Page 1

MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

1

Vol. 91, Issue 39 | March 4 - March 6, 2013

.com

THE MIAMI HURRICANE PHOTO BRIEF

ACADEMICS

Trekking through mud for veterans

Class customs cross cultural boundaries International students find comfort in hand-raising BY JORDAN COYNE COPY EDITOR

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR TRUDGE THROUGH THE MUD: University of Miami alumnus Kevin Peterson makes it through the “electric eel” obstacle, which is part of Tough Mudder, a 12-mile obstacle course that raises money for the Wounded Warriors Project. The event took place Saturday morning at Miami Homestead Speedway. To date, participants have raised more than $5 million. All proceeds go toward support programs for thousands of warriors returning from the battlefield. The obstacles were designed by British Special Forces and are tailored to test physical ability, as well as mental toughness.

ACADEMICS

Faculty, students discuss syllabi preview CaneLink leads to registration questions BY ERIKA GLASS COPY EDITOR

Students register for courses hoping to have a certain experience, but realize that the course was different from their expectations. With the integration of the CaneLink system, the question of having syllabi available during registration time has been raised. “Sometimes the class sounds really cool, but when you get to it, the content doesn’t really reflect what you were expecting, and vice-versa,” freshman Daniela Lorenzo said.

Most students share Lorenzo’s sentiments. Richard L. Williamson, the chair of the Faculty Senate, thinks that asking professors to upload their syllabi would be more burdensome than helpful. “Some people, me included for example, don’t have a syllabus the way some other people do,” he said. “So I have a document I call the ‘course requirements’ document, and I have a separate document called syllabus … a listing of what we’re going to do when.” Trying to straighten out all of those differences can be a problem, according to Williamson. He explained that since some professors don’t have a conventional syllabus, the work that would go into fixing those extra details would

outweigh the benefits. “Ideally [syllabi] should be available before classes ever start,” Williamson said. “But there are some problems with making that a requirement.” Because faculty members are often away doing research or projects, it may be hard for them to get their syllabus in before they return, Williamson said. And in smaller classes where the focus is on interactive processes between the professor and the students, a syllabus wouldn’t make a lot of sense. “I think it’d be beneficial,” he said. “The real question is whether you can deal with all of these complexities.”

SEE SYLLABUS, PAGE 4

Freshman Joe Miano has attended schools in three countries: France, Belgium and now the United States at the University of Miami. He noticed that raising his hand is just as prevalent, despite the cultural differences. “Raising my hand has meant the same thing in all three countries and to all of my teachers,” he said. Miano, as one of 1,413 international undergraduates enrolled at UM, was glad to know that his distance from home does not affect the educational customs he has gained in past classrooms, especially hand-raising. Amy Cuddy, a professor at Harvard Business School, described her psychological findings on hand-raising in a TED Talk given in 2010. According to Cuddy, hand-raising is a reflection of students’ personalities and social status within the classroom. She has identified how nonverbal behaviors and “power posing” affects classroom dynamics. From Cuddy’s conclusions, Miano feels comfortable interacting in class, regardless of the classroom style. He came to the U.S. to study neuroscience and has been able to appreciate many learning styles from the more formal hand-raising environment to the more Socratic, student-led discussion format. “It really depends on the teacher and the subject,” he said.

SEE HAND-RAISING, PAGE 2

DRAFT PICK SPRUNG! BEER FESTIVAL TAKES OVER COCONUT GROVE SATURDAY PAGE 7

DEFEATING DUKE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL BEAT NO. 5 BLUE DEVILS THURSDAY 69-65 PAGE 9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

2

ACADEMICS

Complex houses hurricane simulator

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

Building’s technology advances meteorology BY LUISA ANDONIE CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science will be able to experience the hurricane season all year long. RSMAS’s newest building, the Marine Technology and Life Sciences Seawater Complex, will feature the only existing complex to have the power to generate Category 5 hurricane winds. The complex is housed in the Surge Structure Atmosphere Interaction (SUSTAIN) research facility that focuses on the study of wind’s effects on land and sea. “There’s things we can do in a lab to isolate different effects that you just can’t do in nature,” said Brian Haus, the principal investigator in the SUSTAIN component. The ability to have these winds is an incredible advantage, according to graduate student Michelle Wilson who is studying meteorology. Recreating Category 5 winds will help forecasters prepare for these kinds of storms. “This societal benefit is a big thing in hurricane research,” she said. For Wilson, modeling the effects of storm surge from these winds will be just as important. Storm surge is the build-up of water that the storm drags until hitting the coastline. Storm surge was the primary reason for Sandy’s disastrous effects in the Northeast, especially New York City. While existing marine science facilities, such as those of Pennsylvania State University and Oregon State University, are large-scale and sophisticated, these could only serve as general references, since they are completely different in their function. These current facilities lack SUSTAIN’s specialized wind component. Though the structure of the building is complete, additional work must be done on the stateof-the-art interior. Six months remain in leading up to the scheduled September completion.

