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The Miami

HURRICANE Vol. 90, Issue 40 | March 5 - March 7, 2012

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

Lighting up the stage

UM dance groups feature unique styles Page 3 PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAYLA NIMMO // Assistant Photo Editor


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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Senate to use iClickers for more transparency SG aims to improve communication

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT EDITOR

In an effort to promote transparency, accountability and communication, the legislative branch of Student Government has started using iClickers during meetings to record senators’’ votes on legislation. iClickers are commonly used in UM classrooms so professors can keep track of student responses to questions asked in class. Now, the devices will be used to generate a report that keeps a record of each senator’’s individual votes. This method is replacing the former hand-raise voting style. In the past, only the totals –– yes, no or abstain –– were recorded. ““The idea was that if you were curious about what your senator was voting on and whether you felt it was necessary to make a change in the upcoming election, then you could have access to that information,”” Speaker of the Senate Michael Kaplan said. Senate voting records will be updated every two weeks and kept in the SG office (UC 214). Bills and their iClicker results will be available to any student with a valid Cane Card upon request. They will also soon be made available online, according to SG Press Secretary Mike Piacentino. Sophomore Adriana Morell-Pacheco said she does not know about what her senator for the College of Arts and Sciences is doing.

To read more about SG Senate, check out the staff editorial on page 6.

Read Kristen Spillane’s recap of the men’s tennis matches this past weekend.

MONICA HERNDON // The Miami Hurricane

CLICKING: The Student Government Senate has started to use iClickers during meetings to keep a record of individual senators’ votes. SG hopes to improve communication with its constituents. ““Students should be more informed about what their senators are doing for their school in particular as well as the university in general,”” she said. But junior Melanie Kleiner believes that students are unaware of Senate initiatives and would probably not check out the voting records. ““I probably wouldn’’t look at the results, to be honest,”” she said. ““Unless it was something really, really significant that I felt needed to be changed, then I would.”” Senators are elected to represent their class, residential area, organization and school or college. In a given week, they vote on a range of issues, including granting funds for events hosted by student organizations and approving projects like adding a GPA calculator on myUM.

The decision to use iClickers came after an internal survey of SG members identified the organization’’s strengths and weaknesses. The anonymous survey was conducted at the end of the fall semester and reviewed during winter break. It measured responses of 82 members across all five branches of SG, as well as Cabinet and advisory boards. The survey looked at members’’ reasons for joining SG, meeting preparedness, interaction with constituency, and leadership and meeting efficiency, according to a fact sheet released by Piacentino. The data showed that senators felt that they have not been reaching out to their constituents as often as they should be, according to Piacentino, who analyzed the results. SG President Brandon Mitchell

and the executive branch suggested the use of iClickers to rectify this communication issue. With the change, students can access senators’’ votes, learn about Senate projects and hold their representatives accountable. ““Already, senators have started going out to their constituencies and talking and getting ideas,”” Mitchell said. Kaplan said that the senators want to reach out to the students as much as possible, but they cannot always get through to everybody. ““For the ones that we can’’t always reach, there are plenty of ways to get involved,”” he said. The SG website features a ““Find Your Senator”” tool, and students can attend weekly Senate meetings on Wednesdays at 4:30 p.m. in the UC Ballrooms.

NEWS BRIEFS HOUSING Students who want to live with people of similar interest or hobbies can apply to be a member of a special interest floor for 2012-2013. From the HARMONY floor in Eaton Residential College to STRIVE in Pearson, there are options for everyone. Applications for Special Interest Housing are due

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NEWS

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Tuesday to the Office of Academic Enhancement and can be found online at miami.edu/provost/ oae/sih.html.

SG COMES TO U Student Government, along with Chartwells and UM Dining Services, will be in the Hecht-Stanford

March 5 - March 7, 2012

Dining Hall to engage students in conversation aimed at making improvements in dining services for the upcoming year. The event will take place Tuesday from 5 to 7 p.m, so you can give your feedback when you go to the dining hall for meals. Lyssa Goldberg may be contacted at lgoldberg@ themiamihurricane.com

Check out Moya Bailey’s story about Hillel’s annual Birthright trips to Israel. Want to learn more about the UM bioethics center? See Daniel Pyser’s story. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com. TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane

ON THE COVER: Eduardo LamasBasulto and Lisset Avila of Salsa Craze, Emily Brunden of KAOS and Amber Dawn of Miami Ballroom show off their moves by Lake Osceola.


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STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Campus dance groups feature differing styles, techniques Annual performances, competitions reflect passion, hours of practice On Saturday, two of UM’’s top dance groups strutted their stuff at their annual performances. The Indian Student Association hosted its fifth annual Miami Mayhem dance competition, which featured Garba/Rass dance teams from across the nation. The same evening, Miami Ballroom hosted its second annual Dancing with the UMiami Stars, which brought together UM ““celebrities”” from Sebastian the Ibis to SG President Brandon Mitchell to dance for the trophy. UM is home to multiple dance groups, each with unique styles. Here is a look at five of these groups. KAOS KAOS, the university’’s only co-ed hip-hop dance group, is shattering the concept that hip-hop requires baggy clothes, hulking muscles and a tough demeanor. The 17-member group meets twice a week for two hours to go over routines, learn new choreography by their own team members and also prepare innovative pieces for their semester showcase. In the past, KAOS has featured the burlesque style and lap dances, an audience favorite, in their performances. ““While hip-hop is our predominate style we also have many dancers whose strengths lie in contemporary or lyrical,”” KAOS President Julianne Byun said. ““Everyone on the team has their own niche, so while we stay true to our roots we do a lot of incorporating in our routines.””

