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The Miami

Vol. 88, Issue 16 | Mar. 25 - Mar. 28, 2010

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

Pitching in for Haiti

RACHEL STEINHAUSER // The Miami Hurricane

LIVING IN THE MOMENT: Senior Dana Warshauer stops to talk to senior Kemy Joseph during his camp out on the to raise awareness and funs for Haiti.

“PASS THAT DUTCHIE” STOP DEMONIZING MARIJUANA AND READ THE REAL FACTS PAGE 12

GET YOUR NEON ON ULTRA RETURNS TO BICENTENNIAL PARK THIS WEEKEND PAGE 17

SWEET 16 AND FEELING FINE THE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM MAKES THE WNIT PAGE 21

Student makes a statement about conditions in Haiti BY ANDREA CONCEPCION | STAFF WRITER

O

ut on the Green, near the path to Richter Library, stands a rather large tent. Scattered few feet away are some glow sticks, a deck of cards, shoes and stuffed animals. On a cold Miami night, wearing a blue bathrobe over his clothes, senior Kemy Joseph tried selling these items to pay for his meals. “The hardest thing for me to do is set prices for this stuff,” Joseph said, laughing after haggling with a woman for one of his blankets. Joseph planned to spend a maximum of 10 dollars

per day on meals. A percentage of the money he earns from selling personal items will go towards buying flipcams for citizen journalists to record the devastation in Haiti. Kemy Joseph, the founder of UR Awesome Inc. and former president of Random Acts of Kindness (RAK), pitched the tent to bring awareness and insight to the UM community on what is really going on in Haiti. When RAK led the Haiti donation drive, Joseph predicted people would begin forgetting about the tragedy by March.

SEE JOSEPH, PAGE 10


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A day at the U for new students Cane for a Day program grows

Check out what’s exclusively available at theMiamiHurricane. com.

BY CARLY MILLS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

On the cusp of their high school graduation, students have life-changing decisions to make on where to attend college. The decision has numerous implications that will alter the rest of one's life. "Cane for a Day" is a University of Miami program for newly admitted students who wish to visit campus before making a final decision on which college to attend. Prospective students get matched with a UM student who acts as their host for the day. Due to the popularity of Cane for a Day, a sister program has been introduced titled "You at the U." The program will be specifically for accepted scholarship students and will be held on different dates than the Cane for a Day visits. The host is usually studying a similar major to their guest. They go to their classes, eat with them in the dining hall, take part in some extracurricular activities and experience an average day at UM. Scott Woodcock, assistant director of admissions and chief organizer of the project, believes You at the U will be extremely successful. “We have a 60 percent yield rate. They visit here, take part in the program and end up becoming students," he said.

Steven Stuts caught the action of Tuesday night’s baseball game. Check out his photo slideshow. RACHEL STEINHAUSER // The Miami Hurricane

FUNNY GIRL: Sophomore Lauren Marussich and Katrina Torres, a student at Miami’s St. Brendan, laugh about how Torres attended the Homecoming parade before even starting to attend the school. “I’m definitely coming here. I’ve always wanted to come to UM,” Torres said. Senior Amy Levine, a political science major, hosted three students last year. “I love talking to students about UM and getting to share my experience with them," she said. "I hope that they can have a similar experience.” Students also get the opportunity to speak to their potential professors. They are even provided with credit to use at the dining

hall. Being a host is a voluntary position, and there is a large demand for volunteers. “We already have 260 students signed up to visit, so we’ll have to double up on students per hosts," Woodcock said. While it may seem time consuming, Levine believes it really does work in encouraging students to come here.

“Lots of students I talk to now who were Cane for A Day students now attend the university," she said. Carly Mills may be contacted at cmills@themiamihurricane.com.

To get involved visit cane4aday@miami.edu

The healthy life

Kicking out caffeine might not be the best way to stay fit JEREMY ALBELDA HEALTH COLUMNIST

Everybody has that friend who makes some snarky comment whenever you walk into Starbucks like, “You know coffee is horrible for you right?” Yeah, well it must be nice to ninja jump out of bed and feel 110 percent every day on your own. Although I, alongside many other emerging adults, am a habitual coffee drinker, the ingestion of caffeine has been shown through research to actually have many positive health benefits. The international Olym2

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pic Committee has even gone so far to put limit on caffeine levels because of its proven performance-enhancing capabilities. First, the consumption of caffeine stimulates the release of adrenaline, which is known as a “flight or fight” hormone. This means your body releases it during times of stress or exercise. When caffeine is consumed before a workout, it will help diminish the feelings of fatigue, induce the release of blood sugars (you want this during exercise) and shunt blood to the working muscles and brain for work. Evidence indicates that caffeine binds to a certain site on the muscle cell, increasing the force of contraction. It must be said though that caffeine is a diuretic. This means March 25 - March 28, 2010

it will dehydrate you if ample water is not consumed as well, something you don’t want to happen on top of normal water loss from exercise. So make sure to hydrate as well with pre-workout caffeine consumption. Caffeine is seen to have many other benefits in the body from mood improvement, to increased concentration, to its use as common pain killer in headache medication. Before you decide to rid that “Cup of Joe” from your daily grind, think twice: you could be missing out on a powerful aide. Jeremy Albelda is a senior exercise physiology major and a personal trainer. E-mail health questions to him at jalbelda@themiamihurricane. com.

Kemy Joseph documented his trip to Haiti over Spring Break. Get a closer look. Phi Alpha Delta is a Greek letter organization that caters to pre-law students. Get the info with Nancy Oben. Get both sides of the health care debate with Thomas Prieto and Daniel Hanlon.  Nostalgic for the 80s? Read Nancy Oben’s review of “Hot Tub Time Machine,”a totally rad film. Be sure to vote for all your favorites for Best of Miami. The women's lacrosse team breaks stereotypes and kills with power shots. Read more in Chris Ambrosio's profile on the team. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.


