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The Miami

Vol. 88, Issue 15 | March 11 - March 24, 2010

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL O RA RAL G GA GABLES, A BL BLE ES S , FFL FLORIDA, LO OR R IID DA A,, S SINCE 1929

He’s back NFL wide receiver Andre Johnson returns to his roots at UM, plans to finish his liberal arts degree BY CHRISTINA DE NICOLA MANAGING EDITOR

L

ike any other day, Karen Johnson picked up her son Andre from his football practice at Miami Senior High School and began cooking dinner. Rated the No. 3 receiver in the country by The Sporting News, Andre was looking over recruiting letters from universities such as Miami and Southern California, while his mom stood alone in the kitchen and suddenly heard a voice. “It was like somebody was on the side of me whispering in my ear saying, ‘Go tell Andre that if he goes to the University of Miami he will win a national championship,’” she said. “A couple of nights later, we were heading to dinner with UM, and Andre said, ‘I think I’m going to go to UM. And maybe two years later, we’ll win the national championship.’” Three years later, as a redshirt sophomore, that’s exactly what Andre Johnson did when he earned co-MVP at the 2002 Rose Bowl. The following season, after catching 52 passes for 1,092 yards and a team-high nine touchdowns, Johnson and the Hurricanes lost in the national title game to Ohio State in the Fiesta Bowl. He and redshirt sophomore running

back Willis McGahee were early draftees on a team that sent eight players to the National Football League. Johnson was selected third overall by the Houston Texans in the 2003 NFL Draft. When he made the decision to leave and pursue his professional football career, his mom had one condition: Johnson would come back to finish his degree. Seven years later, the 6-foot-3, 228-pound football player stayed true to his word and enrolled for the 2010 spring semester. “It was just something I always wanted to do,” he said. “I always told my mom that if I left school early, I’d come back and finish. So I just felt like it was time to come back and get it done.”

SEE JOHNSON, PAGE 17

REVENGE OF THE WALKERS ALL THOSE BIKE RIDERS SURE DO GET ANNOYING SOMETIMES PAGE 9

SPRING BREAK MIAMI STYLE STUCK IN THE CITY? MAKE THE MOST OF THE WEEK AND GO EXPLORE PAGE 11 PHOTO BY BRITTNEY BOMNIN


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Administrators hope to house all Forum gives lotto losers options BY CHRIS HARDGROVE CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Brought upon by the recent lottery chaos, Student Government organized an informational forum to rid bad rumors about the current housing dilemma. Jim Smart, director of the Department of Residence Halls and Gilbert Arias, assistant vice president for student affairs, met with mostly irritated students in the Pearson classrooms on Tuesday evening. “This new lottery process was necessary because of the closing of the apartment area and the promise of housing to all freshmen in Hecht and Stanford Residential Colleges as well as a whole floor in Mahoney,” Arias said. According to Arias, now is the best time to close the apartments due to relatively low rents and increased availability of off-campus housing. “I always assumed that Miami’s campus could serve as my home for my four years here, and now I feel like it was all a big lie,” said sophomore Michael Sutphin. Roughly 16 percent of students that participated in the lottery were not selected to live on campus for in the fall. “I will be very surprised if we

cannot accommodate all the demands of our students,” Smart said at the forum. “[We want] as many students as possible living on campus.” James Bauer, director of financial affairs, helped to clear up many of the rumors that have started since the release of the lottery results, namely the question of whether or not scholarships would be affected. He stated that there were no such scholarships for living on campus, and that funds, such as Florida Bright Futures, would go towards a student’s tuition instead. Annual surveys distributed by the Department of Financial Assistance to compile information about cost of living, housing and transportation for students who live off campus will help to calculate the money granted to the need-based students. According to Smart, the Department of Residence Halls wants to help students attain the best living arrangements possible. Nora Villegas, the off-campus housing coordinator, is in charge of helping students locate and arrange to live in houses and apartments in the local area around UM. She can be contacted at nsvillegas@miami. edu. Arias invited students to come to his office with any issues or concerns so that he can address them on an individual basis. If a student was not selected through the optin process lottery, they can sign up on April 9 through myUM to place

Attention YouTube addicts! Get your fix with our videos at themiamihurricane. com, including a FEC domino tournament and this week’s housing forum. ADRIANNE D’ANGELO // The Miami Hurricane

ASK WHY: Michael Kaplan thinks for a moment during the Housing Forum on Wednesday night before asking, “Why this year?” their name on the waiting list. There will also be an off-campus housing and “roommate finder” event on April 22, in the UC Lower Lounge.

Chris Hardgrove may be contacted at chardgrove@themiamihurricane.com.

LOG ON TO THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM TO VIEW FOOTAGE OF THE HOUSING FORUM

Pier 21

How normal is regular marijuana use? BY GABRIELA HALDER CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST

Bush, dope, draw, gage, ganja, grass, hemp, herb, Jane, joint, Mary, Mexican green, Panama Red, pot, puff, reefer, roach, smoke, Texas tea. What do all of these names have in common? They stand for the same thing: Marijuana. Introduced into pop culture in the 1960s, the drug continues to be used and abused by many. Use is especially prominent on college campuses where it stands as the second drug of choice, behind alcohol, for students. Although it’s not the hardest or most addictive drug out there, its use can have a detrimental impact on your health. First, regular marijuana users suffer from 2

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a condition called “amotivational syndrome” which means a person’s lack of interest in doing well in school, and pursuing a successful career. Additionally, the drug affects your lungs much like cigarettes do. One joint is the equivalent to smoking four cigarettes in terms of carbon monoxide, and five cigarettes in terms of tar in the lungs. Marijuana also weakens your immune system, and hence your ability to fight off disease. This is why regular users can catch a cold and keep it for weeks. The drug can even affect your sex life! Users of the drug report a decrease in sexual desire. Marijuana (with frequent use) can also kill a woman’s eggs and damage a man’s sperm. Doesn’t this information just make you want to light up?! Contrary to popular belief, marijuana use March 11 - March 24, 2010

among college students is not commonplace. Nationally, only 20 percent of college students used the drug in the past month. Even at colleges with the highest reported marijuana use, no more than 15 percent of students reported using the drug on a regular basis. Furthermore, depending on which campus you are on, it has been reported that between 20-40 percent of college students tried marijuana at least once last year, and between 8-15 percent are regular users. In sum, marijuana use isn’t as “normal” as everyone thinks. Gabriela Halder is a graduate student at the Miller School of Medicine and a peer educator for Pier 21 and the Sandler Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Education. She may be contacted at ghalder@ themiamihurricane.com.

Briana Grazioso has the 411 on the ROTS nursing students. Did you miss the fraternity intramural basketball tournament? Ernesto Suarez comes to the rescue with his recap of the event. Check out a photo slideshow of Cuban Heritage Week events. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.

