Issuu on Google+

MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

1

The Miami

HURRICANE Vol. 90, Issue 41 | March 8 - March 22, 2012

com

.

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

PHOTO BY NATALIE EDGAR, DESIGN BY ALLISON GOODMAN


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

2

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

Local high school partners with future teachers Education majors work at school in Overtown

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY HYAN DE FREITAS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Andrew DeMuro’’s history students at Booker T. Washington Senior High School didn’’t understand how learning about Napoleon Bonaparte, the 18th-century Frenchman, could be useful to them. DeMuro, currently a senior in the University of Miami’’s School of Education, taught his class that lessons about the historical French leader are still important because ““that short kid in class you pick on in school, could one day grow up to be your boss.”” ““If you can’’t get them into what you’’re saying, then you’’re screwed for the rest of the day,”” DeMuro said. ““You have to think like them to understand them.”” That is just part of DeMuro’’s job as a student-teacher at Booker T. Washington, which is located in Overtown, a poor area in Miami’’s inner city. His work is part of a breakthrough partnership between the School of Education’’s department of teaching and learning at the university along with Booker T. Washington High School. This partnership with an inner city school is the first of its kind at UM. The main goal is to develop an on-going relationship with the high school while providing participating UM students with the experience of working within a secondary school. Although it’’s relatively new, Wendy Cavendish, who serves as the liaison between the teaching and learning department and the high school, said their work is already making a strong, positive impact. ““It’’s a partnership where the high school is very much interested in us working with them and in return there are opportunities for our students,”” Cavendish said. ““It’’s im-

Missed Billy Joel’s appearance on campus on Monday? Check out the photo brief by Zach Beeker.

CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor

TEACH AND LEARN: Senior Andrew DeMuro speaks to an advanced placement psychology class at Booker T. Washington Senior High, where he is a student-teacher. portant to recognize that we don’’t just provide a service –– the relationship is mutually beneficial.”” For the high school students, the benefit is not just in gaining new teachers, but exposing them to the college experience as well. For the student-teachers, there’’s just as much to be learned from the mentors they work with and the students themselves. ““It’’s the perfect combination,”” said senior Kevin Cook, who is involved in the partnership. ““It’’s working with amazing teachers and the toughest kids.”” DeMuro agreed. ““If you can do this, you’’re prepared for any other job,”” he said. Although working within the curriculum dictated by the public school system is a challenge within itself, Cook, DeMuro and Cavendish all see it as a chance to make a

difference at Miami's inner-city schools, and in the Overtown community overall. ““I’’m excited to be part of a greater movement to fix a system that’’s failing,”” DeMuro said. ““I can make a difference and watch it happen.”” They also hope the School of Education will expand its programs to other students, allowing more ways to experience working with the high school students. They said it’’s an experience that will follow them further into their future teaching careers. ““They’’re smart, they just need someone to tell them that,”” DeMuro said. ““When you see it work, it’’s all the verification you need.”” The partnership and related programs are currently only open to students majoring within the School of Education. For information on the department of teaching and learning, visit education.miami.edu.

The Writing Center Workshop Series presents “Citation and Safe Assignment” as a way to reach out to all members of the university’s community. Writers at all levels are invited to the Hecht Residential College Room 101 on March 27 at 6:30 p.m. For

2

NEWS

Check out Ryan Eid’s column on Chartwells’ workers. Want to know about the campus Quidditch team? Read about it in Victoria Hernandez’s story. Subscribe for the email edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

NEWS BRIEFS PLAGIARISM

Interested in immigration? Check out Gabriella Gaggiano’s recap on the panel on immigration at UM’s School of Law.

more information, visit as.miami. edu/writingcenter or call 305-2842956.

KONY 2012 UM’s Invisible Children club is having a screening of “Kony 2012.” The roadies from the national Invisible Children office will be on campus to raise awareness about Joseph Kony.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Invisible Children is a nation-wide movement dedicated to raising awareness for and assisting the victims of the Lord’s Resistance Army in East Africa. According to them, he is “one of the world’s worst war criminals” because he has abducted more than 30,000 children and forced them to become soldiers.The screening will take place March 27 at 5 p.m. in UC Ballroom B.

