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VOTE FOR OUR ANNUAL BEST OF MIAMI EDITION AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM Vol. 91, Issue 32 | Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE ALUMNI FOOTBALL

Freshmen signees ready to make impact Canes finish National Signing Day with 16 new recruits. Read more about Wednesday’s events inside.

BURNS

COLEY

EDWARDS

SANDLAND

LEWIS III

MUHAMMAD

OLSEN

GRACE

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR ONE, TWO, KALAMAZOO: Victor Trivett, 88, plays his blue kazoo. The instrument is used to help regulate the breathing of people with Parkinson’s. His caretaker, Trudy Milone, joins him at the music therapy classes he attends at St. Matthews Episcopal Church.

Music therapy helps tackle Parkinson’s BY RIANNA HIDALGO STAFF WRITER

Each Wednesday in St. Matthews Episcopal Church, the buzzing timbre of 30 to 40 kazoos fills the room. Hands clap, feet stomp and voices join together for musical exercises and warm-ups. But this is more than a music lesson. This is music therapy led by University of Miami graduate and adjunct faculty member Linda Lathroum, and the common thread among the participants is the progressive neurological disorder Parkinson’s disease.

“It’s a hardship, no two ways about it,” said 74-year-old Eugene Dolfi, whose wife, Eleanore Dolfi, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s about 15 years ago. The two have been attending these music therapy sessions once a week as part of the caregiver meetings and social events with the ParkOptimists, a National Parkinson Foundation support group in Coral Gables that also offers dance, yoga and tai chi. According to Erin Keenan, who conducted research on Parkinson’s while pursuing her master’s in music

therapy at UM, music can help with some of the side effects typical of the disease — shuffling gait, tremors, muscle rigidity and speech change. “Music gives the central nervous system so much information,” she said. “There is so much going on in the brain, and rhythm helps organize everything.” The idea is that rhythm, like the beat of a drum or the tick of a metronome, can foster slow, coordinated movement when patients attempt to synchronize their bodies to the sound. SEE MUSIC THERAPY, PAGE 4

COOL COMPOST

SHAKEN NOT STIRRED

DINING HALLS INTRODUCE GREEN INITIATIVE TO REDUCE WASTE PAGE 2

HOT SPOT SHAKES UP THE NIGHT SCENE WITH HOMEMADE COCKTAILS PAGE 10

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ON-CAMPUS DINING

Dining halls implement green option Reusable boxes reduce waste BY LYSSA GOLDBERG ASSISTANT EDITOR

Freshmen leaving HechtStanford Dining Hall with disposable to-go containers enjoy eating their meals outdoors, making conversation with friends outside of Stanford Residential College, and looking out at the intramural fields. These students finish eating and stack their boxes artfully, like professional Jenga players. But the boxes piled atop the trash bins eventually form a replica of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. When a dozen to-go containers become a dozen plus one, the spillover transforms into litter all over the ground. Trash bins overflowing with disposable take-out boxes, which are compostable, can be seen outside of the Mahoney-Pearson and HechtStanford dining halls on a daily basis. When compostable items became litter, freshman Athena Jones knew there was a problem. Jones, the education outreach co-chair for the Energy

& Conservation Organization (ECO) Agency, is now working with the members of Student Government’s green programming board to rectify this waste issue by promoting use of reusable rather than disposable boxes. “They’re biodegradable if you do compost properly, but otherwise they’re going to a traditional landfill when they’re placed in these garbage cans ...” Jones said. “They actually have the same life in the landfill that a Styrofoam box would have, and they produce more carbon dioxide to make. It’s a much more intensive process to make these boxes and therefore they have more of a carbon footprint on the environment than Styrofoam.” The To-Go program implemented at the beginning of the fall semester gives students the option of eating meals outside of the dining halls. But not many realize that there are two types of take-out boxes: the disposable white boxes that are made of compostable material and the reusable green boxes that are made from plastic. Freshman Smitha Vasan, who takes out about half of her meals from the dining hall each week, has been using the disposable to-go boxes because

LUISA ANDONIE // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER GOING GREEN: The ECO Agency promoted its reusable take-out boxes outside of Hecht-Stanford Dining Hall. They will be there until Thursday, informing students about the eco-friendly boxes.

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she did not know about the reusable green containers. “I saw a girl with one the other day, but I thought she had just bought it and decided to use it,” she said. Jones started using the reusable boxes last semester after noticing a sign at the entrance of the dining hall. It had a small picture of the green box and said “Lease Me” at the top, with more information about the program on display. But Jones understands how this would not be an effective promotional strategy for all students. “It’s not something that you can really have a sign up for and then expect people to read it when they’re hungry. That might’ve been where the marketing failed,” she said. “But honestly it’s a good program. It’s awesome for not losing money for the dining hall.” To increase awareness of the eco-friendly program, the ECO Agency’s Green Team has been tabling outside of Hecht-Stanford Dining Hall over the past week to tell people about the reusable containers. Freshman Camlyn Morrison learned about the green boxes through this promotion. “This is the first time that I realized it was offered,” she said. “They had a booth set up that told me that, if I used it, I could return it, and it didn’t sound like a hard thing to do. And personally, I’m an advocate of recycling and less consumption.” Jones said that students who are not concerned about the environmental impact of waste should at least be concerned about the economic impact of a program that is not sustainable. Using the green boxes is eco-friendly and also shows other students that it is important to be green, according to Jones. “It’s definitely, completely in the students’ hands at this point,” she said. “There’s no other reason behind the fact that we don’t use them other than the students.”