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Obama signs historic heath care bill SOME MAJOR POLICY CHANGES SEPT. 21, 2010 Individuals will be allowed to stay on their parents’ health care plans until their 26th birthday, previously most plans covered enrollees until 19 years of age or upon graduation from college. Insurers are prohibited from dropping policy holders when they get sick. Before this bill, they were given more discretion to drop enrollees. Indoor tanning services are subjected to a new federal 10 percent service tax. J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE // The Associated Press

JAN. 1, 2014

20 PENS: President Barack Obama signs the health care bill with 20 pens in the East Room of the White House on Tuesday.

Controversy over content abounds BY RAMON GALIANA NEWS EDITOR

Surrounded by members of Congress and facing a sea of flash photography, President Barack Obama signed legislation that is considered to be one of the most prominent social laws in decades. Having faced unanimous Republican opposition in the House of Representatives, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act passed with a vote of 219 to 212. The law aims to cover 32 million Americans who are currently uninsured and lack access to affordable health insurance. The proponents of the bill argue that the legislation will significantly lower the federal deficit, while making health care affordable for millions of Americans. The final cost of the bill is set at $938 billion over the next 10 years. The Congressional Budget Office, a nonpartisan agency that provides economic data to Congress, states that the law will save $130 billion in the next decade, and more than $1.2 trillion over the following decade. Several of the bill’s major provisions will affect college-aged students across the country. Those currently on their parents’ health insurance policy will be allowed to stay on the plan until they reach 26 years of age. Before the bill, numerous health plans

dropped dependents at the age of 19 or after graduating from college. By the year 2014, insurance companies will be prohibited from discriminating against people with pre-existing conditions who apply for coverage. A USA TODAY/Gallup Poll released on Wednesday states that, of those polled, 49 to 40 percent said the passage of the legislation was “a good thing” rather than a bad one. Forty-eight percent of those polled called the legislation “a good first step” that requires further legislative consideration in Congress. Thirty-one percent of those surveyed said the bill makes “the wrong types of changes”, and eight percent believes health reform was unnecessary The law has provoked a variety of responses from students of both major political parties at the University of Miami. “It is unfortunate how the Democrats approached and passed this health care bill. Last September, President Obama talked about passing a bipartisan bill with support on both side of the aisle,” wrote junior Chris Johnson, a member of UM College Republicans, in an e-mail to The Miami Hurricane. “[We] can only hope going forward, Democrats, local and national will look to solve issues of great importance by listening to all opinions and then finding solutions that are supporting by the American public.” Members of the UM Young and College Democrats, however, consider the passage of the bill a monumental step forward. “We’re very supportive of it. As a

symbol, and for what it does, we’re all very happy about what happened. Our next big focus is to make sure we get the senators and representatives that supported the bill into office,” said senior Lindsey Cartee, the club’s president. “It was not a very pleasant debate, it got very bitter. I wasn’t sure this was ever something our country could ever unite enough to do. It’s nice to show that our efforts helped and that this is now a reality.” Among the most visible results of the new legislation will be the mandate placed on chain restaurants throughout the country with 20 or more establishments to post the caloric intake of foods they serve. The provision is based on laws already enacted in states such as California, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Philadelphia. On Monday, UM President Donna Shalala spoke at a lecture series at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts in Ketchum, Idaho. She had been booked to speak about health care for over a year, according to Twin Falls Times-News, an Idaho news organization. “We’ve taken care of the seniors, we’ve taken care of the disabled, we’ve taken care of poor women and children,” she said, according to the Times-News. “This is very much part of the fabric of our country. Ramon Galiana may be contacted at rgaliana@ themiamihurricane.com.

Insurers are prohibited from discriminating against people with pre-existing medical conditions. National health insurance exchanges will be established to provided subsidized health care for individuals up to 400 percent of the poverty line and single Americans. Businesses with fewer than 25 employees will be given tax credits to provide health care coverage to their employees A new tax penalty will be imposed on businesses with 50 or more employees who do not offer health insurance. With the exception of the poor and those with certain religious beliefs, a penalty will be imposed on individuals without health insurance. This will help expand health insurance throughout the country.

For more on the health care debate turn to page 13. March 25 - March 28, 2010

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Food, friends, fundraising, a smashing good time ACS hosts annual commuter week BY ELENA SCHMIDT CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Walking into the room, the bright orange and green wall immediately makes an impact on newcomers. If the loudest and most talkative corner of the I-Lounge doesn’t attract one’s attention, the screaming school spirit will. On Saturday, the Association of Commuter Students will conclude their Commuter Week 2010, a series of events that raises awareness of the impact of commuter students at the university. With the leadership of the executive board members and the support of sponsors, the week not only showcases the organization but also raises money for the Haiti Relief Fund and the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. The theme for the ACS Commuter Week 2010 is: “We are Miami.” Senior Veronica Alvarez, the ACS vice president, is the lead planner for Commuter Week 2010. According to Alvarez, the theme makes sense because the majority of the membership is diverse like Miami, the area from which they come and because the organization prides itself on being the most spirited one on campus. “We are always in the front row of the football games. We are hard core participants in Homecoming week, our members are involved in many aspects of campus,” Alvarez said. “And with just one look in our office, you will know from our orange and green walls how spirited we are.” Senior Jaife Calil, president of ACS, joined the club her freshman year after attending Great Start, a pre-orientation program for incoming commuters from the area. According to Calil, Commuter Week is an important series of events for all commuters, especially those looking to be more involved on campus. “Campus is close to 50 percent of commuters, yet most involved students are those who 4

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live on campus,” she said. The week of events, including the commuter breakfast in the Memorial parking lot on Monday, reached out to non-member commuter students who have not been involved with the organization. As one of their most popular events, the Wednesday night Charity Date Auction takes place each year for students volunteer to auction themselves for a good cause. The week concludes on a Saturday with the 12-hour Relay for Life event ending at midnight. “I made friends,” Calil said. “I honestly had lunch alone the first day I was at UM. I realized after that day that this is what ACS is about. No commuter should be eating lunch alone.” Senior Christy Gonzalez, believes that the club has impacted her college experience because of the amount of time she spends on campus. “I spend 85-90 percent of my time at school,” Gonzalez said. “But it’s not because I’m studying; I’m hanging out. [Being a member of ACS] helps you really get a sense of community at UM because it’s hard to get close to people when you don’t live in the dorms.” According to Gonzalez, ACS’s week promotes the club to commuter students who may simply not know that there’s a club for them. “I think the main thing is that we get our name out there,” Gonzalez said. “Every year people come by the events and they’re like ‘There’s a commuter club?’ They had no idea.”

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

SMASH IT: Carlos Garcia paid to smash an old car Wednesday to raise money for Relay for Life.

Elena Schmidt may be contacted at eschmidt@themiamihurricane. com. Amanda Schoultz contributed to this report.

IF YOU GO WHAT: ACS Boxball WHERE: The Rock WHEN: Thursday, 1 to 3 p.m.

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Making changes in Haiti’s infrastructure Workshop generates ideas for the future BY ANDREA CONCEPCION STAFF WRITER

The University of Miami hosted a twoday workshop for scientists and engineers across the globe to come together and make recommendations on how to rebuild Haiti and decrease the threat of future disasters. The National Science and Technology Council Subcommittee on Disaster Reduction (SDR) is a U.S. committee that finds strategies to reduce the risk of natural disaster. In February, a month after the Haiti earthquake, SDR got expertise from around the world on the situation. “We’re trying to share our information and share with those that don’t have it,” said Cari Enav, deputy director of the Office of Human Rights, Humanitarian and Social Affairs. A public forum was held on the first day, March 22, with Eric Calais, a geophysicist and Reginald DesRoches, a civil and environmental engineer. Dr. Calais presented Earthquake 101, where he talked about the source of the earthquake, fault lines, the people and structures affected and future quakes to come. Dr. DesRoches’ presentation stated that 30-65 percent of buildings collapsed and 250,000 resident homes were damaged in Port-au-Prince. A few reasons for such high damage were that the first stories of buildings were weak, there was a lack of appropriate tools to straighten columns and a lack of steel bar support. “One thing we look for is not the strength of the structure, but duct ability where it can bend,” DesRoches said.

