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The Miami

Vol. 88, Issue 5 | Feb. 4 - Feb. 7, 2010

HURRICANE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

MATT WALLACH // The Miami Hurricane

Credit crunch

GIVE US FAIR GRADING TAS SHOULDN’T BE IN CONTROL OF OUR GPAS PAGE 5

HAVE A SUPER WEEKEND MAXIMIZE YOUR SUPER BOWL EXPERIENCE PAGE 7

SMASHING THE RECORD SENIOR TENNIS STAR HAS THE MOST WINS IN PROGRAM HISTORY PAGE 10

Getting a credit card in college just got a little bit harder BY NINA RUGGIERO | ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

L

ittle black dress: $60. Taxi to and from South Beach: $80. Two drinks at Heathrow: $50. Graduating college without credit card debt: Priceless. Are you willing to give up the plastic and kiss the old “buy now, pay later” trick goodbye? Starting Feb. 22 some people may have to, at least until they turn 21. The new Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure Act (CARD) will prevent excessive rate increases, improve transparency among credit card companies, eliminate the confusing fine print and protect young

people from getting in over their heads. There’s just one issue for college students: new restrictions on who is eligible for credit could put many underage consumers out of the running. Applicants will be required to have a cosigner before they can be approved, something for which many parents in today’s economy may be unwilling or unable to take responsibility. They’ll be forced to prove how they’ll be paying any balance beforehand, and any credit line increases must be approved by the cosigner who must remain involved in the continuous management of their finances. SEE CREDIT CARD, PAGE 4


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Weight lifting beneficial for women Trainer defies stereotypes

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

BY RAMON GALIANA NEWS EDITOR

Walking into the free weights area of the Wellness Center, you can’t help but notice one thing: the vast majority of people in the area are men. One University of Miami alumna is working to shatter that stereotype through her twiceweekly women’s weight lifting class. “The goal of this program is to get women more familiar with the weight room,” said Nikki McGowan, the personal trainer who teaches the class. “One of my friends in the weight room pointed out to me one evening that there were girls who were interested in using ‘that side’ of the gym, but were too timid or not educated enough in proper lifting technique.” Focusing on women who have not had extensive experience in the weight room, the class stresses high repetition exercises with low weights. A central emphasis during the class is proper lifting form, as well as the proper technique to help a friend while they are lifting. The class is offered on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:15 to 10:45 a.m. and will continue until March 4 at the Wellness Center. The Tuesday sessions concentrate on exercises that work both sides of the body simultaneously, while the Thursday sessions focus on exercises alternating sides of the body. The purpose of the different types of classes according to McGowan is to encourage a comprehensive exercise routine. “I have met many people since moving here that believe women should not lift weights which isn’t the case at all,” she said. “It can be argued that it is more imperative for women to lift than men because of their risk of osteoporosis later in life.” According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), at the age of 65, women have an increased chance of being diagnosed with osteoporosis, a painful and debilitating disease that weakens the strength of bones. The excessive consump2

NEWS

 UM’s greatest football stars attended a fundraiser. See Jamie Hildebrandt’s photo slideshow.  Christina De Nicola covered “An Evening with UM Football Greats” at the Fontainebleau. Watch the latest Speak Up videos to see what your fellow Hurricanes waste their money on.

BRITTNEY BOMNIN // Photo Editor

WORK IT OUT: Nikki McGowan holds a weight training class for women at the Wellness Center every Tuesday and Thursday in the hopes of offering women more time in the weight room. tion of alcohol, smoking and a passive lifestyle will increase a woman’s risk for osteoporosis later in life. One major way of combating osteoporosis, according to the HHS, is to “build strong bones now” by consuming calcium, vitamin D and keeping a balanced diet. Before graduating last December with a degree in exercise physiology from UM, McGowan was a 200- and 400-meter sprinter. Although she was not eligible to compete last year, she worked with head strength coach Andreu Swasey, under whom she served as an assistant strength and condition coach for the track and field and football teams. “Under Coach Swasey I

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

learned a lot about balancing workouts and the importance of organizing proper programs for certain athletes’ needs,” McGowan said. Currently, she is a master’s student here, studying exercise physiology with an emphasis on strength and conditioning. “I have been training with Nikki for a little more than a year. She has designed an amazing weight lifting program for me. The program is challenging but is gradual,” said Silvia Mitchell, a class participant. “We worked in cycles of 5 weeks in which the weight gradually increases. The results were absolutely incredible.” Besides making women stronger, McGowan is also break-

