Issuu on Google+

MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

1

The Miami

Vol. 91, Issue 30 | Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

com

HURRICANE

.

STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI IN CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA, SINCE 1929

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Sickness greets spring semester Flu season affects breaking number BY STEPHANIE PARRA NEWS EDITOR

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAYLA NIMMO // PHOTO EDITOR

Debunking the energy drink myth Safety concerns bubble over portable potency potions BY ERNESTO SUAREZ SPORTS EDITOR

As the semester progresses and assignments pile up, students line up at their local convenience store, on the hunt for a jolt to get them through the day without feeling drained. Running on an hour of sleep and exhaustion seeping in, students may think that downing an energy drink is not a bad idea. With the widespread availability of these portable potions and their popularity increasing with time, it is easier than ever to find a quick buzz. Energy drinks are beverages that are marketed as “stamina boosters,” created to improve a person’s focus and ability to stay awake. Generally, this artificial energy is provided through extraordinary amounts of caffeine,

guarana or other stimulants. Many students are first introduced to these drinks during high school or college – when they are looking for a way to stay awake long enough to fit in a few extra hours of studying or to participate in an event they normally would not have the energy to attend. According to the Beverage Industry’s 2012 State of the Industry Report, energy drinks such as Red Bull or Monster accounted for $6.9 billion of the total sales of beverages last year. “I would drink them consistently freshman year, even twice a day during finals,” said Adriana Morell-Pacheco, a junior majoring in neuroscience. “I’d drink Monster a lot when I was stressed because it tastes good, but I also drink lots of coffee.” But surrounding all the hype of these products is an underlying question: Just how safe are these energy drinks? SEE ENERGY, PAGE 4

Freshman Melissa Bassett missed the first week of class this semester. She caught the flu the day before school began. “I started not feeling well at bid day, and when I woke up Monday, I felt even worse,” said Bassett, who is a neuroscience major on the premed track. She went to the Baptist Health Urgent Care Center near campus. Her condition worsened, and she developed pneumonia and pharyngitis, or an inflammation of the throat, at the same time. Eventually, she had to stay at a hospital overnight. French professor Subha Xavier also had the flu during the beginning of the semester. Though she only teaches Tuesday and Thursday classes, she had to cancel class the first Tuesday of the semester. “I was really conflicted about canceling the first day of class, especially since I am teaching Tuesday/Thursday sections, which are longer classes,” she said. “The university’s health alert about taking the flu seriously gave me pause, however, since I must admit it was a really nasty flu and spread like wildfire among the members of my family.” Although hesitant at first, Xavier eventually decided to cancel her class. “In hindsight I am glad I cancelled my classes and prevented more of an epidemic than necessary ... and I was grateful for the much needed rest too,” she said. SEE INFLUENZA, PAGE 2

ROMANCE ON A BUDGET CREATIVE ON-CAMPUS DATE IDEAS THAT WON’T BREAK THE BANK PAGE 7

CATCHING THE REBOUND COACH LARRANAGA REVAMPS BASKETBALL PROGRAM PAGE 9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

2

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Onset of flu virus takes toll on country INFLUENZA FROM PAGE 1

Bassett and Xavier are among the many people in the United States who have been affected by influenza. According to figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), during the week of Jan. 13 to 19, out of the 11,984 samples tested, 3,129 were positive for influenza. Statistics for the weeks of Jan. 20 to 26 and Jan. 27 to Feb. 2 have not yet been released. Experts and federal health officials have declared that this will be a fairly severe flu season – death rates from flu and pneumonia have increased from those reported in past years. An article reported by The New York Times on Saturday, however, indicated that “new infections with influenza continued to fall, suggesting that the season has peaked almost everywhere in the country except in the far West.” A weekly influenza surveillance report prepared by the influenza division of the CDC indicates Florida’s status on influenzalike illnesses reported. Compared to other states, Florida’s status seems relatively low. The map marks Florida yellow, to indicate the low numbers of those affected in the state. Other states, like Texas, New York, Arizona, Louisiana and Kentucky, are marked red, to indicate the high level of influenza activity reported in those states. According to an article reported by USA Today, there are three types of flu circulating in the country: H3N2, H1N1 and Influenza B. H3N2 is by far the most common and most likely to put people in the hospital with complications. All three are included in this year’s flu vaccine. The last time H3N2 was in high circulation was during the 2002-2003 flu season, according to the same article reported by USA Today. During that season, about 95 percent of the flu

was made up of H3N2. In 2007-2008, it was 75 percent, the CDC officials reported. Since then, other strains have been more common, so resistance to the strain has lessened. The virus has also mutated. Influenza vaccine manufacturers reported a total of 145 million doses of vaccines available for the 2012-2013 flu season, according to statistics released by the CDC. During all of last year’s season, 132.8 million doses of flu vaccine were distributed in the United States. As of Jan. 18, however, more than 133 million doses have already been distributed. “While national reports show an increased number of cases this flu season, rates at UM so far are typical of prior busy flu seasons,” said Dr. Howard Anapol, who currently serves as medical director for the Student Health Center and has worked at UM for 18 years. The Student Health Center immunized nearly 1,200 students during the fall semester. Since school resumed for the spring semester, approximately 900 additional flu shots were given at the Rock, the School of Law and the Student Health Center. In addition, extra hand sanitizers have been placed in high traffic areas, including places like the Wellness Center and the residential halls. At one point this spring, the Health Center’s vaccine supply was low. “… there was one day where our supply was low, and we gave preference to students with an appointment,” he said. “Additional flu shots arrived the next day, allowing us to continue to vaccinate both those with and those without an appointment.” Dr. Anapol offered recommendations to those who have not been afflicted by the flu. “Do your best to stay away from those who are obviously ill,” he said. “Practice good hand washing, use alcohol-based hand sanitizer, and if you have not already done so, get a flu shot.”

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane. com.

Influenza on the rise The spring semester kicked off with an unusually high amount of influenza-afflicted faculty and students compared to past years.

Missed out on the beginning of Social Justice Week? Check out Holly Bensur’s photo brief.