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RACHEL STEINHAUSER // The Miami Hurricane

CONVERSATION FOR A CAUSE: Wayne Pennington, USAID, Cari Ehav, US Department of State, and Olga Cabello, IRIS Consortium, participated in the forum about reconstructing Haiti. The most challenging aspects facing Haiti’s reconstruction is that the structures must tie in with the socio-economic situation and be cost effective. Most prominently featured in the discussion were code development and a change in government policies. The members of the public and university community then had the chance to ask questions: should the capital be away from the water? What are we doing for the

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 25 - March 28, 2010

short-term? Where is the debris going? “You could bring an average person who brings a lot to the table that we don’t know,” Enay said. A conference with the Haitian government will be held in the School of Architecture this week. The UN has set a goal of $11 billion dollars for the reconstruction of Haiti. The proposals from these two conferences will be given to the UN at the Haiti Donor Conference, on

March 31, where countries and international organizations will pledge resources Andrea Concepcion may be contacted at aconcepcion@themiamihurricane.com.

Log on to themiamihurricane.com to learn how to help Haiti.


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Four sightings of swastikas in Hecht Resident says graffiti was not a hate crime BY RAMON GALIANA NEWS EDITOR

Widely interpreted as an international hate symbol of white supremacy, the swastika has made its way back to the walls of the university. On March 12, President Donna Shalala issued an e-mail to the university community stating that swastikas have been sighted on four separate occasions on March 2, 10 and 11 at Hecht Residential College in both the Pentland tower elevators and the sixth floor hallway and bathrooms. “Defacing university property with a swastika symbol is not only a crime,” she wrote in the e-mail. “It is a hate crime and a deplorable attack on our community.” UMPD has opened an investigation into the matter, but has yet to name any suspects. “[We are] vigorously investigating the incident and we take acts that are perceived as hate crimes very seriously, as does the criminal justice system,” wrote Police Chief Rivero in an e-mail to The Miami Hurricane. “We will get to the bottom of this one way or another, but would rather have those involved come forward on their own as soon as possible.” According to sophomore Ryan Faulstich, a student who resides on the floor, the swastika was drawn in marker and called the floor’s resident assistant “a Nazi.” However, he doubts that the symbol was drawn out of a spirit of antiSemitism. “Contrary to how the news and other sources have made it out, [it] was not put in an anti-Semitic manner,” he wrote, in an e-mail to The Miami Hurricane. “In other words, it wasn't meant to be against Jews in the context it was drawn, although obviously the symbol is one that

carries a strong message of hatred along with it and holds no place to be drawn anywhere especially at UM.” The floor’s RA is not Jewish. A floor meeting was held last night to discuss the incident with the residents, and to discuss the conduct of what had happened on the floor. “It had nothing to do with antiSemitism,” said Ricardo Hall, dean of students. “I met with the guys on the floor and I told them: it’s not you making a joke, it’s about the bad reflection of students at the University of Miami.” Possible repercussions for the incident may include displacement from Hecht Residential College, as well as other, more severe punishments after an evaluation by Hall. Channel 7 WSVN, a local news station, reported on the incidents after Shalala’s March 12 e-mail. In the story, they quoted Helby Etter, a UM student. "I mean it's really scary. It's especially scary because I'm Jewish," she said. Faulstich said that Channel 7’s representation of the incident was exaggerated. “The media such as Channel 7 News has blown this largely out of proportion to make it sound far worse than it really is,” he said. Hall said there is little reason to believe that these incidents are tied in any way to early swastika sightings at the Sue and Leonard Miller Center for Contemporary Judaic Studies in the Merrick Building. On Oct. 27, a swastika had been discovered in one of the men’s rooms in the building. UMPD never opened an investigation because students wanted to clean the swastika immediately. The swastika had been found directly in front of the meeting and prayer location for the Muslim Students Association. Ramon Galiana may be contacted at rgaliana@themiamihurricane.com.

OFFERING TIPS If you have information about the incident, UMPD urges you to contact Miami-Dade County Crime Stoppers at 305.471.8477 or by text message at 274637 (crime). Type in “tips139” and type in information you have about the incident. For more information on how to report an anonymous tip, visit www.crimestoppersmiami.com 8

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The Miami Hurricane is now accepting applications for Business Manager and Editor in Chief. Pick up an application at UC 221B.


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JOSEPH FROM PAGE 1 During spring break, Joseph took the initiative to spend eight days in Port-au-Prince. When he came back he decided to pitch a tent and live like many of the now homeless Haitians. Gustavo Lang Jr., president of RAK, was inspired by Kemy's initiative and sense of action. “If you set your mind to it, you’ll find a way to make it happen,” he said. Joseph saved up money and went on his own. “The first two days I went to the provinces and those days affected me the most,” Joseph said. “It was hard to sleep.” He witnessed the tent cities, which were rows and rows of tents are surrounded by trash on top of trash. Though many people think all of Port-au-Prince must have been destroyed, a significant amount of structures still stand. Many homes are still intact with running water and electricity like Joseph’s family home, where he stayed during his trip. Some pharmacies, restaurants, banks and even radio stations are open. “Port-a-Prince is a very poor

Miami,” he said. “It just sucks that the beauty is overlooked and blocked by the amount of sadness.” He found that the best aid to give the Haitians was not donations, but rather, the chance for work. Ninety percent have no jobs. Many times mobs would form where officials gave job contracts. Throughout the trip, Joseph filmed his experiences. Todd Landess, a School of Communication faculty member, who leads a group of student media organizations and volunteers trying to keep the idea of Haiti relief alive, will post the footage on the group’s Web site, kozeawiti.org. “It’s so easy when you’re in this environment to forget the innocent living in hell on Earth,” Landess said. Due to school regulations, Joseph can only stay in the tent until 2 a.m., but he’ll keep going, until the end of March. He will return to Haiti on April 3.

NEWS BRIEFS FIGHTING AGAINST CANCER

WELLNESS CENTER CLASSES TO CEASE

On Saturday, Stanford Circle will be covered in tents, food and members of the university community for the American Cancer Society’s 2010 Relay for Life. The event, which begins at 12 p.m., will feature on-site fundraisers sponsored by student organizations for the society. It will end at 12 a.m. As of Wednesday, 45 teams and 646 participants had already raised $25,661.