Miami Ballroom The waltz and foxtrot are no longer just something your grandparents dance. Miami Ballroom offers classes in two categories of dance, standard and Latin. The standard dances include the waltz, tango and the foxtrot and the Latin dances include the chacha, samba and rumba. Within Miami Ballroom there is a competition and performance team, which has 15 members, and a club, which has about 50-60 members of students, faculty and Miami locals, according to President Kathleen Munley. ““People usually prefer Latin because it’’s more fun and upbeat,”” Munley said. ““Standard is what people see as more ‘‘old people’’ dancing. We did a modern twist and performed ballroom to the song ‘‘Cooler than Me’’ to show people ballroom is cool.”” Once a month, club members are given an opportunity to show off their skills at a social. It gives them the opportunity to practice the steps and moves they have learned. SwaggeRaas This weekend’’s Miami Mayhem was hosted by UM’’s Hurricane SwaggeRaas dance team. SwaggeRaas’’ routines feature Garba/Raas, a high-energy, Indian dance rooted in ethnic folk dances from the Indian state of Gujarat. ““It’’s time-consuming, but it’’s worth it,”” said freshman Puja Patel,

LEAN BACK: Sophomore Beth Kuevler (center) dances with the girls of Miami Motion dance team during practice.

PHOTOS BY MONICA HERNDON // The Miami Hurricane

HIPS DON’T LIE: Daisy Yang (center) performs with a group of Miami Ballroom dancers at the group’s second annual Dancing with the UMiami Stars on Saturday evening. who is a member of SwaggeRaas and performed in Mayhem. Garba is primarily a solo dance performed in a circular fashion, while Raas is done in pairs using a stick called a dandia. SwaggeRaas is one of ISA’’s three dance groups: Hurricane Bhangra showcases traditional folk dances from the Indian state of Punjab; UMiami Thaalam, or UFusion, is ISA’’s all-girls dance team that combines traditional Indian dances with hip-hop dance moves. Miami Motion The girls of Miami Motion like to turn, kick and leap their way into the hearts of students by performing at on-campus events. The all-girl jazz and lyrical dance team is a group of ““friends who come together to dance,”” according to Miami Motion President Joanie Oben. Miami Motion has gone from a group of 10 to 15 dancers to a strong team of around 25 since its formation five years ago. With more girls auditioning, the process has become very selective, sophomore Chrissy Houston said. The group has also worked its way up to performing at three to four events each semester. ““Our goal right now is to keep

growing our presence at school,”” Oben said. When Miami Motion performs at pep rallies, they use high-energy dances to get the crowd excited. Their jazz technique is peppy, like something out of a music video, Oben said. The girls performed a song from the movie ““Burlesque”” at a Greek Week event last Friday night. Freshman Taylor Burnbaum, a new member, said they wanted to ““liven up the crowd”” with their ““sassy”” style. Salsa Craze Every Wednesday night, Salsa Craze offers a fun, party-like environment for the UM and Miami communities to learn how to dance salsa. ““It is a big family, everyone is very welcoming and if you love it,

you’’re just drawn into in and everybody accepts you,”” Salsa Craze President Dagmara Danek said. At the beginning of each lesson, dancers are split up into different groups based on their level. There are four different levels: beginner, intermediate, advanced, and masters. ““Regardless of how I feel starting class, I always end up with a smile on my face,”” sophomore Adrian Lugo said. After dancers have mastered a certain set of moves, the instructors can promote them to the next level. Students who reach the master level can also train to become instructors. Story compiled by Isabel Brador, Ashley Martinez, Alexander Gonzalez, Lyssa Goldberg and Daniel Cepero.

GET INVOLVED MIAMI BALLROOM: 6-8 p.m. Thursdays SWAGGERAAS: Visit miami.edu/studorgs/ISA. SALSA CRAZE: 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, 6-9 p.m. Friday in the International Lounge; members pay $25 per semester.  Auditions for KAOS and Miami Motion will be held at the start of the fall semester.

March 5 - March 17, 2012

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NEWS

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COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES

ON-CAMPUS LIBRARIES

Film series to conclude with ‘‘Margin Call’’

Study locations exist beyond Richter Library

Ethics program confronts pertinent global issues

With midterm season right around the corner, now is the time to find a perfect studying spot. While the Richter Library is the most popular (and crowded) place to study and socialize, there are several smaller libraries across the university’’s three campuses that may offer a change of scenery. Those smaller libraries include the Marta and Austin Weeks Music Library, the Paul Buisson Reference Library at the School of Architecture and the Law Library on the Gables campus, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Library on Virginia Key.

BY DANIEL PYSER CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The University of Miami Ethics Program will conclude it seventh annual ““Ethics in Film”” series with the film ““Margin Call,”” a thrilling tale of the financial crisis that struck the United States in recent years. The film series was created by Anita Cava, co-director of the ethics program. She said she created the film series in an attempt to find a more interesting and appealing alternative to traditional speakers. The movies have become a ““labor of love,”” she said. ““Today’’s audiences are very visually orientated, and I think it’’s a great way to have a conversation about difficult issues that we are confronting today,”” Cava said. ““Margin Call”” is being shown at 6:15 p.m. on March 7 at the Cosford Cinema. It stars Demi Moore and Kevin Spacey, recaps a 36-hour period at a large investment bank during the financial crisis of 2007-2008 on Wall Street. The film deals with the decisions and actions of the employees as they were caught up in the moment of the financial collapse. Admission is free to the public and includes complimentary popcorn and candy. Following the film, there will be a speaker to facilitate a discussion about the film. ““The Ethics in Film series is one of the few events that brings non-blockbuster films to a wider audience,”” said Imri Yekutiel, chair of the University of Miami’’s chapter of Amnesty International. Yekutiel and his organization played a major role in promoting the second film in the series, ““Blood Coltan,”” which was played of Feb. 28 and deals with environmental waste issues related to the widely unknown mineral coltan. The first film, ““Made in India,”” was previously shown on Feb. 13 and dealt with the ethical dilemma of American couples outsourcing surrogacy to India.