March 8 - March 22, 2012

VIOLIN DAY The Frost School of Music is hosting Violin Day on March 20 at the Weeks Center for Recording and Performance. The all-day event will feature music performances. Lyssa Goldberg may be contacted at lgoldberg@themiamihurricane. com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

3

KEY BISCAYNE

Stadium renovation depends on commission vote UM students draw restoration plans BY RACHEL MAHER CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The Miami Marine Stadium, which has been abandoned since Hurricane Andrew in 1992, is now one step closer to being restored to its former glory. On Thursday night, the City of Miami Commission will be voting on creating a partnership between the City of Miami, the Miami Sports and Exhibition Authority, and the Friends of Miami Marine Stadium. This partnership, if approved, will work to restore the stadium using a master plan developed by UM students in 2009. The School of Architecture has been involved with the stadium’’s restoration since 2009. Frank Sanchez, the program director at the World Monuments Fund, recently spoke to a group of UM architecture students about the future of the stadium. The World Monuments Fund sponsors endangered, cultural and heritage sites around the world, and strives to ensure they are there for future generations. The stadium is currently on the World Monument 100 List, which recognizes culturally important places that are at risk of being forgotten and possibly destroyed. He boasted of the stadium’’s potential, believing it could re-create the success of New York’’s High Line. The High Line has been transformed from an unused railway line to a park, which is now New York’’s third most popular tourist attraction. ““The High Line has become

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

SKATING: “The view from the roof is the most unreal sight of the Miami skyline,” local skater Eddie Rivadeneira said. Rivadeneira has been skating at the Miami Marine Stadium for five years, and remembers skating on the roof until the ladder was removed. an international sensation,”” he said. ““The Marine Stadium is destined to follow in its footsteps.”” Years ago, visitors could sit in the grandstand of the now dilapidated stadium and look out onto the

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

SPRAY: Graffiti artists have flocked to the Miami Marine Stadium and covered its walls with designs since it was abandoned.

water stage to see Jimmy Buffet rocking on. This was before Hurricane Andrew severely damaged the stadium in 1992. These days the abandoned stadium is home to graffiti artists, skaters and the odd maintenance man. ““This is the one place where I don’’t have to worry about cops,”” local skater Eddie Rivadeneira said. ““I can freely skate here.”” Architecture professor Jorge Hernandez agrees with Sanchez. Hernandez is the co-founder of the organization Friends of Miami Marine Stadium, which is leading the fight to save the stadium from destruction. In 2009, Hernandez led a studio class of 12 architecture students that created a master plan for the stadium. The class gave the stadium a facelift by restoring the grandstand, improving handicap access and making suggestions for the regeneration of the stadium’’s immediate surroundings. The plan also preserves

some of the graffiti that now covers the stadium. The students’’ master plan was unanimously approved in 2010 by the City Commission of Miami. However, the city currently does not have the funding to implement it. Hernandez and the city commission hope that the stadium will eventually be used again for concerts and events, and will remain open as a public park. ““I think it’’s important because it adds another venue to the city,”” said sophomore Jessica Tsiris, who regularly drives by the stadium. ““It’’s a different kind of place, it could bring in different people, smaller concerts.”” At the event, Hernandez also invited the co-founder and founding chair of the High Line, Robert Hammond and Phillip Aarons, to UM to help his organization learn from their experience of saving the High Line. Hammond and Aarons stressed that fostering community involve-

March 8 - March 22, 2012

ment and public excitement is vital to gaining the funds necessary to save the stadium. One of the strategies the pair used to get the community involved and excited about the High Line was to host a design competition. Hernandez’’s organization adopted a similar strategy to get public support for the stadium by hosting a competition to design the water stage. The winning design, titled the ““Miami Pearl,”” was a floating seasphere designed to highlight the contrast between Miami’’s landscape and seascape. This design will be incorporated in the students’’ master plan. Sophomore Madeline Gonzalez, an architecture major, believes that the stadium should be saved because of its architectural value. ““It has a historical importance to the city,”” she said. ““It was something very important in its age. The architecture has value for future generations.””

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

3


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

4

PHOTO BRIEF

Running to make a difference in education

BORN TO RUN: Miami Dade College student and Imagination Federation member Eligio Damas (left) runs during the Walk2Nicaragua event. Imagination Federation, a non-profit organization that works to educate children in Chacraseca, Nicaragua, hosted the second annual Walk2Nicaragua walka-thon last Friday. The goal was to walk 1,080 miles – the distance between Miami and Chacraseca. UM alumni and Miami Dade College professor Carlos Gonzalez helped put together the second annual Walk2Nicaragua event on Friday along with other students and faculty. More than 400 participants at Miami Dade College finished 1,080 miles just 12 hours after the start of the event. With about a month left in the campaign, Imagination Federation has raised $4,500, nearly half of their $10,000 goal. For more information, visit fundly.com/walk2nicaragua. PHOTOS BY NATALIE EDGAR

ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE

Researchers rent helicopter to conduct studies in remote areas Solution will create new opportunities BY KEVIN SANDS CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Researchers at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science are running up against an unusual problem –– how to conduct research in hard-to-reach areas, like remote islands or swamps. The solution, however, is simple: a helicopter. The Batchelor Foundation issued RSMAS a $700,000 challenge grant earlier this month to help the school purchase a research helicopter. The foundation is a Miami-based organization that supports 4