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Multiple choices for eco-initiative Eco-friendly reusable boxes are available through a leasing program. For a deposit of $4, taken from a student’s dining dollars and refunded at the end of the year, students can receive a reusable green box to take food out of the dining hall. When they return for another meal, they can exchange the used reusable box for either a clean reusable box or a “Green Card.” The “Green Card” proves that the student is a participant in the leasing program and can be exchanged at any time for another reusable box. If the student is holding a “Green Card,” he or she cannot take out a box. A student cannot hold the card and a reusable box at the same time. If a student does not want to take out a meal, he or she can keep the card and must dine in-house. Otherwise, he or she can exchange the card for another box upon entering the dining hall. “It seems like a full-proof answer to the problem,” said freshman Athena Jones, the education outreach co-chair for the Energy & Conservation Organization (ECO) Agency. Armando Cuervo, the manager of Auxiliary and Dining Services, recommends opting for the reusable boxes because they are the best option for the environment. “By using the eco-friendly reusable containers, students will still be able to participate in the take-out dining program while reducing the campus dining services’ carbon footprint,” he said. About 7,000 disposable boxes are used per week in the Hecht-Stanford and MahoneyPearson dining halls, according to Cuervo. Approximately only 10 of the more than 4,000 current meal plan participants are “Green Card” holders as of Monday, he said.

Alpha Epsilon Pi got pied in the face for their philanthropy event, “The Pi Games.” Check out Sydney Polk’s photo brief. Check out Amanda Pena’s story on the Kids & Culture community service organization, which helps at-risk youths. The University of Miami’s School of Law unveiled its new joint degree program. Read more about it Jess Swanson’s article. Subscribe for the email edition of the newspaper at themiamihurricane. com/subscribe. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

TWITTER ACCOUNTS @MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane


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COMMUNITY

Grad students construct eco-friendly tents Hurricanes Andrew, Wilma inspire project BY RIANNA HIDALGO STAFF WRITER

Second-year graduate student Ruslana Makarenko plans on driving down to Everglades National Park and staying in the eco-tent provided at Flamingo Campground sometime in the near future. If she does, she will be intimately familiar with the wooden platform, fabric canvassing and steps of the shelter — she was one of 11 students from the School of Architecture who designed and built it. Under the direction of professors Rocco Ceo and Jim Adamson, fifth-year seniors and graduate students created the eco-tent as part of their design/build studio class in the spring of 2011. “Studios don’t usually offer hands on stuff,” Makarenko said. “You got to put into practice what you’re supposed to be learning in school. It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.” The lone eco-tent is a prototype for possible overnight accommodations, something the park has not offered since Hurricanes

Andrew and Wilma devastated the 103-room Flamingo Lodge that once stood. “We decided it was important to show the public that we could actually make progress,” said Everglades National Park Superintendent Dan Kimball in a video produced by University Communications. Armed with a grant from South Florida National Parks Trust, park officials reached out to the UM School of Architecture to create a shelter that would provide practical, sustainable lodging for visitors. According to an article in the Huffington Post, the original plan was to build 40 units, but finances and logistics stand in the way. The eco-tent is available for overnight booking through April 14 and can be reserved for up to three nights, according to the National Park Service website. The interior offers room for four adults and houses bed frames, a table and chairs. Regardless of how plans progress, the students involved walked away with realworld experience and a better understanding of what it takes to work for a client. “You get more communication skills and bigger appreciation for the whole process and the fact that architecture is more of a service,” said Giancarlo Belledonne, a secondyear graduate student.

PHOTOS BY CAYLA NIMMO// PHOTO EDITOR WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE: Bhagya Janananda, 33, makes breakfast while Navean Wijetena, 33, and Mevan Wijetena, 3, went to the lake. Tents are available until April 14.

For these aspiring architects, the portfolio addition and interview talking point was an extra bonus. “A lot of people only have digital work,” Belledonne said.

CAMPING OUT: Navean Wijetena, 33, carries his 3-year-old son, Mevan Wijetena, to the tent Wednesday morning. The tent, built by UM architecture students, is at the Flamingo Campground in the Everglades. They spent Tuesday night in the shelter, which costs $15 to rent.

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With plenty of guidance from Ceo and Adamson, students met three times a week to design, pitch, order materials and build — from imagination to reality in one semester. According to Makarenko, the intense design period provided a lesson in compromise, respect and group work. “We had things as diverse as using a storage container,” Makarenko said. “People were very set on their ideas and had to overcome their differences.” Ultimately, the students ended up with a 200-square-foot tent made of wood and fabric that sits on a 2-foot platform. It can be disassembled and stored during the area’s most vulnerable time - hurricane season. Indicated by the term “eco-tent,” there was also an emphasis on sustainability, low environmental impact and use of natural materials. The floor decking is made of bamboo and recycled plastic. Once their design was approved, the students picked up their tools and moved forward to construction. “That was the fun part,” Belledonne said. Makarenko noted that, as students who spend most of their time designing digitally, building was a learning process. She recalled the first day of construction, when one student threw down a concrete panel and it broke. “You learn it’s good to order one extra of everything,” she said. For Belledonne, designing the eco-tent was one thing, but seeing it materialize in front of him was another. “I thought it was interesting because seeing something on a computer screen — you can’t picture it,” he said. “It was a lot bigger than I thought it would be.” THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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OBITUARY

Miller scientist dies at age 70 Professor led School of Med in HIV/AIDS research BY DEMI RAFULS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Professor Walter A. Scott, a researcher at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine since 1975, passed away Jan. 28. A professor for biochemistry and microbiology, Scott was an exceptional developer in HIV/AIDS research funded by the National Institutes of SCOTT Health. “His first love was the laboratory,” his wife of 42 years, Dr. Gwendolyn B. Scott, said in a news release. Scott suffered a hemorrhagic stroke at his home in Coral Gables and died later at Jackson Memorial Hospital, only four days before his 70th birthday. Scott earned his bachelor’s degree from the California Institute of Technology and a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin in physiological chemistry in 1970. He met his wife in Wisconsin, and she then followed him to Miami in 1975. She is now a professor of pediatrics and is the director of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Disease and Immunology at the Miller School of Medicine. “Walter Scott dedicated his life to science, to this institution, and to advancing the careers of people across this country who continue to bring honor to both,” Goldschmidt said in the news release. “That is as much a part of his legacy as his contributions to unraveling the mysteries of biochemical mechanisms. Together with his wife Gwen, they have transformed our ability to impact the AIDS epidemic.” In 1989, he and his wife became involved in HIV research, focusing on the biochemical mechanisms of viral replication and antiviral drug resistance. In addition to directing his own molecular virology research laboratory since his arrival at UM, he also chaired the department’s Graduate Program Committee for 10 years. Scott joined the Miller faulty as an assistant professor and quickly elevated the department’s knowledge of recombinant DNA technology. “He fulfilled our best hopes, as a researcher, teacher and mentor,” Whelan said. “He was pivotal to our success in that regard.” In addition to his wife, Scott is survived by sister Nancy Koroloff, of Portland, and brothers Jerry and Gene, both of Seattle. Memorial donations may be made to the Dr. Walter A. Scott Biochemistry Endowment Fund at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, P.O. Box 016960 (R-100), Miami, FL 33101. 4

