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Housing policy opens spots for undergrads, may leave some out in the cold NEWS page 5

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January 29 - February 1, 2009

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

NEWS

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The Miami

HURRICANE

Lowest senior turnout for yearbook photos

Founded 1929

The University of Miami’s Ibis Yearbook is facing an unprecedented low turnout for senior photo sign-ups, while having the largest turnout of underclassmen sign-ups since underclassmen pictures were reintroduced to the book six years ago. “I do not know why there is such a low turnout among seniors,” said Randy Stano, the faculty advisor for the Ibis Yearbook. “It might be because seniors do not want to think about graduation until the spring and think they can get this picture taken later.” Next week might be the last time to take pictures. Approximately 300 slots are currently available for next week. The photographer will not take pictures during an additional week unless 90 How to get a yearpercent of this approaching week’s slots are filled. The number of seniors who signed up for book picture yearbook pictures is half that of previous years, with 310 seniors. In the past, there are usually between 650 Sign-up for your to 700 seniors to have signed up at this time of the yearbook picture in the year. Overall, the yearbook usually gets around 900 to UC Lower Lounge, Feb 2 11,000 senior portraits in their book. -Feb 6, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. There will be over 1,500 undergraduate pictures, which is more than the yearbook anticipated. This Underclassmen: No could be partially due to the addition of new marketappointment or fee ing tactics, including the use of LISTSERVS, table tents, banners and flyers on every floor in the dormitories Seniors: Make an apto notify students about the opportunity to get their pointment at ibisyearpictures taken. book.com. Seniors will be – Ed S. Fishman charged a $25 fee.

An Associated Collegiate Press Hall of Fame Newspaper NEWSROOM: 305-284-2016 BUSINESS OFFICE: 305-284-4401 FAX: 305-284-4404 For advertising rates call 305-284-4401 or fax 305-284-4404.

EDITOR IN CHIEF Matthew Bunch BUSINESS MANAGER Nick Maslow FINANCIAL ADVISER Robert DuBord FACULTY ADVISER Bob Radziewicz ADMINISTRATOR ASSISTANT Maria Jamed NEWS EDITOR Chelsea Kate Isaacs ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR Erika Capek Ed S. Fishman SPORTS EDITOR Pravin Patel ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR Christina De Nicola EDGE EDITOR Hilary Saunders OPINION EDITOR Joshua W. Newman ART DIRECTOR Shayna Blumenthal

ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR Tanya Thompson DESIGNERS Felipe Lobon Jacqueline Villavicencio WEBMASTER Brian Schlansky ASSISTANT WEBMASTER Shayna Blumenthal MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Lauren Whiddon Danny Bull COPY CHIEF Nate Harris COPY EDITOR Sarah B. Pilchick EDITOR AT LARGE Greg Linch PUBLIC RELATIONS Jacob Crows PRODUCTION MANAGER Jessica Jurick ACCOUNT REPS Nico Ciletti Ally Day Brian Schuman

PHOTO EDITOR Chelsea Matiash

CORRECTION: Tristan Clopet last name was misspelled as Colpet in last issues EDGEw article.

Check out what’s exclusively available at TheMiamiHurricane.com.

Read a commentary from senior football writer Dan Stein about the hiring of new offensive coordinator Mark Whipple. Follow all the latest developments with the arrest of Miami point guard Eddie Rios. Need your news fast? Visit TheMiamiHurricane.com and look on the right-hand side for textmessage alerts!

©2009 University of Miami The Miami Hurricane is published semi-weekly during the regular academic year and is edited and produced by undergraduate students at the University of Miami. The publication does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of advertisers or the university’s trustees, faculty or administration. Unsigned editorials represent the opinion of The Hurricane’s Editorial Board. Commentaries, letters and cartoons represent only the views of their respective authors. The newsroom and business office of The Hurricane are located in the Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221.

‘Comcast Newsmakers’ tapes episodes at UC patio for March airing

LETTER POLICY The Miami Hurricane encourages all readers to voice their opinions on issues related to the university or in response to any report published in The Hurricane. Letters to the editor may be submitted typed or handwritten (please make your handwriting legible) to the Whitten University Center, Room 221, or mailed to P.O. Box 248132, Coral Gables, FL, 33124-6922. Letters, with a suggested length of 300 words, must be signed and include a copy of your student ID card, phone number and year in school. ADVERTISING POLICY The Miami Hurricane’s business office is located at 1306 Stanford Drive, Norman A. Whitten University Center, Room 221B, Coral Gables, FL 33124-6922. The Miami Hurricane is published on Mondays and Thursdays during the university’s fall and spring academic terms. Newspapers are distributed free of charge on the Coral Gables campus, the School of Medicine and at several off-campus locations. DEADLINES All ads must be received, cash with copy, in The Miami Hurricane business office, Whitten University Center, Room 221B, by noon Tuesday for Thursday’s issue and by noon Friday for the Monday issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS The Miami Hurricane is available for subscription at the rate of $50 per year. AFFILIATIONS The Miami Hurricane is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, Columbia Scholastic Press Assoc. and Florida College Press Assoc.