On April 16, classes that currently take place on the center court of the Wellness Center will cease because of expansion plans to accommodate for the construction of the new wing of the building. For a full list of future Wellness Center classes, visit www.miami. edu/wellness.

Andrea Concepcion may be contacted at aconcepcion@themiamihurricane. com.

Log on to themiamihurricane.com to view multimedia content of Joseph’s trip to Haiti.

COURTESY KEMY JOSEPH

DIFFICULT TIMES: A Haitian woman who lives in a tent on Kemy Joseph’s friend’s property in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. 10

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Compiled by Ramon Galiana who may be contacted at rgaliana@themiamihurricane.com.


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Gaining appreciation for a new art form

BRITTNEY BOMNIN// Photo Editor

CONNECTING THROUGH DANCE: Senior Stephanie Ohlms follows instructions during her modern dance class which meets in Center Court at the Wellness Center. The class is taught by Carol Kaminsky, a registered dance therapist who uses dance to heal people who have emotional damage. “This class allows for freedom of expression,” Kaminsky said, adding that college students undergo many difficult changes while away at school. The class is composed of athletes from diverse backgrounds including football, volleyball, baseball and track and field. “The purpose is to make them a dance audience that will support the arts in the future,” Kamisky said. In addition gaining an appreciation for a new art form, students in Kamisky’s class are exposed to people they might not normally encounter. “We get people together,” Kamisky said. “We become friends.”

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OPINION UP!

What is the wildest thing you did over spring break?

TERRY TUPINI Freshman “Get a lap dance from a male stripper.”

Health care is going to be expensive and the rich are going to pay for it. Taxes will rise on households making upwards of $250,000, and those making over a million will have to pay $46,000 a year by 2013. Although it may be hard to sympathize with these wealthy individuals, they should not have to pay for the strain of the uninsured on the country’s health care system. These wealthy CEO’s are after all the ones running businesses paying millions of salaries, and are now expected to pay for their insurance, too. Will they be expected to set up governmentmandated college funds for the less fortunate next? Further, a leading cause of health complications is obesity, which has increased dramatically

BRAD KENIN Senior “Sleep for 18 hours straight.”

SISI PORTUONDO Sophomore “Win a mechanical bull contest in Cancun!”

This could be expanded to include taxes on cigarettes and alcohol, allotting the money for the treatment of diseases such as lung cancer and liver cirrhosis. Taxes have been proven effective with cigarettes; a ten percent increase in price lowered consumption by three to five percent. Another possible long-term benefit of raising these taxes is discouraging people from consuming the taxable unhealthy foods, leading to healthier choices. A healthy diet is a preventative treatment that doesn’t cost anything and reduces future complications. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial staff.

It’s 2010 and we’re using the same tired arguments against cannabis use. What is next, reviving that baseless “gateway drug” nonsense? Look, marijuana is no caffeine or acetaminophen (with both of those drugs, an overdose is possible- HEY-OH!). No, seriously. It’s not the safest drug in the world, but let’s be frank about the dangers of marijuana. Where is the causal relationship between amotivational syndrome and cannabis use? Oh that’s right, there is no proven one, at least according to the World Health Organization. Perhaps lazy turds are drawn to cannabis, but that doesn’t mean that smoking cannabis makes one a lazy turd. And “four cigarettes per joint,” another classic argument against the consumption of marijuana! Except this assumes two very silly things: 1) The joint in question is consumed by only one person. If that were true, the Musical Youth wouldn’t have been so stern with their command to “pass that dutchie” and share the love. Cigarette smokers look selfish in comparison! (But, to be fair, cigarette smokers are also less likely to demand that we try to sync Dark Side of the Moon to Wizard of Oz shortly after

indulging in their vice.) 2) Everyone smoking marijuana does so by way of a joint. In reality, marijuana can be smoked or vaporized (hey look, ma, no tar!) or baked into your favorite dessert pastries if you want. Cannabis does have demonstrable effects on the immune system, since cannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 receptors, which have both been found on immune cells. But show me a case of marijuana-induced infection in humans. And don’t get me started about sex. Most studies in humans have shown at most a modest, transient impact on sex hormones. Let’s not forget that marijuana can make sex unthinkably pleasurable, even with an unfortunate case of cottonmouth. I’m not a marijuana apologist. I think there could be real issues with cannabis psychosis in people with pre-existing conditions, but the demonization of cannabis gets us nowhere. Timothy Bishop is a junior majoring in chemistry and mathematics. He may be contacted at tbishop@ themiamihurricane.com.

Entertaining

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To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2010 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue.

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LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy.

in the past 20 years, according to the Center for Disease Control. Coupled with inactivity, obesity is the main cause of diabetes, which cost Americans $12,000 a year in 2007, totalling $178 billion. This is not to say that rich people do not have unhealthy habits. However, wealthy individuals should not be held responsible for the health deficiencies caused by lifestyle choices of others. A way to more fairly distribute this tax would be by raising taxes on less nutritious foods like candy or fast food items with certain fat and cholesterol contents. As a result the people who routinely indulge in health hazardous choices and in effect cost the most in the health care system, will have already paid for a part of their treatment in advance.

The Miami

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NATALIE CAIN Freshman “I went skydiving!”

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Perhaps lazy turds are drawn to cannabis, but that doesn’t mean that smoking cannabis makes one a lazy turd.

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HEALTH CARE: OPPOSING VIEWS

Reconciliation is necessary

What Congress didn’t say

am in complete support of President Obama pursuing a course involving reconciliation on health care reform. Yet, the reconciliation I’m advocating has nothing to DANNY HANLON do with improperly CONTRIBUTING using a rare Senate COLUMNIST procedural rule. President Obama needs to reconcile over health care- he needs to reconcile with the American people. The American public has clearly rejected Obamacare time and again over the past year. It started in angry town halls all across the nation, and then continued with elections in New Jersey, Virginia and, most shockingly, Massachusetts. Now a recent CNN poll reports that 73 percent of Americans fully reject Obamacare, with 48 percent wanting Congress to start from scratch and 25 percent saying they want Obama to stop work on reforming health care altogether. And how did the President and Democrats in Congress react to this clear rejection? Like that person at a party who just won’t take a hint. They’ve used secret talks and sweetheart deals to ram through this unpopular and extremely costly legislation through the House and are poised to use

econci liat ion is a parliamentary procedure established in 1974 as a means of creating federal policies that are related to meeting Congress’ fiscal THOMAS PRIETO objectives. The proCONTRIBUTING cess limits debate to COLUMNIST 20 hours and does not allow for bills to be blocked by filibuster. In other words, only a simple majority is needed to pass the bill. Although the interpretation and usage of reconciliation has changed over the years, one thing has remained the same. The party out of power always opposes its use; the party in power always uses it. Republicans made three arguments against the use of budget reconciliation for the health care legislation. First, they claimed that budget reconciliation goes against the founders’ intent. Curiously, Republicans weren’t making that argument when they were in power. Sen. Judd Gregg (R-NH), who opposed its use to pass the Democrats’ health care bill, actually supported its use in 2005 to pass President Bush’s tax cuts. In fact, Republicans have historically used reconciliation more than