Missed the women’s tennis match against Clemson? Check out Kristen Spillane’s recap.

LUISA ANDONIE // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CREATING THE PERFECT STORM: The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science’s newest building, the Marine Technology and Life Sciences Seawater Coplex, opens in September.

Other than RSMAS’s own smaller existing building, the project lacked a predecessor, meaning that the project required rigorous pretesting and modeling to design a structure that could sustain such extreme forces. Approximately one-third of the funds needed to realize the project, $15 million were awarded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act when RSMAS won a competition in late 2009. With SUSTAIN, the new building will also have another facility called The Marine Life Sciences Center for the study of marine organisms. With a space designed for housing and studying marine animals, such as fish and corals, the complex will allow for the observation of wild life in a controlled environment, where variables can be closely monitored. The build-

ing will focus mostly on research but will also be aimed at education and teaching. While the facility is scientific in its function, its applications are multi-disciplinary. The overarching theme is that of understanding human interactions with nature whether it involves the wind or the sea. Junior Abby Page believes that current scientific research needs to focus on this advancement. “We’re learning that everything we’ve done has an impact,” she said. “You can’t study one without the other, humans and their environment.” The building’s aesthetics suit these varied functions with easier access to the water. “It will change the whole way the campus is laid out,” Haus said.

Hand-raising eases transition for students HANDRAISING FROM PAGE 1

Freshman Siqing Yang, who went to school in central China since she was born, also moved to Miami to study at UM. Despite English not being her first language, she believes she is at an advantage because she has experienced different yet similar teaching styles like hand-raising. “I have found what I like 2

NEWS

best, and also the best ways to succeed,” she said. In China, Yang took all of her classes with the same group of 49 students for three years. Each grade was composed of 30 groups, and there were three grades in her high school. As one of 4,500 students in her school, it was easy for Yang to get lost in the masses. She enjoys the contrast of being in smaller

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

classes at UM, where teachers will facilitate conversations, allowing students to employ not just hand-raising but also their communication skills. Yang’s situation can be explained from Cuddy’s process of power posing, or “fake it till you become it.” She suggests conducting one’s self in the same way as an alpha figure, until one’s mindset and mannerisms

March 4 - March 6, 2013

become those of an alpha. International students like Miano and Yang who come to the U.S. to study believe that the content and language of the discussions may differ, but the body positions and mannerisms discussed by Cuddy, as well as the relationships between students, teachers and their peers, transcend geographical boundaries.

Didn’t catch all the Greek Week excitement? Watch Cayla Nimmo, Holly Bensur and Sydney Polke’s slideshow. Want to know more about students on campus? Catch up on student profiles. Erika Glass spoke to freshman Daniela Rosario about her love for music. Subscribe for the email edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

3

STUDENT ORGANIZATION

Hip-hop dance group thrives on ‘swagger’ KAOS performs at Greek Week, Homecoming BY BAILEY MURRAY CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The members of KAOS see hip-hop dancing as more than a passion. Being part of a dance group gives them an escape from the pressures of school and jobs. “We all have this connection to dancing even though we’re such different people; we come together and have fun,” said sophomore Emily Brudner, president of the student organization. There are 18 members, including 15 women and three men. KAOS holds auditions for new members at the beginning of each semester. The number of dancers they take varies. This last semester, they took four new members. The Executive Board and the general members of KAOS discuss and decide who can join the group. The group’s leaders, like senior Maria Coronado, are not only interested in dance skills. “There is a certain stage presence and style that makes someone stand out,” she said. Junior Natalie Goenaga believes that members should have a certain attitude. “Don’t be nervous, and just be yourself at auditions. KAOS looks for dancers who love to have a good time, have

PHOTOS BY CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR MOVING TO THE MUSIC: Freshman Jamie Servidio performs with the group KAOS during Greek Week’s Organized-Cheer event on the Green Friday night. She is one of 18 members of the student organization that focuses on hip-hop dance.

attitude and swagger, as silly as that sounds,” she said.