NEWS

projects that benefit the environment. Acquiring a helicopter will allow for many new research opportunities, including taking aerial photographs, carrying and deploying equipment, and measuring different components of the atmosphere. ““It will put the university at a competitive advantage,”” said Kenny Broad, a professor of marine affairs and policy. Currently, RSMAS occasionally rents research helicopters, but it is better for the school to have its own, Broad said. He has previously used helicopters to conduct research and finds that the major problem is an inability to carry scientific instruments. Space for these types of devices must be created when the helicopter is being built. Cost is also another problem. Accord-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 8 - March 22, 2012

ing to Bravo Helicopters, where RSMAS Dean Roni Avissar is a regular client, a Bell 206 JetRanger III, which seats five, rents for $900 to $995 per hour. When Avissar was at Duke University, he helped the school develop its own helicopter. However, after Avissar left, the helicopter was dismantled because it was outdated. Broad hopes to use the helicopter with students to study climate change. He also anticipates that students who are certified to fly can serve as co-pilots during certain projects. The deadline for the challenge grant is in March, but faculty and students remain optimistic. Senior Ian Chambers, a marine science and biology major, is excited for the

possbility of a helicopter. ““It’’ll allow us to get to all sorts of place that we couldn’’t get to before,”” he said. ““It’’s a huge advantage for the school.””

“It will put the university at a competitive advantage.” Kenny Broad, Professor of Marine Affairs and Policy


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

5

March 8 - March 22, 2012

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

ADVERTISEMENT

5


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

6

OPINION speak

UP!

What are your plans for spring break?

KATIE PFISTER Sophomore “I am going to England on Friday.”

BRETT RIEDERMAN Sophomore “I am going to visit my sister at school in Wisconsin.”

Continued use of these non-renewable resources is not a good investment for the future.

Raymond La, Contributing Columnist

STAFF EDITORIAL

stadium has become a destination for graffiti artists who have covered the building’’s walls with writing and drawings that capture the 20 years since the storm. But a few years ago, some planned to tear the stadium down. However, there was strength in numbers for saving the cherished remnant. The stadium is now the centerpiece of Virginia Key’’s restoration plan and could possibly become the next world monument. Miami Marine Stadium is a vital landmark of South Florida’’s history and cultural legacy. There is also no comparable feeling to sitting in its graffiti-marked seats and taking in the sound of the lapping waves and smell of the bay. Even for locals who aren’’t

skateboarders, photographers or artists, the stadium can still be admired and visited. The stadium should be appreciated it for its monumental past, significant present and promise for a better tomorrow. The stadium has even inspired some of our campus community to get involved in saving this Miami landmark. UM’’s School of Architecture professors and students in 2009 helped develop the master plan that will restore and preserve the stadium. Miami Marine Stadium may not be a picture-perfect place to some, but its worth is undoubtedly priceless. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Nuclear energy offers solution, less risks

A

ADRIAN LUGO Sophomore “I am going to the beach.”

MICHELLE LOCK Freshman “I’m going to Sarasota with my friend who lives there.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Jennifer Levine

6

OPINION

fter President Obama’’s visit to discuss energy policy for our nation’’s future, I decided to research the issue for myself and develop thoughts of my own. I found that the United States currently garners a vast majority of its energy from RAYMOND LA CONTRIBUTING non-renewable sources like peCOLUMNIST troleum, coal and natural gas. Although these are considered cheap sources of energy, the vision behind them is short-sighted. Continued use of these non-renewable resources is not a good investment for the future. These sources of energy emit significant quantities of carbon, which in turn fuel climate change. An ideal scenario is to invest in solar power, but the implementation of solar energy to power our society is not practical because it is costly. However, while solar energy may not be feasible now, it is the best long-term solution. To attain this, there will be a need for a nuclear renaissance.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 8 - March 22, 2012

HURRICANE Founded 1929

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Marine Stadium is a Miami treasure The Miami Marine Stadium, in the midst of Key Biscayne’’s pristine waters, is an abandoned treasure. This deteriorating 43-year-old graffiti-covered landmark is beloved by local skateboarders, boat owners, cinematographers, photographers, and graffiti artists. It is an odd, but unique, home for memories. When Hurricane Andrew swept through Miami 20 years ago, this stadium was among many things that were destroyed. Before the eye of the storm, though, the stadium was full of life. Whether it was an Easter Sunday service, music concert, boxing match, boat race or political campaign rally, people always filled the 6,566 seats. Today, the abandoned