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Parkinson’s patients find their rhythm MUSIC THERAPY FROM PAGE 1

“We naturally entrain,” said Lathroum, who has been leading the music therapy sessions for three years. “If you are walking down the street and someone comes by with loud music, you naturally start walking to the beat.” As Lathroum pushed up her glasses and sat down at the piano, caregivers, family members and patients sat in a circle of chairs, waiting expectantly to sing a warm-up. Lathroum incorporated more movement as the session went on, like bicep curls in time to simple songs such as “Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two).” “Music therapy helps us,” said Eleanore Dolfi, who donned a white baseball cap with a red tulip, the universal symbol for Parkinson’s disease. “Otherwise I’d be sitting at home, not moving, and that’s not very good.” Lathroum said the exercises are targeted at specific symptoms. The kazoo is good for breath support. Singing in a wide range can help avoid monotone speech, and warm-ups like “ma, may, me, mo, moo” encourage articulation and facial muscle movement. Both Lathroum and Keenan stressed that this kind of music therapy — and the music therapy program at UM — is

neurologic-based, grounded in scientific evidence and research. Beyond the medical benefits, the participants find a community of support and a joyful environment that is invaluable when facing something like Parkinson’s. “It’s like a big family,” Dolfi said. Arlene Lieder, whose husband has Parkinson’s, said she has seen people come in with their heads down and leave with an entirely different disposition. “When you’re singing, you can’t help but feel better,” she said. The music therapy sessions began when the president emeritus of ParkOptimists, Carol Goldman, reached out to UM associate professor of music therapy Shannon de l’Etoile. “I didn’t want to just go in and talk about music therapy,” de l’Etoile said. Instead, she gave them a session. “I think they found themselves moving and responding in ways that they didn’t think they could still do,” she said. “They got really excited about that.” Today, the music therapy sessions are free to participants and funded by Lewis and Esta Ress of North Miami. “It’s hard to see the progression of the disease,” Lathroum said. “I’ve been working with the group for a few years, so there have been a few who passed away or can’t come anymore.”

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR WARMUP: Alumna Linda Lathroum warms up her students with a song.

For Lathroum, the rewards outweigh the challenges. “Always at the end of the session I get so much positive feedback,” she said. “It’s hard to explain — they touch your heart.”

CAMPUS LIFE

SportsFest drops eight sports from lineup Events cross-promoted with UM Athletics BY KEVIN RODRIGUEZ CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

The SportsFest Committee has decided to drop eight sports from this year’s program, which begins Friday. Also, the competitions will be scheduled around the two UM basketball games taking place this weekend. Tom Soria, assistant director of intramurals at the Wellness Center, said the men’s and women’s games – both against big rivals – affected this year’s event planning. “We wanted to make sure the events were done with enough time so students could line up for the games at the BankUnited Center,” Soria said. On Saturday, the No. 8 Canes will take on North Carolina at 2 p.m. in a sold-out arena. Then on Sunday, the women’s team will play a big conference matchup against Florida State at 2 p.m. “It’s going to be fun,” Soria added. “It Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

provides us with a unique opportunity to work with athletics.” In addition, women’s basketball coach Katie Meier will speak at the SportsFest opening ceremonies 5 p.m. Friday at the Rock. The eight events that were cut are ultimate frisbee, darts, track and field, kickball, bocce, the mystery event, homerun derby and the trivia portion of couch potato. The committee felt those have not been as popular in recent years, Soria said. The decision did not please some students. “I think it’s ridiculous,” sophomore Phillip Chan said. “You’re kind of cutting out a population of students from participating in SportsFest.” The committee also decided to change indoor volleyball to beach volleyball, Soria said. “I’m kind of upset about indoor volleyball,” sophomore Jesus Melendez said. “But I’m excited for the new challenge.” Every year the schedule of events is different and depends on what the committee decides, according to Soria. Therefore, it is

not known yet whether those eight events will be included in the future. SportsFest began in the spring semester of 1986 as a competition between Hecht and Stanford residential colleges. It has since grown into one of the biggest events on campus with thousands of students, faculty and staff participating from the five residential colleges, University Village and commuters. The organizing committee is cross-promoting its events with UM Athletics to try and get a high student turnout at both basketball games. The final round of the knockout competition will take place at halftime of the men’s game on Saturday. The SportsFest champion and overall team winners will be announced at the women’s basketball game on Sunday. Members from the individual men’s and women’s first, second and third place teams will be presented with a variety of Nike-sponsored prizes at the closing ceremonies, which will take place Sunday at 1:30 p.m. on the Intramural Fields. For more information about SportsFest events and standings, visit sites.google.com/ site/umsportsfest.


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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Campus leaders deliver updates on progress, plans SG hosts annual State of the U event BY JORDAN COYNE COPY EDITOR

After flocking to tables of food at the Rock Wednesday, University of Miami staff, faculty and students took their seats to listen to their peers deliver the State of the U address. Contrary to past years’ tradition, Student Government (SG) President Nawara Alawa insisted on diversifying this year’s event. “Our team decided to spice things up a bit … we are inspired by you,” Alawa said in her opening statement. She then discussed the progress of the different SG agencies, citing accomplishments such as Cat 5’s efforts to raise support for Miami sports teams, which increased attendance at football games by 20 percent. For the near future, Alawa spoke about the modified academic calendar, SG-sponsored competitions and programs like an “Iron Chef” program and UFactor. She also mentioned SG’s recent collaboration with student governments across the nation, who will be lobbying Congress to keep student interest rates low.