CORRECTION In the previous issue, a caption in the Greek Week photo spread read that Delta Phi Epsilon had won for the eight year in a row. They have only won for the second year in a row.


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Dollars divided for development Rewarding Grant money initiates research campus-wide projects BY DANIEL OSIASON CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The University of Miami capitalized on the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) by obtaining over $90 million in grants that will help spur projects such as medical research, as well as building annexes all throughout the institution. President Barack Obama urged Congress to pass the ARRA last year as a direct response to the economic crisis, signing the bill into law on Feb. 13, 2009. The government has since distributed nearly $200 billion to recipients, with almost twice that number in funds still available.

Evaluators will look at information ranging from the incidence of sexually-transmitted infections to cost-effectiveness of the counseling, using the results to determine future policy. “We try to meet the person where they are at,” Metsch said. “In this very brief counseling, we are able to make goals ranging from condom use and injection use, to reducing the number of sexual partners.” The School of Education also hopes to capitalize on the ARRA’s generosity. After applying for the U.S. Department of Education’s "Investing in Innovation Fund," they hope to receive $30 million across five years to support and develop the studies of School of Education researchers Okhee Lee, Walter Secada and Randall Penfield. Lee, Secada and Penfield devel-

County were very happy because we would be bringing them a proven curriculum that they could use without having to reinvent the wheel,” said Marsha Talianoff, assistant dean of development for the School of Education. The School of Education hopes to partner with Lee, Orange and Palm Beach County public schools to conduct the randomized experiment compromising roughly 100,000 students enrolled in the third, fourth and fifth grades. “If the United States wishes to improve its international standing on science and the knowledge economy, it's imperative to invest early in elementary school children,” said Isaac Prilleltensky, dean of the School of Education. “The stimulus grant would enable the expansion of the program from Miami-Dade County to several school districts across the state,

6%

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Handling the funds In an effort to capitalize on the political initiative, senior leadership at the university created the "Stimulus Work ing Othe Group" r 1 7 .71% c o m prised of a cong lomerathus disseminattion of deans, admin22.3 ing knowledge of 3% istrators and other % proven methods 6 4 employees for the purthat work.” 54. pose of taking advantage of every posGrants assist in sible grant applicable to construction schools and researchers. One grant So far, the univerfrom the NIH, tosity has submitted 513 taling $15 million, proposals requesting roughly will assist the univer$440 million and 116 proposals sity in adding a neuroscihave been awarded. The grant money oped a ence and health annex to the Cox has supported 286 current employees hands-on science curricu- Science Center which will include a while creating and retaining roughly lum called P-SELL, “Promoting Sci- human functional magnetic resonance another 110 jobs. ence among English Language Learn- imaging (f MRI) laboratory. ers,” which provides language support The state of the art equipment will Medical, Education and other schools for English learners and teaches them allow scientists and physicians to cobenefit from stimulus to use mathematics as a scientific ordinate when diagnosing and treating A grant of $12 million, funded tool. multiple neurological diseases. by the National Institutes of Health’s Students exposed to the curIn addition to the f MRI lab, the (NIH) National Institute on Drug riculum during various studies have funding will also allow more space in Abuse (NIDA), will assist a coalition outperformed other students at com- Cox for psychology classes that curled by Dr. Lisa Metsch of the Miller parable schools in science, math and rently use rooms in Flipse Building School of Medicine and members writing, resulting in P-SELL gaining next to the Ponce De Leon parking of the San Francisco Department of the attention of public school officials garage. Public Health in determining if rapid around Florida. “Everyone is extremely excited HIV testing should be accompanied by “Some superintendents in Lee about that, and it’s a fantastic opporcounseling. tunity for the university and the comThose leading the study wish to munity” said Jennifer McCaffertydetermine whether linking counseling Cepero, the assistant dean of research For more information about to every HIV test, even for those who for the Miller School of Medicine. the American Reinvestment test HIV negative, will have a positive and Recovery Act, visit impact on reducing dangerous behavDaniel Osiason may be contacted at recovery.gov. iors and their correlated diseases. dosiason@themiamihurricane.com.

10 chosen to attend prestigious conference BY DANNI ZHAO CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Ten undergraduate students from the University of Miami have been selected to participate in the fifth annual Undergraduate Research Atlantic Coast Conference’s “Meeting of the Minds” April 16 and 17. The conference, which will be held at the Georgia Institute of Technology, is an opportunity for students to showcase research they are conducting at their respective universities. The student research can come from a variety of fields, ranging from laboratory experiments, field research and art research to musical performance. Juniors Sara Michalski, Enrique Garcia, Hilary Jacks, Lung Lau, Teresa Micotto and Natalie York, and seniors Johayra Bouza, Megan Stachura, Daniel Thompson and Carlos Antonorsi have been selected to represent UM at the conference. The University of Miami’s student representatives were chosen based on a universitywide competition. The goal is to have each school represented at this prestigious conference. “The conference is a wonderful avenue for students from a variety of backgrounds to have dialogues with other students and professors about their area of focus,” Michalski said. Michalski’s research mentor is Barbara Kahn, dean of the School of Business Administration. She describes Michalski as “very bright, very hard working, very creative and incredibly reliable.” Michalski worked with Kahn on marketing research for a year and a half. “Our research explores the effect of product image location on the perceived fillingness of a food product in attempt to cue portion size for restrained eaters,” he said. Antonorsi conducted research with Oscar Mitnik, an assistant professor of economics. “Carlos’ dedication is, and has been, admirable,” Mitnik said. Antonorsi describes his project as “using econometric methods to estimate the effect of [‘pork-barrel’ government spending] on the reelection rates of these congressmen.” Danni Zhao may be contacted at dzhao@ themiamihurricane.com