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MATTHEW BUNCH // Hurricane Staff

ACTION: Spero Canton (left) interviews Dr. Jeffrey Cantor during a taping of Comcast Newsmakers on the UC patio.

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

January 29 - February 1, 2009

The UC Rock was turned into a television set Wednesday as Comcast Newsmakers ventured outside their studio to visit the University of Miami. Due to construction on the program’s regular studio, Newsmakers has ventured to notable locations in the South Florida community, including the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Hollywood and UM. “We wanted to pick somewhere that reflected South Florida, and when we saw that [Cobb] fountain, we knew that was it,” host Spero Canton said after taping. The show, which airs at :26 and :56 past the hour on Headline News (channel 29 on campus), features local personalities, ranging from an American Gladiator to Susan Kaufman Purcell, director of UM’s Center for Hemispheric Policy, who spoke with Canton about the economic downturn’s impact on Latin America. Newsmakers taped 26 episodes of the show in one day. “I got here at 8:30 a.m., and we just wrapped at 5 p.m.” Canton said. “Whenever we got hot during the day, we just looked to the left and saw the pool, and that just cooled us down.”


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Healthcare summit addresses ‘sick-care system’

JESSICA HODDER // Hurricane Staff

DISCUSSION: Former Rep. Dick Gephardt speaks at the National Healthcare Summit Wednesday. The event at the BankUnited Center brought together 11 American leaders from various fields and industries to talk about the state of the American system. UM President Donna E. Shalala introduced the group.

Miami event unites former adversaries BY CLAIRE WOLFORD CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

With myriad problems facing the United States, none is more pressing or elicits so many differing responses as the broken healthcare system.

In an effort to establish a reform strategy, 11 American leaders from fields such as business, government, labor and healthcare met with each other on Jan. 28 in the BankUnited Center to kick off the first in a series of Summit Conversations covering national healthcare. UM President Donna E. Shalala, former Secretary of Health and Human Services, introduced the discussion as well as participated in it along with former Rep. Dick Gephardt. PhRMA CEO and President Billy Tauzin and Scotts

Miracle-Gro CEO Jim Hagedorn among others. The theme of the evening was the search for consensus among individuals from different fields, some even former adversaries. The topics discussed were far-reaching, from the issues at hand to the answers ahead. It kicked off with President Shalala saying that the state of American healthcare was “fragmented, fragmented, fragmented.” Brought up a number of times was the fact that America’s system is a “sick-care system,” only treating

patients once they are ill and doing precious little to prevent disease. Prevention was a hot topic; nearly everyone agreed more was needed but there was little consensus as to whose responsibility that was, be it personal, employer or mandated by the government. Also discussed was how healthcare might be prioritized during a recession. However, Tauzin said, “Healthcare is the economy. Thirty percent of the economy is health-related.” Other topics covered the fu-

January 29 - February 1, 2009

ture of health technologies as well as high-risk patients avoided by insurance companies. While a number of good points were made, there seemed to be few conclusions drawn as to where to go from here. “It was more about what healthcare shouldn’t be, not what it should be,” senior Chris Torres said. “The roundtable set up was effective and it was a good starting point.” Claire Wolford may be contacted at cwolford@themiamihurricane.com.

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UM takes precautions against salmonella poisoning

MATT WALLACH // Hurricane Staff

IT’S LUNCHTIME: A salmonella outbreak first reported in September has caused recalls of many peanut paste products, like many peanut butters.

No salmonella cases reported in Florida BY ERIKA CAPEK ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR

Peanut butter products were in a sticky mess after a salmonella outbreak, which first occurred in early September. Since then, there have been more than 500 salmonella cases in 43 states. But students at the University of Miami have no reason to fear. “The University and Chartwells have been working very closely throughout this and we have been proactively ensuring that our students’ health and safety is number one,” said Mel Tenen, assistant vice president of Auxiliary Services. As an early precaution, all products containing peanut butter were pulled from Jamba Juice, the UC and University Village convenience stores, the Wellness Center and the dining halls. Despite a number of products being taken off the shelves of the convenience stores, the resident dining halls were not even open to students when the recall was made. There are no reported cases of anyone at the university becoming ill, and, in fact, Florida is one of seven states that have no 4

