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The Miami

.

Vol. 91, Issue 43 | March 28 - March 31, 2013

com

HURRICANE

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY

STEP hosts week to fight poverty Speakers promote homelessness awareness BY RIANNA HIDALGO STAFF WRITER

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR SURF’S UP: Jack Ruderman, 9, smiles as he learns how to surf. Radael Ruiz, a lifeguard at the camp, helps him get the board in the correct position for the wave. He is one of 12 participants in this year’s Surf Camp for children with autism and related diseases.

Campers splash into spring break UM-NSU CARD’s Surf Camp focuses on abilities instead of disabilities BY JORDAN COYNE COPY EDITOR

On the shores of Miami Beach, 27 staff members and 12 campers take to the waves this week to put their surfing skills to the test during the University of Miami-Nova Southeastern University’s Center for Autism and Related Diseases’ (UM-NSU CARD) Surf Camp. The annual program located at South Pointe Park hosts 12 children between the ages of 8 and 12 who have autism. These high- and low-functioning

children spend the week of their spring break learning how to surf. Of the 7,000 families at CARD, these 12 children are selected after going through an interview process to evaluate their ability to thrive on their own without familiar faces. “This is a camp to focus on their abilities, instead of their disabilities,” said Maricarmen Saleta, an educational specialist at UM-NSU CARD who helped plan the program in 2007. After meeting Michael Alessandri,

executive director of CARD, Saleta moved to Miami in 2005 and began working for him at UM-NSU CARD. In 2007, Julio Magrisso, assistant director of the recreation division for the city of Miami Beach, saw a documentary about a similar camp in California for children with disabilities. Immediately inspired, he contacted Alessandri, who passed the project on to Saleta, and the two groups began co-planning the camp. SEE SURFING, PAGE 3

TO-DOS AT THE U

SWEET 16

A BUCKET LIST FOR GRADUATION-BOUND SENIORS PAGE 7

CANES HEAD TO WASHINGTON, D.C., WITHOUT REGGIE JOHNSON PAGE 9

When 19-year-old Charlie came out to his parents in sixth grade, the reaction was less than positive. Eventually, after the loss of his mother to cancer and several altercations, his father kicked him out of the house, leaving him homeless. “He told me to pack my bags and go,” said Charlie, who preferred only to be identified by his first name. Charlie was one of two high school seniors who shared their stories with about 25 UM students Monday night during a discussion on sexual orientation and youth homelessness put on by Students Together Ending Poverty (STEP). He did not wish to disclose his last name due to privacy reasons. “Adults experiencing homelessness don’t tend to have a problem with identifying themselves,” Junge said. “Kids don’t usually want to because they’re scared.” The discussion was part of STEP’s annual Hunger and Homelessness Week, comprising several events in an attempt to raise awareness, educate students and inspire action. “For me, it’s about sharing that poverty — this vague term — is really people’s lives,” STEP President Kristy Sessions said. “A lot of students can’t ignore it anymore when they’re confronted with it.” In partnership with the Butler Center, STEP also offered students a film screening Monday of “A Place at the Table: One Nation. Underfed” and a display of photos by Lee Jeffries, a photographer known for his stark portraits of homelessness. Other events will extend beyond the week, including Project Clean Plate in April.

SEE HOMELESS, PAGE 4


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CAMPUS LIFE Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

Missed the women’s Tennis match against Brown University on Wednesday night? Check out Nicholas Gangemi’s photo brief.

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR FROM THE GROUND UP: The Art Building is undergoing reconstruction to restore it. It used to house the graphic and multimedia departments and it is located near the Memorial Building and the L-1 Building. It was designated a historic building in 2010.

Historic building regains former glory Departments find new homes BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR

Germaine Price, a UM alumna who graduated in 1983, recalls attending photography classes in the Art Building when she was a student. “It was not what I was expecting from a college campus,” she said. “The paint was peeling, and the floor was creaking. I guess it had that funky college feel.” Price is referring to the building that currently houses the graphic design and multimedia departments, which is located on the north end of campus near the Memorial Building and the L-1 Building. The Coral Gables Historic Preservation Board designated the building historic in 2010 because it “exemplifies the historic … or social trends of the community,” according to a report published by the Gables Historic Resources Department. The building is being renovated after the university deemed it unsafe in 2003, according to an article 2

NEWS

published in The Miami Hurricane. Before 2003, the building was called the Art Building, featuring most of the art programs that are now located in the new Studio Arts Complex on Levante Avenue. The building’s current renovation, which began in November 2011, will provide office spaces for the political science, international studies and geography departments, said Leonidas Bachas, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. The renovation is expected to be completed in the fall of 2013. “The building will be the new home for researchers and students in political science, international studies and geography,” he said. “The college is pleased and excited that our historic administration building is being restored to its former glory.” The estimated cost of the renovation was not available, but it will be more costly because it is a wood building in poor condition, said Janet Gavarrete, associate vice president of campus planning and development. “It is a costly renovation/rehabilitation for two main reasons,” she said. “It is a wood building, and secondly it was in very poor condi-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

tion with a very labor intensive cost of wood construction and renovation. Lastly, the building will meet the current building code in terms of safety and ADA and other storm resistant standards.” Price witnessed only one version of the building’s several incarnations that began after World War II. In the early 1940s, the Art Building was built from surplus military barracks and helped accommodate returning veterans who took advantage of the G.I. Bill that offered benefits like defraying tuition costs and living expenses. The building was one of the “shacks” that was constructed under emergency circumstances because university enrollment increased from 1,923 in 1945 to 5,800 in 1946. The building served as the university’s main administration building before the completion of permanent structures such as Merrick and Memorial. The administration building contained the offices of the president, secretary, treasurer, dean of the graduate school, director of admissions and director of athletics. The Art Building’s architectural significance also designates the

March 28 - March 31, 2013

building as historic. Marion Manley, the first registered female architect in Miami, “rearranged sections of wood frame barracks buildings into an inventive and practical, attractive academic office building, later adapted again for classroom use,” according to the Gables Historic report. Manley served as president of the South Florida chapter of the American Institute of Architects and vice-president of the Florida Association of Architects. The design plan followed a similar scheme to the Memorial Building, with a central corridor that runs the length of the structure and a rectangular layout. The renovation will restore the building’s exterior, enhancing its structure. Other features, such as the existing wood railings and interior partitions, will be restored and reconfigured to meet the needs of the future administration building. “You want the building to retain its character but still look modern and nice,” Price said. “With the rest of the campus looking modern and sophisticated, you don’t want this one building looking ramshackle.”

