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The Miami

Vol. 91, Issue 41 | March 21 - March 24, 2013

com

HURRICANE

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STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

The road to Atlanta Miami has already pulled off a magical season of firsts, but there’s work to be done. Jim Larranaga and his team of poised veterans cut down the net in Greensboro last week. Will they pull off a repeat performance at the Big Dance?

See page 9


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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Secret ingredient, renovation plans revealed SG hosts first-ever Iron Chef UM BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT EDITOR

Junior Danny Barry lifted the smoking silver metal lid. Uncovering a platter of raw meat, he revealed the secret ingredient – American bison – in the first-ever Iron Chef UM competition at the Mahoney-Pearson Dining Hall on Wednesday evening. Three teams of two student celebrities wearing black aprons and white chef hats were paired with an on-campus executive chef in the event planned by Student Government (SG) and Dining Services. SG Vice President Caitlin Giles, who competed alongside SG President Nawara Alawa, exclaimed an excited “woohoo” at the prospect of cooking with the unusual ingredient. Aromas of blueberry barbecue sauce and bison lettuce wraps wafted in the dining hall, reeling in students having dinner. “It smells good in here,” said SG Executive-at-Large External Bhumi Patel, who worked with Dining Services to plan the competition. Other student spectators dined

on hors d’oeuvres, while the three teams prepared their meals. A panel of six judges, which included Vice President of Student Affairs Pat Whitely and Director of the Wellness Center Norm Parsons, taste-tested each of the dishes to select a winner. Hurricane athletes Nrithya Sundararaman and Miles Levine won the competition with their dish: bison burgers with Caribbean slaw. “Nrithya and Miles are both athletes, so we cover a wide base of campus, and they represent a lot of campus coming together for this event,” Patel said. Brenden Koller, president of the Interfraternity Council, and Steven Priepke, assistant dean of students, made up the final team of competitors. An executive chef who works in the Hurricane Food Court assisted as they used hanger steak, a cut of bison beef similar to skirt steak. Junior Jordan Livingston came to the event to support his friends, Alawa and Giles, and the SG program. “It’s a way fancier setup than I thought it would be,” said Livingston, an SG enthusiast. “It’s really exciting.” The event concluded with a public announcement about the renovations that will take place in the

CHARLOTTE CUSHING // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER STUDENTS TO CHEFS: Student leaders competed in the first-ever Iron Chef UM competition Wednesday in the Mahoney-Pearson Dining Hall.

Mahoney-Pearson Dining Hall. “We decided on this type of atmosphere, and that we would incorporate the reveal of the renovations into it because it’s perfect timing and to have it at Mahoney dining hall, where the renovations are taking place,” Patel said. The building will be knocked down, and the new dining hall will offer high-top seating, conferencestyle seating for large groups and even

outdoor seating. Posters of building renderings were on display. “Students have been coming by and looking at the posters for it,” said Barry, the marketing intern for Chartwell. “We’ve got some really, really awesome stuff coming next year.” This will hopefully not be the last Iron Chef event at UM, said Patel, who is also the SG President-elect. “I hope it’s a tradition that continues,” she said.

CAMPUS LIFE

Students discover creative study nooks Stress leads to innovative solutions BY REBECCA COHEN CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Studying can be done almost anywhere: in a bedroom, in a closet, at the beach or a bar. With 10,509 students at the University of Miami, students are bound to get creative when finding and choosing their best study spots. Junior Danielle Bouquio, an employee at the Tavern Bar in Coconut Grove, studies at the bar and finds Tavern convenient. Junior Jacqueline Rangel joins Bouquio at the bar to study as well. The two find it a nice way to study together in a lively environment. “Well since I work there, I control the music that is playing, so I can put on whatever I want,” Bouquio said. “There is a lot of space on the bar to spread things out. The customers that are there during the day are always encouraging me 2

NEWS

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to keep up with my studies.” Others, like senior Hadley Manfredi, prefer a more secluded study location. She finds it too chaotic to study on campus, so she turns to her closet for study serenity. “My closet at school is pretty big, but not big enough for someone to come sit in there and bother me while I study,” Manfredi said. “When I go in there, there aren’t any windows for me to be wishing I was outside and enjoying some quality sun and tanning time.” Junior Amanda Sahley, however, rejects quiet locations. She studies with screaming music in her ears. The severity of the music helps her concentrate by blocking everything else. “I like singing while listening,” she said. “I sometimes associate songs with topics when I’m taking a test in my memory.” But for some students, studying is coupled with other activities like exercise. The Wellness Center can serve as an ideal study location for these multitaskers. In an effort to maximize her time, junior Nabila Bader, studMarch 21 - March 24, 2013

ies while running on the treadmill. “Well I usually read and study on the treadmill because I feel like while I’m working out and waiting for the time to pass,” she said. “I’m not focusing on the exercise and more on what I’m reading, so it makes the exercise not so dreadful.” The efficiency and convenience of studying while working out is also a great method to keep your mind and body healthy, Bader said. Of course, with the glistening, Miami sun and clear blue skies, some students feel it is a sin to study inside. Sophomore Puck Readers, an undeclared pre-med major, utilizes any time she has to take a trip to the beach to study. “The reason why I like to study on the beach is because it relaxes me while studying, so I learn quicker,” she said. “I like to climb up in a big tree to get away from things and read my assigned readings. I hate libraries because I always see people I know, and I feel like I can’t take little breaks like taking a nap or going for a swim.”