UM campuses each offer unique settings BY KARLA DURANGO CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Weeks Music Library Sitting on the edge of Lake Osceola next to the site of the former Rathskeller, the Weeks is the newest and largest branch of the university’’s libraries. Though it mainly caters to the needs of students at the Frost School of Music, the building and its resources are available to

the entire UM community. The library features worktables, cubicle-like study desks and small lounge areas with picturesque views of the lake. ““In the Weeks Music Library I don’’t feel like I have to push myself so hard to keep studying, because the natural light and the atmosphere present in the building gives me more energy to continue,”” sophomore Monica Zgurova said. RSMAS Library For students looking for a change of scenery, the RSMAS library located on the Virginia Key campus is just a short drive or shuttle ride away. This library offers a unique bonus: coffee and candy for students. ““Just the idea of going to the nearby beach alone will drive me to get my studies done,”” senior Laken Garcia said. ““It’’s the perfect incentive.”” Law Library Located near Richter and the popular on-campus Subway restaurant, this is a good place for late-night studying. Robin C. Schard, assistant library director for public service, says that while the library gets fairly busy during the day, it is usually a very quiet space at night. ““It is more quiet and people who are

studying will police any noise,”” she said. The library has a number of group study rooms, computer labs and study cubicles with computers. The computers are only available to law students; however, the desks have connections for personal laptops. Schard said that there are some access restrictions during major exam periods, but otherwise the law library is open to all students. Architecture Library Another campus alternative to Richter is the architecture library is located on the first floor of building 48-D, which faces the central courtyard of the School of Architecture. According to Elisiene Jean, the senior library assistant, the space remains relatively calm and quiet throughout most of the semester, but is busier during finals or heavy exam periods. This facility contains several computers, as well as a small lounge area and two conference rooms that are usually available to students unless a private meeting is being held, according to Jean. There are also a few tables outside in the courtyard that give students the chance to study and take advantage of the fresh air.

IF YOU GO WHAT: “Margin Call” WHERE: Bill Cosford Cinema WHEN: Wednesday at 6:15 p.m. 4

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

STUDY HALL: Ayush Amin studies for a biology exam in the Weeks Music Library, which overlooks Lake Osceola. He prefers it to Richter because “if you are at Richter you see your friends and it’s very distracting,” he said. March 5 - March 7, 2012


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PHOTO BRIEF

Greeks unite in superhero-themed teams on stage SIGMA STANCE: (From left) Freshmen Brian Josefat, Austin Kollefrath, George Coritsidis and Clay Richardson perform in Friday’s Greek Week Organized Cheer event. Josefat, Kollefrath and Richardson are members of Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Coritsidis is a member of Sigma Alpha Mu. The group is pointing at the girls of the Sigma Delta Tau sorority, who were part of the blue team during Greek Week along with SAE and SAM. SAE and SAM’s dance and skit during O-Cheer focused on Superman, the superhero assigned to the blue team during Greek Week. The red team, which consisted of Delta Delta Delta, the Multiethnic Greek Council and Beta Theta Pi, was the winner of Friday’s O-Cheer. The orange team, which comprised Delta Phi Epsilon, Phi Delta Theta and the National Panhellenic Council, won Greek Week overall. Greek Week pits teams of fraternities and sororities against each other every year in competitions like O-Cheer in an effort to raise money for United Cerebral Palsy. MONICA HERNDON // The Miami Hurricane

FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Ensemble performances challenge, inspire music majors Critiques follow weekly shows BY LAURASIA MATTINGLY CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

This year, Frost School of Music students have been able to live the musician’’s dream of performing onstage. Frost majors, which must play in a musical ensemble of some style their freshman year, have been given the opportunity for the first time to perform in front of other ensembles every Monday night. After each performance, professors and other Frost faculty give feedback to the student musicians. Blake Buller, a sophomore music business major with Jazz Performance emphasis, describes his Monday night performance was more than beneficial. ““Being able to perform and

surround myself with such talented musicians, and perform in front of such accomplished faculty inspire me to do my best and always set the bar high,”” Buller said. After auditioning and being accepted into the Frost School of Music, students of all majors are enrolled in the experiential music curriculum (EMC). Students must then audition to be placed in a skills ensemble based on level, skill and area of focus. These ensembles range from classical Be-Bop to world music and hip-hop Each member of the ensemble attends a private lesson once a week to practice and perfect their skills for class-time practices that meet twice a week. EMC trains musicians using a program that integrates performance, music history, ear training, music composition and theory altogether in six hours of

weekly training. This prepares students for any professional music careers. Daniel Susnjar, a jazz skills ensemble instructor, explains that the program is unique because it combines the learning and development of ensemble performance skills, music theory, learning of repertoire, stylistic authenticity and jazz improvisation into one comprehensive class. ““The program was very rewarding and a great challenge to me as a teacher,”” Susnjar said. ““I saw a real willingness from the students to develop their musicianship and to be challenged. The level of improvement of the ensemble was noticeable to not only the group themselves, but also to the student body and faculty.”” Sophomore studio music and jazz drum set performance major Matt Tatro participates in the concert jazz band, the top

jazz ensemble, where he plays the drums. His ensemble is taught by Grammy award-winner and jazz trumpeter Brian Lynch. The duo directs the ensemble’’s area of focus on studying the sounds of tenor saxophonist John Coltrane. ““I love learning and studying the sounds of such amazing musicians and applying them to my own music,”” Tatro said. Lynch said he learns from his students’’ enthusiasm to soak in the sounds of veteran players, like himself, and loves sharing the music he loves with his fellow students. He said his students are more than just an ensemble, but are almost like a family. ““I’’ve been working with these talented musicians for two years now, that we’’ve formed a family,”” Lynch said. Tatro agrees. ““Yeah, we are a family for sure, we have everyone from a crazy uncle, goofball, and a stub-