Flu season is still in progress

75% Percent of flu made up of H3N2

95%

Ladies, looking to bulk up? Read Michael R. Davis’ coverage of Vitality U. Haven’t listened to A$AP Rocky’s new album yet? Find out what copy chief Nicky Diaz thinks. Have a question for V? Ask at dearv@ themiamihurricane. com.

Percent of flu made up of H3N2 H3N2, H1N1 and Influenza B are the most common types of flu viruses this season. People are less restistant to H3N2 because of its lack of popularity in the past.

DESIGN BY ALI FISHMAN

TWITTER ACCOUNTS

NEWS BRIEFS AWARDS The UM Women’s Commission is hosting its 42nd Annual Awards Breakfast from 8 to 9:30 a.m. on March 21 in the Fieldhouse. It will feature guest speaker Racquel Russell, the deputy assistant to the president for Urban Affairs and Economic Mobility on the White House Domestic Policy Council. Russell is a UM alumna and member of Iron Arrow. Russell has worked on various policy issues including economic

2

NEWS

mobility, nutrition policy, health care and women’s issues. Reservations must be made by March 15. Breakfast is $10 per person. For more information, visit miami.edu/wc.

LEADERSHIP The College MENtality Series allows male students on campus to explore the characteristics of successful male leaders in order to incorporate some of their leadership styles into their own. The event

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

will take place at 7 p.m. Feb. 7 in the Mahoney Master’s Apartment.

STUDY ABROAD The deadline to apply for the Japanese Languages and Culture study abroad program in Southern Japan is March 1, or until the program is full. The cultural and linguistic immersion program will allow students to learn about the major aesthetic, social, historical and political factors that have shaped

Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

contemporary and traditional Japanese culture, society and identity. The program is held on the island of Kyushu, a region that has relatively little exposure to foreigners, and therefore offers a more authentic immersion experience. For information about the program, email the leading professor Eiko Isogai Williams at e.williams2@miami.edu. Lyssa Goldberg may be contacted at lgoldberg@themiamihurricane. com.

@MiamiHurricane @Dear_V @TMH_Photo @TMH_Sports FACEBOOK PAGE facebook.com/ themiamihurricane

ON THE COVER Andrew Wyatt is featured on the cover photo dramatizing the effects of energy drinks


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

3

PHOTO BRIEF

Krav Maga teaches safety STRANGER DANGER: Instructor Rick Prado (right) taught students various self-defense techniques in a Krav Maga class that was held in the Hillel building Tuesday evening. Prado demonstrates how to disarm an armed attacker with volunteer Ken Downs. This class is free and open to the public from 6 to 9 p.m. every Tuesday.

NICHOLAS GANGEMI // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

COMMUNITY

Camp Kesem empowers campers, counselors Kids program offers escape from cancer BY JORDAN SCHUMAN SENIOR NEWS WRITER

Senior Brielle Buckler was 17 years old when her father was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer. “It was so rare that Google turned up no results,” she said. Buckler remembers how Camp Kesem helped her cope with her father’s condition at a time when she didn’t know who to turn to or where to find someone who would understand. “It’s a whole different lifestyle when you have a sick parent,” Buckler said. “They’re supposed to be the strong ones, but when you have to step up at a young age and take care of yourself and possibly your siblings because your parent physically can’t get up because of chemo, you feel so alone and helpless. At Camp Kesem, we don’t talk about cancer. Instead, we play.” Every year, more than 40 universi-

ties will send 50 children to Camp Kesem free of charge. The camp is a coed, secular, weeklong summer camp for children ages 6-16 whose parents have or had cancer. According to senior April Brown, co-fundraising chair for Camp Kesem Miami, the e-board is responsible for raising money to fund “a week of spirit for these children.” “We submit proposals, letters, grants, street collections, special events, and we sell food in the breezeway,” she said. “We pay for transportation, food, housing, games and crafts.” The camp is located at Camp Dorothy Thomas in Riverview just outside of Tampa and will be taking place from Aug. 11 to 17. Kesem counselors organize each day with a theme and prepare activities that distract the kids from their reality, according to Brown. “We color and run around and have swimming races and water balloon fights,” Buckler said. “We have messy Olympics and have campfires. The only worry our campers have is how much time before the next fun activity. They’re

too busy to be sad, and they honestly get to be kids for a week after a year of being a child with a sick parent.” Although the camp serves a specific group of children, counselors do not need to have a direct connection to cancer. Kesem instead looks for counselors that have a variety of talents and skills. “We need lifeguards and sport coordinators, creative thinkers and professional kickball players,” Buckler said. “Camp is all about fun, and counselors have just as much as campers do. I love Camp Kesem. It’s my favorite week of the whole year, and I will continue even after graduation.” Brown’s passion for Kesem is what keeps her excited and ready to return each summer, including after college. She has seen the impact her work has first hand. “With Camp Kesem you immediately see the change you are making in the lives of these kids,” she said. “They grow to love you and their Camp Kesem family and, when you experience that, you try everything you can to make sure that camp happens next year.” Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

Donations Want to help Camp Kesem Miami? Check out the information below.

What your money does

Twenty-five dollars fund an entire arts and crafts activity. One hundred dollars fund a “Messy Day,” or paint fun day. Two-hundred-fifty dollars fund one meal for 40 campers. Five hundred dollars fund one child’s week at Camp Kesem Miami. There is no deadline for donations. Checks are accepted. They can be made out to Camp Kesem Miami, and submitted at the UC 240.