“Make sure that you’re as interested and involved in a lot of the things going on, supporting other students in their endeavors,” Alawa said in closing. Many of the students in attendance, like senior Jonathan Bulgini, appreciated the new inclusive format of the event. “I wanted to hear how the university was doing … and I also wanted to hear how different organizations were doing that I’m a part of,” Bulgini said. “It made me feel, as a student, a lot more connected.” Senior Mariah Forde agreed, even though she had only come to the event because one of her sorority sisters was speaking on behalf of United Black Students. “I think it’s good to get a variety of different people speaking,” Forde said. “People actually a part of the organization are speaking on behalf of the organization.” After Alawa thanked all in attendance, she invited a range of 16 different student leaders to bring the audience up to date on their recent accomplishments and future plans. Butler Center UM’s center for service and leadership was represented by its public relations coordinator, junior Mike Piacentino. “Together we can learn from each other,

we can learn with each other, and most importantly we can learn about each other,” he said while starting the speech. Piacentino then went on to mention new additions to the Butler Center, like the Women’s Leadership symposium, as well as upcoming celebrations, such as the 30th anniversary of FunDay. Stanford Residential College From across the lake, third-year Residential Assistant Jacob Sperber and first-year Academic Fellow Victoria Sadowski presented updates on the activities of almost half of the university’s freshmen. This past fall, SRC strived to establish a well-founded community by hosting events exploring the community and interacting with UM staff. For the upcoming semester, SRC plans to further this goal by hosting events, like a fashion show, to educate residents on how to better their careers. Federacion de Estudiantes Cubanos President Justin Borroto gave a thankful welcoming before discussing FEC’s “Not Cuban, who cares?” event and the group’s consequential 50-percent increase in membership. “We pride ourselves on being an integral part of UM’s community,” he said. “Homecoming allowed us to … strengthen what be-

ZOE KAFKES // CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER PROGRESS: SG President Nawara Alawa delivers her State of the U address.

ing a Cane and a member of FEC means.” FEC’s upcoming Jose Marti Day of Service on March 2 will offer free food for all.

GREEK LIFE

Panhellenic Association grows in numbers, popularity Chi Omega to expand Greek community during fall of 2013 BY JORDAN SCHUMAN SENIOR NEWS WRITER

Freshman Lauren Friedman was one of more than 500 girls that signed up for sorority recruitment this spring, after a semester of Panhellenic marketing material reading, “nothing you expected, but everything you were looking for.” “I was very overwhelmed by the number of girls rushing and was afraid that I would get dropped because there were so many girls,” said Friedman, a new member of Sigma Delta Tau. About 530 girls signed up for sorority recruitment this year, according to Caitlin Giles, president of the Panhellenic Association and member of Alpha Delta Pi. Of these more than 500 girls, 460 actually went through the recruitment process, and 430 received bids on Bid Day. “I think it all worked out for most people,” Friedman said. While most schools recruit in similar ways, Greek life at the University of Miami is much smaller, according to Giles. “We only have seven sororities currently,” Giles said. “The National Panhellenic Council has 24 member organizations, and some campuses have all 24 sororities.” However, sorority recruitment grows every year, Giles said. The number of girls that signed up for recruitment increased by

6 percent from the year prior, according to data from Associate Dean of Students Tony Lake. “All the sorority women are so involved on campus, not only in leadership roles, but simply by their presence in classes and other events such as Homecoming,” she said. “There are more and more people walking around wearing letters, participating in events, and spreading the word that Greek life is an amazing experience that everyone should consider becoming a part of.” In fact, the percentage of students on campus that have gone Greek - including fraternity brothers - has jumped from 12 percent to about 20 percent, according to data from the Dean of Students’ Office. Recruitment follows the same format yearly, but next year, a new sorority will be recruiting: Chi Omega. Women who dropped out of the formal recruitment process this semester are still eligible to join and be a founding member of Chi Omega at UM. “Hopefully some women who didn’t find their fit during recruitment will be open-minded about starting a brand new sorority,” Giles said. The addition of Chi Omega will help to bridge the Greek life-sized gap between UM and other schools, but size is not the only difference between UM Panhellenic life and that of other schools. “The most important difference is that UM Panhellenic life is not the stereotypical sorority that you see in mass media,”

Giles said. “We do not haze, and there are no huge rivalries between the sororities.” About a year’s worth of planning went into this year’s 430 bids, Giles said. “We select Recruitment Guides, Rho Gammas, in the spring to be trained during the fall semester,” Giles said. “They act as unbiased guides for their group of girls during recruitment.” Senior Rocio Camusso was a Rho Gamma for the second time this year. A member of Zeta Tau Alpha, she said she loved the process. Although it is a hefty commitment, which includes disaffiliation from one’s own sorority, Camusso appreciated being a Rho Gamma because she “wanted all of her girls to end up really happy regardless of which sorority they joined.” Friedman appreciated her Rho Gamma for her advice. “I was a little confused after a few sororities dropped me, and she talked to me and made me feel a lot better,” she said. “I was so happy when I found out that she was in my sorority on Bid Day.” Giles said Greek life is about friendship and opportunity. “It offers a huge network of friends, instant leadership opportunities and a nationwide network to something bigger than just the school itself,” she said. And for those 430 girls who received bids, Panhellenic Life promises to be “nothing that you expected, but everything you were looking for.” “It is just that special,” she said.

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OPINION UP!

If you could be any other person for a day, who would you be?

JULIA KLINGNER SOPHOMORE “I would want to be Superman because of his cool powers.”

GABRIEL PAISNER JUNIOR “I would like to be the Secretary of Health because growing up in France I can see the disparity between the healthcare system here and the one established in Europe ... In Europe, if you want to go see a doctor, you can go see a doctor regardless of your health insurance. There are many Americans without coverage and under the poverty line, which I think is unacceptable.”

COURTNEY KRUMSIECK FRESHMAN “I would be Taylor Swift because I really like her. I think she’s a great singer, and she gets to go and travel and meet a lot of people.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com.