Want to learn more about food, fashion and campus life? Check out our bloggers’ opinions on these subjects. Student Government presented UFactor Wednesday night. Charlotte Cushing has a photo brief on the event. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


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UC student workers provide guidance Information Desk serves as useful source BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT EDITOR

Student employees at the Information Desk in the University Center are the primary providers of information on campus. They have to know where places are and who to contact if they don’t have the an-

swer to a question. They also help distribute tickets for events, run the lost and found, and provide students with office supplies. “We’re like the mediators for most of the information. Whether we have it or not, we need to know how to get it,” said senior Abel Champion, who has been working at the information desk for four years. People will ask for directions to different locations on campus, from

C

the Cox Science Center to Starbucks. Freshmen and international students especially will come to the desk and ask questions at the start of the semester. “One of the funniest questions that you get often is when people come and they’re like, ‘Where’s the bookstore?’ The bookstore is literally right on the opposite side of the Information Desk so you just point across,” Champion said.

D

B A Whitten University Center First Level Floor Plan GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

a

During the day, many international students gather in the UC Lower Lounge to watch soccer. “They all pull up the sofas, put all of these together, and put them in front of the TV, and then they’re screaming for about an hour and a half until the game’s over,” Champion said.

b

A group of students play Magic: The Gathering in the UC Lower Lounge in the evenings. Magic is the first

trading card game. Introduced in 1993, the game has complex rules, an organized tournament system and even a community of professional players. “They were playing on Thursday nights for a couple of hours, so it was interesting to watch, because I didn’t

know people still played Magic: The Gathering,” Champion said. approach the Inforc mationStudents Desk for staplers, tape dispensers and paper clips on a daily basis. But there are many more supplies available at the desk. “Legitimately speaking, we have almost every supply. We’re an Office Depot behind our desk, but if everyone else knew that, they’d come for everything,” Champion said. items are brought d to the lostsortsandoffound at the inforAll

mation desk – wallets, credit cards, Cane IDs, laptops, sunglasses and even a stack of $20 bills.

“If we find a wallet or an ID, we’ll just send an email to that person and they come pick it up, so we’re pretty efficient in that,” said sophomore Gaston Melo Felgueres, who started working at the Information Desk this semester.

This one time... Recently on a weekend morning, a student organization had a meeting in the UC ballrooms and had changed the bathroom sign to say “Unisex.” It had to be taken down because this is illegal. “The president of the organization came downstairs and said, ‘To what bathroom do we go if we do not identify with a gender?’ So that was a pretty difficult thing for us,” Felgueres said. March 28 - March 31, 2013

CARD fosters confidence SURFING FROM PAGE 1

The weeklong program, funded by the Autism Society of Miami and private sponsors acquired at CARD’s annual “Tropical Nights” fundraiser, is free to campers and their families. The program first took place in 2008 and hosted two sessions. However, each year since, they have only been able to offer one session due to funding. The city already had a summer Surf Camp organized for ordinary kids, so it was easy to adapt the same staff and instructors for CARD’s program, said Edith Guerra, a Miami-Beach Parks and Recreation Supervisor who has worked for the camp since its inception. Guerra feels that the camp is an opportunity for everyone to recognize the true potential of the kids, regardless of their disabilities. “When you get a chance to see the parents see what they’re children have learned, they’re just so surprised,” she said. “They think, ‘I never thought my child would be able to do something like this.’” The children enjoy it as much as the parents. “I feel happy,” said 10-year-old camper Jake Stempel when asked about his surfing experience. Jack Ruderman, a 9-year-old camper, agreed. “I do it because I like to surf and … I have a lot a friends,” he said. In the future, CARD and Miami Beach are talking about expanding the recreational activities to other sports, according to Guerra. In addition to the surf program, CARD already hosts soccer and tennis programs. Saleta hopes more children will be able to participate in this rewarding experience. “It’s an amazing experience for these kids,” she said. “It’s amazing to see their face when they get up on the board.” THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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Speakers share personal struggles, journey HOMELESS FROM PAGE 1

Students in the dining halls will be encouraged to reduce their food waste, and the difference will be donated to Camillus House, a nonprofit that provides services to people who are homeless and impoverished in Miami. STEP will also celebrate a permanent addition to UM’s campus: one of Miami-Dade Homeless Trust’s colorful parking meters designed by neo-pop artist Romero Britto. The meters, scattered throughout Miami-Dade County, collect funds for the trust. Thursday’s discussion, held in the apartment of Scot Evans, faculty master in Eaton Residential College, helped shed light on the challenges homeless youth face. While the two stories were different, both shared a common thread — family situations that were beyond their control. “How many of you still have both your parents?” asked Monica, also only referred to by her first name. Most raised their hands. “Well, I have none of my parents.” Monica explained that her mother’s battles with drug-abuse, breast cancer and HIV meant foster care and eventual placement with an aunt who was emotionally abusive and repeatedly kicked her out of