Volunteering

Counselor applications are due Friday and are available on the Camp Kesem Miami Facebook page. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

3


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

4

ACADEMICS

Offices, student resource centers find new homes Renovations catalyze office relocations BY STEPHANIE PARRA NEWS EDITOR

The Writing Center migrated from its former location near the Pavia Garage at the start of this semester in order to make room for a new Toppel Career Center, set to open during spring 2014. In the meantime, the former location of the Writing Center is undergoing major renovations, thanks to a $3 million donation from Patricia Toppel and the Parents Council. The new center will be twice the size of the current one – from 6,000 square feet, as it is presently – to nearly 12,204 square feet. The expanded center will be comprised of two main buildings, which will be referred to as the East and West Wings. A grand lobby and an outdoor

Career Pavilion will adjoin the two buildings. The East Wing will serve as the technology and recruiting area of the center. It will also house on-campus interviews and serve as a training ground for students preparing to enter the workforce or start their own businesses. The West Wing will house the staff and will advise students who come visit the center. Toppel’s planning and operations will take place on the first floor. The second floor will include a Multipurpose Room, which will overlook the Career Pavilion. The original Toppel Career Center, located at the UC, opened its doors in 1995, due to Toppel and her late husband Harold Toppel’s financial support. Before it was Toppel, the site served as the campus’ bowling alley. Eventually the site will house the Office of Admissions. According to Christian Garcia, the executive director of the Toppel Career Center, the initial plan to move to a new location was set into motion after a decision to move the Office

of Admissions was put into action. “The original plan was to move admissions here, then they had to decide where to put us,” Garcia said. “The new center will allow for our growing staff. It’ll have interview suites and a multipurpose room. It will be very versatile.” Though the renovated Toppel Career Center will open to the public next spring, the Office of Admissions has not received a move date just yet. “Although it will be difficult to leave our longtime home in the Ashe Building, the admission staff is looking forward to being in the University Center,” Dean of Enrollment Management Edward M. Gillis said. “This will be a much more convenient location for prospective students and their parents.” The Writing Center, located where the renovated Toppel Career Center is set to open, is now housed at 170 LaGorce House, on Dickinson Drive, near the Wellness Center and School of Architecture.

According to the Writing Center Director April Mann, the Writing Center’s new location is temporary. “The new location is smaller, but it works fine,” she said. “We are further away now, but near the freshmen dorms.” Additionally, the Writing Center still has the ability to tutor the same amount of students. The English Composition Center is housed next to the new Writing Center, too. “We have much as tutoring space as before,” Mann said. “Even though it’s a smaller location, it does not feel too cramped.” Mann hopes to work closely with Richter Library to eventually create a communication center, which would help develop both writing and technology skills. “If we could work together, they could help students with the technological aspects and we could help students with the writing, communicating and editing,” Mann said. “Right now it’s just an idea.”

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Marketing tactics mislead drink users ENERGY FROM PAGE 1

According to a study published in the Consumer Report, an average healthy adult can safely consume up to 400 milligrams of caffeine in a day. On average, a regular cup of coffee has about 100 milligrams of caffeine, though this can differ depending on how the drink is brewed. Meanwhile, one Monster Energy Drink may contain about 276 milligrams per 24-ounce can. On the other hand, a single serving of 5-Hour Energy, advertised as a 2-ounce shot that has fewer calories than competitors, can contain as much as 215 milligrams. Some may prefer the smaller, shot-style drinks because of their “healthier” marketing tactics that tout the lower calorie- and sugar-intake, but the caffeine levels are consistent across the board. Ashley Falcon, the assistant director of Wellness Education at the Wellness Center, said there is not much of a difference between drinks like 5-Hour Energy and their larger counterparts. “It’s just more concentrated and in less volume. It’s like getting drunk off liquor versus beer,” she said. “It’s the same stuff, whether it’s guarana or all the other different forms of caffeine. You can call it natural and all of a sudden it sounds better, but a stimulant is a stimulant.” In controlled doses, caffeine can have beneficial effects on a person, including increased awareness and improved memory. But when abused, these drinks have other consequences, like anxiety, twitching and elevated heart rates, according to Falcon. Some of these drinks also do not list how much caffeine is actually in their product, so experts suggest that 4

NEWS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

users inform themselves about what ingredients are being used before drinking them. Tony Musto, associate director of Fitness Programs at the Wellness Center, said that with energy drinks, like anything else, people have to be careful with what they are consuming and should only do so in moderation. “The reality is energy drinks aren’t much more than caffeine, some proteins such as taurine, and some Vitamin B. All those things in moderation and small doses are OK,” Musto said. “However, with energy drinks, they tend to be more tempting to consume more than you need. That’s when you get into a danger zone.” Though some may look to energy drinks to find a jolt, other students are not convinced that they actually make a difference. Meghan Doyle, a junior majoring in health science, does not believe the hype associated with energy drinks. “I don’t think they help all that much. I never feel jittery or super energized,” she said. “It’s all mental. You think you have more energy so you feel more energized.” Musto believes that the key to using these drinks safely lies in exercising responsibility. He suggests getting enough sleep, eating well, and exercising before looking to energy drinks. “If you live a fairly healthy lifestyle, you should have the energy you need,” Musto said. But for those who do decide to consume an energy drink, Musto said to be careful. “Just because they sell it in the store doesn’t necessarily make it safe,” he said. “Follow the package serving, don’t chug it, and treat it as if it is some kind of drug you’re using.”

Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

The energy effect Despite the health risks associated with energy drinks, the beverage accounted for numerous deaths and illnesses. Recently, these drinks have been the target of national attention, after several illnesses and deaths have been linked to their consumption. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released reports on casualties on three major energy drinks.  %HFDXVHPRVWHQHUJ\GULQNVDUHFODVVL²HGDV food supplements as opposed to actual soft drinks, the FDA does not have any regulation over how much caffeine these products are allowed to have.

Last year, energy drinks accounted for

MONSTER

40 5 13 2 ILLNESS

DEATHS

ROCKSTAR

ILLNESS

LASTING DISABILITIES

5-HOUR ENERGY

$6.9

92 13 ILLNESS

DEATHS

billion of total beverage sales

DESIGN BY CARLOS MELLA


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

5

OPINION speak

UP!

How do you get energized for the day?

NEIL MEHTA FRESHMAN “I wash my face, eat a good breakfast, and get ready for class.”

PATRICK KELLY SOPHOMORE “I usually put on music because I kicked energy drinks.”

The Miami

Though there are worst things in life than energy drinks, it is better to be educated now than sorry later.