March 11 - March 24, 2010

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More Greeks find it difficult to pay dues Economy affects fees and fundraising BY LAUREN PRESS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The slowly recovering economy still has everyone watching their wallet, and members of the University of Miami’s Greek community are no exception. Although recruitment numbers are up this year, Greeks have been taking extra steps to cope with the recession. Several measurable effects reveal the extent to which the recession has impacted Greek life at UM, which is rooted in members’ abilities to contribute fees and raise funds. Events, materials and efforts made by fraternities and sororities are possible through the flow of money, most of which comes from

membership dues. “We have more girls on payment plans [for membership dues] than we have had the past couple semesters,” said Ashley Somers, treasurer of Sigma Delta Tau. Ethan Alpern, president of the Interfraternity Council (IFC) and a member of Phi Delta Theta, agreed that paying dues has become more difficult, but has not necessarily resulting in reduced membership. He said that a lot of students have been getting parttime jobs to help pay for dues. The amount paid in dues varies among the different Greek chapters. A Zeta Beta Tau brother living outside the fraternity house at UM pays $800 per semester in dues, whereas a Sigma Alpha Epsilon brother pays $480 a semester. Living in a fraternity house increases costs. "All of our brothers have been

able to pay dues for our chapter, but it has not been as easy,” said Justin Williams, a member of Kappa Alpha Psi and treasurer of the National Panhellenic Council, an umbrella organization for historically black fraternities and sororities. “More leniency has been given to pay dues a little later than what was expected.” Greek members agree that fundraising has also been significantly impacted by the recession. Each fraternity and sorority has a philanthropy event, designating a charity organization for its members to raise and contribute money on behalf of. “The biggest hit was to philanthropy events,” Alpern said. “We try to get sponsorships for larger events but, with the recession, it has been more difficult, so we are not able to make as much money for philanthropies, since it

costs more of our money to put on the events.” Although fundraising has become more difficult, it has not been impossible. “We have been able to still hold our traditional flagship events as we have in the past. We unfortunately have had to reduce spending in places like food and decorations to make up for lack of fundraising ability,” Williams said. In response to the economic climate, Greeks have taken measures to reduce and mitigate the effects of the recession. “We are more conscious as a chapter. Our executive board has already been told how serious and finalized their budgets are. As the treasurer, I am definitely taking a more conservative approach to spending our money,” Somers said.

The IFC is in the process of creating a scholarship system to help prospective fraternity members that are facing monetary issues. Alpern explained that his executive board and scholarship chairman are formalizing the scholarship, which will either give three $500 grants or one $1500 grant to help members pay for their first semester of dues. Individual chapters are also implementing scholarships, Alpern said. Greek life is elective and necessitates spending some extra money in return for brotherhood or sisterhood. “There are so many benefits of being a member that students will continue to take the initiative to go Greek,” Alpern said. Lauren Press may be contacted at lpress@themiamihurricane.com

Spring into art SUPPORTING THE ARTS: Sybil Pulver views artwork at this year’s Spring Into Art event at the Lowe Art Museum. Pulver is a long-time Miami resident and a University of Miami supporter; she says she is “addicted” to watching shows at the Ring Theatre. Spring Into Art took place at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Lowe. This year’s flower-themed event was inspired by a famous quote by Emily Dickinson which is displayed on a wall at the museum. Nearly 150 ceramics, glass-works, jewelry, paintings, services and gift certificates were donated for patrons to place bids on in a silent auction. Proceeds from the auction were donated for Friends of Art. “The auction is about promoting the arts, not just the Lowe or the art department,” said Lise Drost, chair of the art and art history department to The Miami Hurricane last week. Friends of Art is a group of individuals dedicated to expanding student interest in art. It was founded in 1965 to support the Lowe Art Museum. The Lowe is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and noon to 4 p.m. Saturdays. LINDSAY BROWN // Assistant Photo Editor

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Students look for easy graders Rating sites could lead to GPA inflation BY RAMON GALIANA NEWS EDITOR

Before enrolling in a class, students at American colleges oftentimes visit popular Web sites such as RateMyProfessors.com to view student reviews on their potential instructors. According to a study released by Kaplan Test Prep and Admissions, such sites are impacting the academic environment in several colleges. “Our research shows that many of today’s college students are looking at multiple factors when picking out courses; overall teacher quality that will result in a good learning experience, but also instructors who don’t like to award a lot of Cs and Ds,” said Jeff Olson, vice president of research at Kaplan Test Prep. “While it makes sense that students would opt for more lenient graders, it also helps explain the recent prevalence of grade inflation.” The study, which consisted of a survey administered to 1,229 active students and recent college graduates, concluded that 46 percent of students who visit such sites based their decision to take a course on the grading reputation of a professor. According to Kaplan, the most popular aspect of such Web sites is simply the peer opinions that are

written and posted by other students. Of the several categories under which a professor can be rated, the survey found that 77 percent of respondents said that “prior student comments about the professor” was the most considered factor in making the decision to take a class. Seventy percent of students selected “the overall quality of a professor” as the second most considered factor, while the third, “easy grading reputation”, was selected by 66 percent of respondents. According to Kaplan, a Duke University study stated that the average GPA at American colleges has increased from 2.93 in 1991, to 3.11 in 2006. William Green, the University of Miami dean of undergraduate education, could not be reached for comment. “I think it’s a good tool for students to get a feel to get handle on the type of teaching style that professors have. I looked at it a couple times but I don’t take it as the whole truth,” said Tim Hulsker, Student Government representative to the board of trustees Academic Affairs Committee at UM. “On the site you’ll see comments like ‘Oh this is the worst professor I’ve ever had’ or ‘this is the best professor I’ve ever had.’ The truth lies somewhere in the middle.”

Other Survey Highlights Students consider RateMyProfessors.com to be more reliable than not, with an average ranking of 5.8 on a scale of 1 through 10. Only eight percent of students who visit professor rating sites say that writing a review is the primary reason they log on; 71 percent says it’s to select classes. Just three percent of students say that a professor’s “hotness” factors into their decision of which classes to take. Pre-Law students place a much higher premium on how engaging an instructor is (73 percent) than Pre-Med students do (57 percent).

Ramon Galiana may be contacted at rgaliana@themiamihurricane.com.

NEWS BRIEFS GIVE BACK WEEK The Butler Center for Service and Leadership will host two informational sessions on Wed., March 24 at 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. at UC 233 for organizations interested in helping out during their first-annual “Give Back Week UM.” The purpose of the week will be to build a network of grassroots volunteers and “give back” to the community. Organizations can RSVP by March 22 to campusrelations@ givebackweekum.com 6

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COM SCHOOL BEGINS WEMEDIA CONFERENCE

YEARBOOK’S BIGGEST PHOTO SHOOT

The School of Communication (SoC) began its third annual WeMedia Conference on Tuesday. The event, which brings together prominent figures in the media such as Associated Press CEO Tom Curley and Juliette Powell, author of “30 Million People in the Room”, will continue until Friday.

On Thursday at 2 p.m. the Ibis Yearbook will be hosting UM’s largest photo shoot for the inside cover of the book, which will be released next fall. To be included in the photo, students need simply be at The Rock at that time. Free food will be provided by Sir Pizza.

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Compiled by Ramon Galiana who may be contacted at rgaliana@ themiamihurricane.com.

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March 11 - March 24, 2010

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OPINION

Nearly seven years have passed since our invasion of Iraq, and despite large gatherings before it began, there is presently no visible protest on our campus over the issue.

- ADAM BIRD-RIDNELL, Contributing Columnist

STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

UP!

If you could have sex anywhere on campus, where would it be?