Daniel Cepero

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OPINION

The Miami Hurricane

a record of such an impairment or is regarded as having such an impairment.” These terms are extremely broad. It is understandable that being confined to a wheelchair would restrict someone from playing a competitive sport at the collegiate level. However, other disabilities are deemed as making an athlete “unable to play” when that isn’t the case. Jim Abbott is an example of a “disabled” athlete who defied the term. Though Abbott was born without his right hand, he decided to pursue baseball and ended up in the MLB. He also pitched for the gold medal Olympic team in 1988. If a man without a hand can pitch in the MLB, then why can’t other “disabled” athletes be given a chance at their sport of choice? Handicapped athletes are seen as inferior and are not given equal opportunities. Dividing athletes based on “able-bodied” and “disabled” is unacceptable. Having the ability to play a

sport comes with practice. Disabled athletes can overcome barriers with proper training. For those who are unable to due to extreme limitations, schools should offer programs where these athletes can find other ways to exert their skills. The term “disability” has been defined by society. We have made it OK to outcast individuals who are impaired when their impairments do not restrict their abilities. A disability becomes a problem in sports when there are regulations against them. But, a limitation should not preclude participation – not in grade school or in collegiate sports. Disabled athletes have allowed rules to inhibit them from pursuing a passion. But as the saying goes, “Never let the fear of striking out keep you from playing the game.” Your disabilities should never define you.

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Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Demi Rafuls ART DIRECTOR Mariah Price PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon NEWS EDITOR Stephanie Parra OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes ASSISTANT EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez COPY CHIEF Nicky Diaz COPY EDITORS Jordan Coyne Erika Glass Ashley Martinez

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger ACCOUNT REP Halima Dodo Kristyna Fong Carlos Parra ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan DESIGNERS Ali Fishman Carlos Mella Amilynn Soto WEBMASTER Kateryna Gontaruk SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Rob Finn ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2013 University of Miami

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

Metrorail needs to improve signage The Disney World Resort monorail has 12 different train lines. The Miami Metrorail has two. The Miami Metrorail might be your most affordable option in traveling to Miami International Airport, but only if you’re on the right train. Prior to the inauguraJORDAN tion of the Orange Line, the singular SCHUMAN Green Line spanned 24.4 miles and CONTRIBUTING provided quick and affordable travel COLUMNIST throughout Miami-Dade County. While the Orange Line added access to the airport, it also added confusion and potential detours for all northbound riders. In my case, it made my trip an hour and a half longer because I got on the wrong train. Yes, partly my fault, but how was I to know which train I was entering when the trains are marked by a lettersized pieces of paper on one train window? The reality of the situation is that Miami-Dade should have made it painfully obvious to me that I was

HURRICANE

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Disabilities don’t derail drive Recently, the Department of Education modified its guidelines for the treatment of disabled athletes in elementary, middle and high school. Under this ratified policy, athletes unable to play a sport due to a physical impairment may now be able to. According to an article published in the Chronicle of Higher Education, the new policy will “accommodate certain students, as long as those changes don’t fundamentally alter the way sports are played.” With these changes being made in kindergarten through 12th grade, the Office for Civil Rights has suggested that it could lead to a possible change to athletics in higher education. This would not happen overnight, but if disabled students are able to play the sport, nothing should hinder that. The Department of Education defines a disability as someone who has a “physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities,

The Miami

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STAFF EDITORIAL

speak

compiled by

A disability becomes a problem in sports when there are regulations against them.

on the wrong train so I could have switched at any of my first 11 stops and not delayed my trip, long enough for me to have flown home or driven to Disney World to ride their efficient and clearly labeled monorail trains. Actually, they should have made it obvious to me before I even got on. If they went to the lengths to put these minimal signs up, they should have finished the task and marked the entire train somehow. If you’re going to do something, do it right the first time. At Disney, I knew I was on the Avengers train. There was Thor right there. The red, green, orange and solid colored trains are marked by a line on the exterior train. So you know which train you’re boarding before the doors even open. Imagine that. Miami-Dade should be posting the signs on each door or painting lines along the exterior or interior floor of the train. That way, I’ll see and know I’m about to go to the airport, and not the tri-rail transfer station. Jordan Schuman is a sophomore majoring in broadcast journalism.

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.


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CARTOONS BY BELDY

CARTOON BY DANIEL BELDY

Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

OPINION

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FOOTBALL

Miami signs 16 recruits for incoming freshman class Self-imposed sanctions limit class size for 2013 BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

DESIGN BY CARLOS MELLA

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The Hurricanes concluded National Signing Day on Wednesday with 16 high school athletes officially accepting scholarships to attend Miami. Five of those recruits came from Florida, with four of those residing in South Florida. While Miami was able to sign 24 recruits on Signing Day last year, a self-imposed scholarship reduction in anticipation of NCAA sanctions limited their class size for 2013. Coach Al Golden gave praise to this year’s class despite the obstacles in Miami’s way. “It’s a class that we’re proud of. It’s a class that we really had to fight hard for,” he said. “I don’t think anybody outside this room knows what we were up against the entire year fighting for this class.” Heading into the offseason, the prime concern for the Hurricanes was on the defensive side of the ball. They added seven players on defense, including two linemen, an area considered most in need of an upgrade. Golden referred to Al-Quadin Muhammad, a 6-foot-3, 240-lbs. defensive end, as a “No. 1 pass rusher on the open side who plays with passion.” He also signed Ufomba Kamalu, a defensive lineman from Butler Community College. Offensively, Miami picked up key recruits at quarterback, running back, wide receiver and two at tight end. Golden said Kevin Olsen – the younger brother of former Canes tight end Greg Olsen – is a “big-time pro-style quarterback.” He also had high praise for wide receiver prospect Stacy Coley. A four-star receiver out of Oakland Park, Fla., he was rated the fourthbest receiver overall by ESPN. “We sought out to get one wide receiver in this class, and that’s tough when you’re in South Florida. That means you’re letting a lot of good ones go but we think we got the best one down here in Stacy Coley,” Golden said. “That was a real good get for us. He’s one of the more fluid wide receivers that we’ve seen in a long time.” Another key recruit that signed on is Ray Lewis III, the son of Hurricane legend and two-time Super Bowl champion Ray Lewis. The three-star athlete is capable of playing at cornerback, wide receiver or running back, and his addition gives Miami a sense of intrigue around the energy and wisdom his father imposes. “It’s exciting,” Golden said of having Lewis around the program. “Just to end [his NFL Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