FEATURED FINALE: Sophomore Fareed Rifal was the only man performing from KAOS on Friday during Greek Week’s Organized-Cheer. The group closed out the event.

Coronado has been a member of KAOS for four years. She has danced ballet and tap since the age of 3. KAOS has been a way for her to continue dancing, get a workout in and forget about school for two hours twice a week. “I know that once I graduate, I won’t be able to perform and do things like this so I’m enjoying it while I can,” she said. KAOS has been a registered student organization since 1995. Although the student organization has a faculty adviser, currently Connie Nickel, the members are mainly responsible for organizing the club’s events and meetings. Each semester, they produce a fall or spring showcase before finals week with about 16 different dances. “You really get to know the other members because the week before showcase, we always practice several hours a day, every day,” Coronado said. The name KAOS is a secret acronym that only group members know, and only find out once they have completed their first showcase. They also receive nickMarch 4 - March 6, 2013

names given to them by the other members. KAOS performs at other occasions besides the end-of-semester showcases. They have danced at Greek Week opening ceremonies and the Organized-Cheer event (O-Cheer) during Homecoming. There is no cost to join KAOS, but students are required to audition at the onset of each semester.

FOR MORE INFORMATION KAOS meets twice a week on Wednesdays from 10 p.m. to midnight and Sundays from noon to 2 p.m. at the Wellness Center. During each practice, they learn a new dance, and the members choreograph the performances themselves. Auditions take place at the beginning of each semester.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

3


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

4

PHOTO BRIEF

UM teams host, partake in Miami Mayhem COLLEGIATE COMPETITION: Sophomore Palna Kapadia dances with the Hurricane SwaggeRaas team at the sixth annual Miami Mayhem Intercollegiate Garba/Raas competition on Saturday night. The competition, held at the Julius Littman Performing Arts Center in North Miami Beach, featured Indian dance teams from across the country. Dandiya Raas is a traditional Indian dance performed to honor the Goddess Amba during the annual Navaratri festival. The dance incorporates hitting sticks together to maintain a steady beat. The winning team was Dirty South Dandiya from the University of Texas.

PHOTOS BY MONICA HERNDON // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

Extra credit: friend to students, foe to professors SYLLABUS FROM PAGE 1

In his post as Faculty Senate chair, Williamson saw the implementation of the Holy Day Policy. He discussed how the decision would affect students. “There’s also always the question about do these rules apply only to undergraduates,” Williamson said. “Basically, the final decision was that these rules only apply to undergraduates, although the professional and graduate schools were strongly encouraged to follow comparable policy.” Williamson also spoke about extra credit policies. He said it was up to the professor to decide what goes on in his or her classroom in regards to grading. Because not all professors grade on a point system, he said having a centralized extra credit policy across the board would be a disadvantage. Traci Ardren, senior associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, explained 4

NEWS

that extra credit could be more hurtful than helpful. “We are reluctant to give extra credit because we feel that it acknowledges that you don’t have to do the work that is part of the course,” she said. “If you do the work ... then you shouldn’t need extra credit.” She also said that extra credit is something that she offers to students in her introductory courses that perhaps don’t know how to take her exams. “There’s very few people here who really need that kind of help,” Ardren said. “I think students expect extra credit these days, and from a faculty perspective, it’s become commonplace, when really it should only be something that’s used in relatively rare or extraordinary cases because there’s no reason that you can’t earn a good grade just doing the regular work of the class.” Sophomore Stephanie Vazquez sees extra credit as a valuable opportunity to make up for an exam.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 4 - March 6, 2013

We are reluctant to give extra credit because we feel that it acknowledges that you don’t have to do the work that is part of the course. If you do the work ... then you shouldn’t need extra credit.”

Traci Ardren, Senior associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

“I think extra credit should be offered more,” she said. “There is always a test that you don’t perform to the best of your ability, so the extra credit really helps alleviate the stress.”

Lorenzo feels that extra credit work is also useful for getting her GPA up to where she wants it to be. “I love being challenged in class, but there are times where stupid mistakes are made or you’re having a bad day … and you can’t perform up to standard,” she said. “Extra credit allows you to have more of an impact on your grade and ensure that it’s as high as you can make it … [I] know if I mess up, there’s a way to fix my mistakes.” Ardren also spoke about student’s habits during class registration. “I don’t think people should shop for classes based on whether or not there’s extra credit offered,” she said. “In college, extra credit should be a rare thing … I want the students here to know that faculty in the college at least ... are willing to work with people on revising drafts of writing or in study sessions or in one-on-one meetings … those are all better solutions than extra credit.”