March 5 - March 17, 2012

born stickler, which is me,”” he said. ““Because support from one another is required at all times while playing, we get on each other about each others’’ playing to satisfy a unified, balanced sound.”” Students can catch the ensembles’’ performances every Wednesday night at 8 p.m. at the Wesley Foundation CoffeeHouse event.

IF YOU GO WHAT: CoffeeHouse, featuring live music, free drinks and snacks WHERE: Wesley Foundation WHEN: 8 p.m. on Wednesday nights

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NEWS

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OPINION speak

UP!

What is your favorite local festival and why?

ELAINE HUANG Freshman “The art festival at Coconut Grove because there are a lot of different artists there, and you get to meet new people and see new things.”

Downloading a record from iTunes just doesn’t do it for me. But it seems like I’m the last person left who buys CDs.

Nicky Diaz, Copy Editor

STAFF EDITORIAL

From our point of view, such efforts are futile when students are ignorant of SG’’s power on campus and what the organization has accomplished in the past. SG has more of an influence on your life as a student than you think. It’’s expected of all citizens to get informed about what’’s going on in local, state and national government. Similarly, it’’s important to learn about SG leaders and their work. And if you’’re especially opinionated about on-campus life, a Senate seat is calling your name. Fill out an application and you could represent the opinions of a community full of students who have needs and demands. If you want to see change at our university, then make it happen. Senate is currently taking applications for the nine empty seats. If you’’re interested, you could represent the junior class, School of Architecture, School of Communication, Hispanic Students Association, Interfraternity Council, United Black Students or one of three other organizations. To apply for one of these seats, visit the SG office in the University Center, room 214. To find out more information about SG Senate, turn to page 3.

Ripping music hurts independent bands

I

DIMITRI NADER Freshman “Ultra Music Festival because I like techno music, and Ultra features the best techno artists in the entire world.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Jennifer Levine

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OPINION

love having the physical copy of a musician’’s album. Downloading the record from iTunes just doesn’’t do it NICKY DIAZ COPY EDITOR for me. But it seems like I’’m the last person left who buys CDs. Listeners who rip the audio from a YouTube video or download songs for free on other sites rather than purchasing the album itself have negatively impacted the industry. As a result, musicians are profiting less from album sales than they did in the past (unless you’’re Adele). This really hit me when a band I used to listen to started using a

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Kickstarter, which helps them raise money through donations from fans. Eventually, those donations will be used to record and release their upcoming album. At first I was caught off guard and thought their plea was pathetic, but after thinking about their situation, I realized that it is a logical thing to do as an indie band. They can’’t afford to record, produce and release an album, so why not ask their fans to help them in their efforts to make new music? Those who donate will probably buy the album anyway. Times are tough and indie bands have realized they need to be creative. Another indie band, Honor Society, recently released their third album independently. Before they released the record, they started a

March 5 - March 7, 2012

Founded 1929

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alexa Lopez MANAGING EDITOR Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman PHOTO EDITOR Marlena Skrobe ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo NEWS EDITOR Alysha Khan OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez ASST. EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez COPY CHIEF Stephanie Parra COPY EDITORS Spencer Dandes Nicky Diaz

BUSINESS MANAGER Isabel Vichot ACCOUNT REPS Melissa Castillo Danica Jones Tara Kleppinger Misha Mayeur ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls PUBLIC RELATIONS James Borchers ONLINE EDITOR Daniel Cepero WEBMASTER Amanda Zacharkiewicz DESIGNERS Carlos Mella Mariah Price Amilynn Soto ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Maria Jamed FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2012 University of Miami

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

DANIEL RODRIGUEZ Junior “Art Basel because it’s so great. It’s the cutting edge of art.”

HURRICANE

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

More active students will fuel Senate Upset that the dining halls aren’’t open late? Wish you could take a course that the university doesn’’t offer? Although Student Government has already addressed these two student needs, it continues to be the organization students run to when they want to voice their concerns about on-campus life. But these impactful decisions become less effective and less representative of the student body when nine Senate seats still remain unoccupied. The Senate is the largest branch of SG, with representatives from every school and college at the university, as well as residential colleges and various student organizations. Senators act as the liaisons between students and the executive board, which consists of the president, vice president and treasurer. But currently, there are only 38 faces on the Senate dais, while there should really be 47. In reality, these 47 senators unify more than 10,000 student voices. Yet many students take the Senate for granted and complain relentlessly about everything from parking to on-campus dining, rather than taking the initiative to get involved and make their voices heard. The Senate continues to work hard in order to improve its transparency with students. The implementation of iClickers is a perfect example of this. Using iClickers will give students the ability to see the Senate votes.

The Miami

system where they would release a new song every week to give their fans a glimpse of what was going on in the recording studio. These downloads were completely free. Most musicians have accepted the fact that most of their fans are going to download their music illegally. Because of this, they’’re trying to mix things up and reach their fans in different ways, like Honor Society’’s free downloads. Just because albums are available for free online doesn’’t mean you shouldn’’t support your favorite bands. Releasing an album and touring the globe is extremely expensive and musicians rely on the profit from album sales to fund those ventures. Reward their hard work by spending $10 on an album.