The Miami

There has been no ground broken for new nuclear reactors in more than 30 years. A revival in nuclear energy calls for the construction of new nuclear reactors that will fuel our country’’s energy needs until solar energy becomes an option. A mass construction of nuclear reactors across the nation would provide vast economic benefits. This is something that should be pursued, especially in the current economy. Job creation is first, followed by a growth in the local economy. Nuclear energy would also present lower costs for households and businesses on their electric bill. Of course there are always those who are hesitant to use nuclear power for safety concerns, but they should take into account that there have only been three major nuclear accidents in history (Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima). Nuclear power presents a minute risk in comparison to a continued use of non-renewable energy sources. Without it, the future will need some recharging. Raymond La is a freshman majoring in microbiology.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexa Lopez MANAGING EDITOR Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman PHOTO EDITOR Marlena Skrobe ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo NEWS EDITOR Alysha Khan OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez ASST. EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez COPY CHIEF Stephanie Parra COPY EDITORS Spencer Dandes Nicky Diaz

BUSINESS MANAGER Isabel Vichot ACCOUNT REPS Melissa Castillo Danica Jones Tara Kleppinger Misha Mayeur ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers ONLINE EDITOR Daniel Cepero WEBMASTER Amanda Zacharkiewicz DESIGNERS Carlos Mella Mariah Price Amilynn Soto ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2011 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

7

Ready to rock?

Check out Styx’s live concert at the Magic City Casino on Friday at 8 p.m. For more information, visit magiccitycasino.com.

edge

Grab an apron and get cooking BY ALEXA LOPEZ EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Leave your spatula, food processor and measuring cups at home and join other chefs-in-training at the Wellness Center’’s Instructional Kitchen, where you can learn to master cuisines from around the globe. Step into the kitchen about twice a month and join Chef Lori or Chef Mer-

cedes in their cooking classes featuring f lavorful menus, from the rich dishes of northern Italy to the spicy Cajun specialties of Louisiana. The chefs not only teach between three and four memorable recipes, but they also offer handy cooking techniques for cooking at home. Come hungry because the class shares the delicious final products at the end.

STIR IT UP: Natalia Navarro (right) and Maha Kikugawa (middle) pan-sear chicken breasts for a chicken continental dish with Chef Mercedes Verela-Mendez’s help.

CHOP IT UP: Jorge Torres Munoz prepares vegetables for his recipe of sloppy joes with mac and cheese while taking a cooking class at the Wellness Center.

UPCOMING CLASSES

PHOTOS BY HOLLY BENSUR // The Miami Hurricane

POUR IT IN: Maha Kikugawa watches as Chef Mercedes Verela-Mendez prepares mushroom barley with cannellini beans and sweet potatoes.

March 20: Create Spanish tapas with Chef Mercedes March 26: Perfect your puff pastries filled with cheese, fruit or meat with Chef Lori April 1: Bake vegan desserts, like plain cake donuts, with Chef Lori March 8 - March 22, 2012

Price: $20 for students and Wellness Center members, $25 for non-members Classes run from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in the Wellness Center Enrichment Suite’’s Instructional Kitchen. For more information, visit miami. edu/wellness. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

EDGE

7


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

8

TRAVEL

Experience Florida on a spring break roadtrip BY MARGAUX HERRERA EDGE EDITOR

at these parks and Cane Cards count as IDs at Universal Studios.

Rather than spending every day with the out-of-town spring breakers getting trashy on South Beach during spring break, grab a car, friends and some clothes and take a trip to one of these awesome Florida locations.

Key West

Contrary to what some might think, there is more to the Keys than just Pride Fest. Drive south and take the obligatory and drunken ““look at this cool landmark!”” photo. Old Town Key West is also home to Ernest Hemingway’’s old house. For all the English and history buffs (and for people who like a little culture), a tour of the house and museum is a must. It’’s also home to several dozen six-toed cats. And no, this is not a joke. So even if you miss the Ripley’’s Believe It Or Not Museum, you still get to see something freaky. And, if all else fails, just hit the beach and spend a couple days tanning without the worry of class on your peeling back. Just make sure to have a slice of key lime pie while you’’re down there.