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

5

COLOR

March 4 - March 6, 2013

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

ADVERTISEMENT

5


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

6

OPINION UP!

Do you think there is a correlation between video games and violence?

SARA RYAN SOPHOMORE “It could possibly affect kids that are younger and more impressionable because they don’t know what’s wrong and what’s right when it comes to violence. It probably won’t make a difference when you’re older because you’re not going to play Halo and then go out and be violent.”

RIPU DAMAN SINGH JUNIOR “There is a correlation between violence and video games because of the moves they see and the blood and gore.”

ERIN BLANCHETTE SOPHOMORE “I kind of go back and forth. It desensitizes people to violence, but at the same time I don’t think it causes violence.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com.

Daniel Cepero

6

OPINION

ABIR GITLIN, Contributing Columnist

STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

compiled by

... while some leaders continue to preach hate, we must make sure they will never get a chance to practice it.

ed murder rates are much lower. The relationship between video games and violent behavior is virtually nonexistent. Playing violent video games for hours on end should not be anyone’s hobby of choice. However, it doesn’t seem to cause any harm in moderation. For decades, video games and television shows have been called into question as a key factor that leads to certain individuals becoming murderers, rapists, sex offenders and robbers. But many people watch the same shows and play the same video games and don’t have a criminal record to back this theory up. In an article published by the New York Times, new research shows that violent video games can cause a short-term period of aggressive behavior, but evidence does not prove that it will carry out in the long-term and cause someone to commit any violent crimes. “None of these extreme acts, like a school shooting, occurs be-

cause of only one risk factor; there are many factors, including feeling socially isolated, being bullied and so on,” said Craig A. Anderson, a psychologist at Iowa State University. “... if you look at the literature, I think it’s clear that violent media is one factor; it’s not the largest factor, but it’s also not the smallest.” The truth: We will never know why Eric David Harris and Dylan Bennet Klebold committed the Columbine massacre; why James Holmes randomly shot up a Colorado movie theater; or why Adam Lanza walked into Sandy Hook Elementary school and killed 26 innocent people. But we do know this: Criminals do not wake up one day and decide to commit a violent crime after playing a video game. It involves several factors that fester overtime. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Holocaust hate still affecting society he International Holocaust Remembrance Day recently commemorated the 68th anniversary for the liberation of the largest Nazi death camp, Auschwitz-Birkenau. Presently, we have the leaders of Iran calling for the annihilation of the people of Israel declarABIR GITLIN CONTRIBUTING ing that “the people of Iran are COLUMNIST ready to march on Israel to wipe it out.” The British Sunday Times published an anti-Semitic cartoon of the Israeli prime minister building a wall using Palestinian blood to mark this Holocaust Remembrance Day. The Egyptian aide to President Mohamed Morsi claims that the Holocaust is just a U.S. hoax to justify the existence of the Jewish people in their homeland. Morsi himself calls the Jewish people “descendants of apes and pigs.” Today we stand in front of an unfortunate reality that consists of the same hatred that led to the Holo-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

T

March 4 - March 6, 2013

HURRICANE Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Games don’t control violence As rampage shootings become the increasingly popular crime of choice, many turn to violent video games as the answer to why this must be. But, there is no evidence this correlation exists. Individuals are inclined to point fingers at video games as the link to violent behavior because it is easy to do so, but the push of a button on an Xbox 360 controller is not leading individuals to pull the trigger of a gun. Though it is possible that criminals play violent video games, their choice to behave violently does not directly result from playing any game. Recently, the Washington Post compared the amount of money spent on video games and gun-related homicide rates in 10 countries. The results showed that although the U.S. has the highest rate of gun-related murders, the Netherlands and South Korea spend more than twice the amount on video games, yet their gun-relat-

The Miami

caust. The odious fight against the Jewish people focuses mainly on Israel, the Jewish homeland, which is perceived as an easier and acceptable target than just plainly Jews. Criticizing Israel or any other country is legitimate, but holding Israel to higher standards based on anti-Semitic notions is just unacceptable. We have the power to fight anti-Semitism, and all racial hatred, by exposing it and standing together to denounce the propagating of hatred. In these times, while some leaders continue to preach hate, we must make sure they will never get a chance to practice it. We are the last generation that has the chance to speak with Holocaust survivors firsthand. We are responsible for understanding the task and challenge that lies on our shoulders – passing the story of how people, not monsters but people full of hate, murdered millions of families in hopes to exterminate an entire race. And all the while, the world stood silent. Abir Gitlin is a freshman majoring in international studies and Judaic studies.