the house. Students asked questions about Monica and Charlie’s experiences, from how they found food to what it was like to go to school while balancing the stressors of homelessness. “Sometimes it feels like you just can’t anymore,” Charlie said. He added that he often hears stories about kids who want to kill themselves. “I tell them, ‘Your life isn’t going to consist of this forever,’” he said. Other students were curious about state aid and shelters. Barbara Junge, a previous board member for the Miami Coalition for the Homeless, explained that it is difficult for older youth to find space at shelters, as they are considered low priority. Additionally, LGBT teens like Charlie are at a higher risk for assault. But past strife doesn’t prevent Monica and Charlie from hopes for the future. Monica plans to attend business school at Miami-Dade College, while Charlie has his own plan. “Mine’s easy. It’s one word. Broadway,” he said. Today, Charlie stays with a friend while Monica has been allowed to remain at a halfway house for free because she cannot afford

rent, even though she is not in rehabilitation. Charlie said he believes his mother would be supportive of him if she were still alive today. He remembers the day she met his boyfriend. “My mom looks at me and says ‘Well, at least you know how to pick the right gays,’” he said. “I’m pretty sure if she was still around, she would be okay with who I am.” Shelby Juarez, a senior civil and architectural engineering major, said the discussion broadened her perspective. “You hold assumptions about the world, and you need to hear stories to challenge those assumptions,” said Juarez, who is also the president of SpectrUM. “I have to understand other issues to understand my own. These aren’t issues of homelessness or LGBTQ. They’re human issues.” Monica had a message for the students who heard her story Thursday night. “Get involved,” she said. “Don’t just take the information and run.” STEP’s ongoing opportunities for student involvement include tutoring at Overtown Youth Center on Saturday and fundraising.

HOMELESSNESS and POVERTY WORLDWIDE WorldHunger.org reported

925 million

hungry people in 2010.

NATIONALLY NATIONALLY National Center on Family Homelessness:

1.6 million youth

were homeless in 2011, with the numbers up 33% from 2007.

1 in 6 CLOSER at youth LOOK poverty

20-40%

of homeless youth identify as LGBT while only

3-5%

of the general population identify as gay or lesbian according to National Gay and Lesbian Task Force.

Americans are

poor and 1

in 5 children

live in POVERTY according to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau

IN THE CITY 2007 Census Bureau: MIAMI had double the national poverty rate.

GRAPHIC BY AMILYNN SOTO

ACADEMICS

Global Ambassadors program promotes study abroad Participants take on leadership roles BY ASHLEY ZIMMERMAN CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The study abroad office at UM has put a new twist on an old program by starting a Global Ambassador group, which utilizes students who have studied overseas to share their experiences by promoting and participating in the study abroad events on campus. “It’s the revitalization of an older student program we had that we sort of beefed up,” said Stephanie Molinare, who worked in the International Education and Exchange Programs office (IEEP) until March. “We want to give students more of a leadership opportunity.” Devika Milner, manager of un4

NEWS

dergraduate programs and special projects in the provost’s office, serves as the interim head of the study abroad office. She helped shepherd in the program, which began this semester. “Devika came up with the idea,” said junior Gregory Sedlik, the lead student coordinator for Global Ambassadors. “She saw that the peer mentoring program wasn’t doing enough on its own.” Sedlik got involved with the program after studying abroad in spring 2012 at the University of Leicester, England. He enjoyed the experience so much that he went on to do a study abroad summer program in Prague the same year. Senior Marissa Wong, who studied in Chile in 2011, is another global ambassador. She is excited to be doing more to help students who may be interested in an overseas ex-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

perience. “I saw it initially as a way of giving back to the study abroad office,” she said. “Studying abroad has been the highlight of my college career.” Wong said the new program is similar to the old one, only better. She described the changes in peer mentoring. “There were more sporadic events like open houses and info sessions that we would go to on a voluntary basis,” she said. “Now they’re trying to get us more actively involved.” According to the IEEP website, ambassadors assist in advising sessions and help coordinate on-campus study abroad events. In addition, they work one-on-one with international exchange students to help them in the transition to life at UM. They benefit by developing leadership capabilities, improving

March 28 - March 31, 2013

communication and intercultural skills and getting public speaking practice. The study abroad program, headquartered in Allen Hall, provides UM students with opportunities to study in more than 35 countries around the world through either UM-run programs or exchange programs at more than 80 partner universities. The ambassadors can offer interested students firsthand knowledge of what it is like living and studying overseas. Applications for the new program are taken on a rolling basis, with the major prerequisite being having studied abroad with UM. Qualified students can apply online. The program currently has 12 ambassadors, said John Schwartz, an intern in the IEEP office who works closely with Sedlik. Amal

Hegeb is the new director of the program. Global ambassadors are asked to participate in monthly planning meetings and cannot miss more than one per semester. “We help out in marketing, participating in study abroad open houses and info sessions, the study abroad fairs, and tabling in the Breezeway,” Sedlik said.

FOR MORE INFORMATION WHAT: Global Ambassador Program WHERE: Allen Hall, Room 111 For more information, email ieep@miami.edu or visit miami.edu/index. php/study_abroad/ students/alumni/global_ ambassador_program.