HURRICANE

Founded 1929

The Miami Hurricane

NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404

STAFF EDITORIAL

For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404. EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Demi Rafuls

Reduce, rethink, recharge It comes as no surprise that many college students consume energy drinks. A Red Bull advertisement says it best: “Nobody ever wishes they’d slept more during college.” But the human body needs three things to survive: food, water and sleep. Yes, sleep is essential. Even if it is less than eight hours. Energy drinks will never replace sleep. Most importantly, energy drinks will never be healthy. Finals week might be an exception. However, avoiding procrastination on research papers or studying can help too. Procrastination is one of the main reasons students initially splurge on these drinks. Caffeine is the main ingredient in energy drinks because it is a stimulant, which hypes you up and makes you feel alert. Of course, this is why so many people are addicted to their cup of

coffee in the morning. We’ve all heard the infamous line, “I can’t function without my coffee.” Hopefully, energy drinks will never amount to that. According to a report published by Fox News, energy drinks have as much sugar and about three times as much caffeine as a caffeinated soda. Caffeine is a drug. It is an addictive substance. Your body can become tolerant to it over time, which means you’ll need more to feel the same effects. Before you realize it, you’ll have withdrawal symptoms and cravings for it. So the next time Chegg.com sends you a can of Red Bull with your rental books, fight the temptation to open it. Throw it away instead. Before you decide to energize yourself with an overdose of caffeine, educate yourself about these drinks. The Internet will inform you that energy drinks have

“I start with brushing my teeth, very minty so it always wakes me up. Then I drink a glass of cold water and eat citrus fruit and/or pineapple.”

DAVID YOUNG FRESHMAN “I listen to music and take a shower.” Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy. Check out video Speak Ups at themiamihurricane.com. compiled by

Daniel Cepero

bet even Vince Lombardi would be amazed. Amazed at the speed and agility of today’s offenses. Amazed at the brunt force trauma inflicted by today’s defenses. Amazed at how today’s Super Bowl has transformed into a multimillion dollar game of not just athletic, but cultural significance. RAYMOND LA SENIOR Initially known as the “First COLUMNIST AFL-NFL World Championship Game,” it was between two different football leagues. The American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL) completed their merge in 1970 and is now known simply as the NFL. The championship game of the first Super Bowl was such an afterthought that the two broadcast networks that televised the game, NBC and CBS, did not retain copies of the videotape. Now, the Super Bowl is easily one of the mostwatched television programs. It makes up the majority of the top 10 most watched television programs of all time. How did the Super Bowl become what it is today?

I

been connected to fatalities. And the nutrition facts label on the back of your preferred drink will inform you that your energy shot causes harm to your body. College is stressful, especially when trying to juggle a full load of courses with a social life on the side. We understand that getting your hands on an energy drink is easy and legal. However, your health is a priority. And we can assure you that an energy drink will not benefit your wellbeing. At the end of the day, choices are ours to make. Though there are worst things in life than energy drinks, it is better to be educated now than sorry later. And remember: The rush comes first, but the crash comes later. Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

No one knows for sure. We sure can trace the origins of some notable aspects of this pop culture behemoth. A 30-second Super Bowl ad spot this year costs a record $4 million. Thirty seconds of the sultry GoDaddy. com, humorous Budweiser and uplifting Chrysler advertisements will cost more than most of us will ever make in our lives, let alone in a minute and a half. The first famous ad can be traced to that of Noxzema in 1973, a skin cleanser that featured Joe Namath and Farrah Fawcett. This may have set the bar for those scintillating ads we now see today. Super Bowls used to invite college marching bands to perform. When did the likes of Madonna, the Rolling Stones and U2 go to perform? The trend began with Michael Jackson in 1993 in an attempt to increase viewership for the Super Bowl. As bags of chips and guacamole are consumed, entertaining commercials are watched, and the halftime show performers are rocked out to, just remember that there is an actual football going on, and you can watch it too. Raymond La is a sophomore majoring in microbiology. Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

BUSINESS MANAGER Tara Kleppinger

ART DIRECTOR Mariah Price

Corporate America alters pastime CARLOS BARRIENTOS SENIOR

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper

ACCOUNT REP Halima Dodo Kristyna Fong Carlos Parra

PHOTO EDITOR Cayla Nimmo ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Monica Herndon

ADVERTISING EDITOR Demi Rafuls

NEWS EDITOR Stephanie Parra

MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Daniel Cepero

OPINION EDITOR Elizabeth De Armas

ONLINE EDITOR Alysha Khan DESIGNERS Ali Fishman Carlos Mella Amilynn Soto

EDGE EDITOR Margaux Herrera SPORTS EDITOR Ernesto Suarez

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Rob Finn

ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Spencer Dandes

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Isabel Vichot

ASSISTANT EDITORS Lyssa Goldberg Alexander Gonzalez

FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz

COPY CHIEF Nicky Diaz

FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord

COPY EDITORS Jordan Coyne Erika Glass Ashley Martinez To reach a member of the staff visit themiamihurricane.com’s contact page. ©2013 University of Miami

The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221. LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

OPINION

5


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

6

Giving a cold shoulder to a hot, new trend fter an eighthour workout at the gym, in which I mostly drank Gatorade and used cheesy pickup lines on girls running on the treadmill, I should KYLE RAMBO CONTRIBUTING end my manly day COLUMNIST by engulfing some hearty, cholesterolfilled steak. But instead, I follow the South Florida hipster trends. This annoying desire to fit in led me to a frozen yogurt shop, where you will usually run into every personality ranging from gangster rappers to your grandma. For some reason all of Miami has fallen for the sugar-free, lightly colored mushiness that you have the option to smother with Oreo cookies, gummy bears or fake strawberries for the low price of $16 an ounce.