KOI JAMES Senior “‘Where haven’t I had sex yet?’ is the million dollar question!”

RUTHIE SOLOMON Sophomore “On the trampoline by the U.C pool.”

JARED SMITH Senior “The Business School fountain.”

SAM SHUNK Sophomore “On the little arch near the Physics courtyard!”

The spring break myth We are the MTV generation. Though most parents would rather their children choose Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” over MTV’s “Spring Break,” back in the day that idealized portrayal of a week-long hiatus from school was the wildest time you could watch from your couch. Spring break was a starstudded event on MTV. In 1998, Boys II Men gave a live performance, and the next year featured Busta Rhymes and 98 Degrees. Here at UM, we live so close to South Beach that potentially any week could be an MTV- like break full of halfnaked beach bodies and celeb-

rities. The reality of a true college spring break, however, comes nowhere close to the fantasy MTV sells so many kids each year. Spring break plans revolve around school. Any shenanigans must be scheduled around those five projects you still have to finish up from midterms. Undoubtedly, many of us will have to leave the partying to the snow birds and spend our one free week this semester catching up on required reading. Another popular option for many is a quiet spring break with family. Though hanging with your little brother might not seem as cool as the MTV

experience, nothing beats family time. There’s no better way to save money than filling up on mom’s meatloaf instead of $12 drinks. So next week when you’re not surrounded by the wet Tshirt contests and beer bongs you always imagined would fill your spring break, don’t fret. The insane college experience you hoped for is not as typical as you might think. Taking a few days just to relax and catch up on all that sleep you missed during midterms could be just the break you needed. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial staff.

America remains largely silent on war t is worth remembering that when the United States began bombing South Vietnam in ADAM BIRDRIDNELL 1962, there CONTRIBUTING was almost COLUMNIST no domestic protest. By 1968, however, there were demonstrations all over the country, mostly by students. Nearly seven years have passed since our invasion of Iraq, and despite large gatherings before it began, there is presently no visible protest on our campus over the issue.

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Some might argue that we have killed far less civilians in Iraq since 2003 than we killed in Vietnam in the late 60s. But should our protests be in proportion to body counts? The American invasion in Iraq was a war crime of aggression under international law. The U.S. invasions were not out of selfdefense against armed attack, nor was it sanctioned by the United Nations Security Council or by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations. Aggression, "the supreme international crime, differing only from other war crimes in that it contains within itself the accumulated evil of the whole," was the crime for which Nazi leaders were hanged at Nuremburg. The

My Lai massacres and the torture and abuse at Abu Ghraib are just two examples of the evils of the Iraq war. Historians often ponder why the German people allowed the Nazis to remain in power after Hitler invaded Poland. The American people can discover at least part of the answer if they take the time to look in the mirror. Of course, the comparison is unfair- to the Germans that is. The people living under Nazi rule could have faced violent reprisal for speaking out. What is our excuse for standing by in silence? Adam Bird-Ridnell is a sophomore majoring in history and philosophy. He may be contacted at abirdridnell@ themiamihurricane.com.

POLL RESULTS: What are you doing for spring break? Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com.

Miami

Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy.

59%

compiled by

OPINION

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Cruise/ Vacation

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Alternative spring break

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Total Voters: 64 WHAT’S YOUR OPINION ABOUT DEAR V? TAKE OUR POLL AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

Kyli Singh

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The Miami

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404. EDITOR IN CHIEF Chelsea Matiash

BUSINESS MANAGER Jessica Jurick

MANAGING EDITOR Christina De Nicola

WEBMASTER Brian Schlansky

ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman NEWS EDITOR Ramon Galiana PHOTO EDITOR Lindsay Brown

PUBLIC RELATIONS Jacob Crows

EDGE EDITOR Danielle Kaslow

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OPINION EDITOR Ed S. Fishman ONLINE EDITOR Megan Terilli ASST. NEWS EDITORS Lila Albizu Nina Ruggiero

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Lindsay Brown DESIGNERS Laura Edwins Demi Rafuls

COPY EDITORS Amanda Gomez Alexa Lopez Kyli Singh ADVERTISING EDITOR Emma Cason-Pratt

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COPY CHIEF Laura Edwins

ACCOUNT REPS Shoshana Gottesman Misha Mayeur Katie Norwood Brian Schuman Jack Whaley GRADUATE ASSISTANT Nick Maslow FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2010 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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YOUniversity of Miami: bike riders ow it’s certainly true that everyone has the right to choose how he or she gets to class. Some choose to take the shuttle, some drive, the occasional peculiar person rollerblades or EVAN PESKIN STAFF uses a scooter and the COLUMNIST majority of us walk. There is a small percentage of students, however, who choose to get around campus in the most irritating way possible: biking. On one hand, our school has set up a great program for students to be able to rent or purchase bikes through UBike, which is a fantastic way to give people the opportunity to get a bike if they really want one. On the other hand, the reality of the situation is that the system has not worked out well. The actual rules state that all bikes must be ridden on the road with the flow of traffic as far to the right side as possible. Most people biking choose to weave and cut through hundreds of people walking along the sidewalks, narrowly avoiding hitting everyone by a matter of inches. I cannot even tell you the number of

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times I’ve resisted throwing a book at a nearby biker and hoped to watch him hit a tree. I know I’m not the only one who feels that way. Another aspect is that people get sick of their bikes, always having to lock them up, unlock them, find a bike rack and so on. When people don’t care for their bikes anymore, the result is about 30 rusting, dented, twisted bikes, locked up in a cluttered pile next to every dormitory. Is that really what we want sitting there? You’ll never see a picture of that on the UM Web site. The bottom line is that it takes 20 minutes to walk clear across our campus, and with the sharp turns and sometimes congested walkways, it takes nearly 15 minutes to bike across it. Are those extra five minutes so important? What’s the rush? Our campus is beautiful, and more of us need to appreciate that we are blessed enough to go to school here. It’s this writer’s opinion that everywhere on campus is within walking distance, as long as you take the time. Evan Peskin is a sophomore majoring in pre-med psychology. He may be contacted at epeskin@ themiamihurricane.com.

MATT ROSEN // The Miami Hurricane

March 11 - March 24, 2010

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Looking for a way to pass the afternoon? Check out the free 10th annual Gifford Lane Art Stroll, between Oak and Day Avenues in Coconut Grove on Sunday, 12- 5 p.m.