February 4 - February 7, 2010

ing popular misconceptions. “I want to debunk a lot of myths that exist about the weight room, such as if women lift they will get ‘big’ or muscular which is rarely the case,” she said. Ramon Galiana may be contacted at rgaliana@themiamihurricane.com

IF YOU GO WHEN: Tuesdays and Thursdays 9:15 to 10:45 a.m. WHERE: The Wellness Center

Sarah B. Pilchick thinks that “When In Rome” is the typical chick flick. Read the entire review online. Men’s basketball lost another ACC road game. Read more from Lelan LeDoux. Debora Rubi recaps the results from last weekend’s men’s tennis matches. Follow us on Twitter @TMH_SPORTS for the latest on all Hurricane sports. Subscribe for the e-mail edition of the newspaper at www. themiamihurricane. com/subscribe.


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Bridging barriers among cultures Behind the scenes

Student organizations promote black history

Student volunteers get real-world experience from the Super Bowl

BY LINDSAY PEREZ CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

On Tuesday, Feb. 2, United Black Students, in coalition with the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs, kicked off their annual Black Awareness Month (B.A.M.) by inviting students to “Wake up.” Wake up to what exactly? “It depends what you want it to mean,” said junior psychology major and B.A.M. chair Courtney Cross-Johnson. “Wake up and learn your history, wake up and learn about issues on campus.” For black students, February has come to be about more than history; it is about awareness and enlightenment. “[The month-long festivities are about] letting the campus know we’re here,” Cross-Johnson said. “We do talk about history but with diversity including people from the Caribbean, Africa, etc.” This multilateral perspective on black culture is exactly what Professor Edmond Abaka, director of Africana studies at the University of Miami, thinks is important for students to take away from these events. He would like B.A.M to “encourage students to look in to history, to understand the black experience on a global scale.” Abaka helped in inviting the evening’s guest speaker, Dr. Thabiti Asukile, a professor of African-American studies at the University of Cincinnati. Asukile’s presentation focused mainly on less prominent blacks who played vital roles in the advancement of black people through the spread of jazz music to Europe in the 1930s and 40s. The main point of his presentation was to focus on the lesser-known stories of blacks who were prominent but have since been somewhat forgotten. “Even though we have the internet there’s so much we don’t know about the African Diaspora, about how they’re treated,” Asukile said. New this year to B.A.M is a forum entitled “In Search of Our Fathers,” a session to discuss fatherlessness in the black community. “Fatherlessness isn’t something that solely affects the black community but it greatly affects the black community,” said junior motion pictures major and Chair of the forum Rae Williams. The forum will consist of a panel made up of students and faculty members alike that will discuss questions posed to them by Professor Abaka. Williams organized a diverse group to serve on the panel, ranging from stu-

BY JASMINE HENDERSON CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

MIKE DUNCAN // The Miami Hurricane

WALK THE WALK: Senior Steven Roberts participated in the BAM fashion show. Throughout February UBS will host a number of muiticultural events. dents on campus who are fathers, faculty members who are fathers and students who either grew up with or without their fathers. Williams hopes this topic will be of interest to the entire university community. “It’s important to be aware of the problems. As college students it is up to us to make a change. For us to be aware that it is a problem and that it has become to be almost accepted,” said Williams. It is clear that these events certainly do translate to other cultures among the university community. Eric Hurley, a junior majoring in electronic media, stumbled upon Dr. Asukile’s talk Tuesday night, and was thrilled because of his love of jazz music, but he ended up learning a little something more. “I was enlightened to the democratic

power of jazz music, and the fact that it was a gateway to tolerance of culture,” Hurley said. This new realm of knowledge is exactly what United Black Students President Christine Nanan hopes students will get out of B.A.M. “We just want people to learn something they didn’t know before; about the campus or the world in general,” she said. The assortment of events ensures that there is something for everyone during Black Awareness Month. “You don’t have to be black to celebrate with us,” said Cross-Johnson. For more information on events during BAM visit themiamihurricane.com. Lindsay Perez may be contacted at lperez@ themiamihurricane.com. February 4 - February 7, 2010