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CAMPUS LIFE

PHOTO BRIEF

UM’s rich history provides Motion of the ocean looking glass for future University continues to make national headlines BY KEVIN RODRIGUEZ CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Hurricane football players, Sebastian the Ibis and President Donna E. Shalala are not the only ones who have contributed to the University of Miami’s rich history. “Miami and UM were built around big ideas, so naturally … history would be drawn down here,” said Peter Perez, a UM alumnus who graduated in 2012. This idea started in 1926 when a group of Miami citizens decided to build an institution that would offer unique opportunities and help a young community grow. The group, which included Bowman Foster Ashe, UM’s first president; J.C. Penney, an American businessman; and George Merrick, founder of Coral Gables, formed what later became the Board of Trustees and set the foundation and expectations for the university. During World War II, UM was a major training location for United States and Royal Air Force cadets. The Navy V-5 and V-12 programs were offered by UM during World War II, which trained approximately 10,000 students and civilians. The Sigma Chi chapter at UM was composed mainly of Navy personnel. In 1954, the UM Band of the Hour and Hurricanettes visited Guatemala to participate in the country’s Independence Day celebration. The band members performed three times in Guatemala City’s Olympic Stadium for more than 800,000 people. The South Campus of UM, the former Richmond Naval Air Station at Coral Reef Drive SW 152nd Street and SW 127th Avenue,

opened in fall 1946. It provided housing, dining and recreational facilities and classrooms for about 1,100 students, mainly freshmen. In the 1960s the Central Intelligence Agency leased several of the buildings at UM’s South Campus saying Zenith Technological Services would use them. In reality this front company was the headquarter for major United States covert operations and intelligence gathering for the war on Cuba, according to the Cuban Information Archives at Richmond Naval Air Station. It was code named JMWAVE and became the center for Operation Mongoose – a U.S. operation to overthrow the communist government of Cuba. When asked about the CIA operations, Perez said he was not surprised. He said UM was always a bridge between Latin America and the United States. University Center Lanes, which was a bowling alley that operated from 1965 to 1994, along with UC Games Area and Storm Surge Café, which operated from 1965 to 2008, were hubs of campus. Students could go to these places to grab a bite to eat or relax, play pool or table tennis, and bowl with their friends. The university made national headlines in 2004 when it hosted the first presidential debate between then-President George W. Bush and Sen. John Kerry. More than 63 million Americans watched the debate and more than 3,000 credentialed news media were on campus that week, according to the University of Miami website. “The future of UM looks bright,” said junior Elan Aleman, who works with the Cuban Heritage Collection at the Richter Library. “The dynamic leadership here at UM, along with our pride and commitment to a culture of excellence, will continue to be a catalyst for success.”

HOLLY BENSUR // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER TOSS UP: Sophomore Jessica Wingar, who is also an Ocean Awareness Week E-board member, plays ring toss with hand-painted ocean themed bottles on the steps of the Rock Monday afternoon as part of the week’s kickoff event.

NEWS BRIEFS YEARBOOK

CAREERS

PETITION

Yearbook portraits will end Thursday. Students can have their pictures taken 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the UC Lower Lounge. Graduating seniors can make an appointment for yearbook portraits at ouryear.com, with the school code 136. Portraits for undergraduate students are free. No appointments are necessary.

The Toppel Career Center and Alumni Association are hosting the annual Student & Alumni Career Symposium from 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. April 17 at the Newman Alumni Center. The conference will provide UM students and alumni with career development experiences and networking opportunities with alumni, local recruiters, and UM staff and faculty.

Student Government is circulating a change. org petition to the owner of the University Centre Plaza to demonstrate the importance of building the U.S. 1 overpass through Mariposa Court. With more than 500 signatures as of Wednesday, the petition has a goal of 5,000 supporters by April 5, the anniversary of the death of Ashley Kelly, a UM student who was

March 28 - March 31, 2013

struck by a car while crossing U.S. 1 in 2005. Students can sign the petition at tinyurl.com/ us1overpass.

Lyssa Goldberg may be emailed at lgoldberg@ themiamihurricane.com.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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OPINION

What gives the federal government the right to be concerned at all about the definition of marriage?

Sonia Sotomayor, Supreme Court Justice

The Miami

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

UP!

What do you think of same-sex marriage?

ALEXIS MILTON SENIOR “I think as Americans, we are way too involved in people’s lives. When it comes to marriage you should be able to marry who you want. It’s an intimate thing that government has no place in.”

ANTHONY TOBOADA SOPHOMORE “I am strongly supportive of same-sex marriage. I’ve had best friends throughout my entire life that are gay, and they are some of the greatest people I know. I just believe that no one should be denied that fundamental right.”

Laws should not dictate love On Tuesday and Wednesday, the Supreme Court argued over same-sex marriage cases, including Proposition 8 and the Defense of Marriage Act. Though the ruling may not be determined until late June, the nine justices attempted to solidify an opinion that will impact society for years to come. Same-sex marriage is the most controversial topic tackled by the Supreme Court since Roe v. Wade in 1973, which legalized abortion. The majority of the 50 states have proactively fought to legalize civil unions, domestic partnerships and same-sex marriage. However, the act of samesex marriage is currently legal in 11 states – New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Iowa, Maryland, Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Washington and Native American tribal jurisdictions.

Other countries such as Sweden and Belgium have also recognized same-sex marriage. But, there is still a considerable amount of work to be done in order to establish equal marriage rights for all, not just some. For the better part of the 20th century, gay marriage has been a pressing topic. The individuals for it argue that love is love, no matter what. The individuals against it argue that a marriage between a man and a woman should be the only recognizable union. Many also quote the Bible to emphasize their distaste toward the matter. The Supreme Court now holds the power to make the ultimate decision on whether gay marriage will be upheld as a legal union in the U.S. The fact that the highest power of the land has decided to take on this case proves how widespread same-sex marriage is.