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reconciliation in passing a related fix-it bill in the Senate. How did the public respond to this latest move? That same CNN poll reported that 52 percent of Americans were outright against the use of reconciliation to pass health care reform. With these numbers in mind, you can understand why Congressional Democrats wince every time Nancy Pelosi and President Obama mention reconciliation. The reason America rejects Obamacare is due to a fundamental flaw in the bill. The glaring problem with our health care system is cost, yet this bill does not do enough to reduce it through medical malpractice reform, increasing private competition or a myriad of other ideas that have been offered. Instead, Obama chooses to concentrate his efforts, and our overextended wallets, on expanding coverage. That’s like having a party which is too expensive for the people already attending, then inviting even more people who have even less income than those already there. Regardless, President Obama needs to be cognizant of one important thing when using reconciliation: there is one time when Washington must pay attention to the desires of America- election day. Danny Hanlon is a senior majoring in political science. He can be contacted at dhanlon@ themiamihurricane.com.

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Democrats. Since its inception, budget reconciliation has been used 23 times. Republican presidents have signed 17 of these bills. Second, Republicans argued that reconciliation should be used solely for budgetary purposes and not health care reform. Once again, they seem to be suffering from selective memory. In 1986, President Reagan signed the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1986 into law. The bill, which was supported by Republicans, contained health care provisions. Finally, Republicans contend that reconciliation should not be used to pass a bill that raises deficits like the Democrats’ health care reform bill. Unfortunately, this argument is not only hypocritical, but also incredibly misleading. According to the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, the Democrat’s health care reform bill will actually decrease the deficit by $132 billion over the first decade and $1 trillion or more over the next. Republicans actually used reconciliation to pass Bush’s tax cuts, which the Congressional Budget Office estimates increased budget deficits by $60 billion in 2003 and by $340 billion in 2008. Thomas Prieto is a senior majoring in political science. He may be contacted at tprieto@themiamihurricane.com.

Read more on Danny Hanlon and Thomas Prieto’s health care debate on THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM I’M STUCK IN A COMIC! ©

MATT ROSEN // The Miami Hurricane

March 25 - March 28, 2010

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OPINION

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Looking for a way to spice up your weekend? Check out Arte Americas, a Latin American art fair at Miami Beach Convention Center this Friday through Monday for $12.

BY CARY GOLDENBERG SENIOR EDGE WRITER

It’s that eclectic, electric time of year again. That’s right, from Tuesday to Saturday, Miami Beach will be celebrating the 25th annual Winter Music Conference, an electronic dance music event. Held over five short days, the conference is jam-packed with 500 events, attracting the likes of artists, DJs, record label industry delegates and fans looking to have a good time. Of these events, one of the most anticipated and highly-acclaimed is the Ultra Music Festival. Friday and Saturday, Miami’s Bicentennial Park will overflow with an anticipated 70,000 people sharing their love for sex, drugs and electrodance-pop at Ultra. This year’s lineup includes acclaimed artists such as David Guetta, deadmau5, Passion Pit, Carl Cox, The Crystal Method, The

Disco Biscuits, Infected Mushroom and many more. Many students attending this year are no amateurs to the festival. Dym, Junior Lauren Shepherd is attending a perUltra for the third time, though she feels cussion there is a downside to the festival. major at “A lot of the artists that play assume UM, will that their audience wants the stereotypibe joining me cal DJ performance set, when really, we and we’re playwould much rather see them in their ing under the natural setting with instruments, name Sinnzinn,” which is how they typically play outZinn said. “My muside of Ultra,” Shepherd said. sic is an influential Nevertheless, she looks formix of house, techno ward to hearing certain artists perand minimal music.” form, such as Groove Armada, Though pricey for Passion Pit and Pretty Lights. the average college student, Junior Alex Zinn will be tickets begin at $139.95 for a playing a 30-minute set on two-day pass, and $89.95 for Friday at the festival, his first a single-day pass. Before you gig at a major music festicomplain of the post-spring break val. workload or your prior weekend “My friend Alana plans, think of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity that awaits you at Ultra and the end of the Winter Music Conference. If you do find yourself at Bicentennial Park, prepare for neon light shows, an array of drugged out DJs, a plethora of musicloving people and a weekend full of shameless fun. Don’t miss it! Cary Goldenberg may be contacted at cgoldenberg@ themiamihurricane.com.

IF YOU GO WHAT: Ultra Music Festival WHEN: Friday from 4 p.m.–12 a.m., Saturday from 12 p.m.–12 a.m. WHERE: Bicentennial Park, 1075 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami COST: 2-Day General Admission (GA) $139.95, Friday 1-Day GA $89.95, Saturday 1-Day GA ticket $99.95

FILE PHOTOS BY CHELSEA MATIASH GRAPHICS BY ALLISON GOODMAN

LINEUP HIGHLIGHTS FRIDAY Tiesto David Guetta Groove Armada Passion Pit Carlcox Eric Prydz SATURDAY The Crystal Method Swedish The Disco Biscuits House Mafia Dirty South Orbital Will.i.am. Armin Van Buuren Faithless Sound System Carlcox Damian Marley and Nas Erick Morillo Sasha and JohnDigweed Above and Beyond Paul Oakenfold

March 25 - March 28, 2010

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Wilco leaves crowd wanting more BY ALEXANDRA LEON STAFF WRITER

Monday night marked Wilco’s first Miami performance in seven years, and it was epic. Miami Beach’s Fillmore at the Jackie Gleason Theater was packed with both older fans (as in, reaching their 60s old) and younger, college-aged fans to see the band on the first show of its “An Evening with Wilco” tour. The evening began with an announcement made by a robotic voice stating things the band likes, among them general

merriment and requests between songs, drawing laughs from an audience that was already buzzing with energy before the first notes were played. When Wilco finally came out, that energy came alive as the band opened with the song “Wilco” off of their latest album, “Wilco.” The song, which introduced the band, also served as a preview of the night: Wilco’s twangy pop powerfully delivered to relentlessly devoted fans. According to Wilco frontman Jeff Tweedy, even the

crowd’s participation was one of the best he has seen. In fact, he referred to the Miami audience as “better than mediocre” when everyone in attendance forcefully sang the lyrics to “Jesus, Etc.” without Tweedy’s assistance. The band was impressive, casually switching between playing acoustic and electric songs with perfect rhythm. Standout tracks included “Impossible Germany,” the frenzied “Misunderstood” and “California Stars,” in which the band invited a young boy

holding up a sign referring to the song to play and sing with them. Apart from their songs, the band’s witty asides offered an entertaining night. Tweedy shared the only two facts he knows about Miami (that it was founded by a woman and that everyone wears white shoes, of course), multi-instrumentalist Pat Sansone humored everyone with his caveman noises and a happy birthday was sung to one of their stage guys, Steve. The evening included a more intimate session in which

f lashy lights were replaced with a variety of lamps on stage and instruments like an accordion, a standup electric bass, a banjo, a sitar and plenty of maracas. Almost everyone present was left begging for an encore when the show was over, hoping to make what was an amazing evening last just a little bit longer.