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

Missed Tuesday night’s baseball game against Columbia? Check out Nicholas Gangemi’s photo brief for the game’s best moments. The Roxy Theatre presented “Thoroughly Modern Millie.” Elizabeth De Armas reviewed the performance. Subscribe for the email edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com. TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane

ON THE COVER Head Coah Jim Larranaga celebrates the ACC Championship win. ZACH BEEKER // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


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NATIONAL NEWS

NEWS BRIEFS USPEAK The fifth issue of UM’s literary journal Mangrove will be unveiled at USpeak. The event will feature readings from Mangrove, open-mic readings from some of the Mangrove staffers and members of the Miami writing community. USpeak will occur at the Oasis Cafe in the UC from 8 to 10 p.m. Thursday. For more information, contact mangrovejournal@gmail.com or visit the Mangrove Facebook page.

HAITI WEEK Haitian Culture Week began Tuesday with a celebration at the Rock. Events will continue throughout the week until March 28. Other activities include a game night and a carnival in the School of Communication courtyard. For more information, contact miamihso@gmail.com.

SYRIAN RELIEF CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR WOMEN WARRIORS: Senior Cadet Battalion Commander Tori Charvat helps lead stretching at the Florida International University. Charvat is the highest ranking cadet in the Southern Strike Battalion and will go into the Army active duty Military Police in May.

Lifted ban benefits ROTC women UM female cadets can now rise to new levels BY SAM ABBASSI SENIOR NEWS WRITER

Cadets and professors of the Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) responded to the Pentagon’s decisions to lift its ban on women in combat. The policy change was announced back on Jan. 24, but will not be enacted until 2016. Senior Tori Charvat, Army ROTC Battalion commander, sees that the policy is a progressive move and standard of the United States military. “The military has typically been at the forefront of change within the American population, like when African-Americans were integrated into military,” she said. Fellow cadet at Florida International University, Commander Sergeant Major Luisa Tobon echoes Charvat. “It could impact the private sector in terms of equality and could be something that the rest of the country follows suit in,” she said. Besides these widespread consequences, UM ROTC cadet Adam O’Reilly said that the policy will help female cadets improve their motivation. “Knowing that they’ll be officers and

knowing that they’ll will have the same opportunities as men, will give them so much more motivation as they work their way up,” he said. O’Reilly believes that a more diverse group in the military is beneficial because it brings different perspectives to a situation that solves problems in the field. “Women do have certain strengths that men don’t have, and vice and versa,” Charvat said. “There are certain aspects that women could bring to a combat unit that men simply can’t.” Sergeant First Class Jim Lanfear, who teaches military science to freshman and sophomore cadets at UM, understands those strengths from his two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. “When I was in Iraq and Afghanistan, we would sometimes take females with us because they can communicate with the local female populous, especially in the Middle East where the gender rules are much stricter,” he said. Lanfear noted that having females actually integrated into the squad would be much more beneficial than relying on outside assets and resources. According to USA Today, women are currently in combat situations on a regular basis, but they are just not granted the opportunity to be listed in infantry and other direct actions in Military Occupational Specialties (MOS).

Charvat, Tobon and O’Reilly find the counterargument of the policy change invalid because gender does not determine the cadet’s capability. “I think people get confused and are being sexist when they say women can’t handle it. Well, 90 percent of men can’t handle it either,” O’Reilly said. “You’re going to have to be able to pick up 70-pound mortar shells again and again, and people say a lot of women can’t do that, well a lot of men also can’t do that.” Not only can the policy change benefit the military as a whole, but it will also enhance opportunities for female troops in their military careers, Tobon said. “It will open up a lot more doors that were previously closed for women in the military because promotions rely heavily on combat experience,” she said. Lanfear, however, believes that the policy change in terms of ROTC doesn’t necessarily affect them because ROTC focuses on building a leadership core within the cadets. “We are teaching everyone to be leaders, and leadership is one standard,” he said. Charvat and Tobon are examples of this standard leadership. They are the leading cadets for the entire Southern Strike Battalion, which includes eights schools from the South Florida region including Florida Atlantic University, Barry University and Miami-Dade College. March 21 - March 24, 2013

The Middle Eastern Studies Society will host a clothing drive and sell Middle Eastern foods to benefit Syrians who have left their homes for refugee camps in Jordan. Club members will be tabling in the UC Breezeway throughout the week of March 25 every day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, visit facebook. com/MESSatUM.