Orlando

Pile in the car and drive four hours (three and a half if you don’’t take a bathroom break!) up to Orlando, where you can have your pick between Disney World, Universal Studios and Sea World. Or be adventurous (sort of ) and hit all three. See Hogwarts brought to life at the Wizarding World of Harry Potter at Universal’’s Islands of Adventure, get splashed by Shamu at Sea World, and drink around the world at Epcot, one of Disney’’s four parks. Hotels are as cheap as $50 per night, and split between four people (or more if you can sneak them in), it’’s almost ridiculous how little you’’ll be paying. All Florida residents receive ticket discounts

Homestead

If you’’re not feeling the long drive, pop down to Homestead. Grab a smooth-

ie from Robert is Here, a recently reopened fruit and smoothie stand. Or you could pop by Knaus Berry farms for a half-dozen sticky cinnamon buns that are guaranteed to be the best you’’ve ever had. Take a tour of Schnebly Redland Winery, where tropical fruit wine is sold. The Schneblys produce wine from fruits like lychee, carambola, coconut and mango. Even if they sound weird, it’’s worth a try. You might be in for a surprise. RF Orchids also gives free tours through hundreds and hundreds of orchid plants. You may not be able to eat anything, but the f lowers are amazing enough to make up for it.

St. Augustine

The oldest city in the country is just a five-hour trip up the east coast. Soak up the sun at the rocky but beautiful beach at Anastasia State Park or visit the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument. Pop into the homemade popsicle

shop, The Hyppo, to cool down. Or try the vegan and authentic Southern food at The Floridian. To keep the day going well into the night, hit the Bar With No Name or the Taberna Del Gallo. There are plenty of touristy shops for those who like to browse, but the most important part of the city is the architecture. The old-style buildings give the place a real, historic feel.

Naples

Just south of Naples, Marco Island is a niche for beaches sprinkled with white, crisp sand. Check out the resort scene to experience the life of luxury with a pina colada in hand, or enjoy tasty coconut shrimp. The Marriot Marco Island Florida Resort and Spa offers a luxurious spa scene, where you can calm down after stressful midterms. Visit the USS Nemo, a restaurant located off N. Tamiami Trail, offers local seafood cuisine with a French twist. A creative and modern restaurant, the scene boasts chic décor and is the perfect way to end a long day on the beach.

MOVIE PREVIEW

Comedic film stars take on more serious roles BY NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR

Ed Helms and Jason Segel have gone to some extremes to get a laugh. From marrying a hooker in Vegas to stripping down in front of the camera, it seems like they’’ve done it all. However, the comedic actors recently threw their fans a curveball and teamed up for a more serious film, ““Jeff Who Lives at Home.”” Mark and Jay Duplass, who also worked on ““Cyrus”” starring Jonah Hill and John C. Reilly, wrote and directed the film. The comedy-drama focuses on 30-year-old Jeff (played by Segel) who lives in his parents’’ basement, unable to determine his fate. His brother (Helms) is also struggling, while trying to cope with a failed marriage. The film takes place over one day with the siblings trying to discover their destinies together. ““It might not be what you expect from Jason Segel and me,”” said Ed Helms during a recent conference call with student journalists. ““This movie, kind of in keeping with the Duplass brothers’’ tone, it sort of rides the line into drama a little bit.”” Segel said he was able to relate to his character, Jeff, by thinking back to his ear8

EDGE

ly- to mid-20s. ““I think I related back to this time where you’’re kind of bopping around and you have a sense that your destiny is to do something,”” he said. ““Mine was to be an actor, but I was kind of waiting for the world to present that opportunity to me.”” While the roles are different for the comedic duo, Helms said he hopes the film will resonate with the audience. ““This movie doesn’’t shy away from the kind of painful aspect of a dysfunctional life, whereas my character on ‘‘The Office’’ is arguably very dysfunctional, but you don’’t really see the pain very often,”” Helms said. ““It’’s played for comedy. This is a little bit more played for reality and I hope that it resonates.”” Although the Duplass brothers wrote the film’’s script, Helms and Segel impro-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Jeff Who Lives At Home” WHEN: In theaters March 16

vised most of their lines. ““It’’s funny because they wrote a fabulous script,”” Helms said. ““They were the first ones to say, ‘‘Don’’t say a word of this.’’ So, we improvised almost every line of that movie and it was really exciting because Mark and Jay just really love that collaboration and that’’s kind of a rare thing in writers and directors.”” Improvising might make achieving the perfect shot more difficult. For an actor, it might be hard to know when you’’ve nailed a scene. ““It’’s my least favorite thing to like catch a little glimpse of when I’’m watching a movie, to see someone be a little proud of themselves and you really can see it if you watch carefully,”” Segel said. ““And so I try not to think about that too much.”” As a director, Mark Duplass also mentioned a basic rule of thumb when it comes to getting the best take. ““If you’’re ever asking yourself the question ‘‘Do we have it?’’ you definitely don’’t have it,”” he said. ““So as soon as you stop drilling that question, you usually feel like you’’ve got a sense of it.”” The film hits theaters March 16. Tyler Cooney contributed to this report.