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

January 29 - February 1, 2009

reported cases at all. “This was a more extensive recall than others we’ve had in the past because there are so many items that contain peanut paste,” said Leland Rapport, the resident district manager of Chartwells. “It’s been a lengthy process but many of the products recalled have already been released.” There are still a handful of products, however, that students won’t find just yet, such as Keebler peanut butter-containing foods. But many other products that were first pulled have been reintroduced over the past several weeks. Salmonella infections can be treated with antibiotics, though some strains are resistant to these drugs, according to the Center for Disease Control. Most people infected develop diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps within a few days of infection. The illness can last up to a week. “The university was well aware of this since the beginning and we will always be in full compliance with the Food and Drug Administration’s regulations,” Tenen said. For the latest information on the outbreak including number of illnesses and a list of states reporting illnesses, visit www. cdc.gov/salmonella/typhimurium/. Erika Capek may be contacted at ecapek@ themiamihurricane.com.


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Graduate students to be banned from UV next year Village to allocate additional 80 beds to underclassmen BY ALICIA ABALO CONTRIBUTING NEWS WRITER

Eighty additional beds in the four-story University Village complex will become available to undergraduate students this coming fall semester, as administrators announced this week that graduate students will no longer be able to apply for housing there. At a monthly roundtable meeting on Wednesday, Patricia A. Whitely, vice president for Student Affairs, said the change was made because of the overwhelming demand among undergraduate students for on-campus housing. “Graduate students are more capable of living off-campus,” Whitely said. “There’s plenty of off-campus housing and we wouldn’t do this if today’s market wasn’t soft.” However, some graduate students say that off-campus housing will not fit in their budget. Stephen Lazer, a Graduate Student Association representative, told Whitely at the roundtable meeting that

graduates feel they’re being treated unfairly. Lazer said that housing for graduate students has been “one of UM’s selling points” because of the high cost of renting an apartment in South Florida. A one-bedroom apartment in the Red Road Commons, located within walking distance of the university at 6600 SW 57th Ave., rents for about $1,600 per month. “Graduate students had somewhat of an expectation for housing, and we feel like this expectation has not been met,” Lazer said. The University Village is UM’s newest residential community and the apartments have been in high demand since construction was completed in 2006. The complex’s popularity can be attributed to its option of apartment-style living, as opposed to a typical dormitory atmosphere, within walking distance from classes. Students pay between $4,000 and $7,000 in rent per semester, and they can use financial aid and student loans to pay the rent. Will Thompson, a first-year graduate student in business administration, was planning on living in the University Village next fall but will be looking for other options. “I plan on finding alternative housing, maybe in Brickell or the Gables,” he said. Alicia Abalo may be contacted at aabalo@themiamihurricane.com.

NEW FRIEND

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Condo or Room for Rent in Gated Community (Gables Court) Spacious 2 bedroom/2 bath • 5-Minute Drive to U.M. Split Plan for Privacy Washer and Dryer • Gym, Pool, Indoor Racquetball, Jacuzzi and Club House Free Basic Cable and DSL • $875/month to rent one room or $1,750/month for entire condo (plus first, last and security) • Call 305-282-9174 for more info.

January 29 - February 1, 2009

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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College students take advantage of economy’s discounts Hard times for clothing designers, retailers ease prices BY KARUNYA KRISHNAN STAFF NEWS WRITER

With tough times come tough decisions, especially for stores in today’s economy. Many stores have reduced their prices and extended their clearance sales. The result is a potential shopper’s paradise. To many, the number of sales in retail stores is baffling. Junior Niki Kothari wasn’t expecting the amount of sales and the quantity of merchandise on sale that she saw this season. “Even designer stores like BCBG [Max Azria] had ‘70 percent off ’ sales, and that never happens,” Kothari said. Milna Correa, an associate manager of surf and skate clothing store PacSun at Dadeland Mall, explained that at the end of each season, companies offer clearance sales to get rid of the previous season’s merchandise and make room for new products. The same

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clearance sales take place every year, she said. This year, however, sales in stores may have decreased over the holidays so more merchandise was placed on clearance. “It looks like it’s a big sale because there is more merchandise,” Correa said. This helps to explain how many stores, like Bath and Body Works, are offering up to a 90 percent discount on winter items. Popular stores such as Linens ‘n Things have already gone out of business and Circuit City has begun its “going out of business” sale after nearly 60 years of selling electronics. “These are tough times for an industry that sells mostly luxury items,” sophomore Jeff Shweky said. Shweky visited Circuit City specifically to take advantage of their 10 to 30 percent markdowns. “I went because I knew I would get a good deal,” he said. “It’s unfortunate, but one person’s loss is another person’s gain.” Senior Jaimee Spec- tor believes the sales are a sign. “It is good for shoppers short-term, but if stores aren’t getting any money, it means the value of the dollar is going down, and that’s not a good sign,” she said. “It reminds people of how bad the mar-