RAFFLE Two basketballs signed by the UM 2013 ACC Champions will be raffled at the UC Breezeway from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday, Friday and March 25 through 29.The UM Hurricane Athletic Training Students will be selling raffle tickets. One ticket costs $2, three tickets cost $5 and seven tickets are $10.

SOCIAL JUSTICE The Students Together Ending Poverty (S.T.E.P.) organization will feature Hunger and Homelessness Week Saturday through March 29. Each day will focus on a specific theme, such as sexual orientation and youth homelessness, at Eaton Residental College, apartment 108 and a faces of homelessness series on the Rock from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m Monday through March 28. For more information, contact umstep11@gmail.com. Alex Gonzalez may be contacted at agonzalez@themiamihurricane.com.

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COMMUNITY

High school partnership opens doors Program makes plans to expand BY ASHLEY MARTINEZ COPY EDITOR

Going to college is something most students take for granted, but for many people, college is an unattainable dream. The University of Miami Office of Civic and Community Engagement is bridging the gap between traditionally underserved high school students and UM students to promote a college-going atmosphere. “All the students who have participated have all seen a tremendous impact on their lives,” said Robin Bachin, assistant provost for civic and community engagement. “It’s a significant experience for them to the point of completely changing their plans for graduate school, or their career after seeing the tremendous benefit their enthusiasm can bring to our community.” The Southridge High School Partnership brings together high school students, teachers and UM undergraduates to provide innovative lectures and enhance the public school curriculum. The program is finishing its second year and is looking forward to expanding its reach next semester. The program currently accepts history or English majors who will be paired with a teacher at Southridge High School. The student will assist in promoting a college-going culture by translating what they are learning in their classes to practical classroom learning for high school students.

I think that the humanities and the social sciences are less about translating data or knowledge, but about teaching a way of reading, writing and thinking. Shane Owens, Senior majoring in English literature and international relations

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NEWS

Because it has been a success for all the key stake holders, the program will be expanding next semester to Booker T. Washington High School and will include

I hope they understand they bring tremendous value to our community at large and their intellectual mindset and passion for learning ... can be translated to classrooms. Robin Bachin, Assistant provost for civic and community engagement

STEM subjects, Bachin said. English and history are a semester long commitment and worth three credits. The STEM program will be a one-year commitment and will be worth six credits. As part of the program, students will present three guest lectures, coordinate with the teacher to enhance three lessons plans, meet with the teacher five times to discuss the curriculum and mentor the students during class. “For UM students, this is eyeopening,” Bachin said. “It forces them to know and understand what they are studying in order to make it compelling for high school students.” So far, the program has focused on English and history because literacy and writing skills are essential to the college admissions and handling the workload. Senior Shane Owens is working at Southridge with sophomore English honors students and is studying Edgar Allen Poe with them. “I think that the humanities and the social sciences are less about translating data or knowledge, but about teaching a way of reading, writing and thinking,” Owens said. “In subjects like English and history, there’s not the issue of a knowledge gap, it’s an experience gap. The interactive nature of learning these subjects

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

means you can take a college student like me with a group of high school students, and we can have a mutual learning process.” Bachin hopes UM students will get involved with the program and realize the rewards of investing their time. “I hope they understand they bring tremendous value to our community at large and their intellectual mindset and passion for learning is not just for personal gain, but can be translated to classrooms as well to serve some larger civic purpose,” she said.

It’s Not Too Late To Be In YOUR Yearbook

FAST FACTS Some facts about the program include:

THE HISTORY

Expanding to two schools Will include STEM subjects Currently accepting history and English majors

Semester-long commitments to the program Worth three credits a semester STEM program is a year-long and worth six credits WHAT THEY DO

Plan three guest lectures Create three lesson plans by coordinating with teachers

Attend five teacher discussions about curriculum Mentor students in class

March 21 - March 24, 2013

Portraits have been brought back for ONLY ONE MORE WEEK, starting Tuesday the 26th

just for YOU! Tuesday thru Friday 10AM—6PM UC Lower Lounge

Graduating Seniors: FOR MORE INFORMATION The deadline to apply for the partnership is Friday. To apply, visit miami. edu/index.php/civic_ community_engagement/ initiatives/southridge.

Make your appointment @ WWW.OURYEAR.COM SCHOOL CODE: 136 Graduation Portraits: $25 FREE for Underclassmen


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March 21 - March 24, 2013

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OPINION

... no level of government should have the authority to dictate what we can and cannot consume.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

The Miami

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

UP!