A

As I sprinkle Fruity Pebbles on my nonfat, red velvet cupcake yogurt, there is a small part of me that doesn’t find the appeal of this snack that was once only consumed by third grade Girl Scouts after school. I can’t deny that frozen yogurt is tasty. That’s not the issue. The complaint is about walking into a restaurant painted like a Chuck E. Cheese’s mixed with a “Powerpuff Girls’” episode (I’m not proud to say that I watched it). Even worse is waiting in line behind people who are so excited to mix yogurts that they have to Instagram it. Ordering coffee at Starbucks is complicated enough, but now I have to memorize yogurt combinations too. With 60 different yogurt flavors and 500 toppings to choose from, I just can’t find the space in the tiny paper bowl they give me to fit it all. As college students, do we really need to stoop that low and hang out at yogurt shops? Let’s be honest here, we all crave sugary ice cream with peanut butter cups

and chocolate syrup running down our faces as opposed to basically eating watered down fat-free whipped cream. So unless you’re dating a high school senior, there is no reason to choose Menchie’s over a decent restaurant. As tacky as T.G.I. Friday's is, it's still better than a Friday night with froyo where you will most likely be surrounded by an entire girls’ pee wee soccer team. Instead of scooping yogurt from my pink spoon with a winky cartoon face on it in front of all the hipsters that are too lazy to find a food truck, I will go home and pull a Go-Gurt out of my freezer and into my mouth. There I can enjoy a simple yogurt with no complicated toppings, and no people to judge my fruity cravings. That may have sounded a little strange, but at least I’m not at a public yogurt gathering. Kyle Rambo is a junior majoring in math.

CARTOONS BY BELDY

CARTOON BY DANIEL BELDY

6

OPINION

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

Depiction of violence should be re-evaluated ast weekend, the Cosford Cinema showed “Looper.” I thoroughly enjoyed the sci-fi movie, and it raised many questions in my mind, specifically about violence and guns. I’m not going to give PAUL LEVY CONTRIBUTING statistics, since propoCOLUMNIST nents of both sides can find studies to back up their opinions. I am not proposing that violence and guns should be banned from movies either, since film is an art form. Art ref lects the culture in which it is developed, and it seems violence and guns are part of our culture. I only wish to encourage readers to think strongly about their own opinions. “Looper” involves a great deal of shooting, with futuristic shotguns, handguns and machine guns. From the very first scene, the viewer sees countless deaths at the hands of gunmen. In one scene, Bruce Willis confronts a young child whom he believes will grow up to become Rainmaker, a powerful mob boss. While the scene doesn’t show the shooting, the audience hears the gun fire before the next scene begins quickly. In another scene, Willis uses two machine guns to annihilate a small army of thugs. This explicit display of shooting contrasts greatly with the director’s choice to skip a sex scene, choosing instead to imply its happening. In this movie, the sex scene would’ve served little purpose, but it reminded me that sex seems to be more taboo, and kept more hidden from the eyes of children, than violence. Perhaps I’ve been forced to re-evaluate my own sensitivity toward violence, especially with the string of recent gun tragedies. However, I could not help but cringe and turn away in shock during scenes with excess brutality. Inevitably, a movie about assassins will involve shooting, but I left Cosford questioning the way in which this violence is displayed. Certainly, to completely ignore that such acts exist is to give into censorship. At the same time, ubiquitous displays of violence in which the offender is not held accountable for their actions, nor forced to see its consequences, serves to desensitize the viewer. Though I don’t know how, I do know that the depiction of violence in news and media needs to be re-evaluated. This ugly aspect of our culture is merely hindering the prosperity and development of our society.

L

Paul Levy is a sophomore majoring in physics.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

7

FROST

PHYSICS

BUILDING

MUSIC SCHOOL DINNER AND MOVIE

COSFORD ARBORETUM CINEMA PICNIC SPORTS GAME SCREEN ON THE GREEN LOWE ART MUSEUM

STAR GAZING RING THEATRE ART EXHIBIT CONCERT STUDY

DESIGN BY AMILYNN SOTO

BY ENRICO DOMINGUEZ CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

Dating is nearly always romanticized in movies and books, but in reality it can be stressful and, quite frankly, expensive. But whether you’re dirt broke or one of the wealthiest students on campus, your wallet will always thank you for a free date. Most guys (and let’s face it, some girls too) might be thinking the best free date would be an athletic event, but in reality you might end up focusing more on the game and less on your date. There’s really no excuse for missing out on a good conversation, so take the time to get creative and get to know your date. There are plenty of other options that your significant other might find at least a little bit more romantic.

For cinema lovers, there is always a good selection of movies at the Cosford Cinema. Coming up this semester are “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” “Wreck-It Ralph” and “Life of Pi.” For those who are more romantic, the Cosford is constantly screening new indie and foreign films, all free for students. Hurricane Productions has plenty of other events that are free of charge, like “Screen on the Green” and its upcoming drive-in movie screening of “Hercules” on the roof of Pavia Garage on Feb. 7. If you’re more of a performing arts junkie, the Frost School of Music and Ring Theatre provide plenty of options. Check out the Ring Theatre’s upcoming production of “King Lear,” which opens Feb. 20, or the Annual Concerto Competition by the Frost Symphony Or-

chestra on Feb. 9. For the art buffs, take advantage of the Lowe Art Museum. If your partner is the one who loves art, let them teach you a thing or two. You can both check out the Lowe’s “Stephen Knapp: New Light” exhibit. Knapp uses light to create colorful displays. But if you really want to show your creative side, make your own campus experience specifically for the two of you. This is one of the most beautiful campuses in the country. Most people wouldn’t take the time out to plan a tour of the campus, so show your partner your favorite spots and end with a private picnic in the pit next to the physics building. If you want to keep it outdoors, check out the John C. Gifford Arboretum behind Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

the physics building, but with a twist. Look online for interesting plants or flowers and set up a blanket next to them. Then return at night with a flashlight and explore the newfound plants. After your exploration, take the opportunity to get to know each other better. Lounge on your blanket and gaze at the stars together. If you take money out of the scenario, the creative juices start flowing, and you can really start to come up with dates that make both of you happy. These ideas are simple and creative, but more importantly for broke, hopeless and romantic college students, they are completely free. So try it out, let’s see if we can throw out the expensive dinners and date ideas, but still have a good time. THE MIAMI HURRICANE

EDGE

7


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25� X 14�

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

8

COME MEET ALUMNI AT OUR INFORMATION SEMINAR LILIAN SARFATI, MD ’12

Family Medicine Resident

  ÄŒĹś ÄŒĹś  ÄŒ THE DEFINITION OF A ROSS GRADUATE. Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) provides clinical rotations at teaching hospitals across the US.

Register at RossU.edu or scan the QR code.

Our graduates have attained more US residencies than those of any other medical school in the last ďŹ ve years.