career] like that, that’s a storybook ending for Ray. To have Ray [Lewis III] not only have passion and discipline and have a great work ethic, but he kind of looks like [his father]. It’ll be fun to have him around.” Miami’s limited class missed out on signing some of the higher-rated players it had given offers. Matthew Thomas, the No. 1 linebacker in the nation, signed with rival Florida State on Wednesday. The Canes also lost out on defensive tackle Keith Bryant, who will join Thomas in Tallahassee. Offensive tackle Denver Kirkland, who lost his offer from UM and then got it back days later, ultimately signed with the Arkansas Razorbacks. Another Hurricane target, five-star running back Alex Collins, announced he would be attending Arkansas on Monday, but as of Wednesday night had not sent in his letter of intent. Multiple reports claim that his mother, who wants him to stay close to home at Miami, took his letter away just before his announcement began in an attempt to persuade him otherwise. Per NCAA rules, Golden could not refer to players not signed to Miami by name, but referenced the situation indirectly. “We may have room for one more,” he said about a possible addition to the class. “But that’s about it.” He also noted that while last season’s recruiting class was about trying to build depth at every position, this season had to be more specific with areas of need. He said that with such a limited class, there wasn’t any other choice. “Last year was about signing a two-deep everywhere because we lost so many seniors the year before,” he said. “This group is more filling in and giving us symmetry and some competition.” Although the class size for 2013 is smaller, Golden emphasized that nobody – newcomer or not – is guaranteed a starting role. “The one thing that’s consistent with how we run our organization is that everybody gets an opportunity to compete for a starting job. It doesn’t matter if you’re a freshman or a senior,” he said. “We have 20 starters back on a 7-5 team. We start getting to 10, 11, 12 wins then we can start saying there’s a little bit of a hierarchy, but we’re not there yet.” With all the difficulties that the NCAA investigation led to in the recruiting process, Golden admitted he is eagerly awaiting the day he can put it to rest. “I think all of us feel like there’s closure coming. That’s going to be a great day,” he said. “I haven’t had that experience yet at the University of Miami. I’m looking forward to being able to go into homes and communities and not have to answer that question.”

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DESIGN BY AMILYNN SOTO

TrEnDy bAr mIxEs hOmEmAdE cOcKtAiLs BY FRANK MALVAR CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

When you’re fed up with the Grove, don’t want to deal with Wynwood’s pretentious hipsters, and can’t stand the grimy club rats in South Beach, where are you supposed to go? The Broken Shaker in the Freehand Miami Hostel is the answer to your problems. The intimate bar prides itself on its specialty cocktails, made from locally grown fruits as well as herbs and spices straight from the Broken Shaker’s garden. “It’s our passion,” co-owner Gabriel Orta said. “We were first a pop-up and after we saw how everyone embraced it and how big of a success it was, we decided to settle down at the unique location.” The cocktail menu is always changing 10

EDGE

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according to what is growing in the garden. Recent drink options have included the Midwestern Old Fashioned – made with apple, cinnamon, Old Forester Bourbon and walnut bitters – and the Clover Club – a mix of homemade raspberry syrup, fresh lemon juice, egg whites and Bombay dry gin. “We always bring something new to the table,” Orta said. But it isn’t just the cocktails that make the Broken Shaker worth a visit. With both indoor and outdoor seating, the laid-back bar offers plenty of entertainment. You and a buddy can have a blast from the past with a round of Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots, or a game of table tennis in the courtyard if you’re feeling up to it. For the more low-key groups, start up a game of Jenga, and hope you can still see

Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

straight enough to play. In the spirit of keeping things different, the bar will soon have cocktails on tap and begin serving food. The bar also serves beer. Prices range from $3 for some beers to $11 for mixed drinks.

IF YOU GO WHAT: The Broken Shaker WHERE: 2727 Indian Creek Drive, Miami Beach Open from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m. on weekdays, 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. on weekends


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PHOTO BRIEF

Celebrating Black Awareness Month TO THE BEAT: Junior Lindsi Arrington performed spoken word during the Black Awareness Month (BAM) Opening Ceremony on Monday night. The ceremony, held in the Wesley Art Gallery, also featured performances from Storm Dance Troupe and poet Taalam Acey. BAM events continue throughout February. As part of BAM, Soul Food Night will take place in the Mahoney-Pearson Dining Hall on Thursday night. Gospel Explosion, another BAM event, on the Rock next Wednesday. The BAM Day of Service will be held Feb. 23.

MONICA HERNDON // ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR

BARRY LAW Makes its Case Providing students with the skills and knowledge to aid society through the competent and ethical practice of law is what drives the Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law. The real-world legal skills developed at Barry Law are showcased by our championship-caliber trial and moot court teams. That same legal expertise is displayed by our graduates every day in law offices and courtrooms.

www.barry.edu/Canes

Barry Law students (L-R) Brian Kozlowski, Leanne Palmer, John Berry

ORLANDO, FLORIDA Barry University School of Law is fully accredited by the American Bar Association (Section of Legal Education & Admissions to the Bar, ABA, 321 N. Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60654, 312-988-6738).

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SPORTS

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number of commits signed to UM during Signing Day.

.669

winning percentage for Nicole Lantagne Welch, who left the volleyball program on Wednesday.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Canes blow out Eagles for tenth straight victory Brown leads Miami with 22 points BY ALEX SCHWARTZ SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

On Monday, the Miami men’s basketball team ascended to No. 8 in the AP Poll, tying its highest ranking in program history. On Tuesday, the Boston College Eagles came to the BankUnited Center hoping to pick up a signature win over a top 10 opponent. There would be no letdown for the Hurricanes, as they rolled to a 72-50 victory to move to 18-3 (9-0 ACC) on the season. Miami was led by junior guard Rion Brown, who tied a career-high with 22 points and connected on 5-of-7 shots from 3-point range. The Georgia native had been struggling this season, entering the game averaging 5.8 points and shooting 22.5 percent from deep. “I just got in the gym, got up shots,” Brown said of breaking his slump. “And today my teammates did a great job of finding me, and they kept passing me the ball, and I kept knocking it down.” This was Miami’s second game against Boston College (1012, 2-7 ACC) this season. The Hurricanes narrowly escaped Chestnut Hill, Mass., with a 6059 victory on Jan. 16. Miami senior center Julian Gamble pointed to one main difference between the two matchups. “Our defense,” he said. “We were just more active, we had a lot more energy coming out of the gate, and that’s something that we focused on the past couple of days. And we know that our successes come from our preparation and our attention to detail. That’s something that we definitely got back to and we’re going to continue to do for the rest of the way.” The Miami defense limited 12