What do you think about the Canes getting a No. 2 seed for the NCAA Tournament?

RICHEY FRAGA SOPHOMORE “The Canes having the No. 2 seed in the upcoming tournament is a fantastic thing, not only for the team, but also for the University of Miami. It’s the highest we’ve ever been ranked, and it’s really exciting. You can feel the excitement around campus and everyone’s talking about it. Everyone’s motivated. We can’t wait to see what they have in store for us this Friday.”

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Don’t tread on our sugary sodas Obesity in America is rising at a higher rate than in any other country in the world. Some adults, and children alike, don’t take care of their physical health as they should. Not exercising regularly and eating poorly are the two main reasons for being overweight, or obese. It doesn’t help that fast food restaurants are conveniently located in every one of the 50 states. In South Florida, these fast food chains are found on every major avenue. Occasionally there is a McDonald’s, Burger King, Checkers and Taco Bell in the same shopping center. If not, they are within a one-mile radius. Recently, Michael Bloomberg, governor of New York, mandated a soda ban. Although his ban was overturned earlier last week by a New York state judge, it aimed to restrict the

sale of large sugary drinks at local movie theaters, restaurants and street stands. As a society, being obese is not something we should work to become. However, no level of government should have the authority to dictate what we can and cannot consume. Being obese is a health issue that needs to be addressed by the individual suffering from the condition, not by governmental authorities. It is our right as citizens to be able to choose what to eat freely, without limitations. At the end of the day, a regulation will not stop people from finding a way to consume soda or any other unhealthy food. As long as fast food is around, soda will be, too. Although the government cannot limit our right to choose what to eat or drink, there are other ways they can help. For

example, some cities require calorie counts to be included in menus at restaurants. In Miami, food chains such as Subway, McDonald’s and Panera Bread already have this measure in place. Adding calorie counts to menus educates people who are choosing what they want to eat. Although it doesn’t limit their options, it allows them to make educated decisions. In many cases, people may still choose to eat the meal with more calories, but at least they will know what they’re putting into their bodies. Knowing exactly what you are eating or drinking is a benefit, even if it is overlooked. But don’t take away our freedom to choose. Some people want to go for the big gulp. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Self-defense law poses threats JORDAN CAREY LAW STUDENT “I think it’s pretty cool since going into the season the Canes weren’t even ranked, and now they’re the No. 2 seed. But, there’s definitely an open debate that they had a better resume than Gonzaga, who’s No. 1. They lost to two really good teams and didn’t really play any other teams, but being a No. 2 seed is pretty good. And if they get to play Indiana, I think it’ll be a heck of a game.”

Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Daniel Cepero

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OPINION

lorida’s Stand Your Ground law has been the circle of controversy and criticism since its inception. The law gives someone the right to use deadly force if the person reasonably believes his or her life is in imminent danger, or if the person believes deadly force is necessary to protect his or her property. CHRISTOPHER IVORY This defense may not be assertSTAFF ed against things like law enforceCOLUMNIST ment officer or to prevent the lawful repossession of property. The Stand Your Ground law is not textually absurd. In fact, this law has been mimicked by more than 20 other states. The problem lies in the precedent the law sets. This statute, while well intended, incentivizes possessors of deadly weapons to avoid retreat and unnecessarily use deadly force to subdue the threat at hand. Human nature tells us to use what we have. When you buy a new dress and heels, you look for the dinner party to wear them to. Similarly, when we acquire deadly

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F

March 21 - March 24, 2013

weapons, we subconsciously find reasons to use them. Stand Your Ground provides a justifiable defense for using deadly force. Why bother to exhaust all options to escape from harm’s way when you don’t have to? A vaguely stated “reasonable belief that such force is necessary” births the ugly face of discrimination. A person with a firearm may exacerbate the perceived threat of harm in encounters with people of different ethnicities. This was the case in the deaths of Trayvon Martin and Jordan Davis in Florida last year. As long as Stand Your Ground is a justifiable defense, the George Zimmermans and Michael Dunns of the world will have more reason to unnecessarily pursue and amplify the threat of different people on the premise of discrimination. Despite its application and criticism, it is unlikely that the law will be repealed or modified in the nearby future. Still, this law should serve as a message to lawmakers that if not careful, statutory misinterpretations can have severe unwanted consequences. Christopher Ivory is a second-year law student.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Mariah Price PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon NEWS EDITOR Stephanie Parra OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes ASSISTANT EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez COPY CHIEF Nicky Diaz COPY EDITORS Jordan Coyne Erika Glass Ashley Martinez

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger ACCOUNT REP Halima Dodo Kristyna Fong Jaydev Hemrajani Carlos Parra ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan DESIGNERS Ali Fishman Carlos Mella Amilynn Soto SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Rob Finn ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

WEBMASTER Kateryna Gontaruk To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2013 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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How to look ‘ultra’ trendy at UMF ‘13 BY JORDAN COYNE | COPY EDITOR STEPHANIE PARRA | NEWS EDITOR

While partygoers classically deck themselves out in neon and “kandi” (large, beaded bracelets typically given out at raves), it’s always cool to try new options for Ultra Music Festival. This year, the festival is celebrating its 15th anniversary and lasts six days rather than its typical three. Check out this guide for top trends to sport at the music festival and the top fashion faux pas everyone should steer clear from.