Super Bowl XLIV being held in Miami this year is not just bringing more economic attention to the city; the annual championship has now brought fruitful opportunities to students at the University of Miami by giving them free access to volunteer opportunities at the famous event. The National Football League is allowing over 35 qualified students from the School of Communication and the School of Education to volunteer at the Super Bowl. The students will help out with the event's media presentation and public relations during the game and have even begun early volunteer work at the Broward Convention Center. The registration process was simple. The majority of the volunteers saw a flyer or responded to an e-mail they received to get this once-in-a-lifetime deal. It was that easy. Maria Scott, lecturer at the School of Communication, was instrumental in organizing the development of the volunteer program. Students are responding well to her efforts. “The students are getting the opportunity to interface with communications professionals and sports journalists, while also getting to see the inner workings of a media center,” Scott said. Students just don’t see this as an opportunity for a free pass for the NFL’s most anticipated night. Media management and sports administration major junior Justin Leiser is equally excited about the helpful career action he’ll be getting as a volunteer at the Super Bowl. The students will undergo a unique experience and will certainly leave a mark on the presentation of the event. Senior public relations major Alyssa Baker also decided that in participating, she would be gaining important hands-on experience in media relations. She decided that this would be a good way, if not the best way, to fulfill her media relations task. “I’m looking forward to the experience and Dr. Scott is such a big help with everything,” she said. “I think we have a pretty significant part in the media of the game." Jasmine Henderson may be contacted at jhenderson@themiamihurricane.com. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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CREDIT CARD FROM PAGE 1

Crunching the numbers The facts affecting college students

92% The percent of undergraduates that use credit cards to pay for educational expenses, like books and tuition

$2,169 The credit card debt carried by an average student in 2004

$3,173 The credit card debt owed by an average college student

18 to 24 The age bracket that spent nearly 30 percent of its monthly income on debt repayment

4.6 The average number of credit cards a college student owned in 2009

7.2% The rate of students who drop out from college due to debt and financial pressures

All data listed pertains to the year 2008, unless otherwise noted. To view sources visit this story online at themiamihurricane.com.

Morgan’s company offers a solution. For those whose dreams of owning a credit card have been crushed, there is the prepaid card plan. These cards are reloadable and have a previously determined amount of money on them, which is paid before use. “Reloadable prepaid cards are like having a bank in your pocket,” Morgan said. Money can be added to the card through direct deposit by an employer, bank to card by a family member or at a load location. The card can be used wherever the brand (Visa, MasterCard or Discover) is accepted. It can be used for anything credit or debit cards are used for such as retail purchases, services, online shopping, paying bills or taking out cash. The limits are set by the issuer. Many people have chosen to use a prepaid card regardless to avoid opening a bank account, which is required for a credit or debit card. With this new act it is predicted that transactions on reloadable prepaid cards will reach $12 billion in 2010. Morgan advises consumers interested in getting a prepaid card to compare card offerings. “Free is not always free,” she said. “Some companies say ‘no monthly fee’ but they charge $1 per transaction which adds up very quickly.” Morgan said the key is to look for a low purchase price, a low monthly fee, free customer service and easy access to a live agent. “If you have a question about your money, you want help as quickly as possible,” she said. Supporters of the act believe today’s youth, and tomorrow’s economy, can use all the help they can get. Considering the steep costs of graduate schools and the difficulties many new graduates will encounter when trying to find jobs, debt accrued during college from careless spending could cause serious long-term problems. “Credit card companies thought of many tricks to nickel and dime a huge number of customers, thus creating higher profits for their companies,” UM political science professor Sylvia Thompson said. “They should have dealt with their customers fairly. They didn’t. This new law will force credit card companies to be more honest and fair in their treatment of customers.” Still, Thompson believes that college students need to be responsible to protect their future. “College students should have to prove they have income to get a credit card,” he said. “Over the past decade many young people have graduated from college already burdened with a damaged record. This causes problems in getting credit in the future, when they can afford it.” Some university students believe they are mature enough to handle a credit card without parental and governmental guidance. “I have a job and know how much I’m going to be paid biweekly,” said Kristin Wright, an employee at the Wellness Center. “I only spend what I know I either have or will have. I have a job and know how much I’m going to be paid biweekly. I only spend what I know I either have or will have.” Wright said she pays off her credit card every month. “Too many young people end up paying hundreds of dollars of interest on a $15 late night pizza because they didn’t understand that the interest compounds rapidly and don’t have the resources to pay off the credit card,” UM Assistant Political Science Professor Christopher Mann said. “These credit card debts force many college students to make shortterm decisions about graduate school and careers that may delay or divert them from what they really want to do.” Nina Ruggiero may be contacted at nruggiero@themiamihurricane. com.