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Mariah Price PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon NEWS EDITOR Stephanie Parra OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes ASSISTANT EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez COPY CHIEF Nicky Diaz COPY EDITORS Jordan Coyne Erika Glass Ashley Martinez

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger ACCOUNT REP Halima Dodo Kristyna Fong Jaydev Hemrajani Carlos Parra ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan DESIGNERS Ali Fishman Carlos Mella Amilynn Soto SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Rob Finn ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

WEBMASTER Kateryna Gontaruk To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2013 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

7

Festival fills the need for beer

BY ROBERT PURSELL CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Nothing is worse than the repetitive weekends downing watery Natty Light, but where is a beer enthusiast supposed to go for a good time in Miami? On Saturday, beer aficionados will have the opportunity to sample craft spring and summer beers at SPRUNG! Beer Festival in Peacock Park. The festival is by the same producers of Grovetoberfest, which brings thousands of people to Coconut Grove every October to sample seasonal craft beers. This spring’s festival will include more than 150 different beers from around the world and will allow those attending to drink as much as their hearts desire with unlimited samples. For something made close-to-home, try locally brewed Michael’s Genuine Brew or Big Rod Key West Ale. Other beers include Guinness Black Lager and Fox Barrel Pacific Pear. “SPRUNG! will be unlike any other beer festival,” event producer Tony Albelo said. “It will be a celebration of the craft beer lifestyle and of simply having fun. It will be an unforgettable experience.” Albelo said that the inspiration to bring another beer festival to the Grove came after last year’s Grovetoberfest. He said there was an overwhelmingly positive response from festival-goers to the potential of adding a festival in the spring. By having a second festival, it allows the organizers and attendees to sample summer and spring seasonal beers they otherwise would not have a chance to try at Grovetoberfest. However, SPRUNG! is far from the same experience as Grovetoberfest, bringing in more games and entertainment for guests. “SPRUNG! is going to be more of a fun experience than Grovetoberfest,” Albelo said. Beer pong tables will be set up throughout the park. Each of the 15 bars participating will have their own game set up, Albelo said. But for those tired out from beer pong at frat parties, the festival will have a games arena and bar. SPRUNG! is super-sizing some of their games including human bowling, in which a person gets inside an oversized plastic ball and rolls themselves toward a set of oversized bowling pins. There will also March 4 - March 6, 2013

be giant Jenga, mega Twister, as well as regular cornhole. For sports fanatics, the UM vs. Clemson basketball game will be shown that night on four TVs at the bar. Local Miami band ArtOfficial will be playing on Bougainvillea’s live music stage for the event as well. The festival’s mission statement is to further the appreciation and knowledge of craft beers in South Florida. Albelo said he is excited over the prospect of helping new beer drinkers discover craft beers they enjoy, while helping to grow the local economy for beer. He cited the facts that Florida ranks fourth nationally for money spent on beer, yet 44th nationally in terms of breweries per capita as reasons to expand the market. “As of right now, there are only two full-scale breweries being operated in Miami, and we want to help bring that number up,” Albelo said. “Hopefully SPRUNG! will help that.” Albelo said that he has been impressed in recent years with the upswing in craft beer consumption, particularly with Belgian white beers such as Shocktop or Blue Moon, and states that he is happy that those beers serve as gateway beers in, “the fight to move away from Bud and Bud Light.” Albelo believes that SPRUNG! will be as informative for attendees as it will be enjoyable. “If there is a point in space where craft beer knowledge and fun intersect, that will be SPRUNG!” Albelo said.

IF YOU GO WHAT: SPRUNG! Beer Festival WHERE: Peacock Park, 2820 McFarlane Road, Coconut Grove WHEN: 4-7 p.m. Saturday COST: $39 for regular admission online; $30 at limited local locations (see the Facebook page for more information); $89 for VIP, which includes a 2:30 p.m. meet and greet with brewers, 3 p.m. entrance to the festival, VIP tent with appetizers and special brews and air conditioned bathrooms. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Visit igotsprung.com or facebook. com/igotsprung.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

EDGE

7


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

8

COLOR Summer Sessions offers more than 800 undergraduate and graduate courses in sessions ranging from 3 to 12 weeks. On campus and online courses

Registration Opens: March 5 Submit your Visiting Student Information Form today.