1

GLASSES

Dancing up the dirt under the sun creates the need for some type of protective eye gear. Beat the UV rays and the dirt particles, and grab a pair of sunglasses to protect your pupils. When the sun goes down switch to a pair of clear lensed glasses to continue raving safely. You can also wear your sunglasses at night and look just at cool. It’s Ultra ... no one judges you.

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TRUCKER HATS/ HEADBANDS

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Rather than letting the sweat ruin your hair and makeup, sporting a hat or a headband is an easy and popular fix. Neon trucker hats that say “rage,” are meant for nothing but that. If you don’t feel like covering up your luscious locks, rock a headband covered in flowers.

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CAYLA NIMMO PHOTO EDITOR

4

BANDEAUS

Though you may want to wear your cutest string bikini, think again. In a rambunctious crowd, it’s easy for someone to pull one string and help you have your own Janet Jackson moment. Instead, try a bright and printed bandeau from Urban Outfitters or Forever 21. Not only will you save yourself from embarrassment, but you’ll also avoid awkward tan lines.

4

EYE DOODADS

Kaskade is right: Eyes are the window to the soul. So bedazzle your eyelids with eye jewels, false eyelashes or glitter, all available at most Claire’s stores near you.

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ELECTRIC LOOKS: Ultra-goers enjoy Sunday’s festivities during Steve Aoki’s set on the main stage. These partyready girls have geared up to enjoy “the world’s largest dance floor.” Ultra Music Festival (UMF) will take place again from Friday to Sunday. Tickets are sold out, but for more information, like the lineup, visit ultramusicfestival.com.

COLORED LIPSTICK

Iconic women throughout the years have always rocked a bold lip look, and the women of Ultra are no different. Choose a risque shade of pink or purple you wouldn’t dare wear outside of a raver’s world that knows no limits. Get ballsy and go big, while trying new looks.

What Not to Wear: STICKIES/PASTIES

FEATHER BOOT COVERS

Most outfits consist of a top and a bottom. A piece of tape covering your nipple does not constitute a top. Regardless of your Victoria’s Secret model body status, save the tape and use it to go wrap your mother’s birthday gift instead. While you’re at it, remind her you still have some dignity.

Covered in sweat is one thing, but covered in sweat and feathers is another. Nix the feathered boot covers and save yourself the chicken look. Some say these are the staple of a true party-goer, but after one day they’ll be covered in dirt and look cheap as ever. Plus, that look is so three years ago.

March 21 - March 24, 2013

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MUSIC

Electronic dance music guide BY JORDAN COYNE | COPY EDITOR STEPHANIE PARRA | NEWS EDITOR

For two weekends, Ultra Music Festival attendees rage away for hours on end to electronic dance music (EDM). While dancing each day away, it can be difficult to distinguish the various types of music each DJ is playing. From changes in bass lines to the addition of vocals, each artist has their own sound that falls into a different category of EDM. Here is your guide to distinguishing between dub step artists, like Bassnectar, house artists, like Benny Benassi, and many more.

tends to have more organic or humanlike qualities involved (i.e., a voice). On the other hand, techno is much more industrial, rhythmic and at times, even robotic. Want to know more how this sounds? Check out Steve Aoki’s track, “I’m in the House,” released in 2010.

To Be In YOUR Yearbook

TRANCE Known as the “lovechild” of classical, house and techno, trance music blends all three genres and subgenres to form the slow-moving, yet club-raging beats. These tunes were born in Germany (the first trance melody was born in Frankfurt in 1993). While some suggest the music got its name for the emotional, euphoric feel the music emits to its listeners, others suggest its name came from an album released in the early ‘80s. Check out theuntz.com/best-trancesongs-of-2012-top-10-tracks for the top trance songs of 2012.

DUB STEP

COURTESY OF LYRICSPOND.COM Skrillex’s “Dear Diary, My Teen Angst Has A Body Count” was released in 2004.

lex, the movement actually began in the late ‘90s in England. The style sounds like broken beats, and at times includes drums, percussion patterns and deep bass beats. For more dub step, check out Spin’s list of the best dub step of all time at spin.com/articles/30-greatestdubstep-songs-all-time.