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OPINION

Students can learn a lot from the feedback they receive on their essays, and it should come from a qualified professor, not the girl down the hall. -Pat Cunnane, Contributing Columnist

The Miami

HURRICANE

Founded 1929 An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

speak

UP!

What do you waste most of your money on?

BECCA LONG Sophomore “Getting my nails done twice a week.”

HECTOR CARDIEL SAM Senior “Food!”

ANDREA MAFFESSANTI Sophomore “Video games.”

KRISTEN VARGAS VILA Sophomore “Shoes- even though I don’t consider it a waste!”

STAFF EDITORIAL

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

Football ended, let the fun begin This weekend will mark a sad event in the lives of all football fanatics. After watching the battling of two great quarterbacks in Super Bowl XLIV Sunday, the season is officially over. Say goodbye to waking up at the crack of dawn to tailgate outside of Sun Life Stadium and driving 30 minutes down I-95 to arrive four hours before kickoff. It’s time to find some other way to make small talk other than, “how ‘bout those Canes?” and we’re all going to have to find a new reason to hate the University of Florida. Though it may not seem like it now, life will go on, and all those football-free weekends are just waiting to be claimed by

more creative activities. Take a cue from the school’s old nickname, “Suntan U,” and hit the beach. If you have some extra spending money, then check out the cafés that line South Beach where the food is great and the people-watching is prime. Looking for something more unusual? Take a three-day weekend and plan a road trip. Believe it or not, the state of Florida has more to offer than just Miami. Head south to Key West, or take the turnpike up to Orlando for some quality theme park time. Or, for the combination surfer/ history buff within, head north to Saint Augustine, the oldest city in Florida with a reputation for great waves.

EDITOR IN CHIEF Chelsea Matiash

Still craving some sports action? The school does have more to offer than football. Basketball and baseball games are played on campus, automatically alleviating the headache that comes with a trek to Sun Life Stadium. Try something new and hit the Rat or Titantic before a game rather than tailgating. And of course, there is the ever popular weekend activity, Club Richter. Use your newfound free time on the weekends to undo some of the damage all that tailgating and those after parties did to your GPA last semester. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial staff.

W

Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. compiled by

too large for the professor to read everyone’s essays. It’s unreasonable for students to be graded by other students, and it is doubly unjust that, in many cases, there are several TAs grading one class’ materials. In one class this semester, four different TAs are grading papers and in-class essays. Some students receive letter grades while others get number grades. Inconsistent grading leads to bewilderment and frustration. For many students, grades are important. The letters lining our transcripts and the numbers that makes up our GPA encapsulates our university experience. TAs should not have the ability to influence these letters and numbers; especially since many internship programs, graduate schools and potential employers ask students to explain their records. Students at UM need to know that they will be evaluated by the instructor they sign up for during registration, not the kid standing behind them in line at the registrar’s office. Pat Cunnane is a senior majoring in political science and journalism. He may be contacted at pcunnane@ themiamihurricane.com.

Kyli Singh

Yes

No

Maybe

35%

62%

3%

Total Voters: 34

WHAT’S THE BEST CHAMPIONSHIP SPORTING EVENT? TAKE OUR POLL AT THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM.

February 4 - February 7, 2010

WEBMASTER Brian Schlansky

ART DIRECTOR Allison Goodman NEWS EDITOR Ramon Galiana

COPY CHIEF Laura Edwins COPY EDITORS Alexa Lopez Kyli Singh ADVERTISING EDITOR Emma Cason-Pratt

PHOTO EDITOR Brittney Bomnin SPORTS EDITOR Justin Antweil

PUBLIC RELATIONS Jacob Crows

EDGE EDITOR Danielle Kaslow

ADMINISTRATOR ASSISTANT Maria Jamed

OPINION EDITOR Ed S. Fishman ONLINE EDITOR Megan Terilli ASST. NEWS EDITORS Lila Albizu Nina Ruggiero

ACCOUNT REPS Shoshana Gottesman Misha Mayeur Katie Norwood Brian Schuman Jack Whaley GRADUATE ASSISTANT Nick Maslow

ASST. SPORTS EDITOR Calvin Cestari

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

DESIGNERS Felipe Lobon Demi Rafuls Kiersten Schimdt

POLL RESULTS: Should there be a university-wide standardized attendance policy? Check out video Speak Up online at themiamihurricane.com.