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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Want to feel like you’re at Carnaval?

Check out the Calle Ocho Festival for food, music and performances throughout the week. For more information, visit miamiandbeaches.com.

BY JONATHAN BORGE SENIOR EDGE WRITER

First was Midtown. Then came South Beach. And now 100 Montaditos, a popular eatery straight from Spain, has made its way to South Miami. Just a few steps from Ra Sushi, restaurant managers hope to grab the attention of University of Miami students and South Miami residents alike. With tapas-style dining options and Mahou beer imported directly from Spain, it offers what most restaurants nearby cannot: delicious fare at a more than affordable price ("montaditos" range between $1 and $3 each). The staff at 100 Montaditos takes pride in the restaurant’’s Spanish origin and the ““montadito,”” the small-scale sandwich behind the restaurant’’s name. Exactly 100 of these appetizing sandwiches are on the menu and offer a unique array of selections, including grilled chicken drizzled with Caesar dressing and shrimp covered in mojo sauce. Though most of the choices include some form of meat and cheese, the milk chocolate and dulce de leche mon-

taditos are perfect for dessert. And for those seeking healthier options, a selection of five salads is available. Though different in pricing, the restaurant’’s opening is part of a larger movement of Spanish-influenced food making its way into Miami. Just recently, Cavas Restaurant opened in Coral Gables and Barceloneta hit South Beach, along with plenty of live music and flamenco dancers. Montaditos' newest location was selected for the South Miami community’’s vibrancy and its proximity to UM, according to Juan Dilan, director of operations at 100 Montaditos. ““We appreciate being around the university because a big part of our demographic are people that are around the university age,”” Dilan said. ““In all of our locations we try to be in the vicinity of major colleges and universities as anchors.”” From Spain to Miami, each 100 Montaditos location offers all of the menu items (including beer) for just $1 each all day on Wednesdays. According to Dilan, the weekly offer usually attracts large

sums of university students. ““We’’re very happy to be in South Florida and we look forward to growing throughout the United States,”” Dilan said. ““We have seen

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every week increments of growth in terms of the college students.”” For now, there are three 100 Montaditos locations already open in Miami-Dade County, but Dilan

plans to open 20 more locations in South Florida within the next year. 100 Mondatitos is located at 5829 SW 73rd St in South Miami.

NATALIE EDGAR // The Miami Hurricane

TASTE OF SPAIN: 100 Montaditos offers a large variety of small sandwiches, from salmon and cream cheese to barbecue pulled pork. On Wednesdays, most menu items cost just $1.

DESIGN BY MARIAH PRICE

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STUDENT PROFILE

Motion picture major impresses with music video BY ALEXANDER GONZALEZ ASSISTANT EDITOR

What began as an introductory film assignment for junior Maggy Torres-Rodriguez emerged as a piece that will be featured in one of this year's Miami International Film Festival’’s (MIFF) series of short films. The music video, "Someone Else's Bed," features a song of the same name by freshman Justina Shandler. The video tells a story of a girl's infidelity with close shots and an unconventional use of a handheld camera. The video was filmed around UM’’s campus. Torres-Rodriguez's video will be a part of MIFF's Festival Wynwood Walls Screenings, which will screen a series of 20 short films in random rotation throughout the festival. MIFF recognizes filmmakers from around the world in local venues like Regal South Beach Cinema 18 and 8th street's Tower Theater. Torres-Rodriguez submitted her video on a whim to the annual film competition CineSlam, which awards work done by undergraduate and graduate students. Filmmaker liaison for MIFF Alexander Van Mecl looked through the film listing on CineSlam

and saw that "Someone Else's Bed" was one of the films with the highest number of votes. ““I enjoyed that it was unconventional and had a story without saying much,”” Van Mecl said. Torres-Rodriguez did not win CineSlam, but made such a strong impression on Van Mecl that he contacted her and entered her work into the festival. Torres-Rodriguez is in awe of how far her first film experience has gone. ““It won’’t hit me until I see it in the big screen,”” she said. Torres-Rodriguez’’s music vid-

TO SEE MAGGY TORRES-RODRIGUEZ’S MUSIC VIDEO: WHAT: Wynwood Walls Screenings WHERE: Wynwood Walls, 2506 NW 2nd Ave. WHEN: 6 p.m. through Friday FOR MORE INFO: miamifilmfestival.com

eo brings to life Shandler’’s original music. "Someone Else's Bed" deals with issues of past love, guilt and regret. The film student found Shandler’’s music on Facebook and felt an instant connection. ““I immediately fell in love with the song,”” Torres-Rodriguez said. Shandler was equally excited and nervous to be in a music video. She liked that Torres-Rodriguez made the project more than an assignment. ““It felt awesome and terrifying,”” Shandler said. ““The shooting was fun, but I had no idea what Maggy was doing, and why she was asking me to pose the way she did. When I saw the finished product, it all clicked and her genius became very clear.”” Torres-Rodriguez, a motion pictures major, started with small projects in her digital productions class, taught by Professor Grace Barnes. In the class, Barnes teaches how to tell a story and how to integrate certain film techniques into a finished project. ““Maggy is very talented,”” Barnes said. ““I’’m thrilled that she not only made a great project, but that she also entered it into the fes-

tival.”” Van Mecl does not find it strange that her first film got noticed. ““She has a good eye for composition,”” he said. ““It had a nice beginning, middle and end from the overall message she wanted to deliver.”” Torres-Rodriguez thinks that

proof of success comes from provocative art, and not solely from recognition. ““If things are visually nice and the story touches you in ways you didn’’t think it could, then that’’s a successful film,”” she said. ““It’’s those movies that make you stop watching and see life differently. That’’s what this art is all about.””