HYATT REGENCY MIAMI

RUSM is eligible to participate in the US Federal Direct Loan Program; ďŹ nancial aid and scholarships are available to those who qualify.

Ä?ĹśŜċÄ?ĹśÄ„Ä‚ÄƒÄ…ĹśÄ“ĹśÄ„Ĺś

Speak with alumni and our admissions staff. Bring your family and friends who are helping you make this important decision; refreshments will be provided.

For comprehensive consumer information visit www.RossU.edu/med-student-consumer-info 2013 Global Education International. All rights reserved.

8

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

9

SPORTS

0

7

number of times the women’s basketball team has beaten Duke.

number of combined former Hurricanes on the 49ers’ and Ravens’ Super Bowl rosters.

COMMENTARY

Larranaga, veteran squad become contenders in ACC im Larra n a ga tripped and nearly hit the pavement as he greeted several hundred voracious fans lined up SPENCER DANDES hours before ASSISTANT last week’s SPORTS EDITOR Duke game. So he turned on his heel, started to laugh, and rolled his hands to signal a traveling call – on himself. The 63-year-old coach hasn’t hit a bump in the road since. Miami is f lying high after a f lawless week that saw two hugely important home victories over the top-ranked Blue Devils and the Florida State Seminoles. At last, basketball at the U has developed from an afterthought into primetime entertainment. At last, the standard ACC powerhouses aren’t just beatable – they’re beneath us. At last, we’re not begging students to walk 45 steps from Hecht to the BUC. We’re turning away latecomers because the arena is already at capacity. We have Larranaga to thank. His knowledge, charisma and energy have ignited the Hurricanes since he took the job in 2011. The team’s current undefeated stretch of conference dominance is the product of Larranaga’s exciting brand of basketball. It’s a fierce team mindset that starts with a swarming defensive foundation. Not including Wednesday night’s game on the road against Virginia Tech, the Canes held all but one of their opponents in January to fewer than 60 points. The one squad that was able to break the barrier was Duke, which scored 63. But as we all know, by then Miami was well on its way to 90. There were hints of this

J

growth last season: Miami finished 9-7 in the ACC, a mark that showed some potential but fell short of a NCAA Tournament berth. The overtime road win at Cameron Indoor was galvanizing, but the Canes failed to sustain that momentum. This year could be different. This team has built on that experience and benefits from veteran leadership; four of Miami’s five starters are seniors. Julian Gamble, while admittedly less orange, is throwing down put-back dunks like a young Jimmy Graham. Durand Scott and Shane Larkin are both intelligent ball handlers who can create their own shots or find the open man. And perhaps most notable, the surprisingly versatile Kenny Kadji is a legitimate scoring threat, whether he’s driving the lane or pulling up from 3-point range. Leonard Hamilton was full of genuine respect after the Hurricanes trounced his lagging Seminoles on Sunday. “There is no question this is a top team in America, a nationally ranked team, and they will have a chance to earn their rightful place,” he said. Hamilton led the Canes to their all-time best ranking (No. 9) and a trip to the Sweet 16 during his time on Miami’s bench, which makes his high praise even more gratifying. The Hurricanes are ranked 14th in the Associated Press poll, just a week after their first appearance this season at No. 25. The quick ascension won’t be lost on the 11 ACC opponents left on Miami’s schedule. January was good to Larranaga and the Canes, there’s no doubting that. But Miami is prepared to intensify its focus and ignore the extra attention, because this team might be playing deep into March.

ZACH BEEKER // STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER THE TIDES ARE CHANGING: Junior guard Rion Brown slams a dunk against FSU in Sunday’s game.

Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

SPORTS

9


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

10

FOOTBALL

FITNESS

Notable coach hits the small screen

Fitness program inspires faculty

HBO feature depicts Uncle Luke BY MICHAEL PERCHICK CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

Luther “Uncle Luke” Campbell is known as a lot of different things to a lot of different people. As the notorious lead singer of 2 Live Crew, he earned the label as the leader of the most profane music group of all time. The ESPN documentary “The U” hinted at Campbell’s alleged financial incentives given to Hurricane football players during their heyday of the 1980s and early 1990s. Campbell’s star status even led him to campaign for mayor of Miami. But the awardwinning HBO program “Real Sports” helps shed light on the modern-day Uncle Luke. That is, coach Luke. Today, Campbell is a defensive coordinator at Miami Northwestern, one of the country’s finest high school football programs – and also the alma mater of many Canes, past and present. Miami Northwestern’s football program has been an important recruiting pipeline for Miami, producing the likes of Melvin Bratton, Brett Per-

riman, Vernon Carey, Jacory Harris, Sean Spence, Tommy Streeter and Marcus Fortson, as well as with current Canes Ben Jones and Kendal Thompkins. So how did Campbell make the jump from the rap limelight to the gridiron? The Liberty City, Fla., native, who made millions for his rap exploits and pledged to reinvest his money back into his hometown, started a youth football league. NFL and college stars, including Chad Ochocinco, played in the program with Campbell’s Pop Warner teams winning numerous national championships. When the call came for Campbell to join the coaching ranks, he jumped on the opportunity. “I take the whole game of football, and translate it into life,” Campbell said in the “Real Sports” segment. But as the contemplative piece details, Campbell has faced difficulty outrunning his past. Hurricanes and rap fans alike should make a point to check the story out. The piece will replay on HBO at 10 a.m. Saturday, as well as 7 and 11 p.m. Tuesday. It is also available on HBO On Demand and hbogo.com.