Alexandra Leon may be contacted at aleon@themiamihurricane.com.

HILARY SAUNDERS // The Miami Hurricane

A NIGHT OF FAVORITES: Jeff Tweedy, singer of Wilco, rocked out with the rest of the band at the Filmore Miami Beach this Monday. They blew the crowd away with a fantastic set. 18

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DJ Motion Potion and Funk Dirty at the Rat BY CAMRON GHORBI STAFF WRITER

In a “can‘t miss” night of free music and entertainment, Hurricane Productions will bring the thrill of the Ultra Music Festical to UM Thursday. Funk Dirty, a hip-hop/funk group fresh off an appearance at the South by Southwest Festival in Austin, will be opening up the night with a performance on the Rathskeller patio. DJ Motion Potion, famous for his yearly concert at the Bonnaroo Music Festival, will be headlining the event and spinning inside the Rat as part of his Silent Soundclash Series tour. Funk Dirty kicks off the evening outside at the start of Happy Hour, and Motion Potion’s performance is set to begin inside around 8 p.m. “There’s no way any music fan should be missing this,” Hurricane Productions chair Max Winik said. “It’s going to be a special night at the Rat.” Motion Potion, who has performed at Bonnaroo for the past seven years, is taking his music on the road for the first time ever. He will be spinning his signature “silent disco,” a medley of tunes that are pumped into wireless headphones that will be distributed before the concert. Only the first 250 students who show up with a Cane Card are guaranteed headphones.

“For a DJ like myself who’s always been genre-blind, the silent disco format has been a true gift,” Motion Potion said. With a style that lead singer and University of Miami junior Miles Dotson describes as “the sound of new funk for the future,” Funk Dirty will be opening up the concert with an eclectic mixture of hip-hop, rock and jazz. Their set will be located on the patio near the Registrar’s office adjacent to the Rathskeller. Thursday is the first of back-to-back concerts for Funk Dirty; on Friday night, the group opens up for Julian Marley at the Culture Room in Fort Lauderdale. “I think Miami is a city of many influences, which matches up with our style of music,” Dotson said. “I’m excited for this, we’re going to have everyone dancing and feeling good.” Despite having played concerts on a much larger scale than his upcoming Rathskeller performance, DJ Motion Potion also described his excitement about his first visit to the U. “I didn’t start DJing until I was 23 years old,” Motion Potion said. “Playing for college audiences gives me a chance to remind younger cats that their lives have not even begun. This is one of the events I’m most excited about.” Camron Ghorbi may be contacted at cghorbi@ themiamihurricane.com.

COURTESY MAX WINIK

PARTY ON: Fans of silent disco rock out at Bonnaroo summer festival in Tenn.

March 25 - March 28, 2010

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Jam band visits Miami

COURTESY GIRLIE ACTION MEDIA

BY CHRISTINA DE NICOLA MANAGING EDITOR

Jon Gutwillig expects a party this weekend at Ultra Music Festival. As the guitarist for the jam band the Disco Biscuits, he intends to make the make the most of his extra week in Miami as he stays with a friend on the beach. “I’m gonna go crazy and just have the best time of all times,” he said. “I just expect to have a lot of fun. I need to get out of my hotel at some point in time. I expect to miss all of my phonebased requirements while I’m there.” While the Philly-based quartet has never played in the Magic City, it has put on shows at Revolution Live in Ft. Lauderdale. Starting in the mid-1990s, Gutwillig and his bandmates played fraternity houses at the University of Pennsylvania because “that’s where you make the good money.” “We were chosen to do it,” he said. “We didn’t really want to do it, but people came up to us every time. You can’t fight it, you just have to go with the flow.” But what exactly is the type of music that Gutwillig, bassist Marc Brownstein, keyboardist Aron Magner and drummer Allen Aucoin play? According to the band’s Web site, the Disco Biscuits mix free-form improvisations of jazz with the hypnotic 20

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rhythms that provide the soundtrack for rave culture, something that’ll fit right in at Ultra. “Our style of music is often called ‘trance fusion,’” Gutwillig said. Set to perform on Friday on the Bayfront Live Stage, the band is no stranger to the festival lifestyle. Since 1999, the Disco Biscuits have hosted Camp Bisco, a summer music festival, with musical acts like Snoop Dogg, Kid Cudi, Umphrey’s McGee and Infected Mushroom. Over 20,000 people attend, and the event now involves four stages and three tents in Mariaville, N.Y. “The whole point behind Camp Bisco was to make a biscuit festival and add electronic acts,” Gutwillig explained. “There were a couple of bills in the early years that were legitimate live music concerts by day and electronic bills by night. It’s what Ultra’s doing now and what we’ve been doing for eight years. Ultra’s understanding that these trance fusion bands are making the best dance music of today.” Part of being in a trance fusion band means that Gutwillig holds the distinction as one of 10 people in the world that can play songs on the guitar backwards. Just don’t ask him to spell the alphabet that way. “I can’t do that one sober,” Gutwillig said. “They ask you when

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

they know you’re drunk so they have a reason to take you in. They need some way to prove it to him. ‘Hey, touch your nose and say the alphabet backwards.’ Nobody can say the alphabet backwards! How are you supposed to say ‘LMNOP’ backwards? That’s one letter when you’re saying the alphabet.” Christina De Nicola may be contacted at cdenicola@themiamihurricane.com

March 25 - March 28, 2010

DISCO FACTS Their latest album, “Planet Anthem,” is on sale now. Bayfront Live Stage performance on Friday After the interview, Gutwillig injured his wrist in an accident and received immediate medical attention. He had surgery in New York and missed the band’s March 19 show in Boston. An announcement of the lineup at Ultra will be released sometime this week.