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

January 29 - February 1, 2009

ANA ALBA // Hurricane Staff

WE’RE SLASHING PRICES: Due to the economy many stores have been sporting sales in hopes of drawing in more customers. ket is,” Kothari said. “For people tight on money, shopping is the last thing on their mind, but college kids definitely take advantage of it.”and jeans styles for $14.99.

Karunya Krishnan may be contacted at kkrishnan@themiamihurricane.com.


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opinion Editorial

“Will UM help these essentially homeless graduate students?” – The Miami Hurricane Editorial Board

cartoon by Chip Hanna

speak

UP!

Expectations of graduate students unfair Kick out the grad students. Let them fend for themselves. So if you’ve browsed through the news section today, or if you’re a graduate student, there’s no doubt you’ve heard of the new plan for the University Village. Graduate students will no longer be allowed to live there. Vice president for Student Affairs Patricia A. Whitely claimed that graduate students are more capable of finding off-campus housing than undergraduates. Let that sit for a moment. Without any further context, it seems as though because of a simple age difference and higher level of education, grads have an easier time surfing Craigslist, contacting realtors and closing rental deals. But maybe the average grad student is financially independent. Maybe that’s what gives them the edge. Although I doubt there is any truth behind that statement – economic times are rough, and balancing a full-time job with a fulltime education can be just as daunting as dealing with loans and financial aid. One proposed solution for the disposal of the graduates focuses on the new Red Road Commons, located just across the street from the University Village. The cost of a one-bedroom apartment just across the street from UV is literally double the price. The politics of the situation might sound nice and pretty for incoming undergraduates, but come July, will UM help these essentially homeless graduate students? Not that additional subsidies from the university are in question these days, but if graduates are feeling cheated, maybe the school should pay the difference between the price of UV living and the price of living at the Commons. Certainly something to think about.

What happens when you go to class drunk?

JOHN LEWIS sophomore “Definitely not any learning. It’s absolutely brutal.”

a word from cartoonist Tiffany Agam It has come to my attention that the cartoon I drew last week regarding Hamas policies (“Step one in the Hamas handbook”) has seriously personally offended certain members of the UM community, and I would like to personally say that this was not my intent. The purpose of the cartoon was to visually portray my point of view of how Hamas is

handling the situation in Gaza. There is hard evidence proving that Hamas members, in certain circumstances, use women and children as human shields against their will. I wanted to expose the suffering on the Palestinian side in a manner that is hardly seen because it is shunned from the media view.

LETYOURVOICEBEHEARD

LANA SCHISSEL sophomore “Everyone looks a little bit uglier.”

LEONA ZAHLAN freshman “It’s horrible, I couldn’t concentrate and just wanted to leave. It wasn’t even worth going to class.”

letters@themiamihurricane.com Speak Up answers are edited for clarity, brevity and accuracy.

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

compiled by Dan Buyanovsky

January 29 - February 1, 2009

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A Pair of Nuts presents “The Super Phenomenal Grandiose Extravaganza” Friday, Jan. 30 myspace.com/pairofnuts.

The Perez Hilton of the East Coast BY NICK MASLOW OF THE STAFF

For recent University of Miami graduate Jessica Marquez, life after college can be pretty sweet: the free dishes in New York’s most craved eateries, a guaranteed spot on the impossible guest list, modeling for Reebok and appearing on Fox News. The woman who seems to have it all is not an heiress or pop star, but rather part of a new breed of bloggers. By writing about the celebrity lifestyle on her blog, “As Good As It Gets,” Marquez gets to live it. Indeed, the city’s numerous wannabes offer Marquez the A-list treatment in hopes that she’ll blog about their product or business. Marquez’s life isn’t all shopping and partying. As The Miami Hurricane discovered, Marquez hasn’t given up her day job in advertising, and she uses her UM education to distinguish her site from the multitudes of others in the blogosphere. THE MIAMI HURRICANE: How did you make the transition from a college graduate to popular blogger? Jessica Marquez: I was always interested in fashion and how nightlife worked, how one place could be cool and another place wasn’t, and how it’s all about the guests who are there. I came to New York and somehow ended