Though many people think the dub step movement started with Skril-

COURTESY OF DREAMCHIMNEY.COM Cybotron’s album “Clear” was released in 1990.

6 credits in 6 weeks? Really.

TECHNO A trio in Detroit started mixing beats in the early ‘80s, and then the techno movement emerged. According to gridface.com, a non-commercial webzine covering deep electronic music, techno was born after Juan Atkins, Derrick May and Kevin Saunderson were influenced by a radio DJ named the Electrifying Mojo, who played European tunes at the same time as Prince and the B-52’s. According to the site, Atkins and Richard Davies, also known as 3070, started releasing records as Cybotron. In 1981, techno was born. Check out “Clear” by Cybotron. Sound familiar? Missy Elliot, Ciara and Fatman Scoop added lyrics to the track when they released “Lose Control” in 2005.

HOUSE House music got its name because it was born in the basement of the artists who created it. The tunes are extremely similar to techno music, but house 8

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Attend classes in New York City, Westchester, and online.

Portraits have been brought back for ONLY ONE MORE WEEK, starting Tuesday the 26th

just for YOU!

Choose from more than 600 courses, including:

Tuesday thru Friday 10AM—6PM UC Lower Lounge

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Graduating Seniors:

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Your Summer. Your Pace. Sessions start May 30 and July 15 Register today for our Special Summer Rate

www.pace.edu/summer13 March 21 - March 24, 2013

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number of schools, including Miami, to make both the men’s and women’s NCAA Tournaments

79

points per game in the ACC Tournament last week by the men’s squad

NCAA TOURNAMENT PREVIEW

Hurricanes prepare to continue making history MADNESS: DEFINED Bracketology: The science of filling out a March Madness bracket from start to finish, with slim chances of actually making decent picks. Regions: The winner of each region (West, Midwest, South, East) meets at the Final Four in Atlanta, beginning April 6. Seeds: Each quarter of the 68-team bracket has teams seeded one through 16. The first round of the tournament is play-in games to determine the four No. 16 seeds.

WATCH PARTY INFO

ZACH BEEKER // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER ELATED: The Miami men’s basketball team celebrates the first ACC Tournament title in school history as streamers fly around them at the Greensboro Coliseum. Shane Larkin and Trey McKinney-Jones led the Canes over UNC on Sunday, 87-77.

Canes look to cut down another net BY PATRICK RILEY STAFF WRITER

The 2013 season has undoubtedly been a dream come true for the Miami Hurricanes. It’s a fairytale ride that not even Jim Larranaga, a noted believer in visualizing one’s goals, probably could have imagined. But the team is still six wins away from its ultimate goal. The Canes have departed for Austin, Texas, to face the Pacific Tigers in the second round of the NCAA Tournament at 2:10 p.m. Friday. In their first trip to the Big Dance since 2008, the Canes will be playing in a winnable East Region. Miami’s experience and maturity – the average Hurricane is 21.3 years old – as well as their superb guard play should propel them to an Elite Eight showdown

with No. 1-seed Indiana. Tom Crean’s Hoosiers and their high-powered offense (80 points per game) will be the ultimate challenge for the swarming Hurricanes defense. Interestingly, Indiana has made the ascent to No. 1 and then lost in the same week on three occasions this year. To make the final push to Atlanta, the Canes must keep the ball in the reliable hands of All-ACC first teamer and Naismith Player of the Year candidate Shane Larkin. The sophomore point guard, who leads the team in points and assists, has emerged as Miami’s go-to guy with his ability to create for his teammates and make important shots when needed. Miami’s frontcourt, on the other hand, will rely heavily on sixth-year senior Julian Gamble. With Reggie Johnson struggling to find his pre-injury form, Gamble stepped up as a defensive anchor, leading the Canes with 59 blocks.

Buffalo Wild Wings will host watch parties for the men’s and women’s basketball teams as they begin their respective NCAA Tournaments. The No. 2-seeded Canes take on Pacific at 2:10 p.m. Friday in the men’s tournament. TNT is broadcasting the game from Austin, Texas. The Miami women, meanwhile, are entering their third consecutive NCAA Tournament as a No. 8 Seed. Morgan Stroman, Shawnice Wilson and Stefanie Yderstrom will look to build on last year’s disappointing second-round exit. The Canes play Iowa, a No. 9 seed, at 7:35 p.m. Sunday on ESPN.

FINAL FOUR

PICKS

THREE SLEEPERS TO WATCH 1. Ole Miss: The Rebels head into the Big Dance with a lot of momentum after winning the SEC Tournament over the No. 3 Florida Gators. They have the 10th-best offense in the nation (77.9 points per game) and had the good fortune of landing in the weak West Region. Statistically speaking, 12 seeds over 5 seeds are the most common upsets, and if Ole Miss can stop Wisconsin they’ll be in shape to make a good run.