MARLENA SKROBE // Photo Editor

TALENT: Junior Maggy Torres-Rodriguez (left) created a music video for a song written by freshman Justina Shandler, which will be played at the Wynwood Wall Screenings until Friday.

MOVIE Q&A

Stars of ‘21 Jump Street’ discuss comedy, fame BY LAUREN COHEN CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

COURTESY ELECTROSHADOW.COM

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

In the big screen adaptation of the popular 80’’s TV show ““21 Jump Street,”” heartthrob Channing Tatum and funnyman Jonah Hill play inept cops who go undercover as high school students to investigate a drug ring. Ice Cube plays Captain Dickson, the man in charge of the undercover cops. The action-comedy hits theaters March 16. The Miami Hurricane, along with other press organizations, sat down with the guys to discuss the film. What scene was the hardest to get through without laughing? Channing Tatum: Anything with Rob Riggle in it. I don’’t know what it is, but he’’s maybe the funniest person that I’’ve ever been in a scene with. You’’ll never see me in a frame with Rob because I couldn’’t keep my shit together. You guys as producers, how important was it to keep it R-rated? Because right now there are too many March 5 - March 7, 2012

PG-13 movies that are not funny. Jonah Hill: I think it depends on the story you’’re trying to tell. This movie, we wanted to make it a ““Bad Boys”” meets a John Hughes movie, and for that you needed an R rating. I just put that in my contract and if you wanted me involved it had be to be R-rated. How was it being trained as a cop? JH: It was brutal, man. I was supposed to be the inept cop. Jonah, ““21 Jump Street”” has always been on your films that were producing. How does it feel to finally have this movie released? JH: It’’s really weird because for five years I’’ve been working on this movie. And it’’s bizarre because I’’ve always had this thing that I knew I was doing. And now that it’’s done it’’s a weird, bittersweet feeling. How does it compare with you being nominated [for an Oscar]? This was your baby, you wrote it, you produced it and now it’’s out. JH: I mean, they’’re totally different things. One was a feeling of like a pat on the back from my industry or my peers saying, ““you did a

good job.”” And that was really special. And this was really bizarre. Like I’’m here with Channing Tatum and Ice Cube, who I didn’’t know before, and we’’re sitting here working on it with them. Was it kind of like a ““pinch-me”” kind of thing? JH: My whole life for the past couple of years has been that. It doesn’’t seem real and I’’m a really lucky guy. What was it like playing roles within roles, like being high school students and police officers? JH: Daniel Day Lewis couldn’’t do that. I was three characters in one day –– do you know what that means? A lot of this stuff come from preparing for ““Superbad”” because I was a guy in his 20s pretending he was 17 and this film, we’’re guys in our 20s pretending to be 17. How would you like to see the story progress in the sequel if it gets made? Ice Cube: I would like to see the story progress with me getting more money.

FINISH READING AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM


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consecutive games that the Hurricanes have lost to the Florida Gators in baseball, after this weekend’s three-game sweep

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number of wins the men’s basketball team tallied in the ACC this season, their highest total since joining the conference in 2004

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Regular season ends with blowout win over BC Canes to face Georgia Tech in ACC first round BY DAVID FURONES SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

The men’’s basketball team finished the regular season the way it hoped to, and gained some much-needed momentum heading into the ACC Tournament with a 77-56 win over Boston College on Saturday. With the win, Miami (18-11, 9-7 ACC) finishes the regular season with a winning record in conference play for the first time since joining the ACC in 2004. The team will be seeded sixth in the conference tournament. ““A loss today would’’ve been devastating to our guys, to me, to everybody,”” Hurricane coach Jim Larranaga said. ““It’’s your last home game of the year, we lost on Wednesday [at N.C. State], so it’’s nice to bounce back.”” Kenny Kadji and Durand Scott led the team over the Eagles (9-21, 4-12 ACC) with 14 points apiece. Scott scored his 14 on an efficient seven field goal attempts. The Hurricanes connected on 12 of their 30 3-point field goal attempts. The surge from distance was led by Malcolm Grant, who shot 4-of-8 from beyond the arc for 12 points. ““This has been the craziest year I’’ve ever been a part of as far as everything I’’ve had to go through,”” said Grant, whose 36-year-old brother passed away earlier this season. ““And then my shot being in a crazy slump the whole year. Everybody stayed positive with me and told me, ‘‘It can’’t stay like this for long,’’ and it’’s finally getting back to the way it was.”” Grant has now made at least 40 percent of his 3-pointers over his last four games after struggling with his shot in games prior. He’’s now reached double figures two straight games after failing to reach that mark the previous seven. Grant had his parents make the trip to Coral Gables and watch him play for the first time since he joined the Hurricanes. He said he cried a bit during pre-game introductions when his name was announced. Scott sent the Hurricanes into halftime up 46-25 with a halfcourt heave at the buzzer. Miami finished the half on a 26-7 run and never looked back. ““I told them at halftime that we played terrific at both ends of the court, shared the ball, had 10 assists,”” Larranaga said.