Spring break in Miami:

Make it fabulous

BY NICOLETTE ROQUE AND DAVID SARGENT STAFF AND CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITERS

Spring break is what you make of it, and in a city like Miami, students remaining on campus can sure make it fabulous. With countless local attractions and swimsuit-friendly dives, your 2010 Miami spring break has the potential to be so clothingoptional and SPF-soaked, it will keep you relaxed until finals week. Nature lovers, at ease! Miami’s natural attractions provide that Jimmy Buffet escape you’re been pining for. If you’re looking for a quick beach break, check out the Matheson Hammock Park. This marina/ wildlife reserve, located adjacent to Fairchild Tropical Botanical Gardens, has the one of the least-crowded public beaches near the University of Miami. It takes just a 15-minute bicycle ride from campus to reach its unique atoll pool that overlooks Key Biscayne and downtown Miami. A handful of nature trails offer scenic and secluded views of Biscayne Bay- perfect for a quick fishing getaway. But if its adventure you’re looking for, consider South Beach Kayak for an adrenaline fix. This rental location welcomes groups, couples, first-time kayakers and even pets. Starting at $25, you can kayak your heart out for two hours or extend your visit as you please. South Beach Kayak even offers group tour packages where you kayak to Monument Island and enjoy a bonfire and refreshments after sunset.

For those spending all their waking hours on the shores of South Beach, consider parking your towel at 8th and Ocean. It’s the perfect beach real estate with a party atmosphere and close proximity to the South Beach staple Wet Willie’s. Earning an iconic reputation (and a mention in a Ludacris song), the daiquiri bar features 19 slushy alcoholic drinks to cool you down after a day on the beach. Drinks titled “Call A Cab” and “Attitude Improvement” are definite ways to improve any day. But if the hotel bar is more your scene, consider one of Miami’s gems, The Shore Club, where you can tan pool-side and enjoy Rumbar, featuring 75 different varieties of rum. The luxury hotel also boasts an elegant lounge, Skybar, where celebrities and sexy locals converge after sunset. Decorated with deep reds, modern furniture and Napoleon III-inspired art, the Red Room at Skybar is a sultry escape from South Beach nightclubs. If “Carpe Noctem” is your Spring Break mantra, consider checking out Jazid on Washington Avenue, a live music nightclub with a sterling reputation. Known for having “live music every damn night,” Jazid’s mix of funk, rock and jazz provides a spring break vibe you won’t find inside any other four walls. Check out reggae Sundays and enjoy cheap drinks in true spring break spirit. Culture shock more your style? Visit Boteco Brazilian, a unique and undiscovered restaurant alternative to the South Beach scene where a diversao nao tem fim (the fun never ends)! Complete with caipirinhas, live bossa nova, authentic Brazilian cuisine and a decent price tag, dinner and

drinks at Boteco is a sure way to learn a little and enjoy a lot. For those who want to keep it close to campus, visit Scotty’s Landing in Coconut Grove. The restaurant offers a relaxed, less-crowded setting than the usual Monty’s experience, but with an equally breathtaking waterfront view of Key Biscayne. The American grill-fare menu gets about as good as a burger and a beer, but the genuinely Caribbean atmosphere is worth it. There is free live music on weekends which, on some nights, transitions into a guitar player sitting at the bar playing riffs in between drinks. Whether you invert your sleep schedule this spring break or relax a la Tommy Bahama, enjoy the vacation to its fullest before the madness of finals sets in. For more information on these spring break activities visit themiamihurricane. com. Nicolette Roque may be contacted at nrogque@ themaimihurricane.com. David Sargent may be contacted at dsargent@themiamihurricane. com.

GRAPHIC BY ALLISON GOODMAN

March 11 - March 24, 2010

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Taking time to help out BY DANIELLE KASLOW EDGE EDITOR

While some students jet off to exotic locales or tan by the pool, a dedicated group of University of Miami Alternative Breaks (UMAB) participants will spend their spring vacation helping others and immersing themselves in a different way of life. This coming week, a total of 145 students will travel to sites around the United States during spring break to perform community service. Working to make a difference and promote social change, UMAB offers this opportunity at a low cost to enable as many students as possible to participate. The $225 fee covers all airfare, transportation, accommodations and most meals. “Students get to help out and go to a new place in the United States for one week,” said junior Stephanie Jimenez, a program participant last year. “You make lasting friendships and you have a memorable spring break. When you get back, you can actually say you did something you will never forget; it’s a great program.” This year UMAB is sending students to volunteer at 17 different sites throughout the country depending on what issue they will be working to promote. From aiding the elderly in Huntsville, Ala. to promoting LGBTQ equality rights in Los Angeles, these students are serious about making a difference in the lives of others.

Spring break edition BY NICOLE ADLMAN CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Midterms are finally over and spring break madness has just begun. Feel free to pull all-nighters, not for an exam, but because you don’t want to give up one minute of your capacity to rage. There’s only seven days in March to feel this way, so make the most of it. Whether you’re heading back home, jetting off to a nearby island or staying in Miami, where the party comes to you, this is the week where the music never stops.  “Imma Be” by Black Eyed Peas - As much as you might hate to admit it, the hook of this song is irresistible. Fergie and the gang will have you spreading your wings and doing your thing all break long.  “On the Dance Floor (feat. MATT WALLACH // The Miami Hurricane

LEND A HAND: Sophomore Naomi Levy helped to sand and paint a community center in the Bangu favela of Rio De Janeiro, Brazil during Hillel’s 2009 spring break trip. “I never do anything during spring break and thought it might be cool to actually do something that involves helping others,” senior Lisbeth Reyes said. "My group and I are going to Fonda, N.Y. and we will be staying in the Mohawk Tribe community… I want to be able to help the tribe in restoring what belongs to them.” Co-chair of UMAB junior Claire Heckerman feels that alternative spring break is a worthwhile experience and that students should con-

sider the opportunity. “You can always go out to the club and party; you’re in Miami,” Heckerman said. “But [alternative break is] something different, it’s something new… you really do get inspired; you can make that difference and you see it.” Fellow co-chair, junior Muhil Prabakar shares similar sentiments. “Our whole goal is not to have students go over for one week and volunteer and come back and not do anything about it,” Prabakar said.

“Our intention is for them to come back and…carry on this passion. We hope that people can go on these trips and understand that there are issues in our country that need to be solved… Many people feel that the things they do might not make an impact, [but] by doing alternative breaks, you realize it’s the small changes that really matter.” Danielle Kaslow may be contacted at dkaslow@ themiamihurricane.com.

UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ALTERNATIVE BREAKS (UMAB)  WHEN: Service trips during

fall and spring break  WHERE: Locations vary on the issue and are not revealed until students have been accepted into the program to work on a specific issue.  COST: $225 fee, payment plans are available (the fee supplements the cost of the program; fundraising and SA12

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FAC help to cover the remaining costs)  APPLY: Applications will be available next fall and spring. Keep an eye out for the UMAB showcases to learn more about the program and issues available next year.  ISSUES: The 17 issues covered this spring by UMAB include: children’s issues, education and March 11 - March 24, 2010

immigration of children, disabilities, HIV/AIDS and youth, HIV/ AIDS and homelessness, parks and recreation, rebuilding/reconstruction, rural poverty, poverty and education of children, animal rights, environmental issues, Native American issues, poverty/racism/injustice, elderly services and LGBTQ equality rights.