March 8 - March 22, 2012

COURTESY ELECTROSHADOW.COM


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

9

SPORTS

3

the number of Hurricane divers that will be competing in the NCAA Championships this month

BREAKING NEWS: Senior men’s basketball player Malcolm Grant was tapped into Iron Arrow on Tuesday. “He is a great role model and great ambassador of the university,” coach Jim Larranaga said.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Strong ACC run could boost Canes into NCAA field Larranaga: “They have higher aspirations” BY DAVID FURONES SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

GRAPHIC BY CARLOS MELLA

The ACC Tournament is set to commence, and for the UM men’’s basketball team, an NCAA Tournament bubble team, it’’s do-or-die time with one objective in mind: impress the selection committee enough to reach the proverbial Big Dance. If you ask coach Jim Larranaga, his goal is to actually win the tournament, thereby becoming ACC Champions and receiving an automatic bid instead of leaving an at-large bid up to the committee. It’’s a tall task, considering the Canes, not one of the top four teams that earned a first-round bye, would have to win four games in four nights. The sixth-seeded Hurricanes (1811, 9-7 ACC) kick off the tournament Thursday night at 9 p.m. against the 11thseeded Yellow Jackets of Georgia Tech (11-19, 4-12 ACC) in Atlanta’’s Philips Arena.It will essentially be a home game for Tech, as its campus is a mere two miles away from the home of the NBA’’s Atlanta Hawks. ““I think the guys are excited,”” Larranaga said. ““They feel that they’’ve accomplished a certain number of things during the regular season but they have higher aspirations.”” Among some of the firsts this team has accomplished in Larranaga’’s first year coaching the team: a winning season in ACC play and a road win at Duke’’s Cameron Indoor Stadium. But the team has also come up short enough times to land it on the NCAA bubble. CBS Sports lists Miami as one of the last four teams projected to reach the tournament. However, ESPN’’s Joe Lunardi currently has Miami at the top of his ““next four out”” after the ““first four out,”” meaning he believes five teams lie between the Canes and the 68-team tournament field. The 10-member selection committee, composed of NCAA athletic directors and conference commissioners from around March 8 - March 22, 2012

the country, does not take into account the opinions of the ““bracketologists,”” but what they do consider is every team’’s entire body of work from the season as a whole. When they look at Miami, they’’ll see the winning conference record and impressive wins against Florida State and at Duke, but they will also see a season sweep at the hands of N.C. State, another bubble team, and poor out-of-conference play to start the season. A major wild card in the selection process will be how much the committee weighs Reggie Johnson’’s knee injury that yielded a rocky 5-4 start for the Canes in his absence. It will certainly come up in the discussion, but other teams have dealt with injuries, too. Just how far Miami must advance in the ACC tournament to earn their spot in the Big Dance is debatable. The Hurricanes, without question, must win their first game against the lowly Yellow Jackets. ““They are a much-improved basketball team,”” Larranaga said, but the committee will not be sympathetic of a team that loses to a well-below-.500 conference foe at the most critical juncture of the season. A Georgia Tech win would mean the Canes’’ next opponent is Florida State on Friday. A win could lock up a tournament spot so long as Miami doesn’’t get blown out in the semifinal, but a loss would mean the Canes would need some help in the form of other bubble teams falling early in their respective conference tournaments. Coaches around the ACC have expressed high praise for Miami. Boston College coach Steve Donahue called the Canes one of the best offensive teams he’’s seen after his Eagles fell to them 77-56 in the regular season finale, his second defeat of the year to Miami. Jeff Bzdelik of Wake Forest deemed the Hurricanes worthy of a tournament bid in the press conference after his 18-point loss Feb. 18 at the hands of Larranaga. UNC’’s Roy Williams said the Hurricanes, who went 6-1 between their two meetings with the Tar Heels, were much improved the second time he faced them, and ask Duke’’s Mike Krzyzewski what he thought about the team after his home loss to UM on Super Bowl Sunday. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

10

BASEBALL

Canes fall to Marlins, defeat Redhawks in week of walk-offs Miami teams open new ballpark with exhibition BY ADAM BERGER | SENIOR SPORTS WRITER ERNESTO SUAREZ | SPORTS EDITOR

It was a week full of Miami baseball. Literally. The Hurricanes helped the Miami Marlins open up their new downtown ballpark in an exhibition game Tuesday night, and then welcomed Miami (Ohio) University to Alex Rodriguez Park on Wednesday. It’’s become a yearly tradition for the Canes and Marlins to scrimmage each other in early March, but this time around was a bit more memorable that the previous outings at Roger Dean Stadium in Jupiter, Fla. The Marlins took the field for the first time at Marlins Park, and it was the building, not the baseball, that was the main attraction. ““It was a great night for our players and I think for the Marlins, to get to play the first game in this stadium,”” coach Jim Morris said after the Canes lost to the Marlins 7-6. ““It’’s a beautiful, beautiful stadium.”” The evening was essentially a dress rehearsal for the new park. With the smell of fresh paint in the air, the digital scoreboards on the outfield walls were turned off, and the Marlins’’ gigantic and colorful centerfield homerun sculpture didn’’t spring to life when Hanley Ramirez lifted a ball over the right-field fence in the fourth inning. But that’’s not to say the state-of-theart facility didn’’t pass its most important test of the evening. As dark clouds, strong winds and the typically volatile South Florida weather surrounded the stadium just before first pitch, the retractable roof made its move and ensured Mother Nature could not impact the game. ““The first thing it does, you get a weather issue, and you just close the dome and play,”” Morris said. ““And that’’s