up getting a job in entertainment. I met club owners and restaurant owners from networking. Eventually, I would go to a top restaurant and get my meal for free or go to a club and get a drink for free. All of my friends were always saying, ‘I can’t believe this is your life and you’ve only lived in New York for three months.’ I started out e-mailing my friends updates on what was going on in my life. They were like, ‘We can’t read e-mail all the time. Is there any way you could start a blog?’ TMH: Would you say that as an entertainment blogger you have to feed off of people’s insatiable need to attack others and be critical? JM: Definitely. It’s 100 percent about what they want to read. The more people that want to read it, the more they tell their friends to read it. That’s how I get advertisers, by the amount of visitors that come to the site. That’s the only way I’m going to profit from doing this. TMH: Do you get satisfaction out of writing for your audience or is there something else you’d rather be writing about? JM: It’s a mix. I do throw in some things that I

personally would like to write. I also was a poetry major at UM. Sometimes I’ll throw in a little poem on there just to see what people think. TMH: How has your UM education helped you with your blog? JM: [Broadcasting professor] Andrew Barton definitely taught me a lot. For his class, we’d have to go out and do everything by ourselves – the interview, the questions, everything. We focused on what the story was and how to generate interest. For me, it definitely helped with my blog and being able to make a profit from this. Anyone can write about anything, but if you find stories that no one is writing about that you’re interested in and you think can generate interest, you can make money from it. It’s crazy that the blog is my personal opinion on things and I get hundreds and hundreds of e-mails from people who take it seriously. Visit Marquez’s blog at www.asgoodasitsguests. com. Nick Maslow may themiamihurricane.com.

January 29 - February 1, 2009

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THE MIAMI HURRICANE

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Tribute band Dark Star Orchestra set to revive the Grateful Dead in South Florida BY LAURA EDWINS CONTRIBUTING EDGE WRITER

The Grateful Dead may have disbanded in 1995, but the Deadhead spirit lives on through the Dark Star Orchestra, a tribute band made up of seven members who present faithful reproductions of the rock legends’ live shows. With original set lists and even the same instrument arrangement and musician configuration as the Grateful Dead, Dark Star Orchestra brings to life the music that spawned what has arguable become the most loyal fan base of all time, the Deadheads. “Our approach is what we call ‘traditional,’” drummer Dino English said in an interview with The Miami Hurricane. “We hear all the parts of the music, the melody and harmony. Each part is important.” The band has been together for more than 11 years and its members vary in age from 30 to “50 something.” “I would say our relationship is one like a brother and sister,” English said. “We’re all friends but it’s deeper than that. We get in fights like brothers and sisters but we love each other in the end.” Though musicians in the group have come and gone, the current band members have been together for about nine years and are some of the best Grateful Dead cover artists nationwide. “We’re all Deadheads; we grew up listening to the Grateful Dead, going to shows and I think we all regard this as the best music out there,” English said. “We play the music we love the most.” Although the band sticks strictly to Grateful Dead music, English says there is a lot of individuality in what they play. “We’re all way into music in general but the Grateful Dead is such a special experience that that’s what we’re drawn to,” he said. The Grateful Dead were more than an extraordinary jam band in the ‘70s. They gave birth to thousands of die-hard Deadheads who experienced the feeling of being part of something bigger through their music and live shows. Today the fans consider themselves an extended family. “Deadheads from all over 10

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the planet are part of the family,” English said. “We try to keep that vibe going.” Dark Star Orchestra is more than just a cover band playing rock songs from the ‘70s to an aging audience. The group’s goal is to achieve something almost supernatural. “We’re trying to tap into the group mind, the audience and the band, a feeling together,” English

said. “We’re going for that magic feeling music gives you.” Dark Star Orchestra will be playing in Pompano Beach this Saturday, Jan, 31, at Club Cinema at 9 p.m. Laura Edwins may be contacted at ledwins@themiamihurricane.com.

If You Go What: Dark Star Orchestra When: Saturday, Jan. 31 at 8 p.m. Where: Club Cinema, 3251 North Federal Highway, Pompano Beach, FL 33064

Bruce Springsteen not at his best, but remains the Boss BY SARAH B. PILCHICK OF THE STAFF