Will.i.am and Apl.de.ap)” by David Guetta - The song’s title is definitely where it belongs. A fastpaced beat is set off by Will.i.am’s piercing order to “Turn. It. Up.” You don’t have to tell us twice, Will.  “Chillin” by Wale and Lady Gaga - This spring break, straight chillin’ is the only thing listed on your agenda. Wale is straightforward and cool, while Gaga’s chorus will have you singing along.  “Where’s Your Head At

(Robbie Rivera remix)” by Basement Jaxx- When this song plays, you feel it in your heart. The beat is so heavy that you can get lost in it- one listen and you’ll wonder where your head was at for the past six minutes.  “Say Aah (feat. Fabolous)” by Trey Songz – It doesn’t have to be your birthday to get down to this. While not new by any means, this song has lasting potential; it will see you through the end of spring break and leave you wistful that it wasn’t longer. Nicole Adlman may be contacted at nadlman@themiamihurricane.com.


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Sustainable fashion creates a sensation

"Alice in Wonderland" dominated by Depp BY SARAH B. PILCHICK SENIOR EDGE WRITER

COURTESY FRANOVIK DESIGNS

BY NICOLE ADLMAN CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

While Victor Vega is a man of many hats, he is also a man of many couture creations. By day, he works at the University of Miami hospital on the medical campus as the associate vice president of customer and concierge service, but by night, he is “Viktor Franovik,” founder and CEO of Franovik Designs. Franovik’s line is a vivacious display of clothes made from recyclable materials, a sustainable-meets-fashionable centerpiece to the showings held at Miami Fashion Week. His new collection will be presented Saturday at 6 p.m., in Miami’s Design District. This year’s show, aptly named “Elements of Green,” promises to be just as fierce and environmentally friendly as the last, where models paraded around in get-ups made from materials normally found in a recycling bin. The clothes are made in homage to mother nature. Franovik and his design partner, Francisco Perez, founded the company based on the idea of being responsible for the world in which you live. Las Vegas-based designer Elizabeth Calderon also contributed to the upcoming collection. “We are eco-designers,” Vega said. “We believe in giving back to the environment and helping the environment. We’re able to do this by making fashions with recycled and vintage materials that would otherwise end up in a landfill.” While their clothes are not made for everyday wear, he considers the pieces to be more than just a typical costume. “We make wearable pieces of art,” he said. “We do not make paper dresses or dress-

es from plastic bags. We use things like linen, duck tape and raw silk- unprocessed- so no chemicals are going into the environment. We cater to the couture side, all these pieces are unique, nothing is mass-made.” This year, the show is donating a portion of its proceeds to Angel’s Pediatric Heart House, a non-profit organization supporting families affected by congenital heart defects. Franovik Designs, while focused on high fashion, is not just limited to the runway. Their pieces have been featured in Miss Earth United States, Miss Teen Earth United States and Miss Latina USA. “People are astonished when they see a dress made from duck tape and window screen,” Vega said. Nicole Adlman may be contacted at nadlman@ themaimihurricane.com.

It is no great surprise that "Alice in Wonderland," Tim Burton’s latest film, features regular actor Johnny Depp to an almost obsessive degree. Though intended to be fiercely independent and headstrong, the character of Alice (played by Mia Wasikowska) is treated more as a cipher, becoming secondary in the plot. It may be Alice’s name in the title, but this is entirely the Mad Hatter’s story. To some degree, this choice works. Depp is certainly a strong enough actor to carry a film of this magnitude. At the same time, it’s slightly disappointing that Burton chose to make Alice a secondary figure in the film. The film, set traditionally in Victorian England, could have made Alice an intensely progressive character, but all Burton does to establish her character is make her speak of odd visions she’s been having. This is no fault of Wasikowsa as an actress, but rather a frustrating misstep on the part of Burton and Linda Woolverton as director and screenwriter. Beyond the slightly odd, but not unexpected, focus, on the Mad Hatter, "Alice in Wonderland" features a stunning roster of British acting talent with one glaringly bad performance in particular. Anne Hathaway, as the beatific White Queen, is surprisingly bad. Hathaway’s queen is all grandiose gestures and overacting. Luckily, she’s surrounded by actors like Helena Bonham Carter (the Red Queen), the inimitable Frances de la

Tour (Aunt Imogen) and, if only in voice, Stephen Fry, Michael Sheen, Alan Rickman, Timothy Spall and Imelda Staunton. This is a typical Burton film in that it is not wholly faithful to the original novel by Lewis Carroll. Although it takes on a much darker tone, it is still entertaining. There isn’t a ton of suspense- does anyone doubt that Alice will save Wonderland? It is, however, a testament to Burton’s talent as a director that he can manage to make a story as wellknown as "Alice in Wonderland" feel both familiar and brand new. Sarah B. Pilchick may be contacted at sbpilchick@themiamihurricane.com.

STARRING: Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter, Frances de la Tour DIRECTED BY: Tim Burton

IF YOU GO WHAT: Franovik Designs

“Elements of Green” fashion show WHEN: Saturday, 6-9 p.m. WHERE: Miami Design District, 140 N.E. 39th Street COST: $25 general admission $25, $60 VIP admission (includes admission to the after party). To purchase tickets, visit www. ctstickets.com. COURTESY DISNEY ENTERPRISES INC.

March 11 - March 24, 2010

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the number of runs Miami scored against UCF in Tuesday night’s victory

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the number of active members on the University of Miami women’s rugby team

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Canes teeter on the edge of NIT play Haith hopes for a pair of wins BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