UPCOMING GAMES VS. BOSTON COLLEGE Friday at 7 p.m. Saturday at 7 p.m. Sunday at 1 p.m. VS. ILLINOIS STATE March 13 at 6 p.m. 10

SPORTS

perfect; that’’s something that’’s needed in this ballpark.”” So, despite all the distractions surrounding the evening, a game was played and the Canes fared pretty well against one of the Marlins new free agent acquisitions, Mark Buehrle, who started Tuesday’’s game on the mound. Buehrle retired UM in order in both the first and second innings, and after Stephen Perez struck out to begin the third, the Canes hit three singles on three straight pitches to load the bases with one out. Sophomore Dale Carey stepped into the batter’’s box and also swung at the first pitch he saw from Buehrle, lining a basesclearing double down the left field line to put Miami up 3-0. ““That was fun to get a hit off of a major leaguer like that in a clutch situation,”” Carey said. ““It was a good feeling.”” Buerhle left after the third inning, his first start of the spring and first time pitching in a Marlins uniform. ““Usually when I go up against Double-A and Single-A guys I don’’t fare too well, so I was kind of nervous coming out facing college guys thinking it was going to be even worse,”” joked Buerhle, a pitcher with a no-hitter and perfect game under his belt. ““Three runs is pretty good; I’’ll take that any day.”” On Wednesday night the Hurricanes were able to recover from their early struggles against the Redhawks of Miami (Ohio) to come away with their ninth win of the season. The Canes struggled to score early and trailed for most of the evening, but timely hitting along with some defensive miscues by the Hawks gave the fans in Coral Gables reason to go home happy. ““It was a tough game for us. The fact that we played Florida, we played the Marlins, I thought we came out flat during batting practice,”” Morris said following the win. ““We were very fortunate to win.”” The Redhawks struck first in the second inning after third baseman Bryan Beaver hit a two-RBI double after back-toback singles off starter Steven Ewing. The Redhawks would add another run in the fourth, and the Hurricanes made it 3-1 in the bottom of the inning. After an error in the eighth made it 3-2, the Canes got started in the ninth after shortstop Michael Broad, who entered the game in the seventh inning, got to second after a dropped fly ball. A single by Tyler Palmer and a walk by Dale Carey loaded the bases, and Broad was able tie the game on a close play at home plate. Then, Esteban Tresgallo hit a chopper to shortstop that was mishandled, allowing Palmer to score the game-winning run.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 8 - March 22, 2012

CARLOS MELLA // The Miami Hurricane

NEW DIGS: Hurricanes rightfielder Chantz Mack swings at a pitch from Miami Marlins’ Elih Villanueva during Tuesday’s exhibition game at the new Marlins Park. The Marlins defeated UM by 7-6 with a walkoff single by first baseman Terry Terry Tiffee. On Wednesday, the Canes beat Miami (Ohio) 4-3.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

11

Dear V: I want to know if my friend plays for the other team... Dear Not Just Besties, , My best friend and I have been hooking up recently whenever we are drunk together. But now I am starting to develop feelings for him. What do I do about this? Confused Bromance

Well, first thing would be to find out if your biffle also identifies with the not-so-straight crowd. It’’s going to be hard to move past just alcohol-induced third base if he’’s not willing to bat for the same team when he’’s sober. He might say, ““Four balls? I’’m walking,”” and be out of there. If you two are at least in agreement about which gender is not only fun to touch, but good to date, then it sounds like we are making some progress. Call me stupid, but if this is your best friend, with whom I assume you often drink, and you two are getting handsy and maybe even mouthy every time you two get drunk, you guys have wiped semen off each other’’s chests more than a few times. Have you two not discussed this the days after your hookups? No ““Hey bro, can we talk about last night?”” Just ask him how he feels about it! Of course, you can try to continue down the friendswith-benefits path. Keep being friends ... just ones who

dear ... i for each other’’s penises. i also have a drunk liking What better than someone you can watch the game with and stroke you while you do it? In my experience though, this is only going to further complicate things. In every FWB relationship, someone ultimately isn’’t able to keep it just friends and becomes attached. It sounds like you’’re already going down this sticky path. You two really need to sit down together and stroke things out ... ahem. Work things out. Continuing to loosen each other up with tequila so that you can lick the other’’s salt and finish with the suck of a lime is going to ultimately ruin your friendship when someone gets emotionally hurt. Sit down and talk it through, or just cut it out. You can trust V on this one. It’’s gay if it’’s only in a two-way, V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

COOL STORY, V! Submit a Dear V question and receive a free t-shirt!