MANAGING EDITOR Christina De Nicola

ASST. PHOTO EDITOR Steven Stuts

Restrict the reach of TAs e’re not always happy with our grades so sometimes we like to discuss these substandard scores with the source. Unfortunately, at the University of Miami, this often means chatting with the guy you just played in beer pong. PAT CUNNANE CONTRIBUTING Teaching Assistants (TAs) COLUMNIST can be very helpful in assisting with review groups and lessening professors’ workloads. TAs should not, however, assess anything subjective; papers and Blue Book examinations should be off-limits and graded solely by the professor. Students have the right for their papers to be evaluated by the instructor hired by the university. A professor’s duty is to teach, not only to lecture. Students can learn a lot from the feedback they receive on their essays, and it should come from a qualified professor, not the girl down the hall. It’s understandable that some classes are simply

BUSINESS MANAGER Jessica Jurick

©2010 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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Super Bowl not your thing? Check out the Rock n’ Ride Car Show and concert Saturday, from 12 p.m. - 8 p.m., admission is $10 for students with Cane Card at the BUC.

edge

Take it to the next level this Super Bowl weekend BY NANCY OBEN CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Miami is notorious for throwing celebrity-packed parties, and the events planned for South Florida’s 10th Super Bowl are no exception. Starting tonight, the Pepsi Fan Jam concert series is going to kick into high gear with Justin Beiber and Rihanna performing on South Beach for free. The concert stage is on the sand by Eighth Street and gates open at 6:30 p.m. with the performances starting at 9 p.m. Even though the concert is free, tickets must be obtained through Ticketmaster. The concert will be broadcasted live on VH1. If you can drag yourself out of bed on Friday, there are more free events before the big game. For those who want

to make a difference, Habitat for Humanity is having a Helmet for Homes Build Day. Work alongside NFL players in Fort Lauderdale at the inaugural “green build” site, located at 2224 NW 26 Street. The event starts at 8 a.m. and registration is online at www.habitatbroward.org. After volunteering, the music continues in Miami with the Pepsi Musica Fan Jam concert, featuring Nelly Furtado, Paulina Rubio and Pitbull. The concert will be held at the same stage as the aforement ioned

Pepsi Fan Jam concert, and gates open at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for this free event are also available through Ticketmaster. Kick off your weekend with a starfilled Saturday at the DIRECTV Celebrity Beach Bowl. Over 30 celebrities, including Taylor Lautner, Chace Crawford and Victoria’s Secret supermodel Marissa Miller, will be battling it out in a beach football game coached by Eli Manning and Mark Sanchez. Immediately following, there will be a post-game concert by the All American Rejects. This event is

free and no tickets are required, so get there early. Gates open at 12:30 p.m. on Collins Avenue between 21st and 22nd Street in South Beach. For the day of the big game, start in Brickell by going to the Finnegan’s on the River tailgate, hosted by MTV's “Jersey Shore” personality, Snooki. The tailgate starts at 12 p.m. with live music and specials. The Grove will also be hosting watch parties, including UM favorites, Mr. Moe's, Sandbar Bar and Grill. After the final touchdown, end your night at the Seminole Hard Rock Casino at an after party hosted by Ludacris. With all these exciting events, Super Bowl weekend will be a highlight of spring semester; go out with a bang regardless of your football loyalties. Nancy Oben may be contacted at noben@themiamihurricane. com.