2. Bucknell: No, it’s hardly plausible that we’ll see the winner of the Patriot League Tournament in the Elite Eight or the Final Four, but the Sweet Sixteen is in reach for the Bison. Bucknell is second best in the nation with only 9.5 turnovers per game, and their opponents shoot just 37.5 percent from

the field (seventh best overall). Most importantly, nobody seems crazy about Butler, who came out of the gates firing when they went 13-0 from Nov. 27 to Jan. 19, but cooled down and posted a 10-6 record since.

3.

Colorado State: The best rebounding team in the country (+12.1 margin) will face a Missouri team that is not only coached by a familiar face, but also lost to Kentucky. The same Kentucky that just lost in the first round of the NIT. Meanwhile, the Rams have been able to limit turnovers (10.8 per game) and while they would face Louisville in the third round, one cannot forget that the Cardinals were 15 minutes away from being blown out by Syracuse and … well … crazier things have happened.

Ultimately, the NCAA Tournament is about rounding into championship form at the end of a year where no team has distanced itself from the pack. The field of 68 will quickly thin as the legitimate contenders dismiss the legions of pretenders (we’re looking at you, North Carolina A&T). Here are Patrick Riley’s predictions for the last four standing in Atlanta.

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OHIO ST.

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March 21 - March 24, 2013

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

E E T T I M COM T N E D ON STU ATIONS Z I N A G OR ion t a r t s i g e Re -r

ATTENTION STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

COSO’s re-registration deadline: Friday, April 19 by 12 p.m. Register your organization on OrgSync! Questions? Come by the STIC (UC209) or contact your COSO delegate before the deadline.

s d r a w A SOAR

CELEBRATE AND NOMINATE YOUR STUDENT ORGANIZATION

SOAR Awards is the student organization achievement and recognitions banquet. Nomination forms can be found on OrgSync and are due Friday, March 22. The ceremony is Wednesday, April 10 at 6:30 p.m. in the Architecture School Courtyard. Tickets will be available soon.

m a e t e h t Join

APPLY TO JOIN COSO OR THE CANEFEST COMMITTEE

COSO is responsible for making sure student organizations are in good standing with the university. We are behind Canefest, SOAR Awards and Organization of the Month.

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We are now accepting applications for the COSO board and Canefest committee. COSO meets weekly during the school year while Canefest members meet over the summer. Applications are due on Friday, March 22 by 5 p.m. Questions? Please email the incoming COSO Chair, Andre Abadin at COSO_chair@miami.edu designed by Kim Maples

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dear ...

Dear V: My one-night stand evolved into a love triangle... Dear Slutger, , I’m on a dance team, and I recently hooked up with a Rutgers guy at an after-party we both attended up North. We ended up hooking up the following weekend when he came down to Miami for a dance competition. This time things got a lot steamier, and we ended up texting and hanging out the next morning post the after-party. However, later that week, I found out that he has a girlfriend. I asked him if it was true, and he admitted it was. Even though I know it was a bad idea to accept his apology, I still want to continue talking to him. Why do I feel like this? Should I not text him anymore? Sincerely, Slutger Boy’s Other Girl

It appears that you are a victim of dirty dancing sans Patrick Swayze and the corny, ‘80s montage. As a dancer, you exist in the center of a dramatic life. Rehearsals are naturally sensual, and that sexual energy found its climax at Rutgers’ competition. These unsuspecting boys appreciate your way of life and know the tricks to seduce and then reject other advances. You needed a relief from the closet gays and catty girls that secretly comment on your amazing moves, but want you to slip and fall so that e-board elections benefit them. You made the first grave error in breaking the sacred code of the one-night stand. If you didn’t notice, onenight stands are supposed to end after one night. You can rent your prize, but you cannot keep it. And just think about your situation: you’re in the middle of an edgy love triangle that fans of “Felicity” and “Twilight” would envy. But without the vampires and

i convenient season cliffhangers, you actually have to get out of the triangle and get it together. If he is willing to cheat on his girlfriend with a dancer, then he may do the same with you. He’ll eye musicians, jugglers and photographers with a keen eye. You’ll then revisit a second triangle and before you can claim allegiance to Team Edward or Team Jacob. I’m Team Edward because I enjoy brooding faces during sex. I recommend cutting him out cold turkey. He needs to work on his relationship skills, and you need to search for potential suitors outside of skanky dance competitions and debaucherous after-parties. If you wish to continue and enjoy the attention of a love triangle, then start preparing for despair and anger toward your Rutger beau and the occasional menage-atrois. V

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Friday, March 22 • 2 p.m. Rathskeller Who’s ready to watch our ACC CHAMPIONS Men’s Basketball team take on University of the Pacific in the first round of March Madness!? Come out to the Rat at 2pm on Friday, join your fellow Canes fans, and watch the boys continue their historic season! This event is brought to you by Category 5 ithe Spirit Programming Board of the “U” and the branch of Student Government that works directly with Hurricane Athletics to plan events on campus to promote our school traditions, spirit, and athletic programs.