Walking Canes strengthens staff BY KEVIN RODRIGUEZ CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

With a determined look and a protein shake in hand, Cari Schaeffler walked to the Rhodes House alongside students who were headed to class. Schaeffler, the receptionist at the Office of Financial Assistance Services, has always enjoyed physical activity, and this year she is participating in the Walking Canes program sponsored by the Wellness Center. “Seeing students walking around campus motivates me,” Schaeffler said. “It makes you want to be more aware of your health and physical wellbeing.” The Walking Canes is a 10,000-step-a-day program that uses a pedometer to help participants quantify their physical activity on a daily basis. It costs $10 to participate. The program is open to UM faculty and staff, but Thursday is the deadline for signing up. UM employees can register in person at the center’s Wellness Enrichment Suite from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., or at the Medical Wellness Center from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Schaeffler said she is excit-

ed to participate a second time and is determined to complete the program, something that eluded her the previous year. “Last year I sometimes forgot to log in my steps,” she said. “But I kept going at it. I knew I was walking and challenging myself.” The program lasts for 12 weeks, and holds each participant accountable for tallying the number of steps they accumulate by requiring them to check in online every Monday. Each participant is encouraged to wear the pedometer from the time they wake up until they go to sleep. One goal is to try and increase the number of steps each day. “It’s a good way to get in shape and exercise,” Schaeffler said. “You feel better about yourself – physically and emotionally.” Tony Musto, associate director of fitness programs at the Wellness Center, initiated the program in the spring of 2005 to help educate UM employees about becoming more active. “You can be a physically active person without rigorously working out,” he said. “Most people don’t know that.” Sue Rundlett, an administrative assistant at the Office of Financial Assistance Services, participated in Walking Canes for two years.

“I love that UM offers a program like it,” she said. “I feel proud that I stuck with it and didn’t give up.” To meet her daily goal, Rundlett said she parked in Ponce Garage and purposely walked up and down the stairs at the BankUnited Center every day before coming to work. To keep participants motivated, Musto says he tries to equate the steps taken to fun facts, such as calories burned per step. When asked if weather affected the program, Musto said, “It is for people who count on walking outside, but the point is to be creative about it.” The Kaiser Foundation donated $10,000 to help the program get off the ground in 2005, Musto said. “Your overall wellness matters,” President Donna E. Shalala said. “The university’s philosophy of wellness embraces the whole you. We are passionate about providing all of you with opportunities to reach your potential.” This semester, the top 10 walkers will be treated to a Chartwells-sponsored lunch at the Faculty Club with Shalala. The winners will receive a free, plan-ahead ticket on American Airlines, or two floor seats to an event at the BankUnited Center.

SPORTS BRIEFS WOMEN’S BASKETBALL Following a bitter, last-second 64-62 loss to North Carolina on Sunday afternoon, the Hurricanes will take a trip to Durham, N.C., to take on the ACC leading Duke Blue Devils on Thursday night. Miami, currently sitting on a 5-4 ACC record, will look to upset No. 4 Duke, who remains the only team undefeated in conference play. The Canes will look for their first-ever win over the Blue Devils. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m. Thursday night. The game can be heard live on 90.5 FM or on wvum.org.

10

SPORTS

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

MEN’S BASKETBALL Following Wednesday’s night game against Virginia Tech, the Hurricanes will travel up to Raleigh, N.C., to take on N.C. State in what is expected to be an exciting matchup between two ranked conference opponents. Miami, currently No. 14 in the Associated Press rankings, will look to hold off the No. 19 Wolfpack and remain on top of the ACC standings. The game is slated for a 4 p.m. start on Saturday. It will be broadcast locally on CBS. The Hurricanes’ upcoming home matchup on Feb. 9 against UNC is officially sold out. Miami has sold out the BankUnited Center for three games so far

Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

this season, including its last two home contests against Duke and Florida State.

SUPER BOWL When the San Francisco 49ers and the Baltimore Ravens kick off on Sunday evening, seven former Hurricane football players will be represented in the Super Bowl. Ray Lewis, Ed Reed, Bryant McKinnie, Damien Berry and Tommy Streeter for Baltimore, and Frank Gore and Tavares Gooden for the 49ers. Lewis will be competing in his second Super Bowl, after coming away victorious in Super Bowl XXXV in 2000. Everyone else will be looking for their

first championship. Both Lewis and Gore are coming off big games, with Lewis recording 14 tackles against the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship. Gore carried the ball 21 times for 90 yards and two touchdowns against the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Championship. Information compiled from hurricanesports. com. Ernesto Suarez may be contacted at sports@ themiamihurricane.com.


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

11

Dear V: My girlfriend keeps skipping our sex appointments... Dear Chicken Soup for the OCD Soul, ,

I have sex with my girlfriend at least twice a week, and we always choose our class schedules to make sure that sexy time is possible. But lately, she has been missing the designated times and it’s getting frustrating. I feel like she is putting other priorities before me. I don’t want to have to masturbate anymore when I could be getting some real loving. What should I do? Sex-Deprived Soul

I can make my answer short and simple by assigning you “50 Shades of Grey” because your relationship reminds me of Christian and Anastasia’s agreement. Don’t celebrate this comparison. It’s not as exciting as the millions that E.L. James earned while I wrote this sentence. Before I address this problem, I believe I understand your decision to schedule sex. Some “sexy time” between sociology and psychology makes you sound smarter than I had anticipated. Though building your life around sex may appear organized and practical, it can actually make your relationship dull and uneventful. Where is the spontaneity? Some of the best relationships are serendipitous. Bonnie and Clyde, Thelma and Louise, the loyal readers of Cosmopolitan magazine. C’mon, 55 ways to orgasm? Classic.

dear ... i i of these relationi I can’t comment on the specifics ships, but they lived life on the edge. They don’t wait for sex to happen at 4 p.m. Otherwise, Bonnie and Clyde would have been caught much earlier, and Thelma and Louise would have had less time to be guilt-ridden. Talk about a win-win situation, if you ask me. And do not call yourself “sex-deprived.” Masturbation has helped many single people since the beginning of time. What you do with your privates can be scheduled to your heart’s content. Give the others the chance to live their lives, and maintain a shroud of their normalness. No one wants a sexual dictator. If you insist on the schedule, then find someone else that appreciates your fetish for timed intercourse. Look up the directory for sex-starved science students, and you might get lucky. And please avoid escorts, they’re not as glamorous as British TV makes them out to be. V

GOT AN ACHY, BREAKY HEART? WRITE TO DEARV@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM FOR ADVICE.