Logo courtesy NFL Graphic by Allison Goodman

February 4 - February 7, 2010

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SPORTS

18

number of turnovers for the UM basketball team Tuesday night against Wake Forest

28

number of members in the 2010 football recruiting class

FOOTBALL

Class of 2010 adds depth and fills gaps Signing day gives Miami a fresh start BY JUSTIN ANTWEIL SPORTS EDITOR

On Wednesday, 22 players signed national letters of intent to play football for the University of Miami in the fall of 2010. UM signed an additional six players in the early signing period and they enrolled this semester to get accustomed to the playbook and participate in spring practice. “We feel like we got one of the great classes that can get us to that next step in college football,” fourth year head coach Randy Shannon said. “A lot of these young men can come in and establish this program for a long period of time.” Unfortunately for the Hurricanes, highly touted offensive lineman Seantrel

Henderson was not one of the 28 newcomers. Rivals.com tabbed Henderson the No. 2 player overall regardless of position. Henderson visited Miami this past weekend and the Canes made a great late push but it was not enough to sway the Minnesota native past head coach Lane Kiffin and the USC Trojans. The Canes also lost out on Miramar High School All-American wide receiver Ivan McCartney who announced he would play college football at West Virginia. Miami was a finalist, but the thought of playing with his former high school quarterback swayed him to become a Mountaineer. Despite the fact that Miami didn’t get a lot of highly regarded names and fivestar players, the coaching staff is still satisfied with the depth and talent. “We won’t be ranked high because we don’t have the athletes in the class,” Shan-

MIAMI’S EARLY ENROLLEES NAME

POSITION

HOME TOWN

Malcolm Bunche Stephen Morris Tyrone Cornelius Allen Hurns Storm Johnson Shane McDermott

Offensive Line Quarterback Linebacker Wide Receiver Running Back Offensive Line

Newark, Del. Miami, Fla. Stone Mountain, Ga. Miami, Fla. Loganville, Ga. Lake Worth, Fla.

non said. “We had to fill our needs on this football team. You always have to find what your needs are and when you address those needs you become a better football team.” Since former recruiting coordinator Clint Hurtt took a job with the University

of Louisville, Shannon said wide receivers coach Aubrey Hill has taken over duties as recruiting coordinator. The Hurricanes needed to address three key issues: offensive line, linebackers and tight ends. The Canes recruited six offensive lineman, five linebackers and four tight ends. The best lineman is Brandon Linder, who was a U.S. Army All-American. The Hurricanes needed depth in the linebacking position after losing co-MVP Darryl Sharpton to graduation, and sophomore Arthur Brown has taken a leave of absence from UM and won’t participate in spring practice. He returned to Kansas to be back with his family. Junior college transfer Chase Ford is the most polished tight end but the Hurricanes snagged Asante Cleveland, a 6-feet-5-inches, 240-pounder from Sacramento, Calif. Shannon loves the idea that players can enroll early and arrive on campus in January instead of August. “You get caught up to the football part with adjusting to the speed, contact and physical and mental phase of it,” he said. “You get used to the school part too.” The key for Shannon during the entire process was looking for versatile, competitive athletes. “You’ve got to find guys that like to win,” he said. “Guys who like to play football. You can tell a lot on film. If we get big fast guys on this football team, then we’ll be a great football team.” Justin Antweil may be contacted at jantweil@themiamihurricane.com.

February 4 - February 7, 2010

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WOMEN’S TENNIS

Smashing the record Senior becomes alltime wins leader BY PEDRO ORTIZ-MEOZ CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

On a quiet, cloudy Sunday afternoon at the Neil Schiff Tennis Center, history was made. You wouldn’t have been able to tell by the reactions, however. As a matter of fact, even the athlete that fought her way into the University of Miami record books wasn’t aware of what she had just accomplished. With a 6-1, 6-2 singles victory over Mississippi State’s Olesya Tsigvintseva this past weekend, UM senior Laura Vallverdu became Miami’s all-time leader in singles wins for women’s tennis. She celebrated the win like any other, with a small fist pump and a handshake with her rival before heading to the other courts to cheer on her teammates. “I had heard I was getting close but I didn’t know how close or even how many matches the record was,” Vallverdu said. Vallverdu, a three-time All-American with a No. 7 singles national ranking, won her 111th career singles match to sury Bañada ((2003-2007)) pass alumna Audrey me UM U women’s wom omen e ’s tennis for the most all-tim all-time petitio on vi vict ctor ct orie or iees.. singles competition victories. dy dese de serv se rvvess “Nobody deserves he p us ut it more. S She puts rk and d in the work he attishe’s got the h-year tude,” ninth-year head coach Paige -Te w s Ya r o s h u k -T rob-said. “She’ss p probhe mo m st ably one of th the most lay ayer erss yo ou explosive players you gee tten enni n s an ni nd see in college tennis and ecep ec e ti ep tive ve tto o co coac achhshe’s very receptive coachh ng hi ngss se sett he herr ap apar art. t.”” ing. Those things apart.” du, u a V Val alen al enci c a, ci a V enez en ezuuVallverdu, Valencia, Venezucred ed ditted Yaroshuk-Tews Yar aros osshu ukk-Te T ws Te w ela native, cr credited ord-breakin ingg win. wi n. after her record-breaking beginnin i g sh he re ally ll b be“From the beginning she really lieved in me and saw what my weaknesses were and helped me improve them,” shee said. “Also, I really love the University off Miami and I wanted to give them back forr iven me.” all they’ve given