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, March 21 Men’s Tennis vs Georgia State 11 a.m. • Neil Schiff Tennis Center Come out and support your ‘Canes as they take on the Georgia State Panthers! Patio Jams ft. Juke 12:15 p.m. • UC Patio Continue your Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the sounds of Juke! For more information on the event or how you can participate, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-2844606.

Ibis Yearbook: Dear Miami... 3:30 p.m. • UC Rock This event invites UM students to share your thoughts, hopes, dreams, and fears for a chance to be featured in the 2013 Ibis Yearbook! Cornhole at the Rat 4 p.m. • Rathskeller No, we’re not selling roasted corn, but we are teaming up with UM’s very own Cornhole Club for an evening of fun, games and competition! Join us, from 4-8 p.m. and show off your skills with

this traditional Midwestern game. Do you think your team has what it takes to come out on top? Come check it out and get a free fanny pack! This event is brought to you by th Rathskeller Advisory Board. For more information on the event or how you can participate, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

Friday, March 22 March Madness Watch Party 2:10 p.m. • UC Lower Lounge Come to the UC Lower Lounge this Friday to watch your ACC Champs take on the No. 15 Pacific Tigers in their first round of the NCAA tournament! Tip-off is set for 2:10pm, so come and be a part of Canes history! Free pizza will be served while supplies lasts. Men’s Baseball vs Virginia Tech 7 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your ‘Canes as they take on ACC foe the Virginia Tech Hokies! This is also Commuter Night at the ballpark as a part of Commuter Week so come on out and show that UM Pride. This game will be aired on WVUM.

Party on the Bridge

CAC Presents: Zero Dark Thirty

8 p.m. • Hecht-Stanford Bridge

10 p.m. • Cosford Cinema For a decade, an elite team of intelligence and military operatives, working in secret across the globe, devoted themselves to a single goal: to find and eliminate Osama bin Laden. Zero Dark Thirty reunites the Oscar winning team of director-producer Kathryn Bigelow and writer-producer Mark Boal (The Hurt Locker) for the story of history’s greatest manhunt for the world’s most dangerous man.

Don’t have anything to do on a Friday night? Come on out and have some fun while you enjoy music, food and entertainment all brought to you by Pier 21 and the Department of Housing and Residential Life!

CAC Presents: Holes 11:59 p.m. • Cosford Cinema

“But if you forget to come back for Madame Zeroni, you and your family will be cursed for always and eternity.” Those were the exact words spoken to young Elya Yelnats the day he forgot to repay the gypsy Madame Zeroni. From then on his family was cursed with bad luck. One hundred years later Stanley Yelnats IV is wrongfully convicted boy and sent to a brutal desert detention camp where he joins the job of digging holes for some mysterious reason.

Saturday, March 23 Men’s Baseball vs Virginia Tech 7 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your ‘Canes as they take on ACC foe the Virginia Tech Hokies! This game will be aired on WVUM.

Next week...

Commuter Week

Monday, March 25 - Friday, March 29 The Association of Commuter Students will be hosting their 6th annual commuter week! Join ACS starting this Friday at the Alex Rodriguez stadium as we watch our canes baseball team defeat Virginia Tech! The week will continue with various events including Laser Tag on the green, a car smash, bumper cars on the rock, a drive in movie on the top floor of the Mahoney Pearson garage! For more information stop by UC 207 and meet us in the ACS office.

Sunday, March 24 Men’s Baseball vs Virginia Tech 1 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your ‘Canes as they take on ACC foe the Virginia Tech Hokies! This game will be aired on WVUM. A Conversation with Rachel Maddow 4 p.m. • BankUnited Center Host of MSNBC’s “The Rachel Maddow Show” and author of Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power. Tickets available online. CAC Presents: Zero Dark Thirty 8 p.m. • Cosford Cinema

Yearbook Portraits

Tuesday, March 26 - Friday, March29 • 10 a.m. UC Lower Lounge Final week of yearbook portraits is here! Portraits are FREE for underclassmen and takes less than five minutes. Graduation portraits are $25.00 for graduating seniors, make an appointment at OURYEAR.COM School Code: 136 so you don’t have to wait in line and to ensure the photographer is there when you go!

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 12

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Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

March Madness Kick-Off Party

March 21 - March 24, 2013


The Miami Hurricane - Mar. 21, 2013