VWD\RQWUDFN

8

ADVERTISEMENTS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 4 - March 6, 2013


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

9

SPORTS

10

consecutive wins to start the season for Miami’s baseball team, before Saturday’s loss at Florida snapped the streak.

1

victory over Duke in Miami women’s basketball history, after Thursday’s heroic win over the No. 5 Blue Devils.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Miami claims first victory over Duke Senior players score in double digits BY ALEX SCHWARTZ SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

On the final day of January, the Miami women’s basketball team was demolished by 39 points on the road at Duke. On the final day of February, Miami exacted its revenge, handing the No. 5 Blue Devils their first ACC loss of the season. The 69-65 victory, which came on Senior Night at the BankUnited Center, sent fans streaming onto the court to celebrate with the players this past Thursday. It was Miami’s first-ever defeat of Duke, where coach Katie Meier was formerly a standout player. “You get some special moments, and you go through a grind, and you have some disappointments and some tough losses along the way,” Meier said. “Then something like this happens to people who truly deserve it. These three [seniors Stefanie Yderstrom, Shawnice Wilson and Morgan Stroman], it’s such a great script for them, and I’m not sure it would have happened if we hadn’t had some bitter losses along the way.” Each of those seniors scored in double figures to help UM (19-9, 10-7 ACC) bounce back from a demoralizing 68-64 road loss against Georgia Tech just four days earlier. Yderstrom, a 5-foot-8 guard from Ostertalje, Sweden, tied for a team-high 16 points and led the way with four assists in 37 minutes on the court. Wilson posted a double-double, as she scored 16 points and used her soaring height to collect a game-high 12 rebounds. Stroman concluded her career at the BUC with 11 points and six rebounds. “Just to have my fellow seniors there and my coach and ... everyone who loves us and we love them, it was just a great feeling to have out there,” Stroman said. “To have that one loss in the ACC that Duke has lost to, that just makes

it great, and we had nothing to lose, so might as well go out with a bang.” Miami struggled to shoot the ball, finishing at just 34.3 percent from the field. But the Canes forced 19 turnovers and limited Duke – the nation’s best 3-point shooting team – to just 23.1 percent from deep. Sophomore center Elizabeth Williams, the reigning consensus National Freshman of the Year, led the Blue Devils (26-2, 16-1 ACC) with 17 points. When the two ACC elites met in January, the game was tied at 29 before Duke outscored Miami 53-14 in the second half, coasting to an 82-43 win. This time around, Miami led 33-30 at the break, but did not let up in the final 20 minutes of play. “The last time we played them, we were satisfied with our first half, and then we were embarrassed out of our second half,” Meier said. “So that wasn’t going to happen again, and if that’s what needed to happen for this moment, for these three seniors on their Senior Night, maybe it was worth it because we’ve gotten a lot better – obviously – in a month.” The biggest play of the game came with 20 seconds left when Wilson scored off a quick drive and dish from Yderstrom, extending Miami’s lead to four and making it a two-possession difference. That was the final bucket of the contest. “She was really good down there,” Yderstrom said. “She was catching every pass almost throughout the game, so I was just confident. I saw her open in the lane, so fortunately I passed it to her.” The resume-boosting win over the Blue Devils likely moves Miami from the NCAA Tournament bubble into a pretty comfortable position leading up to the big dance. Meier hopes the Canes will build on this momentum. “I think this is a springboard and not the final chapter,” she said. “We can’t have this be the final chapter. We say, ‘The rest is still unwritten,’ and I hope we have a lot more pages left to write.”

HOLLY BENSUR // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PASSING: Junior guard Krystal Saunders passes the ball to a teammate during Thursday’s game against Duke. This was the first time Miami has defeated Duke ending with 69-65.

March 4 - March 6, 2013

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

10

SPORTS BRIEFS MEN’S BASKETBALL

crowd at Cameron Indoor Stadium and carried the Blue Devils to a retaliatory win.

Mike Krzyzewski called it one for the ages.

Miami (23-5, 14-2) hoped for a series sweep of Duke after the 90-63 blowout earlier this year, and a win Saturday would have clinched the first outright conference title in school history.