SPORTS

Boston College to 37 percent shooting from the field and 21.7 percent shooting from 3-point range. BC closed the first half on a 10-5 run and trailed 33-23 at the break. The Eagles then scored the first four points of the second half to make it a six-point game. But it was all orange and green from there. Miami went on a 17-4 run over a span of seven minutes, grabbing a 50-31 lead that was never in danger. They would extend the advantage as high as 28 points in the closing minutes. In addition to the 22 points from Brown, Miami also got 16 from senior forward Kenny Kadji, who shot 6-of-9 from the field and pulled down a team-high eight rebounds. Boston College, which never led at any point, was paced by 16 points from freshman guard Olivier Hanlan, who went 8-of-14. Sophomore forward Ryan Anderson posted a double-double with 14 points and 11 rebounds. While the loss drops BC into a tie for last place in the ACC, it only adds to Miami’s lead atop the conference. The Hurricanes are now the only team in a major conference that hasn’t dropped a game in conference play. Florida, ranked No. 2 and previously unbeaten in the SEC, fell to Arkansas Tuesday night. Coach Jim Larranaga does not place much meaning on Miami’s achievement, though. “Really, it means we got to play North Carolina on Saturday,” Larranaga said to a round of laughter. “I don’t pay attention to those numbers because they don’t ref lect what our job is.” The Hurricanes take on UNC (16-6, 6-3 ACC) at 2 p.m. Saturday at the BUC. Miami took a 68-59 victory home from Chapel Hill, N.C., on Jan. 10.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

NICHOLAS GANGEMI // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER BALL CONTROL: Senior guard Durand Scott ducks under the attempted block from Boston College freshman Olivier Hanlan. Miami won 72-50, extending its winning streak to 10 and its ACC record to 9-0.


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GOLF

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR ON THE LINKS: Freshman Lauren Riehle hits an iron down the fairway at Deering Bay Yacht and Country Club on Tuesday at the Hurricane Invitational.

Ras-Anderica shoots 216 at Hurricane Invitational Canes finish third in annual tournament BY VICTORIA HERNANDEZ CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

The Hurricanes golf team has caught spring fever. Amid the peacock calls and lakes filled with lily pads, Miami finished third for the second consecutive year at the annual Hurricane Invitational, which ended Tuesday afternoon. The team is gaining confidence and making a statement after a rocky fall season. Deering Bay Yacht and Country Club in Coral Gables hosted the three-round tournament on Monday and Tuesday. No. 23 Baylor won the overall competition with a score of 883, followed by No. 48 Texas State (887). The Hurricanes, ranked No. 71, finished with a final score of 898. The highest ranked team, No. 11 Oklahoma State, finished fourth with a total score of 902. The third-place finish is a huge step for Miami to move up in the rankings. “It’s a really big win for us. Any team that we beat that’s ahead of us helps us climb up to get to where we need to be to make it to regionals,” assistant coach John

Koskinen said. The Hurricanes got off to a slow start to begin the tournament. Sophomore Leticia Ras-Anderica, the leading scorer for Miami, shot 216 overall despite a first-round score of four over par. Her frustration was evident when she struggled to make a clean par putt at hole 13. The ball laid to rest right next to the cup, and the sophomore tapped it in for a bogey. Coach Patti Rizzo was called over and she guided Ras-Anderica back to confidence. The sophomore shot 68 – three under par – in round two. “Her and I tend to click well on the course so I think I just calmed her down,” Rizzo said. “Then she played well the second round so she wouldn’t let me leave her the third round.” Sophomore Rika Park also turned in a solid performance, finishing only three shots behind Ras-Anderica. She started well and scored 69 in round one. A triple bogey in round three was her biggest error. All seven players participated for Miami. “It’s a very tight, tricky golf course and we know it very well,” Rizzo said. “Whereas the other schools, not only coming out of the winter season when it’s freezing ... to come somewhere where you have to hit it dead straight to not get into trouble. So we feel it’s a big advantage for us.”

FillmoreMB.com Next Time You Snap a Photo at a show TAG IT with #FillmoreMB For VIP Ticket Package Information Call Juan Rodriguez: 305-938-2510

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dear ...

Dear V: Am I being stack-stalked?

, I like to study in the serenity of the ninth floor stacks. It is comforting to know that I am usually the only one there. All of a sudden, I have noticed that the same person has been sitting in the cubicle next to mine for the past week. He enters and leaves the library at the same time as me. This has been happening for a week. Do you think this is a coincidence? Does he want something from me? What should I do? Stack-Stalked Silence of the Stacks, Great perfume campaigns promise love and happiness with the purchase of their symbolic scents. Kate Winslet gave us the “Tresor” to our hearts. Charlize Theron embodies sensual attraction expressed with a French term “j’adore,” or

“I love.” Like any good scent, though, it goes away. These advertisements mask the true messages of their scents. They don’t indicate love but promote obsession with a fantasy that will probably never be fulfilled. A fantasy that resembles your stalker scenario. There is something alluring about playing with the notion of a stalker. Someone is always watching you, learning your every behavior and studying your patterns. Stalkers focus their attention on you and only you. If that doesn’t lead to narcissism, then it’s time to wake up and get that limitededition copy of “Ovid.” You feel in control and have the ability to change the course of this situation. You may be more inclined to engage in dangerous liaisons just for the sake of the story. I agree that having a stalker does improve your street-cred. With that being said, I am not recommending you have a fatal attraction a la Michael Douglas. Stalkers can be emotionally unstable and are often searching for something that is lost in their lives. The hunt and the desire for a person

ll l i a position ii who is unattainable allows stalkers to gain off control. If you’re telling yourself “yikes,” then we are making progress. You also do not want a stranger tweeting you every five seconds about your next move. Think about it. “It’s 10 a.m., she walks into her cubicle. At 10:05 a.m., she opens her computer.” I just wonder how all of this productive and creative energy would be used aside from stalking. Solving the economic crisis, world hunger and Lindsay Lohan are a few ideas. The other alternative might be that you’re having a relationship with a ghost. He may be a founder of the school and is looking to improve his spirit street-cred. Hey, it’s a hard-knock life when you have nothing to claim but sex with mortals. FYI, there is no way to get a restraining order for a mass of ectoplasm. The only exception is Casper because no one really has time for him anymore. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

PART-TIME DRIVER WANTED Reliable, friendly driver needed to transport three children to after-school activities Monday and Tuesday evenings. $15/ hour. If interested, call 305-926-6469.