To submit a question, contact: dearv

} @themiami hurricane.com

WE’RE TAKING A BREAK! The Miami Hurricane will not publish an issue until March 22, the week classes resume.

Have a great spring break! March 8 - March 22, 2012

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

11


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25”” X 14””

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

12

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, March 8 Patio Jams featuring Le Blorr

12:15 p.m. •• UC Patio Come out and enjoy this special edition of HP’’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the live band while celebrating with FEC and their Week of Cuban Culture!

Mindful Eating Lunch

12:30 p.m. •• Wellness Center Classroom 1 This presentation is based on the seven attitudinal foundations of mindfulness and how they relate to our relationship with food, eating and self-nurturing. Lunch will be provided.

CPR Certification Class with AED Training

2:30 p.m. •• Herbert Wellness Center Heart Saver CPR with AED teaches CPR and relief of choking in adults, children, and infants, as well as use of barrier devices for all ages. Participants will also learn how to use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). The cost is $30 for student members, $35 for non-student members and $40 for non-members. To

register, call 305-284-5433 or go to the Wellness Enrichment Suite located on the second floor of the Herbert Wellness Center.

RAB Spring Break

5 p.m. •• Rathskeller Bring your friends and enjoy happy hour with RAB’’s Spring Break celebration as they bring a steel drum band to UM!

Lousiana and Cajun Cooking Class

6:30 p.m. •• Herbert Wellness Center Instructional Kitchen Due to the overwhelming response, Chef Mercedes is offering another session of her popular Cajun cooking class. Participants will learn how to prepare shrimp creole, chicken jambalaya, dirty rice, and bread pudding soufflé with bourbon sauce. The cost is only $20 for UM students and Wellness Center members; $25 for nonmembers. The fee includes cooking demonstration, recipes, and food tasting. To register or for more information, go to the Wellness Enrichment Suite located on the second floor of the Herbert Wellness Center or call 305-284-LIFE (5433).

Thursday, March 8 •• 3 p.m. Wellness Center Atrium Life Alliance, part of the Donate Life Foundation, will be registering UM students, faculty, alumni, staff, and invited guests as organ donors. Everyone who registers will receive a loaded gift bag. Information on kidney health will be available as well as free health screenings from nursing students. There will be tons of great giveaways and FREE Food and Smoothies! Jill Morton, kidney transplant recipient and Transplant Games Gold Medalist will be the lead speaker. Come hear her inspirational story and learn about the ways we can save lives. Speaker presentations will be at 3:00PM, 4:00PM, and 4:45PM. The rst 20 people to each presentation will receive a FREE Gift Bag with t-shirts, hats, bracelets and more and even meet some UM football players while you are at it!

Frost Jazz Ensemble I/The Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra

8 p.m. •• Gusman Concert Hall This event is a sizzling jazz-infused concert that combines Frost’’s award-winning Jazz Vocal I Ensemble with the crossgenre Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra! This crowd-pleasing concert filled with favorite American song classics, arranged by faculty and students. Tickets: Adults $15, Seniors $10. UM Students free with valid ID at the door (subject to availability on concert night).

Friday, March 9 Women’s Tennis vs. Boston College 12 p.m. •• Neil Schiff Tennis Center

Moon Child

1 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

Baseball vs. Boston College

7 p.m. •• Alex Rodriquez Park Coverage available via Gametracker and WVUM 90.5.

Lowe Art Musem: Annual Silent Auction

7 p.m. •• Newman Alumni Center Spring into art with Lowe’’s Annual Silent Auction! For tickets or information, call Friends of Art at 305.284.6756 or e-mail FriendsofArt@miami.edu. All proceeds benefit the Lowe Art Museum

Saturday, March 10 17 Girls

3 p.m. •• Cosford Cinema

Baseball vs. Boston College

7 p.m. •• Alex Rodriquez Park Coverage available via Gametracker and WVUM 90.5.

Sunday, March 11 Baseball vs. Boston College

1 p.m. •• Alex Rodriquez Park Coverage available via Gametracker and WVUM 90.5.

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 12

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 8 - March 22, 2012

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

World Kidney Day Fair


The Miami Hurricane -- March 8, 2012