The room is closing in on the Miami Hurricanes’ season and they have little room to survive. With their backs against the wall, the 12th-seeded Hurricanes (1812, 4-12) will face the fifth-seeded Wake Forest Demon Deacons (199, 9-7) Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m., in the first round of the ACC Tournament in Greensboro, N.C. With an NIT berth on the line, head coach Frank Haith knows the significance of this weekend. “I think we’ve got to get a [win],” said Haith, who believes one win will solidify a spot in the NIT. “I would feel pretty confident if we get one win, but I’d like to get two to make sure. I would feel good about us being able to get in.” Miami and Wake Forest split the series this season, with each team winning at their territory. The Canes slipped past the Demon Deacons, 67-66, at the BankUnited Center on January 9, and then fell in Winston-Salem, 62-53, on February 2. “We’re playing a good team, a very talented Wake Forest basketball team,” Haith said. “We have had success, beat them two of the last three times we played them.” Haith will have to rely on freshman guard Durand Scott to lead the charge. Scott was Miami’s first-ever All-Rookie Team selection and Scott received the ACC Rookie of the Week selection three times this season. The New York City native is the only ACC freshman to rank among the top six freshmen in scoring with 9.8 points per game, sixth with 3.9 rebounds per game and leads with 3.5 assists per game. “Durand Scott is a phenomenal, dynamic young player,” Haith

said. “He is one of the most unselfish players and will do whatever he needs to help his team win.” Scott will lead the perimeter play but the Hurricanes might need leading scorer senior forward Dwayne Collins in the post to make a run in the ACC Tournament. Collins hasn’t practiced consistently over the past month because of numerous injuries but Haith hopes Collins can play. Collins averaged a team-high 14 points and 6.5 rebounds over the two meetings against Wake Forest. They truly will need him to bang in the inside against the Demon Deacons. The winner of today’s game between the Canes and the Demon Deacons will square off against fourth-seeded Virginia Tech in the ACC Tournament quarterfinals. Redshirt sophomore Malcolm Grant believes his team has gotten better throughout the season and hopes they will move on in the ACC Tournament. “Early in the season it was kind of rough for us because it was a first time experience,” Grant said. “But I think we’ve definitely got better as a unit playing on the road. It’s been close games, not getting blown out like earlier in the season. I think we’re getting better as a unit playing on the road. We don’t want our season to end.” Lelan LeDoux may be contacted at lledoux@themiamihurricane.com.

THE FACTS WHAT: No. 12 Miami vs. No. 5 Wake Forest WHEN: Thursday at 2 p.m. WHY: Winner plays No. 4 Virginia Tech Firday at 2 p.m.

LINDSAY BROWN // Assistant Photo Editor

COUNT IT, AND THE FOUL: Senior guard James Dews lets out a scream of emotions against thensixth-ranked Duke Blue Devils on Feb. 17. Miami lost 81-74 at the BankUnited Center. March 11 - March 24, 2010

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CLUB SPORTS

Women's rugby squad hits hard and plays harder South Florida a great place to play BY ERNESTO SUAREZ CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

LINDSAY BROWN // Assistant Photo Editor

SHE’S OUT: Senior Megan Moran, a rugby captain, is tagged out in a game of touch rugby Monday night. She has been playing for the past two years and a half years and is the team’s scumhalf.

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On a typical Monday evening, where most students struggle to cope with the idea of starting a new week, one group of ladies is giving the phrase “hits like a girl” a painful new connotation. The UM Club Women’s Rugby team practices on Monday and Wednesday evenings at the IM fields, running and taking hits to prepare for competition. They currently have about 20 active members and are the only full contact women’s club sport on campus. There are several different ways that rugby can be played, but traditionally it is played in teams of 15 and incorporates elements of both football and soccer. Although not as popular in the U.S. as it is abroad, new teams are slowly forming at high schools and colleges nationwide. “Florida is a great place to be if you are a women’s rugby player,” said Michelle Horevitz, current president of the club. “There’s some good variety in play between universities like FAU and USF, city clubs and even schools like Jupiter High School that have great programs.” The club is still relatively young, this being only its third year as an official club at UM licensed under the Florida Rugby Union.

March 11 - March 24, 2010

Still, this group of girls are as close as any other organization on campus. Megan Flynn, a captain on the squad, says that rugby is unlike any other sport she has participated in. She also says that due to the sport being so team-oriented, all 15 players need to be working together on the same level. “The team isn't just about practicing a few times a week; we try and do things outside of rugby,” Flynn said. “We are definitely more of a family than a team.” Horevitz compared the women’s rugby team to one big sorority. After every game, the hosting team holds a social where, after an afternoon of yelling, hitting and feeling emotions on the field, the players all become acquainted with one another and build bonds. Due to the club’s youth and the fact that rugby is not very well-

QUICK FACTS ABOUT RUGBY  The ball may only be passed laterally or backwards  A player may kick the ball forward at any time  Field is 110 yards long and 75 yards wide  Play is continuous like soccer

known in the U.S., there are students who may not realize that the club exists or who simply do not know how to play the game. “Virtually every girl that comes to a rugby club in college probably has close to zero knowledge of the game,” said Elizabeth Schlaerth, coach for the women’s rugby team. “When in life are women encouraged to play a contact sport?” However, Schlaerth and the team say this should not discourage those who are interested from joining. “I only went to two practices before my first game and knew nothing,” said Amy Alexander, a regular member of the team. “There is no reason to worry because we will teach you and show you that it’s a lot of fun.” Ernesto Suarez may be contacted at esuarez@themiamihurricane.com.

PRACTICE  Where: the IM fields behind Hecht and Stanford  When: Mon. 6- 8 p.m., Wed. 6:30-8:30 p.m.  Contact: Michelle Horevitz mhorevitz@ me.com for more information


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JOHNSON FROM PAGE 1 The Pro Bowl wide receiver makes the daily commute from his home in Ft. Lauderdale in time for his earliest class at 11 a.m. “It’s definitely different because you haven’t been doing it for so long,” he said. “To be honest it’s kind of fun to be back here. I get a kick out of just seeing people looking at me walking around campus and things like that.” Initially, classmates were surprised to see a book bag-toting Johnson riding on the Hurry ‘Canes shuttle or eating at the food court. He signed autographs and received bewildered stares from workers at Wendy’s. “For me to come in and just walk into class with my book bag on, I know they’re kind of wondering why I’m here,” he said. “It shows them that just because you’re presented with an opportunity you can still come back and get your education.” His decision to return to school and finish his degree is something that he says his peers respect. “It doesn’t surprise me that he went back because he was always one of those guys who wanted to achieve things, and I knew that was one of those achievements,” said McGahee, now a sixth-year running back for the Baltimore Ravens.

McGahee was supposed to enroll in three classes for the spring semester with Johnson, but had to back out at the last minute due to scheduling conflicts. Although undeclared when he left the university, the Pro Bowler hopes to pursue political science. “I just want to get my degree,” he said. “It’s something I’ve always wanted to put on my wall.” According to David Wyman, assistant athletic director of academic services, more than 50 percent of UM’s former athletes inquire about finishing their degrees. That number includes former All-Pro defensive tackle Cortez Kennedy and former cornerback and Super Bowl champion Duane Starks. “The University of Miami is a family, and we always embrace our former student-athletes to help them in any way possible,” Wyman said. “Our door and arms are always open to help them get back in school and finish their degrees. We want to see them continue to produce and have successful lives even after football.” Junior offensive lineman Orlando Franklin, who is in Johnson’s social inequalities class, believes that the receiver serves as a role model to kids, college students, studentathletes and professional football players alike.