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SPORTS

47

yard catch by Tommy Streeter in the Champs Sports Bowl in December

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consecutive starts of allowing three earned runs or less by a weekend starter

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Looking forward to the WNIT sweet 16 Miami has hopes high for tourney BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

For the first time since Katie Meier’s inaugural season as the Miami Hurricanes women’s basketball coach, the Canes are in the Women’s National Invitation Tournament (WNIT) “sweet 16,” the remaining number of teams in the tournament. It has been five years, but the Hurricanes are savoring every moment of it and hope this is just a sign of good things to come. The Canes (19-13) look to carry their momentum into Thursday night’s contest against NC A&T (20-13) in the third round of the WNIT. The game will be hosted at the BankUnited Center starting at 7 p.m. “We’re very excited,” senior forward Diane Barnes said. “My sophomore year and junior year weren’t the best years. But we worked together throughout these past couple of years to accomplish something.” The inexperienced squad was determined to show their real identity after losing six of their final seven games to end the season including a 66-65 heartbreaker to Wake Forest in the first round of the ACC Tournament. The Canes came out surging in the WNIT and won two postseason games for the first time in school history. “We are really excited to be alive still,” Meier said. “We played two great games so far this postseason and it’s been a lot of fun. We have had a lot of balance and our depth has been great. We are getting contributions from everyone.” Miami knocked off Florida Gulf Coast 70-57 in the opening round. The Canes were led by sophomore sensation Shenise

Johnson. The first-team AllACC selection notched her 13th 20-point game this season as she led all scorers. Miami used a wellbalanced scoring attack last Sunday afternoon to defeat the University of Florida Gators 7764. Johnson led her squad with 19 points, but also chipping in were senior forward Charmaine Clark, sophomore guard Riquna Williams and senior forward Diane Barnes with 16, 15 and 11 points respectively. Johnson, an All-American candidate, tallied her ninth double-double of the season as she hauled in 10 rebounds. Eighty percent of the team is underclassmen, but it’s the two veterans that have taken on the burden of being a leader during this postseason run. “The seniors have been playing their tails off,” Meier said. “For Charmaine Clark and Diane Barnes, this is a tribute to them. They are playing their best basketball. They are running the huddles and getting in peoples’ faces for me. They have earned this run and we are going to try and keep it alive for them.” This will be Meier’s second time taking the Hurricanes to the sweet 16. Five years ago she guided the Canes to the round of 16 but she had inherited the team from former head coach Ferne Labati who had run the women’s basketball program for the 17 prior years before Meier landed in Coral Gables. Meier refuses to take credit for reviving the women’s basketball program. “It’s their run,” she said. “It’s all about them. I’m just behind them cheering them on and pushing them.” But the Hurricanes are not going to be satisfied with just making it to the sweet 16. They know they have a tough task at

MATT WALLACH // The Miami Hurricane

FLY LIKE AN EAGLE: Senior forward Charmaine Clark takes a shot over a Virginia Tech defender in the first half of Sunday’s game. After leading through the first half, the Hurricanes lost 73-69. hand as the Aggies are a quick and athletic team. “NC A&T is one of the highest scoring teams in the tournament. They scored against Wake Forest and that had our attention because we had a hard time scoring against Wake Forest,” Meier said. “It’s going

to be up-tempo. They have two special guards. They are a lot of fun to watch on film. They should be in the NCAA Tournament and might have pulled a first round upset.” Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@themiamihurricane.com.

March 25 - March 28, 2010

IF YOU GO WHAT: WNIT Sweet 16 WHERE: BankUnited Center WHEN: Thursday at 7 p.m.

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FOOTBALL

Improvement to be tested at annual spring game High expectations for wide receivers BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

The University of Miami football team has many questions to answer as they jump into the pivotal 2010 season, the final year of fourth-year head coach Randy Shannon’s contract. The coaching staff will have the opportunity to see just how far the team has progressed in the 14 spring practices at the annual spring game Saturday at 4:30 p.m. at Traz Powell Stadium. “[The players] do some things in the run game, show some flashes in the pass game. They keep getting better every day and every week.” Shannon said. Even with the coaching staff’s reassurances, concerns still loom. Sophomore Jacory Harris is out as he nurses a sore right thumb, the offensive line lost 60 percent of its starters from last year, and issues

still surround how physical this team is on defense. The one positive is the wide receiver rotation. The Canes have a plethora of talent with blazing speed and great hands led by the core four: junior Leonard Hankerson, sophomores LaRon Byrd, Travis Benjamin and Aldarius Johnson and the diamond in the rough, red shirt freshman Tommy Streeter. Streeter was one of the prized recruits out of Miami Northwestern but was plagued with injuries his first year as he red shirted in 2008 with a wrist injury. Last year, Streeter was patient and seldom saw action. He finished with only five catches on the season, but none was bigger than his 47-yard haul on a go route in the Champs Sports Bowl that ignited the offense for a comeback initially. “I always had confidence in myself,” the 6-foot-5, 209-pound Streeter said. “I was always just waiting on the opportunity. I didn’t know I was fast.” Shannon was very terse when evaluating Streeter’s progression,

but Streeter is currently fifth in the depth chart. “He just needs to keep improving, just like everyone else,” Shannon said. Streeter likes what he has seen from the three quarterbacks so far. “[Freshman Stephen Morris] has a real fluid motion and is real strong in the pocket,” Streeter said of the early enrollee from Monsignor Pace. Streeter had similar remarks for freshman A.J. Highsmith. “He has been here longer, so with his presence in the pocket, he feels comfortable being able to sit there and take a blitz and still deliver the ball on time,” Streeter said. But the lanky Streeter had the biggest raves for offensive coordinator Mark Whipple’s son, walk-on quarterback Spencer Whipple. “A lot of times when [the ball] is coming it reminds me of the movie Little Giants. It’s like a toilet roll just coming at you with pretty spin on it.”

COURTESY KERWIN LONZO

SKY HIGH: Tommy Streeter at the Champs Sports Bowl 2009. Streeter looks to build an even stronger bond with his quarterbacks and show the coaching staff that he is ready to translate his talents in big

March 25 - March 28, 2010

game situations like on Saturday. Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@themiamihurricane.com.