“I really believe if two people want to get married, they should be able to. I don’t think it interferes with someone’s life if a gay couple in Ohio wants to get married. I don’t think it should be prohibited.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Daniel Cepero

6

OPINION

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor said, “What gives the federal government the right to be concerned at all about the definition of marriage?” Sotomayor is correct. They have no right to impede on sexual orientation. They have no right to impede on relationships. And, they certainly have no right to impede on whom we choose to love. After two days of arguments over same-sex marriage, results are still inconclusive. Ultimately, the nine justices have agreed to disagree. If the Supreme Court is given the final say on the matter, then a decision needs to be made soon. America is waiting. Families are waiting. Equality is waiting. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Glitchy technology fails to impress

I

DANIELA LORENZO FRESHMAN

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

once was team Blackberry, until my phone started leaking battery acid. Then, I switched to an Android phone. I was excited because I had heard such great things about the Android operating system. And I was impressed, until it began having issues too. Technology, though helpful TAYLOR DUCKETT STAFF and innovative, isn’t made to last. COLUMNIST Think back to your house phone – it lasted through everything. Granted, it may not have been “smart,” but it served its function. It allowed you to do the basics: make and receive phone calls. If you look to the earlier cell phones, they were able to withstand the majority of the abuse that users inflicted on them. I feel that we are sacrificing durability for innovation and aesthetics. What good is it to have a phone with high speed 4G Internet access and a completely stocked app store if it won’t last more than a year? It is likely that technical issues or software mishaps will begin after a year of having

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 28 - March 31, 2013

your latest phone. Therefore, spending hundreds of dollars on the latest phone may end up being like paying for a ridiculously overpriced paper weight. I considered downgrading my cell phone because my two latest phones have the exact same problem. I wanted to go back to a simpler time – when phones were simply used to make calls and send text messages. Let’s be honest, many of us have tablets or computers in addition to our cell phones. Do we really need three pieces of technology that can essentially do the same things? My attempt to downgrade my phone was unsuccessful because phone companies don’t make it easy for you to do so for the simple reason that it hurts their profit margin. Alas, I have a new smart phone that has worked well for the time being. But it’s only been a few weeks. While innovations are important, be aware that it can end up costing you time, energy and money in the long run. Taylor Duckett is a sophomore majoring in economics.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Mariah Price PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon NEWS EDITOR Stephanie Parra OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes ASSISTANT EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez COPY CHIEF Nicky Diaz COPY EDITORS Jordan Coyne Erika Glass Ashley Martinez

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger ACCOUNT REPS Halima Dodo Kristyna Fong Jaydev Hemrajani Carlos Parra ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan DESIGNERS Ali Fishman Carlos Mella Amilynn Soto SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Rob Finn ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

WEBMASTER Kateryna Gontaruk To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2013 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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BY NICKY DIAZ COPY CHIEF

STEPHANIE PARRA NEWS EDITOR

Graduation seems far away when you’re a freshman and just getting to know your way around Miami and the university. Before you know it, you’ll be wearing your cap and gown. But before you graduate, there are certain things that every UM student has to do like attend a tailgate or throw up the U with President Donna E. Shalala. Here is a list of things you have to do before graduating UM. Start working on checking them off your bucket list. Befriend a UM athlete Go to a baseball game and have a shake Most people attend a football game or two during their time at UM - even if it is just to tailgate. But not many students realize the perks of going to a baseball game. Not only is the park on campus, but one of the concession stands includes something that you won’t find at Sun Life Stadium: milkshakes. Whether you want plain vanilla or maybe chocolate mint, there’s no doubt you’ll find the flavor that will tickle your fancy. Make your way to a game to cheer on the Canes and try these famous milkshakes. Study in the stacks of the Richter Library

Senior bucket

list

Jump off the diving board at the pool Several swimmers on the UM team have moved on to pursue Olympic medals - but you don’t have to be an Olympian to try this freeing activity. There are two levels of diving boards to choose from - so why not climb to the top, hold your breath and take the plunge? You’ll be glad you did so on a bright, sunny Miami day.

Jump in fountains A plunge in Lake Osceola can get you expelled, but a quick dip of the toes inside any of the fountains at UM never hurt anyone.

Stargaze from the rooftop of the music school or the Ungar building Nap in the hammocks during finals week Finals can be stressful. Studying a whole semester’s worth of material is daunting and just plain boring. But if you’re tired of staring at the four walls of your dorm room or feeling burdened from the tension in Richter, the U knows exactly how to cure your finals stress. If you stop studying for a minute and take a walk, you’ll find several hammocks around campus. Treat yourself to a nap on one of these and it’ll be the best rest you can have during finals week. Watch a play at the Ring Theatre, a movie at the Cosford Cinema or a performance at Gusman Hall Miami is known for its arts and culture, but you don’t need to venture off campus to explore it. You can find incredible musical performances at Gusman Hall, amazing productions at the Ring Theatre and popular movies at Cosford, all on campus. Take a break from the South Beach and Wynwood scenes; it’ll save you gas, and you won’t be surrounded by hipsters. Go to a UM sporting event Pep rally at the Rock

Attend commencement Have a beer at the Rat Having a beer at the Rat on the day of your 21st birthday has almost become a rite of passage among the most loyal of Canes. If you missed having a beer on the date of your 21st, however, round up your friends and make time in your schedule to partake in this and make up for lost time. Nothing else beats heading to the Rat after a hectic Thursday and drowning your sorrows in fattening alcoholic beverages. Twenty-one-year-olds only, though!

So if you’re in the mood for a refreshing activity, make a tiny splash at the fountains.