SAVVY IN SALES? SALES REPRESENTATIVE POSITIONS ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE. ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT TARA AT 305-284-4401 OR TARA@ THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

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DEAR V

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Saturday, Feb. 9 • 2 p.m. BankUnited Center Join your Miami Hurricanes Men’s Basketball team as they continue their incredible season with a matchup against ACC foe the North Carolina Tarheels! Make sure you’re there to see the ‘Canes keep their perfect record in ACC play on the road to the Final Four. The first students that arrive will be receiving #PacktheBUC foam noodles for the game courtesy of Category 5. This game will be aired on ESPN and 560 WQAM.

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, Feb. 7 2013 Yearbook Portraits

information please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

9 a.m. • UC Lower Lounge Come take your student portraits for the 2013 IBIS Yearbook! Portraits are FREE for underclassmen. Graduation portraits are $25.00 for graduating seniors, go to http://www.ibisyearbook.com/seniorportraits to make an appointment. Portraits can be taken through Friday, February 15 from 10am -6pm in the UC Lower Lounge.

Miami Motion Benefit Showcase 6 p.m. • Clarke Recital Hall Join Miami Motion as they partner up with Relay for Life to hold a beneift showcase and raise money for cancer research. Admission is free and all donations benefit Relay for Life. For more information contact j.coffey@umiami. edu or visit facebook.com/MiaMoDT.

Patio Jams ft. Bess Rodgers

CNL/CAC Drive In Movie

12:15 p.m. • UC Patio Continue your Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the sounds of Bess rodgers! For more information on the event or how you can participate, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-2844606.

RAB Pub Trivia

Next week...

7 p.m. • Rathskeller Think you have what it takes to be crowned trivia champion? Well come out and enjoy an evening full of fun at Pub Trivia and win a Rat gift card! This event is brought to you by the Rathskeller Advisory Board. For more

8 p.m. • Pavia Garage Hurricane Productions in association with the Cinematic Arts Commission (CAC), the Association of Commuter Students and Canes Night Live (CNL) proudly present our newest awesome event! Come in your cars to this great new event located on the top floor of Pavia Garage! Sit in your car and enjoy the always great Disney’s Hercules on our awesome 3 story screen. The area will open at 7:00, so show up early if you want a good spot (parking is first come first served). Don’t have a car? No problem! There will be an area for people without cars to just sit and enjoy the movie in the open air so feel free to bring your favorite beach towel or lawn

chair! There will be free food courtesy of Hurricane Productions, and the movie will be preceded by a classic Nickelodeon short. For more information on the event, please contact Hurricane Productions at 305-284-4606.

Friday, Feb. 8 Men’s Tennis vs Louisiana - Lafayette 2 p.m. • Neil Schiff Tennis Center Come out and support your Men’s Tennis team as they take on the LouisianaLafayette Ragin Cajuns!

Saturday, Feb. 9 Men’s Baseball Alumni Game 6 p.m. • Mark Light Field Come out and support your baseball team and watch them take on the alumni before they start their season next week against the Rutgers Scarlet Knights. CAC Presents: Argo 10 p.m. • Cosford Cinema In 1979, the American embassy in Iran was invaded by Iranian revolutionaries and several Americans were taken hostage. However, six managed to escape

to the official residence of the Canadian Ambassador and the CIA was eventually ordered to get them out of the country. With few options, exfiltration expert Tony Mendez devised a daring plan: to create a phony Canadian film project looking to shoot in Iran and smuggle the Americans out as its production crew. With the help of some trusted Hollywood contacts, Mendez created the ruse and proceed to Iran as its associate producer. However, time was running out with the Iranian security forces closing in on the truth while both his charges and the White House had grave doubts about the operation themselves.

Sunday, Feb. 10 Women’s Basketball vs Florida State 2 p.m. • BankUnited Center Come out and support your Lady ‘Canes as they take on in-state rival and ACC foe the Florida State Seminoles! This game will be aired on CSS and on WVUM.

CAC Presents: Argo 8 p.m. • Cosford Cinema

FUNDAY

Rathskeller 40th Birthday

Monday. Feb. 11 • 11:30 a.m. Rathskeller Happy Birthday to the Rathskeller! For 40 years, the Rathskeller has been a staple of our campus. It is a place where generations of ‘Canes have created memories that will last a lifetime, sharing food and drinks among the gliders with friends. Come out this Monday, February 11th, to continue our traditions, make your own memories, and wish the “Rat” a happy 40th! There will be cupcakes, balloons and commemorative cups for you to take home starting at 11:30 a.m. This is a celebration you do not want to miss!

Saturday, Feb. 16 • 9:30 a.m. UC Rock FunDay is the longest standing service day at the University of Miami. Every year it brings over 300 special citizens from the Miami area on campus to be paired up with students to enjoy a day of fun and games. This year, the theme is...LUAU! Come out to the Rock on Saturday, February 16th at 9:30am to enjoy a day of arts and crafts, a bounce house, BBQ , performances by the Hawaiian club, and more! *To pre-register use the following link: llackstein. wix.com/funday2013. Those who pre-register will be more likely to be in the same group as their organization.

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 16

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Feb. 7 - Feb. 10, 2013

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

Men’s Basketball vs UNC


The Miami Hurricane - Feb. 7, 2013