COURTESY KERWIN LONZO

THE U: Andre Johnson played wide receiver from 2000-2003.

COURTESY KERWIN LONZO

CHAMPIONS: Andre Johnson holds the BCS Championship Trophy at the 2002 Rose Bowl. “He was one of those top guys who got drafted and left early,” he said. “He was blessed with the talent he has, and he’s not hurting moneywise, so he notices you can’t play ball forever. It’s good that he’s fallen back upon his education.” When Johnson left the University of Miami, he needed just 30 credits to graduate with a degree in liberal arts. This semester he is a fulltime student taking 12 credits. One of his professors, Dr. George Wilson, teaches his social inequalities class and had him as a student when he first came to Coral Gables. “It has been a pleasure to see how much intellectual and emotional growth Andre has made,” Wilson said of the soft-spoken 28-year-old athlete. Chris Harris, a Ph.D. candidate who has Johnson in his intercultural communications course, appreciates that the professional football player participates like any other student. He also agreed that Johnson has a quiet and somewhat shy demeanor. Forty-two NFL touchdowns later, the wide receiver has yet to celebrate like some of the sport’s play making receivers such as Cincinnati Bengal Chad Ochocinco or free agent Terrell Owens. “He takes all of his assignments seriously and gets them all in on time,” Harris said. “He’s taking his degree seriously. He has a good work ethic and always does what I ask him to do. My class is discussion based, and he participates consistently.” During Pro Bowl week, John-

son missed classes because of practice and admitted that he was worried about receiving excused absences. “I was pretty nervous about it because I knew I’d be missing a lot of time over those two weeks and I didn’t know, with me being away for so long, how the teachers would react to it, but they’ve been very helpful,” he said. “They understand that part of it, but I’m going to try my best to communicate with them and get my assignments done.” When he isn’t shaking off Pro Bowl cornerbacks or hitting the books, Johnson stops by his childhood home for a meal every now and then and to spend time with his mother. “He likes seafood. He likes fish and shrimp,” Karen Johnson said. “When he was first at school, what I would do is call him and ask him what time he would get out of practice on a Sunday. He’d bring a couple of players by and I’d cook them a home-cooked meal. They would eat and they’d bring some back for the guys who couldn’t make it.” It’s that camaraderie that Johnson misses the most seven years removed from the University of Miami’s Coral Gables campus. “There are so many memories that I have just from being around my teammates, being over at the Hecht Athletic Center all the time, even in the dorms when I stayed in the dorms,” he said. “We were always on campus. When you spend so much time somewhere and you get up one day and leave, you defi-

March 11 - March 24, 2010

nitely miss it from the memories.” As a Parade All-American, Johnson actually missed his high school graduation ceremony because he was competing in the Florida/ Georgia All-Star Game. “I feel like I’ve never really graduated,” he said. “Me getting my college degree would definitely be a graduation that I go to.” His mother still remembers the entire recruiting process. When then-head coach Butch Davis came to visit, she asked questions purely on academics, and gave her brother the job of anything related to football. She can’t wait until her son joins his brother, Willie, as a college graduate. “I’ll probably be in tears. It’s going to be interesting,” Karen Johnson said. “We will need extra tickets.” Christina De Nicola may be contacted at cdenicola@themiamihurricane.com. Calvin Cestari contributed to this report.

Players who returned to complete degrees  Duane Starks, Class of 2005 Cortez Kennedy, Class of 2006  Kenny Holmes, Class of 2006  Kenard Lang, Class of 2007  Lamar Thomas, Class of 2008

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BASEBALL

MATCHUPS: MIAMI VS. BOSTON COLLEGE POSITION

ADVANTAGE

POSITION

Starting Pitcher

Infield

Bullpen

Outfield

Catcher

Intangibles

ADVANTAGE

David Furones may be contacted at dfurones@themiamihurricane.com. LOG ON TO THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR DAVID FURONES’S ANALYSIS OF EACH POSITION.

BOSTON COLLEGE VS. MIAMI WEEKEND SERIES Friday at 7 p.m. Saturday at 7 p.m. Sunday at 1 p.m. All games are at Alex Rodriguez Park at Mark Light Field All games can be heard on 90.5 FM WVUM

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CANES TAKE GOLDEN KNIGHTS The 13th-ranked Hurricanes (8-3) beat the University of Central Florida Knights by a score of 19-2 on Tuesday night in Orlando.  Freshman shortstop Stephen Perez led the team with four hits and six RBI.

March 11 - March 24, 2010

SPORTS BRIEFS FOOTBALL

ROWING

Miami will hold an intrasquad scrimmage at 7 p.m. at Lockhart Stadium in Fort Lauderdale. The scrimmage will be open to the public. Gates will open at 6 p.m. and players will take part in an autograph session from 6-6:45 p.m.

The University of Miami women’s rowing varsity eight split two race pieces with the University of Connecticut on Wednesday morning in Miami Beach.

MEN’S BASKETBALL The 12th-seeded Hurricanes (18-12, 4-12) will play the fifthseeded Wake Forest Demon Deacons (19-9, 9-7) at 2 p.m. Thursday in the opening round of the Atlantic Coast Conference Tournament in Greensboro, N.C. Senior forward Dwayne Collins will not play due to a leg injury.

The Canes captured the first race with a winning time of 4:50.1, followed by the UConn varsity eight in 4:57.4.

FORTY UNDER 40 University of Miami Athletic Director Kirby Hocutt was selected to receive one of this year’s Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal “Forty Under 40” award. News from hurricanesports.com Calvin Cestari may be contacted at ccestari@themiamihurricane.com


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dear ...

Dear V: I have long lips... Dear Lippy, , Dear V, My boyfriend told me that I have “long lips,” and he wasn’t talking about the lips on my face. What is the normal length of inner labia? Sincerely, Lippy

First of all, don’t let anyone (including your boyfriend) compare your body parts to others. He should know girls can be self-conscious, especially about their private areas. But if you must know, this is something that can vary just as much as any other body part. In some women, the inner lips are completely enclosed by the outer lips. In other women, the inner lips (labia minora) are larger than the outside lips. Many pornographic images have been retouched, causing a lot of men to expect a certain look below the belt, but you shouldn’t be ashamed of your body. Advertising may try to convince women that they are larger than the norm, but it’s really something that comes in a wide range of sizes. The size of your lips doesn’t affect anything about your sexual experience, they may just look different and that’s all. If you’re really curious, you can try visiting a genitourinary medicine clinic. These clinics deal with a variety

of sexual and genital issues, and they see more labia a day than pretty much anyone else. They can take a look down there and let you know if anything is abnormal, but most likely they’ll tell you you’re perfectly fine and that everyone is different. So embrace your body! Hope this helps, V

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