The Hurricanes made six 3-pointers during that run and converted 9-of-17 from distance in the first half. In comparison, the team only took 11 field goal attempts inside the 3-point line to that point. Miami and Boston College combined to shoot 59 3-point field goals on the day. The Canes’’ seniors were honored at the final home game of their collegiate career. All three seniors –– Grant, DeQuan Jones and Ryan Quigtar –– were in the starting lineup Saturday as is tradition under Larranagacoached teams. ““The coaching staff, and as a team, we all put a huge emphasis on just going out and having fun,”” said Jones, who finished with nine points, five rebounds and two blocks. Quigtar, the walk-on 5-foot-11 point guard who had only played 23 minutes in his collegiate career before Saturday, registered a career-high eight minutes with one rebound, one assist and one point that came on the second of two free-throw attempts with 15.6 seconds remaining. The BankUnited Center crowd erupted when he made the foul shot. ““Second free throw –– yeah, I was a little nervous,”” Quigtar said. ““The first one, I thought it was good and bounced out.”” Despite the victory, Miami will finish behind N.C. State and Virginia in the conference standings. The Wolfpack defeated Virginia Tech on Sunday, and Virginia won at Maryland. The Canes will play Georgia Tech in the first round of the ACC Tournament Thursday night. With a win in that game, Miami would face Florida State in the quarterfinals on Friday. ““Every player on our team knows how important the ACC Tournament is,”” Larranaga said. ““They’’re all excited about that. They get a day off to rest [Sunday] and enjoy today’’s victory, but on Monday it’’s back to business.”” The winner of the conference tournament will receive an automatic bid into the NCAA Tournament. Miami could receive an at-large bid if the teams makes a solid run in the ACC Tournament. Asked what the team needs to do to reach the Big Dance, Larranaga simply said they have to win the conference tournament. That way, they would not leave their fate in anyone else’’s hands. No team has ever won the ACC tournament when having to play four games in four days.

ZACH BEEKER // The Miami Hurricane

STRONG FINISH: Senior guard Malcolm Grant dribbles up the court during Miami’s 77-56 win over Boston College on Saturday. The Canes finished at 9-7 in the ACC, their first winning record in the conference. The ACC Tournament begins Thursday. March 5 - March 7, 2012

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WOMEN’S TENNIS

Miami beats North Florida, Clemson Canes improve to 7-1 with big wins BY KRISTEN SPILLANE STAFF WRITER

The University of Miami women’’s tennis team returned home for a weekend of victories over Clemson and the University of North Florida. The No. 10 Hurricanes came out on top over No. 34 Clemson by a score of 5-2 in Sunday’’s five-hour match. Despite two rain delays, UM clinched their second ACC victory of the season. ““It’’s always nice playing at home, it’’s always a little windy and the conditions are a little different than I think most programs see,”” head coach Paige Yaroshuk-Tews said following the afternoon win. Strong play from sophomore Melissa Bolivar and freshman Liat Zimmerman, the

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doubles first team, and senior Gabriella Mejia and freshman Lina Lileikite, who play second doubles, gave the Canes an early edge. ““It does make a difference because it’’s nice playing here at home, but it’’s just another match that we have to win,”” Mejia said. The doubles tandem of Mejia and Lileikite was unbeaten in this weekend’’s matches and are individually ranked 25th and 119th, respectively. ““In doubles I know my partner is next to me and she will help me,”” Lileikite said. ““Gabi is a really great partner, she will help me and cheer me up when I’’m having a bad day.”” Senior Anna Bartenstein (6-1, 6-3), Lileikite (6-2, 6-1) and Zimmerman (6-1, 6-4) each added singles points for the Hurricanes in straight sets. Bolivar closed out the match with an 11-9 win in her

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

third set over Clemson’’s Beatrice Gumulya. The victory followed Saturday’’s 7-0 demolition of the University of North Florida. Doubles wins from second team Mejia and Lileikite, and third pair Bartenstein and freshman Brittany Dubins, put the Canes on the scoreboard first. Six singles wins closed out the clean sweep of the overmatched Ospreys for the Hurricanes. ““North Florida, they’’re a competitive team, they’’re going to make you beat them, so we knew that it was going to be a good test,”” Yaroshuk-Tews said. ““We were able to come out of the blocks and play on our terms.”” UM takes on Boston College at home on Friday, and No. 12 Baylor will come into Coral Gables for a showdown with the Canes on March 13.

March 5 - March 7, 2012

SPORTS BRIEFS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Hurricanes went into the ACC Tournament on Friday evening looking to ride the momentum generated from their season-ending victory against Boston College. Instead, Wake Forest came away with the upset win over Miami, 81-74 at the Greensboro Coliseum. Senior Riquna Williams scored 22 points and Shenise Johnson and Stefanie Yderstrom added 18 apiece, but the Canes were unable to overcome a slow first half. Miami erupted for 51 points in the second half, but the Demon Deacons survived the surge. The loss followed an upset win for N.C. State, which defeated the No. 1 seed Duke Blue Devils 75-73 early Friday afternoon. Miami awaits its NCAA tournament seeding, which should be released early next week.

TRACK AND FIELD Freshman Innocent Jacob and junior Samantha Williams competed in the Virginia Tech Last Chance Qualifier Meet a week before the NCAA Indoor Championships will take place. Williams finished in the top five in the triple jump and Williams finished 10th in the long jump, as both women wait to find out whether they will qualify to compete for the national championship. They will learn their fates on Monday afternoon. Information compiled from hurricanesports.com. Ernesto Suarez may be contacted at sports@themiamihurricane.com.


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BASEBALL

GAME 2

GAME 1

HURRICANES WEEKEND SCOREBOARD

GATORS

7-5

HURRICANES

GATORS

13-5

GAME 3

HURRICANES

GATORS

8-5

HURRICANES

ZACH BEEKER // The Miami Hurricane

HEAD FIRST: Freshman outfielder Julian Santos slides into third base for a triple during Sunday’s loss to the Florida Gators. Miami, which was undefeated entering the weekend series, dropped all three games to the No. 1 Gators. The Hurricanes took a 5-3 lead into the ninth inning of Sunday’s game, but could not hold on.