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BASEBALL

Team loses focus during another midweek defeat Mental strength not enough for victory BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

The Miami Hurricanes may have taken the UCF Knights a little too lightly Tuesday night as UCF (14-8) doubled up the No. 12 Hurricanes 6-3 at Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field. Earlier this month, Miami annihilated the Knights 19-2 in Orlando as the Knights were plagued by committing six errors. On Tuesday, the Knights played solid defense and turned three double plays to propel the Canes toward an upset victory. “We didn’t play the game offensively as well as I would have liked to and we didn’t play the game intelligently,” head coach Jim Morris said. “We didn’t get it done when we had opportunities offensively. Bottom line is I don’t think we were ready to play mentally today. We have to play the game hard every day. It doesn’t matter what the score was last time. We are now 1-1 with Central Florida.” The Hurricanes lost a midweek game for the second time in three tries. Last week they lost to Fordham. “The midweek games are killing us right now,” senior first baseman Scott Lawson said. “It seems like during the weekends we are so locked in and so mentally strong but we just don’t carry that into midweek games. We really need to be focused because all of these midweek teams are hungry to beat us because it really looks good on their resume because they are not in powerhouse conferences.” Freshman right-hander E.J. Encinosa got his first career start and he was electric. Encinosa, standing at 6 feet, 4 inches and 230 pounds, struck out seven batters in three innings of work. He was limited because he had been a reliever in his nine previous outings so he was not stretched out. “E.J. had been throwing so good,” Morris said. “We said this guy needs to pitch more. E.J. had been lights out coming out of the bullpen and Steven [Ewing] had thrown well his past starts but not as well as E.J.” The Knights scored one run off of Encinosa, but the Canes responded in the bottom of the fourth inning with a line drive two-run home run by Lawson over the right field wall. Lawson finished 3-for-4 and has three multi-hit games in his last four outings. “[Morris] brought me in his office,” Lawson said. “He knew I was trying to do too much. It’s easy to bring your average up when it’s so low. I was putting too much pressure on myself. Now I am more relaxed.” UCF grabbed the lead in the fifth that they would never relinquish. They scored three runs off freshman Steven Ewing (2-2) who suffered the loss. 24

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STEVEN STUTS // The Miami Hurricane

FROM THE MOUND: Freshman E.J. Encinosa made his first career start allowing one run on three hits while striking out seven batters.

The Hurricanes had a golden opportunity to climb back in the game and gain momentum in the bottom of the sixth inning. They trailed 4-2 and had runners at second and third with one out. But two of the Hurricanes hottest hitters, junior Yasmani Grandal and sophomore Harold Martinez, struck out looking to end the inning. “You have to put the ball in play,” Morris said. “We had the right guys at the plate. Those are the guys you want at the plate in that situation and we didn’t get it done when we had the opportunity.” UCF would add two solo home runs in the top of the eighth as insurance runs. Other than Encinosa and Lawson, a bright spot for the Hurricanes was seeing senior Taylor Wulf and sophomore Travis Miller pitch well as they both return from major off-season elbow surgeries. Wulf pitched a third of an inning in his second appearance of the year and Miller threw a 1-2-3 ninth inning in his first appearance since last year’s Regionals. Next up, the Hurricanes head to North Carolina for the second time in as many weekends. This time they face N.C. State (147).

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March 25 - March 28, 2010

“N.C. State is a good hitting team. They are always tough. They are a blue collar team. It’s always a tough place to play at too,” Morris said. Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@ themiamihurricane.com.

UPCOMING GAMES Friday @ 6:30 p.m. Saturday @ 6:30 p.m. Sunday @ 1 p.m. *All games can be heard on 90.5 FM or WVUM.ORG

MATCHUPS: MIAMI VS. N.C. STATE POSITION

ADVANTAGE

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Starting Pitching

Infield

Bullpen

Outfield

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Intangibles

ADVANTAGE

David Furones may be contacted at dfurones@themiamihurricane.com. LOG ON TO THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR DAVID FURONES’ ANALYSIS OF EACH POSITION.


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MEN’S BASKETBALL

A promising future for a young team Miami advances in ACC tournament BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

After going 0-8 on the road in the ACC, the University of Miami men’s basketball squad was determined to show critics they were capable of winning games outside of the BankUnited Center. The way the Miami Hurricanes’ ACC season was playing out, it didn’t look as though they could squeeze out a win. Instead, the Hurricanes advanced to the ACC semifinals for the first time in school history. Despite the amazing run in Greensboro, N.C. by beating No. 5 Wake Forest and No. 4 Virginia Tech, the Canes were left out of the NIT which showcases the best 32 teams that did not make the field of 65 in the NCAA Tournament. But now is the time for the Hurricanes to grow and burst out next year. Next season, guard play will be a strong suit for the Hurricanes. Scott was Miami’s first ever ACC All-Rookie team selection and he received ACC All-Tournament First Team.

Next year, Scott will be leading the team at point guard and next in line will be red shirt sophomore Malcolm Grant. Even though Grant doesn’t start, he closes down the stretch and consistently gets starting minutes. The combination of Scott and Grant should be the fastest backcourt in the ACC next year. Head coach Frank Haith knew the backcourt improved throughout the season. “We had a young team with a freshman point guard and a sophomore backcourt,” Haith said. “That takes times. It’s like having a freshman quarterback. Our guys got better. We have a very good foundation moving forward.” At the end of the season, sophomore forward DeQuan Jones really stepped his game up. His jump shot was falling and he was the best defensive one-on-one player Miami had. If Jones can bring that same style and intensity over to next season, then the Hurricanes will not finish last in the ACC again. Miami will have only one senior next year with forward Adrian Thomas being granted another season, redshirt freshman center Reggie Johnson.

Johnson was named ACC AllTournament Second Team. He was the biggest surprise for the orange and green this year. Johnson averaged 13.7 points and a team-high eight rebounds in the ACC Tournament. Johnson finished the regular season third among all ACC freshmen in rebounding average and was 10th among all players in free throw shooting in conference games. However, the Canes will be thin in the post. Next in line, will be redshirt freshman Donnavan Kirk off the bench. Kirk has yet to play and the post might be the weak point

of the team. Right now, it looks like the Hurricanes will be adding only two players in their 2010 class. One is a 6-foot-five-inch shooting guard Rion Brown from Hinesville, Ga. The other is power forward Raphael Akpejiori, a 6-foot-9-inch Nigerian native who played ball in Kansas. The problem for the two will be being able to crack the lineup. It will be difficult for Brown to jump Antoine Allen, Garrius Adams, Scott and Grant in the backcourt. Also, it will take some effort from Akpejiori to move ahead of Kirk. Plus, Haith has been known to

redshirt post players in the past. Haith is excited for his team down the road. “You can just see the potential of this basketball team,” Haith said. “I think our best basketball is ahead of us in this program. These guys are all babies and we’re only going to have one senior on our team next year, so I think it’s going to be a team that can have some success down the road, a lot of success down the road.” Lelan LeDoux may be contacted at lledoux@themiamihurricane.com.

ALEX BROADWELL // The Miami Hurricane

BEAT BASKET: Sophomore Julian Gamble goes up for a shot. March 25 - March 28, 2010

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The Miami Hurricane is holding Elections! The positions of Editor-In-Chief and Business Manager for the Fall 2010 semester are up for election. Elections will take place through the Board of Publications on Tuesday, Apr. 13 at 7:30 am. Applications are due Apr. 6. To apply for Editor-In-Chief, contact Bob Radziewicz at: bobr@miami.edu. To apply for Business Manager, contact Bob DuBord at: rdubord@miami.edu.

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