2013 BASEBALL

Teach someone not to walk on the UM seal in front of the bookstore When you were a kid, the saying was “don’t step on the crack, or you’ll break your mother’s back.” At UM, it’s “don’t step on the seal in front of the bookstore, or you won’t graduate.” Though this myth is probably not true, it’s always important to maintain respect for the U. Even though the former SG administration put up velvet ropes to remind us not to step on the seal, there’s always a curious freshman wandering by the bookstore who wonders about the purpose of the ropes. Make Sebastian proud, and teach an inquisitive soul a thing or two about tradition. Attend the official class ring ceremony

DESIGN BY ALI FISHMAN

Pose for a photo with Sebastian at the U statue Sure, it seems cheesy, but you most likely already have a picture with Sebastian or the U statue. Combine both for a shot that will show your pride of the U. At first, it might be hard to find Sebastian hanging around the statue. But if you’re at the right place at the right time, you’ll be able to snag a new profile picture. March 28 - March 31, 2013

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MUSIC REVIEW

Honor Society prepares for tour, evolves sound BY NICKY DIAZ COPY CHIEF

A lot has changed for pop-rock band Honor Society since the recent release of its third EP “Serendipity.” The new album shows that the band’s sound has once again evolved; from R&B and pop to rock and electronic, the trio – originally from New York – isn’t afraid to push the limits. The new EP’s release also marks Honor Society’s last record with keyboardist and guitarist Jason Rosen, who announced his departure from the band in mid-February. Fans were shocked and upset. But just because one man is down, doesn’t mean the band is disappearing; there are still three talented musicians in the band fighting their way up, which they’ve made clear while they prep for their upcoming concerts for Serendipity The Tour. They have not replaced Rosen. Honor Society has proved to critics and listeners that the band means business. And there’s no doubt that “Serendipity” is the band’s most mature and impressive album yet. The opening track, “Obsession,” had been released earlier through the Honor System – a program in which the

PHOTO COURTESY BY HONORSOCIETY.COM

band would release free tracks to fans as it recorded and prepped for “Serendipity’s” release. However, drummer Alex Noyes, singer-guitarist Michael Bruno and bassist Andrew Lee revamped the track, giving it a completely new feel. The lyrics are catchy: “A moment alone/a crack in the stone/I’m breaking down/But her smile weighs too much.” The music itself will draw listeners in as well; the incredible guitar riffs, the nostalgic 1980s vibe and powerful bass line are irresistible.

Following “Obsession” is the band’s latest single, “Serendipity.” These first two tracks couldn’t be more different, showcasing Honor Society’s range in genres and sounds. The title track has a lighter sound – more acoustic than “Obsession’s” heavier rock sound – paired with comedic lyrics: “My Kim to her Kanye/My Jay to her Beyonce/I want to be her guy.” It’s definitely a summer tune; you’ll be craving a pina colada and a poolside hammock by the end of it. The next two songs, “This Bed Is An Ocean” and “House On The Hill,” tie the EP together. The former is a treat for dedicated Honor Society fans, considering it was one of the first songs the group played together. They teased it on the last album, “A Tale of Risky Business Part 2,” through an interlude. But fans can now get the full and recorded version of the track. Although it is an oldie, the guys made sure to insert their new sound into it, venturing from the standard acoustic version with a leading piano melody and powerful mood-setting percussion. “House On The Hill” shows exactly where the band is now: a more mature alternative sound accompanied by beau-

tifully complex lyrics. There’s no doubt that this is Honor Society’s strongest song to date. The EP closes with “Kaleidoscope,” a step down from “House On The Hill.” That’s not to say it isn’t enjoyable. The upbeat track isn’t the band’s strongest, but the lyrics are endearing: “Your colors shine/But you live your life/Trapped inside a silent film.” As the band preps to promote the new EP during Serendipity The Tour, the group has made it clear that there are plenty of tricks up its sleeve. In true Honor Society fashion, the tour is bound to be a month-long party rather than just a series of concerts. For more information, visit honorsocietymusic.com. Tour dates and updates are available on the site.

‘SERENDIPITY’

RELEASE DATE: Sept. 18, 2012 ARTIST NAME: Honor Society LABEL: Independent

THEATER

‘In The Heights’ brings Latin spice to Gables BY NICKY DIAZ COPY CHIEF

It’s easy to see why “In The Heights” would attract crowds in Miami; the Latin population can easily relate to the music, the humor and the plot. Luckily for those who aren’t familiar with Lin-Manuel Miranda and Quiara Alegria Hudes’ story, Actors’ Playhouse is bringing a bit of Latin f lavor to the Miracle Theatre through April 7 with its production of “In The Heights.” Set in Washington Heights during early July, the musical tells the story of a group of family and friends who live in a predominantly Latin neighborhood. The plot tends to revolve around Usnavi (Nick Duckart), a convenience store owner, who 8

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tells the audience about his struggles with love, business and life through rap. While Usnavi tries to get the courage to ask Vanessa (Christie Padres) out, salon owner Daniela (Elise Santora) gets ready to move her business to the Bronx. In the meantime, Nina (Sarah Amengual) – the neighborhood’s pride and joy – comes back from her first year at Stanford University with a big secret she’s keeping from her parents, Kevin (Oscar Cheda) and Camila (Denise Sanchez). Such a complex plot driven by several story lines requires a talented cast, and that’s just what the Actors’ Playhouse is giving their audiences. What makes the production stand out are the characters – and the cast

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– who you find yourself rooting for throughout the musical. The actors are incredibly talented; not only can they sing and act, but they can also dance. Choreographer Stephanie Klemons does a marvelous job of utilizing every inch of the stage. Combined with the musical’s catchy and upbeat Latin songs – performed live by eight musicians directed by Manny Schvartzman – the choreography brings this production of “In The Heights” to another level. The ensemble of dancers is extraordinary, particularly Jose-Luis Lopez, who was also in the musical on Broadway. Moreover, the cast effortlessly portrays the charming characters. Standout performances include Doreen Mon-

March 28 - March 31, 2013

talvo’s Abuela Claudia and Cheda’s portrayal of Nina’s father, Kevin. Both performers f lawlessly depict the typical Latin grandmother and father. The duo shines during numbers like “Inútil” – a powerful performance from Cheda – and Montalvo’s “Paciencia y Fé (Patience and Faith).” The understated set design is incredible as well; it manages to set the right tone and ambiance for the audience without excessively trying to recreate the actual setting of Washington Heights. Every audience member will develop a personal connection to the production and its characters. Between the cast’s impressive performances and the

catchy music, there is no way anyone will leave the theater disappointed after watching Actors’ Playhouse’s “In The Heights.”