Canes swept by top-ranked Gators for first losses of season Team collapses in 9th inning of Sunday’s game BY ADAM BERGER SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

After the University of Miami baseball team beat Florida Atlantic last week, the players and coaches finally opened up about their upcoming series against the top-ranked University of Florida. The conversation focused on the Gator’’s recent dominance in the series, and the Canes’’ opportunity to end those struggles. Unfortunately for the Hurricanes and their fans, the weekend didn’’t play out as they planned. Miami (8-3) was swept by Florida and has now lost 11 straight games to its in-state rival dating back to the 2010 season. ““I’’ve never been beaten 11 times in a row in anything, including tiddlywinks,”” coach Jim

Morris said of the losing streak, which includes losses in the postseason. ““That’’s not something I like or ever expected.”” It didn’’t help that the 11th loss came in stunning and heartbreaking fashion. After starter Bryan Radziewski pitched an impressive 6 2/3 innings allowing just three runs, Miami’’s bullpen took over and got the ball to closer EJ Encinosa, who recorded the final two outs in the top of the eighth for Miami. He returned to the mound in the top of the ninth with a 5-3 lead for a save opportunity. Encinosa walked leadoff hitter Nolan Fontana to start the inning and then hit centerfielder Daniel Pigott. Preston Tucker grounded out to second, and into the batter’’s box stepped catcher Mike Zunino. The preseason All-American hit a bloop double into shallow centerfield, scoring both runners and tying the ballgame at 5-5. That’’s when Encinosa lost all control. With Taylor Gushue at the plate, Enci-

nosa threw a wild pitch and Zunino advanced to third. Gushue took first after being hit by a pitch. With runners at the corners and the game tied, Encinosa then threw a second wild pitch. Zunino came in to score the go-ahead run. Florida would go on to win 8-5, scoring five runs on just two hits in the ninth. The remarkable comeback clinched the sweep for the No. 1 Gators and left the Hurricanes with another tough rivalry series to digest. ““We played really well for eight innings,”” Morris said. ““You’’ve got to close the game out. The toughest inning to pitch in baseball is the ninth inning.”” But as bad as that ninth inning was, the Hurricanes didn’’t lose the series on Sunday alone. Friday and Saturday’’s games saw suspect pitching from the usually reliable Erik Erickson and Eric Whaley, and several mental errors from the Hurricanes’’ fielders. Erickson held the Gators in check at the March 5 - March 7, 2012

beginning of the series opener, limiting the damage after runners got on base. But after giving up three runs through four innings, Erickson came undone in the fifth. The Gators scored three more runs. That was all for Miami’’s Friday night starter, who fell to 2-1 with the loss. Eric Whaley didn’’t fair much better on Saturday night. The Gators scored eight runs in the fourth and fifth with some help from the Hurricane fielders. Michael Broad misplayed a potential double play in the fourth, which led to three runs, and Stephen Perez recorded two errors on one play in the top of the fifth. ““Every game is a tough loss,”” Radziewski said. ““Luckily it’’s early in the season and we’’ll bounce back from it.”” The Canes will play an exhibition game against the Miami Marlins in their new ballpark on Tuesday, and will return to Alex Rodriguez Park to play Miami of Ohio on Wednesday. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Dear V: Skype sex isn’t cutting it anymore... , I’’m in a long distance relationship, but Skyping isn’’t doing it for us anymore. What to do? Miles Apart Dear Masturbates a Lot, Been there, done that and trust me I understand. A long distance relationship can feel nearly impossible sometimes, and your hands can hurt from touching yourself so much. Luckily, it sounds like you’’ve found Skype. Webcams can be an absolute life saver. Skype is perfect for tiding yourselves over until your far away partner is able to make one of those weekend drives down. Y’’know, the ones where you don’’t do anything other than screw each other’’s

brains out for 72 hours straight, and your neighbors know both of your names because they’’re continuously screamed and moaned at all hours of the day and night? Yeah, those ones. And when you can’’t do that, Skype is there to let you stare at each other through a computer screen while you touch yourselves. Because who doesn’’t love their roommate catching them in that act! But what you really need is to get down to what the root of the problem is with the distance between you. If you’’re in different time zones and are racking up more air miles than someone running for president, you may need to reassess the situation. It just might not be possible to make it work. But if chances are that you may be living in the same state soon and your impossible separation is only temporary, try to keep at it. You only live once, and if you’’ve possibly found the right one, don’’t be so quick to give it up. Of course, you’’re going to have physical needs. I understand that. And hopefully so will your other half

dear ... k l b h somewhen you text to say you d drunkenly brought one home last night. I love sex as much as the next whore, but I must admit that I am secretly sometimes a bit of a hopeless romantic. Just don’’t go spreading it around. And if you’’re able to overcome the physical barriers between the two of you as a couple, your relationship will only be better and stronger for it. The trick is to remember why you’’re in a relationship with this person in the first place. Yes, it’’s hard to be apart, but while the physical was the initial attraction, it was personality that kept you around. Or so says the prude. Not exactly the advice you were looking for? Fine. Break up and go have sex with the closest thing with a pulse. Just keep it as legal as possible and don’’t come crawling back to V when you realize I was right. Now back to touching yourself on webcam! V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

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DEAR V

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 5 - March 7, 2012

The Miami Hurricane -- March 5, 2012  

The Miami Hurricane -- March 5, 2012

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