HELP WANTED Clean, smiley salesperson needed for Miami Boat Show Part or full time Feb. 14-18 Commission based pay, average $300+ for show Call Donald 305-283-1958

Coconut Grove law firm seeking full time employee Email resume to madison@ jaslawfirm.com

HIRING HURRICANE HOODLUMS THE MIAMI HURRICANE IS IN THE MARKET FOR SALES REPRESENTATIVES, PHOTOGRAPHERS, CARTOONISTS, REPORTERS AND VIDEOGRAPHERS. ALL POSITIONS ARE PAID. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT EDITOR@THEMIAMIHURRICANE.COM. Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

DEAR V

11


MHMC- Commercial Template Doc Size 11.25” X 14”

Image Area 10.375 x 11.75 CYAN

MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK

12

miami.edu/calendar Thursday, Jan. 31 2013 Yearbook Portraits 9 a.m. • UC Lower Lounge Come take your student portraits for the 2013 IBIS Yearbook! Portraits are FREE for underclassmen. Graduation portraits are $25.00 for graduating seniors, go to ibisyearbook.com/seniorportraits to make an appointment. Portraits can be taken through Friday, February 15 from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. in the UC Lower Lounge.

SAFAC Fall Budget Workshops

Next week...

11 a.m. • UC Ballrooms SAFAC Fall Budget Workshops are coming up in the beginning of the spring semester. All COSO-Registered student organizations who wish to receive SAFAC funding next year must send their current or preferably incoming treasurer to attend one of these workshops in order to request Fall Budget funds for the 2013-2014 academic year. If the current or incoming treasurer is not able to attend, it is suggested to send another member of the executive board to attend one workshop. Those who do not attend the workshops this spring will have to wait after S.O.S. in early fall 2013 to be eligible to turn in a Fall Budget Request. Questions can be sent to the SAFAC executive board at safac@miami.edu.

Patio Jams ft. Megan Talay 12:15 p.m. • UC Patio Continue your Thursday afternoon tradition with HP’s Patio Jams! Take a break from classes, bring your lunch, and enjoy the sounds of Megan Talay!

Friday, Feb. 1 SAFAC Fall Budget Workshops 1 p.m. • UC Ballrooms

Men’s Tennis vs UCF 2 p.m. • Neil Schiff Tennis Center Come out and support your Men’s Tennis team as they take on the UCF Knights!

Friday, February 1 • 6 p.m. BankUnited Center

Justice Sonia Sotomayor will visit the BankUnited Center on the University of Miami Coral Gables campus on Friday, February 1st. The event is a discussion with Justice Sotomayor led by University of Miami President Donna E. Shalala. Doors will open at 5:30pm, and the event will begin at 6:00pm. Tickets for this special event are free and required for entry, and must be picked up in advance. Tickets for undergraduate, law, and graduate students on the Coral Gables campus will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis, at the Whitten University Center Ticket Window located on the Coral Gables campus. The ticket window is open from 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. until Friday.

Saturday, Feb. 2 Leadership Summit 9 a.m. • Wellness Center Leadership Summit, an annual tradition at the University of Miami, is a oneday conference for UM students which increases awareness of real-world leadership concepts and emphasizes the development of one’s leadership potential. Attendees will also have the opportunity to partake in breakout sessions that will encourage interaction, discussion, curiosity and questions relating to life issues, educational initiatives, and issues relevant to the unique world in which we live. Please sign up online at miami.edu/ leadershipsummit.

IFC Bid Day 5 p.m. • UC Rock Come out and support the Interfraternity council as they welcome their newest members and the newest members of the Greek community.

Women’s Tennis vs UNF

Men’s Lacrosse vs Florida St.

CAC Presents: The Perks of Being a Wallflower

7 p.m. • IM Fields Come out and support your University of Miami Men’s Lacrosse team as they open up the 2013 season under the lights against rival Florida State. Grab a chair, grab some friends and come out to the IM fields to enjoy some lacrosse.

2 p.m. • Neil Schiff Tennis Center Come out and support your Women’s Tennis team as they take on the UNF Ospreys!

10 p.m. • Cosford Cinema Based on the best-selling novel by Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a modern classic that captures the dizzying highs and crushing lows of growing up. Starring Logan Le-

rman, Emma Watson and Ezra Miller, The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a moving tale of love, loss, fear and hopeand the unforgettable friends that help us through life.

Sunday, Feb. 3 Men’s Tennis vs Rice 11 a.m. • Neil Schiff Tennis Center Come out and support your Men’s Tennis team as they take on the Rice Owls!

Women’s Basketball vs VTech 2 p.m. • BankUnited Center Come out and support your Lady ‘Canes as they take on the Virginia Tech Hokies! This game will be aired on WVUM.

RAB Superbowl Watch Party 5 p.m. • Rathskeller Whether you are a Baltimore or San Francisco fan, come cheer on your team this Sunday at the Rathskeller for Super Bowl XLVII and enjoy our 50 cent wing special! The Rathskeller will be open from 5:00pm - end of game. *Limit 20 per person. Dine in only.

CAC Presents: The Perks of Being a Wallflower 10 p.m. • Cosford Cinema

CNL/CAC Drive-In Movie: Hercules

State of the U

Wednesday. February 6 • 5 p.m. UC Lower Lounge Continuing the theme of having the Student Government president present on ‘The State of the U’, for the first time not only will SG speak, but numerous leaders of organizations on campus. Come to this event to hear the state of affairs, attend a mixer with student leaders, and be aware of what’s going on at your campus

Thursday, February 7 • 8 p.m. Pavia Garage Hurricane Productions in association with the Cinematic Arts Commission and Canes Night Live proudly present our newest awesome event! Come in your cars to this event located on the top floor of Pavia Garage with a 3 story screen! The area will open at 7:00, so show up early if you want a good spot (parking is first come first served) Don’t have a car? No problem! There will be an area for people without cars to just sit and enjoy the movie in the open air! There will be free food courtesy of Hurricane Productions. The movie will be preceded by a classic Nickelodeon short!

Got an event that you would like to see posted in the ad? Please submit your information at least two weeks in advance to STUDENT-ACTIVITIES@MIAMI.EDU. 12

ADVERTISEMENT

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

Jan. 31 - Feb. 3, 2013

Sebastian suggests...

‘Canes Calendar

A Conversation with Sonia Sotomayor


The Miami Hurricane - Jan. 31, 2013