Make no mistake: Bruce Springsteen is a god. The E Street Band is full of rock deities and the Boss is a musician with a storied career. Even his worst effort is far superior to what many of today’s singers are producing. His latest effort, Working On A Dream, is not his greatest album. With such an extensive catalogue, that would be quite a feat indeed. It is certainly worth the purchase and multiple listens, but it may not be the Springsteen you’re expecting, as this is not the Springsteen of years past. The E Street Band is at its best 3 out of 4 stars when The Boss is either angry – see Born to Run, Born in the U.S.A., and The Rising – or wistful – “Thunder Road” or “I’m On Fire.” Whether singing about the mistreatment of Vietnam veterans or reflecting on the tragedy of Sept. 11, his most compelling songs come from a far darker place than the ones on Dream. This is a Bruce we haven’t seen much of in recent times. This Bruce is happy. The optimism and ebullience of Dream reflect Springsteen’s personal politics; this album is the perfect soundtrack for the age of Obama. Songs like “Surprise, Surprise” and “My Lucky Day” are hopeful and catchy, but they lack his usual depth. “The Wrestler” is by far the best song on the album, and though he inexplicably did not receive an Oscar nomination for the performance, it is outstanding. Buy Working On A Dream. Listen to it multiple times. For the best of Bruce Springsteen, however, be sure to dig deep into his back catalog. There is definitely a reason why Springsteen has maintained relevance over nearly three decades, for he remains the one, the only, the Boss. Sarah B. Pilchick may be contacted at sbpilchick@themiamihurricane. com.

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band will be performing in this Sunday’s Super Bowl Halftime Show, airing on NBC channel 6. COURTESY DARK STAR ORCHESTRA

PATRIOTIC: Members of Dark Star Orchestra, a Grateful Dead cover band, were recently in the capital, Washington D.C.

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Number of offensive coordinators the Hurricanes have had in past 5 seasons

Number of years of offensive coaching experience that Mark Whipple brings with him

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Sophomore point guard Eddie Rios, suspended twice this season, was arrested in Miami-Dade County early Wednesday and charged with two counts each of third-degree grand theft and burglary of an unoccupied dwelling, both felony counts, according to the Clerk of Court’s Web site. Rios was arrested at 5:51 a.m. and taken to the Pre-Trial Detention Center in downtown. He is currently out on bond, which, according to the Miami-Dade Department of Corrections totals $35,000. A pre-trial hearing is scheduled for Feb. 17 at 9 a.m. He was suspended by the Hurricanes on Jan. 12 for “violating team rules relating to following team protocol and lack of communication with coaches,” according to the university. He was also suspended for two games in December for a “violation of team rules.”

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Suspended guard Rios arrested

For a second straight game, the Miami Hurricanes lost another heartbreaker in overtime, this time falling to N.C. State, 84-81. N.C. State freshman Julius Mays played only 11 minutes but hit the biggest shot of the game, knocking down a 3-pointer with 2.6 seconds left to give the Wolfpack (11-7, 2-4) the win. “It feels like you just got punched in the gut two games in a row,” said head coach Frank Haith, whose team also lost in overtime this past weekend against Virginia Tech. “Early in the game they got a lot of open looks. We weren’t there. They felt very comfortable against us – our defense – and that’s disappointing.” In regulation, junior Adrian Thomas gave the Hurricanes (146, 3-4) a 70-68 lead after he hit a 3-pointer. The Wolfpack tied it up after Brandon Costner scored on a layup. “We wanted Jack [McClinton] to make a play, but he mishandled the ball,” Haith said about the final possession of regulation. “Once he mishandled the ball it was a broken play. We just missed it.” In overtime, N.C. State started out strong but Thomas’s 3-pointer made it a 76-75 Wolfpack advantage. On the following possession, N.C. State bumped it back up to a 79-75 lead. The Canes responded with a Brian Asbury 3-point play after Dwayne Collins missed two free throw attempts. Miami trailed by three with 31 seconds left, but McClinton came through in the clutch, getting fouled on a 3-point attempt. McClinton hit all three free throws to tie the game at 81. McClinton

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BY LELAN LEDOUX SENIOR SPORTS WRITER

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ACC STANDINGS

CE

Canes nearly come back from 19 down

W -L

Wolfpack deals Hurricanes second straight OT loss Wake Forest

4-1

17-1

Duke

5-1

18-2

Clemson

3-2

17-2

North Carolina

4-2

18-2

Florida State

3-3

16-5

Virginia Tech

4-1

14-5

Boston College

4-3

16-6

Miami

3-4

14-6

Maryland

2-4

13-7

Virginia

1-4

7-9

North Carolina State

2-4

11-7

Georgia Tech

0-6

9-10

finished with 27 points, going 9-17 from the floor. But the ball rested in N.C. State’s hands and Mays hit the game winner, sealing the win. “He had a bigger guy on him; he just made a tough shot,” Haith said. “We dug ourselves a big hole, but I felt our guys played with a lot of toughness, showed a lot character.” Miami trailed at halftime, 3925, and fell behind in the second half by 19. However, the Canes didn’t quit and finally cut the lead to an eight-point deficit with 13 minutes to go. Later, a gliding layup by Dwayne Collins gave the Hurricanes their first lead of the game at 54-53. “Adrian is a major guy for us, in terms of making plays on the offensive end,” Haith said. “Adrian continues to grow. I think he’s a guy that down the stretch will continue to make big plays for us.” Haith acknowledges that the Hurricanes blew another opportunity to pick a win in a tough ACC. “We turned the ball over and missed free throws,” Haith said. “We left too many points out there. In order to win in this league you have to make those winning plays.” Lelan LeDoux may be contacted at lledoux@themiamihurricane.com.

