTIN ANTWEIL sometimes even calls SPORTS EDITOR the plays. The head coach is also the face of the team and is the voice of reason if something goes wrong or the sound bite if something goes well. After all, the media is the bridge that connects the team to the fans. Fans do not have the access that members of the media do, so it’s the media’s job to accurately portray what goes on at practices, games and other news and notes surrounding the specific squad. I have been covering various athletic programs at the University of Miami for over two and half years with WVUM radio and with The Miami Hurricane. I have learned that some coaches love the spotlight and others despise it.

18

SPORTS

Fifth-year women’s basketball coach Katie Meier and 17th-year head baseball coach Jim Morris are extremely media savvy and are not afraid to speak their minds and speak the truth. She is a quote machine and gives long and elaborate answers to even the simplest questions. In fact, she sometimes even uses too much detail in her answer when she speaks in basketball terminology. For example, when I asked her after the WNIT quarterfinals game why the team’s perimeter defense was so good against Providence, she responded with a detailed answer instead of just saying ‘we executed well.’ “We defended the umbrella well,” said Meier in reference to the umbrella as the perimeter and arc that makes up the three-point line. This is music to a reporter’s ears. Meier is also one to never make excuses. Morris is the same way. Morris is humbled and appreciative of reporters electing to cover his team. I once asked him who the Friday night starter would be and he went on to tell me who all three weekend starters are. He is not afraid to discuss injuries and the practices are open to the public. He’s not afraid to say his team was not mentally prepared if the team loses a mid-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 1 - April 7, 2010

week game. Sure, Morris has been around the longest and maybe that’s why he is so comfortable around the press. Or maybe he just gets it. Then, there is the antithesis which is fourth-year football head coach Randy Shannon. Shannon clearly finds dealing with the media a nuisance and gives cliché answers. He refuses to discuss injuries or depth charts. He will not even comment on specific plays after a game until he sees film the next day. Practices are closed to the public and media members are only allowed to attend the first 15 minutes to watch the team stretch and capture b-roll. Shannon leaves reporters’ notebooks as dry as a bone. They have nothing to work with. A couple of weeks ago I attended a Shannon press conference at Greentree Practice Field along with various other South Florida media members. I wanted to get a pulse on how the football team was doing this spring. I asked a question that aggravated Shannon and caused a public verbal disagreement between him and me. The question centered on the status of a backup player. Shannon was unhappy

with the way I phrased the question. After the media question-and-answer session was over he told me, “I’m sorry, but I hope you understand what I’m saying.” I told him I didn’t and he had no reason to get mad. I didn’t ask about an injury, a scholarship or his contact situation. It was a simple question about a player trying to work his way into the starting rotation. After speaking to me in private after the conference, his attempted apology turned into a journalism lesson because he told me the way I should have asked the question. As you can see, coaches have different philosophies of handling the press. Some are more conversational than others while others would rather be secluded and keep their thoughts to themselves. Media members are not supposed to be friends with the people they cover. Their job is strictly to report the facts. But if anyone wants the benefit of the doubt, then treating the media with respect and kindness is the way to go. Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@ themiamihurricane.com.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

19

dear ...

Dear V: I have some fear ‘cause the camera’s here...

, Dear V, I have been with my boyfriend for nearly three years. I love and trust him, but we have one squabble in the bedroom: he wants to film us having sex. He promises he’ll give the only copy to me. But I feel pretty uncomfortable about it. He says it will be incredibly erotic and that I should loosen up. What should I do? Sincerely, Camera Shy Dear Camera Shy, This is definitely something to be cautious about. He can assure you that you’ll have the only copy, but how can you really be so positive? If there’s even a chance that he could keep another copy for himself, you

could be in for big trouble down the road. Yes, he may just watch it for personal use, but what if you all have a terrible break up and his bitterness gets the best of him? You can never be sure what will happen to that video and you sure as hell don’t want to end up like Paris Hilton. I’m sure you two have a great sex life but no one besides you needs to see it. Being cautious about your privacy isn’t the only issue here. Having sex with someone you love is a private, personal experience and it’s understandable that you don’t want to risk it being publicized. Your boyfriend should respect that you don’t share all the same urges as he does. I’m sure he doesn’t go to every chick flick you want to see and you shouldn’t feel pressured to do everything he wants either. Filming acts in the bedroom is not as common as he makes it sound by telling you to “loosen up.” It’s not as though every other couple on the planet is going crazy with their video cameras, documenting every sexual escapade.

If you eventually feel comfortable enough to make your own personal sexumentary, there is nothing wrong with that. Just make it very clear to your boyfriend how important it is to you that it be kept absolutely private and make sure he keeps his word on giving you the only copy. Another alternative is to compromise and give him another option that allows for a similar viewing experience. Try getting more mirrors for your bedroom, even place one on the ceiling above your bed. This will give you both a 360 degree view of each other in the act, much like a movie. Best part is, this movie has VIP admission, for you and your boyfriend’s eyes only. Good luck, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane. com.

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

RENTALS BEST LOCATIONS, BEST PROPERTIES IN THE HEART OF SOUTH MIAMI OR CORAL GABLES WALK, DRIVE OR METRO TO UM 1,2 AND 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS UM DISCOUNTS, GREAT VALUE VISIT SOUTHMIAMIRENTALS.COM CALL Shirley at 305-666-1549

ELECTRIC SCOOTER No insurance/registration needed. Inexpensive to own & operate assembled/delivery/ guaranty. American Electric Scooter Co www. greenscootersoncampus.com

BARTENDERS WANTED! UP TO $250 A DAY NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Training Provided. Age 18+ OK 800-965-6520 ext 166

NEW MEMBERS WANTED!

No equipment, partner, or experience required! Open Gym Tues: 8:30-11 PM, Fri: 8-11 PM, Sun 1-4 PM University Wellness Center-Centre Court

April 1 - April 7, 2010

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

19


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

20

20

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

April 1 - April 4, 2010

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK


The Miami Hurricane -- April 1, 2010  

The Miami Hurricane -- April 1, 2010

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you