Bañada was in attendance on Saturday’s matches and reminded her former teammate Vallverdu that she was approaching her record. On Sunday, Yaroshuk-Tews praised Bañada for her impact on the program. “Audrey is the reason why we’re a top 10 team in the country right now,” said Yaroshuk-Tews. “She was a player that came through here and set high standards for everyone and really helped establish Miami tennis.” Vallverdu, an NCAA Singles Finalist in 2009, has now raised the bar and is guiding the No. 7-ranked Miami women’s tennis team. “Laura is an incredible leader to have on this team,” said Yaroshuk-Tews. “If she plays the type of tennis she knows how to play, she could be playing for the national title again.” Vallverdu is not concerned about alltime records and rewriting history, she has other things on her mind. “I’m looking forward to getting into shape during the whole season to peak at the right time, and go for the national title,” Vallverdu said. “But my first focus right now is the team.” Pedro Ortiz-Meoz may be contacted at portizmeoz@themiamih ihur urri rica cane ne.c .ccom m. portizmeoz@themiamihurricane.com.

LINDSAY BROWN // The Miami Hurricane

A REAL ACE: Senior Laura Vallverdu broke the all-time singles wins record in University of Miami women’s tennis history on Sunday with a total of 111 wins.

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SPORTS BRIEFS FOOTBALL Miami acquired Kentucky Defensive Line Coach Rick Petri, who will begin his second stint with the Canes. Petri has 29 years of coaching experience.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Hurricanes host No. 9 North Carolina at 7 p.m. Thursday at the BankUnited Center. Miami enters the game on a three-game losing streak.

SOCCER Four student-athletes signed National Letters of Intent for seventh-year head coach Tricia Taliaferro. The 2010 recruiting class will replace six graduating seniors. Information from hurricanesports.com Calvin Cestari may be contacted at ccestari@themiamihurricane.com.


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Dear V: I want my swagger back... Dear Snookin’, , Dear V, I am a super senior here at our great school and I have basically outlasted all of my friends. During freshman year, my friends gave me the nickname “The Beast” and I was pretty much the man. I was athletic, playing ultimate frisbee all throughout my high school years and I could basically hook up with any girl I wanted. As the years have progressed I have basically lost a little bit of my swagger. Most of the girls I hang out with think of me as a chubby big brother. I have been reduced to Little Caesar’s pizza and Asian diaper porn for kicks. What can help me snap out of this super-senior rut? Sincerely, Alone-and-snookin’-for-love

Sounds like you’ve been a bit down lately; we’ve got to find something to get you out of this rut. If you were The Beast once, you can do it again, right? Just because your friends are gone and and a few years have passed, doesn’t mean you can’t get your swagger back. It seems like all you need are a few life changes to get you going. Swagger has a lot to do with how you feel about yourself and the attitude you give off to other people (especially the ladies). If you can find a way to feel like the man again, other people will see it too. Try going to the gym more and maybe getting some new clothes or a new haircut. A new look and feel will help change things up and help reintroduce you to your friends as a force to be reckoned with. As for the Little Caeser’s and diaper porn, maybe you should try getting out of the house more to shake things up.

Going out and being social can help you feel better about yourself too; if you look like you’re having fun, girls will want to have fun with you. Try going out with guys and less of your female friends; this will hopefully make you feel like one of the guys again and girls will recognize you as a stud with an entourage. If you can convince yourself that you’re the man, the ladies will soon follow (just be sure to ditch the dirty mags before you get back to your place). Hope the Beast comes out of hibernation soon, V Have a question for V? Hit up DearV@themiamihurricane. com.

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