IF YOU GO WHAT: “In The Heights” WHERE: Actors’ Playhouse, 280 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables WHEN: 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays through April 7

Ticket prices are $28 to $44

For more information, call 305-444-9293


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SPORTS

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latest ITA ranking for the women’s tennis team, which beat Texas and Baylor on the road last week.

number of victories in the Sweet Sixteen in the history of Miami basketball.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Canes ready for Marquette, but Johnson stays home Thursday tipoff marks fight for spot in Elite Eight BY PATRICK RILEY STAFF WRITER

ZACH BEEKER // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER MAN DOWN: Miami will play without senior center Reggie johnson, who did not travel with the team as he recovers from minor knee surgery.

University of Miami coach Jim Larranaga did his best Muhammad Ali impression, senior Julian Gamble photo-bombed yet another television interview, and the Canes rolled past Illinois on Sunday, 63-59, to reach the Sweet Sixteen. The Canes’ second-round game against the Pacific Tigers two days prior was essentially over by halftime – Miami led 40-19 at the break. But the Fighting Illini almost pulled off the upset, giving the Canes all they could handle. “Our hats are off to Illinois,” Larranaga said. “I thought they played the best defense on us we have seen. They were so active in their man-to-man pressure, and after the game was over I was still kind of stunned.” Unflinching defense on Shane Larkin and Durand Scott paired with some lethal 3-point shooting led Illinois to a one-point lead with 1:24 to go. Just 24 seconds later, Larkin’s clutch step-back jumper from beyond the arc would put Miami ahead for good. “I have made that shot in the Carolina game, and I kind of had a mindset of shooting that shot when I came off the ball screen, so I just had a lot of confidence,” said Larkin, who played all 40 minutes and scored 17 points. Junior Rion Brown came up huge for Miami as well, scoring a game-high 21 points on 50-percent shooting from the 3-point range. “Different players step up on any given night,” senior Trey McKinney-Jones said. “This game Rion had the hot hand, and Shane was finding him, and he was knocking them down. He was very big for us.” After the narrow escape, Miami (29-6) traveled to Washington, D.C., where they will play Marquette (25-8) on Thursday. The Golden Eagles have played close contests in both rounds leading up to the Sweet Sixteen. It took a late-game surge to advance past Davidson, and a ferocious back-and-forth with Butler went Marquette’s way as well. “The thing you have to recognize in Marquette is the way they’ve won their first two games,” Larranaga said. “They’ve come from behind in both games and played very, very well down the stretch. They’ve played incredible de-

fense, they’ve gotten the offensive boards, and a guy like Vander Blue has made some incredible plays. So our players will be very well aware and very well prepared come Thursday night.” If the Canes can contain Blue – who put up 29 points against Butler – and fend off any second-half comebacks, they have the size to get over Marquette into the Elite Eight. Miami, however, will be without center Reggie Johnson. The university announced that Johnson sustained an injury against Illinois and did not travel with the team. He is expected to be available for the Final Four, should the Hurricanes make it to Atlanta.

SWEET SIXTEEN MATCHUP PREVIEW

March 28 - March 31, 2013

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UM STUDENTS and COMMUNITY

Tuesday, April 9th Gables election Speak out for your campus environment! You can influence our city’s future by voting for K equality K the environment K respect for UM students K tolerance for student lifestyles Vote where you voted for our president in November, and elect Sierra Club-endorsed environmentalist Ross Hancock for Coral Gables city commissioner

ross@VoteRossHancock.com (786) 543-3412 www.VoteRossHancock.com Political advertisement paid for and approved by Ross Hancock for Coral Gables Commission Group 2

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dear ...

Dear V: My blowjobs don’t compete with his gay best friend’s...

,

My boyfriend told me that I was inadequate because I couldn’t give a good blowjob. I dumped him because I realized that he was a total tool. I later found out that he was cheating on me with his gay best friend. How am I supposed to recover from this? Dumper Begot Dumpee Dear Dumpee, Don’t beat yourself up because it’s hard to compete against a gay’s blowjob. Don’t ask how I know this. Crazy events at an underground, ‘80s-inspired rave occurred, and I found myself vomiting my binge

drinking habits among other bodily f luids. I admire that you had the common sense to leave the douchebag. But many men are so unsatisfied with boring girls who just want the missionary position that a good blowjob is a welcomed change. I am not saying it’s your fault, but maybe you bored your boyfriend to the point where he needed to get his gay on. And don’t try to compete with the average gayboy. They have been practicing since high school, they have years of experience. You should find your sexual niche instead of validating yourself based on your former meathead lover. Take a pole-dancing class. Work as a hot bartender, making $600 tips because you have a great rack. Hey, consider Hooters as a last resort. Take ownership of your sexuality in whatever way possible. This is not the time to weep in self-pity with a carton of Cherry Garcia.

i iis one example of the RelaAnd your situation tionship Circle of Life. Your ex-boyfriend will eventually find someone else, and you’ll move on, probably scouting for the lawyer or doctor to have more babies to continue the cycle. And your boyfriend chose his gay friend because he might be dealing with his sexuality. Now with Bravo and Project Runway, you never know anything about anyone. Never assume – that’s my motto. I really hope you don’t take this singular moment as fodder for your next novel that ends up in the New York Times bestsellers list. I can already see the CW adapting this story to follow up their cha-ching shows “Vampire Diaries” and “Arrow.” By the way, did you notice that I used multiple puns in my first sentence? Yes, I’m quite the wordsmith. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS HOLDING ELECTIONS! The positions of EDITOR-IN-CHIEF and BUSINESS MANAGER for the Fall 2013 semester are up for election.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS IN THE MARKET FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS, BLOGGERS, CARTOONISTS, REPORTERS AND VIDEOGRAPHERS.