Duke senior Ryan Kelly emerged from a two-month absence to score 36 points in a thrilling 7976 win over Miami. The Hurricanes trailed by 10 with less than two minutes to play on Saturday, but then made a lastsecond push that came up just short. Shane Larkin – who had 25 points on 8-for-16 shooting – barely reached the rim on a deep 3-pointer, and Rion Brown’s desperation shot at the final buzzer went in and out. Duke (25-4, 12-4 ACC) remains undefeated at 16-0 with Kelly on the floor. The sharp shooter was lethal against Miami, draining 7-of-9 from beyond the arc. He electrified a rowdy home

10

SPORTS

Still, the Canes need just one win in their final two games to secure the top spot in the ACC. Georgia Tech will be in town for a 9 p.m. tipoff Wednesday, and Clemson will visit the BankUnited Center at 2:30 p.m. Saturday.

of 42 feet and .5 inches was top among 22 competitors. Isaiah Simmons – who won ACC Indoors last week – placed second in the men’s shot-put event with an impressive 57-foot throw.

On Sunday, Miami’s quarterbacks worked through several areas of the offense, including three-step drops, third-down scenarios and two-minute drills.

Miami’s track stars will travel to Fayetteville, Ark., for the NCAA Indoor Championships, which begin Friday.

Golden faced questions about the strength of the Miami defense, which was the more inexperienced unit last season.

FOOTBALL

“We can look at a lot of things differently with a lot of guys on defense returning,” he said. “We’re not out of the woods yet. We expect a lot of the young guys

The Hurricanes opened spring practice on Saturday, and coach Al Golden said the weekend was

TRACK & FIELD Four Miami athletes competed for a chance to participate in the NCAA Indoor Championships next week. Samantha Williams led the way at the VT Qualifier in Blacksburg, Va., winning the women’s triple jump event. The All-American senior’s mark

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

a “two-day passing camp.”

March 4 - March 6, 2013

on defense to make marked improvements this spring.” The team will practice Tuesday and Thursday before taking off for spring break. The first spring scrimmage will be held at 10 a.m. March 23 at Traz-Powell Stadium on the Miami Dade College north campus. Information compiled from hurricanesports.com. Spencer Dandes may be contacted at sports@themiamihurricane. com.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

11

dear ...

Dear V: Piercings are not a party for two... Persnickety Pierce, ,

My girlfriend is going on a piercing frenzy. She wants to pierce every available and hot part of her body. I am not really into this trend, and I would want to keep the piercing to a minimum. She has threatened to break up with me if I don’t pierce to the same extent. I love her, but I don’t think it’s worth the pain. Perfect Pierce

I already have this picture of your girlfriend. She bought all the seasons of Criss Angel’s “Mindfreak” on DVD, has the piercing parlor on speed dial and hates being compared to the main character in “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” but secretly enjoys the attribution. The piercings are probably a form of her insecurities, a safety net she needs to keep her relationships and life together. Forcing you to be a part of this vicious cycle is unjust and makes you only feel guilty about leaving her. But she may be trying to expose you to a world you have not considered. Perhaps the pain from piercing becomes pleasurable and even sexual. Your girlfriend is trying to share her interests by forcing a needle through you. Talk about love. I draw the line with the extent of your girlfriend’s piercings. Undergoing a Prince Charles piercing that

i iis not can lead to an uncomfortable southern region worth the price. Imagine having sex with all those ornaments, metal clunk and shiny beads distracting you from the task at hand. Piercings are a subtle art form that is revolutionizing the way we see others, but sex doesn’t need any extra embellishments. If anything, they may cause more trouble, leading to a visit to the health clinic. If you’re not prepared to become a human canvas, you should start setting your eyes on less cluttered roads. Your girlfriend’s personal journey is not for the faint of heart and skin. Is her skin elastic? Piercing a vagina is no cakewalk. And let her know that she will never be able to replicate the fantasy of Daniel Craig getting it on with Rooney Mara. Thank Hollywood movie magic! V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

HIRING HURRICANE HOODLUMS THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS IN THE MARKET FOR PHOTOGRAPHERS, CARTOONISTS, REPORTERS AND VIDEOGRAPHERS. ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT EDITOR@ THEMIAMIHURRICANE. COM.

March 4 - March 6, 2013

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

11


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

12

COLOR

12

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

March 4 - March 6, 2013


The Miami Hurricane - Mar. 4, 2013  

The Miami Hurricane - Mar. 4, 2013

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you