MATT MOORE // The Technician

SLIPPING BY: N.C. State guard Farnold Degand drives by Miami’s Adrian Thomas during Tuesday night’s game.

January 29 - February 1, 2009

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WOMEN’S TENNIS

No. 13 Miami notches 6-1 victory over No. 53 FIU Team gears up for ITA indoor qualifier BY CHRISTINA DE NICOLA ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

It took the last singles match of Wednesday afternoon for the 13th-ranked University of Miami women’s tennis team to finally lose its first point of the season. Luckily everything else went the Hurricanes’ way against No. 53 Florida International in a 6-1 victory at the Neil Schiff Tennis Center. Junior two-time All-American Laura Vallverdu easily disposed of her opponent in the second position, 6-1, 6-0, while eighthranked sophomore Julia Cohen battled back from an early first-set deficit to win in straight sets, 6-4, 6-0. In the sixth position, freshman Alessa Waibel won in her debut, finishing on a come-from-behind three-set win, 5-7, 6-3, 11-9. Junior Claudia Wasilewski and 50thranked sophomore Michaela Kissell won in two sets.

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“I think it was a great test for the girls, definitely our strongest opponent thus far,” head coach Paige Yaroshuk-Tews said. “I think we responded in a positive way.” In doubles, the tandem of Cohen and Vallverdu overcame a 3-2 disadvantage and held off a late rally to clinch the point. “At the beginning we started pretty nervous,” Vallverdu said. “It was really windy and the girls were serving pretty well.” The only setback on the day was Mariana Muci’s 6-4, 6-4 upset over 20th-ranked sophomore Bianca Eichkorn. Miami will serve as one of 15 host sites for this weekend’s ITA National Indoor Qualifier. The Hurricanes face Utah (1-1) at 10 a.m. Saturday. No. 41 Virginia (2-0) and 24th-ranked Tennessee (2-0) will also compete, with the winners of each match set to play in the final on Sunday afternoon. “Heading into this weekend we’re expecting to have to play great tennis,” Yaroshuk-Tews said. Christina De Nicola may be contacted at cdenicola@themiamihurricane. com.

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January 29 - February 1, 2009

FILE PHOTO // Billy Gilbert

DETERMINATION: Julia Cohen returns the ball during a women’s tennis match on Saturday against Florida Atlantic. Miami won that match 7-0.


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FOOTBALL

Mark Whipple leaves the Eagles for Coral Gables Shannon hires new offensive coordinator BY PRAVIN PATEL SPORTS EDITOR

The University of Miami and Randy Shannon got their man: the newly-hired Mark Whipple, who is replacing Patrick Nix MARK as the team’s WHIPPLE offensive coo r d i n a t o r. Whipple comes to the Hurricanes with 27 years of collegiate and professional coaching experience. “I am excited to work with Randy Shannon,” Whipple said. “I feel like we’re going to be a great team. Coach Shannon and I have been on the same page from day one. Our goal is to win a national championship.” Whipple fits the mold for the type of people head coach Randy Shannon has made a point to make part of the Hurricane culture. He is a winner. Whipple comes to the Hurricanes after having served as an offensive assistant for the Philadelphia Eagles this past season, where he helped them reach the NFC Championship game. Prior to his job with the Eagles, Whipple served as the quarterbacks coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers, where he helped Ben Roethlisberger become the youngest starting quarterback to win a Super Bowl. “Mark has been successful in every phase of his career,” Shannon said. “He developed a Super Bowl quarterback in Ben Roethlisberger, won a national championship as the head coach at UMass and created an effective and potent offense most recently for the playoff-bound Philadelphia Eagles. Aside from being innovative at his craft, Mark is a tremendous individual who will positively impact our student athletes on and off the field.” Before his professional career, Whipple coached in the college ranks for 16 seasons, putting to-

FILE PHOTO // Hurricane Staff

NEW BLOOD: Philadelphia Eagles assistant offensive coach Mark Whipple will join the Miami Hurricanes coaching staff next season. Formerly at the University of Massachusetts, Whipple recorded a 121-59 as a head coach on the college level. gether a record of 121-59. Whipple’s collegiate career included head coaching stints at the University of Massachusetts, Brown and New Haven, posting a winning percentage of .600 or better at each university. His resume also boasts a Division I-AA National Championship with UMass and a National Coach of the Year award in 1998. Everywhere Whipple has

gone, he has constructed highpowered offenses, which have gone on to set countless school and team records. All that can be done now is to wait and see if Whipple can take Miami’s talented group of offensive players and turn them into title contenders. Pravin Patel may be contacted at ppatel@themiamihurricane.com.