Elections

SAVVY IN SALES? SALES REPRESENTATIVE POSITIONS ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE. ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT TARA AT 305-284-4401 OR TARA@ THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

will take place through the Board of Publications on Thursday, April 11 at 7:30 a.m.

HIRING HURRICANE HOODLUMS

To

apply for editorin chief, contact Bob Radziewicz at bobr@miami.edu.

ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT EDITOR@ THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

To

apply for business manager, contact Bob DuBord at rdubord@miami.edu. March 28 - March 31, 2013

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Saturday, March 30 • 2 p.m. Foote Green

UM ISA, UM HSC, Hurricane Productions, and Student Government are proud to invite you to this year’s Holi 2013! If you like the COLOR RUN, you will love HOLI! Holi is the Festival of Colors, celebrating the arrival of spring with colored powder and water. Come on out on Saturday, March 30th at 2pm on the Green in one of the most fun events this semester! There will be a big SLIP-N-SLIDE! Please dress in white clothing. We’ll see you there!

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, March 28 Ocean Awareness Week: Touch Tank 11 a.m. • UC Breezeway Come join Rho Rho Rho the Marine and Atmospheric Honor Society allow the wonders of the ocean on a first hand basis! Women’s Tennis vs NC State 12 p.m. • Neil Schiff Tennis Center Come out and support your ‘Canes as they take on ACC foe the North Carolina State Wolfpack! Patio Jams ft. Jared Hall 12:15 p.m. • UC Patio Continue your Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the sounds of Jared Hall! For more information on the event or how you can participate, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-2844606.

Next week...

Commuter Week: Drive-In Watch Party 8 p.m. • Mahoney/Pearson Garage Join the Association of Commuter Students and Mahoney/Pearson College Council for a night at the movies.

Drive your car up to the top of Mahoney/Pearson garage and support your #2 seeded Miami Hurricanes Men’s Basketball team as they take on the #3 seeded Marquette Golden Eagles of the Big East in the Sweet Sixteen round of the NCAA Tournament.

Friday, March 29 Commuter Week: FEC Breakfast 9 a.m. • UC Bridge Join commuters and FEC for their 6th Annual FEC Breakfast. They will be handing out delicious pastelitos on the UC Bridge. Get a taste of commuter life in Miami with a quick breakfast on the go! Ocean Awareness Week: Speaker Pamela Sweeney 6:30 p.m. • Cox 145 Come out and enjoy speaker Pamela Sweeney an environmental specialist for the Florida Department of environmental protection as she talks about her work with the conservation of Manatees in South Florida. Food and refreshments will be provided by Student Government.

HP Presents: UTOPIA: Surfer Blood and the Cool Kids

Friday, April 5 • 9:30 p.m. Foote Green Hurricane Productions at the University of Miami is proud to present UTOPIA featuring Surfer Blood and The Cool Kids performing LIVE! UTOPIA is a festival-inspired Spring concert with two live acts, a bounce house, international food trucks (in celebration of I Week with COISO), and more!

CAC Presents: Pokemon The First Movie 11:59 p.m. • Cosford Cinema

When a group of scientists are offered funding into genetic research if they agree to try and clone the greatest ever Pokémon, Mew, the end result is success and Mewtwo is born. However Mewtwo is bitter about his purpose in life and kills his masters. In order to become the greatest he throws open a challenge to the world to battle him and his Pokémon. Ash and his friends are one of the few groups of trainers who pass the first test and prepare for battle. However they soon find out about further cloning and Mewtwo’s ultimate plan for the earth.

Saturday, March 30 Ocean Awareness Week: Beach Cleanup 10:30 a.m. • The Rock Join Rho Rho Rho as they host a beach clean-up at Matheson Hammock Park. Transportation will be provided to and from the event. Breakfast will be provided by the Butler Center for Service and Leadership. Tshirts will also be provided. Make sure to wear comfortable clothing.

Women’s Tennis vs Wake Forest 1 p.m. • Neil Schiff Tennis Center Come out and support your ‘Canes as they take on ACC foe the Wake Forest Demon Deacons! CAC Presents: Les Miserables 10 p.m. • Cosford Cinema Set against the backdrop of 19th-century France, Les Misérables tells an enthralling story of broken dreams and unrequited love, passion, sacrifice and redemption-a timeless testament to the survival of the human spirit. Jackman plays ex-prisoner Jean Valjean, hunted for decades by the ruthless policeman Javert (Crowe) after he breaks parole. When Valjean agrees to care for factory worker Fantine’s (Hathaway) young daughter, Cosette, their lives change forever. In December 2012, the world’s longest-running musical brings its power to the big screen in Tom Hooper’s sweeping and spectacular interpretation of Victor Hugo’s epic tale.

Sunday, March 31 CAC Presents: Les Miserables 8:30 p.m. • Cosford Cinema

Baseball vs. Bethune Cookman

Wednesday, April 3 • 6 p.m. Mark Light Field Come out and support your ‘Canes as they take on the Bethune Cookman Wildcats! While you’re at the game be sure to enjoy dollar hot dogs for a good ol’ fashioned American pastime.

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 12

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Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

HOLI: The Festival of Colors

The Miami Hurricane - Mar. 28, 2013  

The Miami Hurricane - Mar. 28, 2013

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