Whipple’s Pedigree 2008 Philadelphia Eagles (offensive assistant) 2004-2006 Pittsburgh Steelers (quarterbacks coach) 1998-2003 Massachusetts (head coach) 1994-97 Brown (head coach) 1988-93 New Haven (head coach)

January 29 - February 1, 2009

1986-87 New Hampshire (offensive coordinator) 1984 Arizona Wranglers (USFL) (offensive quality control) 1983 Brown (wide receivers) 1981-82 Union College (offensive coordinator) 1980 St. Lawrence (assistant coach)

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CLUB SPORT

Women join men in Ultimate Frisbee competition

PHOTO COURTESY // SARAH MUI

FLING: Member of UM’s Willy-Willies Ultimate Frisbee team compete in a game. For the first time, UM will also field a women’s Ultimate Frisbee team.

New women’s team added this semester BY ESTEFANIA AGUAYO CONTRIBUTING SPORTS WRITER

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Ultimate Frisbee, one of the fastest growing club sports on college campuses, now has a women’s team at the University of Miami. UM has had a men’s team for about six years. Soon women too will be flinging

THE MIAMI HURRICANE

January 29 - February 1, 2009

discs and making acrobatic grabs when they compete against teams from other schools in Florida and elsewhere. “I’ve been working since I was a freshman and we finally have a women’s team,” said senior Barry Katz, the men’s team president. “I am really proud to have a women’s team. It’s a big step.” Sophomore Sarah Mui is the president of the women’s team, which is named the Southern Tropical Depression. She says she is excited to begin competing. “I’m expecting a lot of improvement” on the team, she said. “A lot of the girls had never touched a disc.” So what is Ultimate Frisbee? It’s little bit like football and rugby, but there are no referees. The game is played by two sevenplayer squads, with the object being to score points by catching a Frisbee pass in the opponent’s end zone. Players cannot run with the disc; it must be thrown. Katz says the men’s team – nicknamed the Willy-Willies, the Australian term for swirling winds or dust devils – is also look-

ing forward to the season. “We are a pretty good team,” he said. “We really have high expectations. We have been training since last year. This year I expect us to go to regionals.” Ultimate Frisbee is split into A and B teams, depending on skill level. “It’s a learning experience,” Katz said. The spring semester is the most important season in Ultimate Frisbee. The team usually plays in five or six tournaments. Last February, the Willy-Willies competed in Las Vegas against teams from around the country, placing fourth out of 32 teams. There are usually four practices a week at Yaron Field, and the cost to join is $10. “A lot of money comes out of pocket,” said Katz, though Ultimate Frisbee receives some funding from SAFAC to travel to tournaments. Mui said she began playing in high school because “it seemed like a great sport.” She added that its popularity is growing at UM. “A lot of my friends thought it was a really laid-back sport.” Mui said. “The general idea is that it’s a hippie sport. It’s actually very competitive; you have to wear cleats. There is a lot of running involved. But it is a lot of fun!” Economics professor and the team’s faculty advisor David Kelly got hooked on Ultimate Frisbee as a college student at Wake Forest. In 2004, the Miami team he plays on won the world championship the master’s division. He said he expects the UM men’s team to be competitive this year. “It’s very early,” Kelly said. “We lost one of the better players in graduation. They have tough teams to compete with,” such as the University of Florida. Kelly said he expects both teams will do well this year. “I think Sarah is very capable. She has good leadership,” he said. “Teams in the first year always struggle, but I think they have good leadership at the top.” Even after two surgeries and numerous other injuries, Kelly says he plans to keep on playing. “I find it great; I don’t want to give it up,” he said. “The main thing I want to emphasize is that the sport is really fun. It gets you in killer shape. It’s a tremendous workout.” Estefania Aguayo may be contacted at eaguayo@themiamihurricane.com.


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Your ‘messy’ relationship isn’t the worst of your problems...

, DISCLAIMER: The following column includes information about personal bodily functions and sexual interactions. If you are not comfortable with this subject matter, The Miami Hurricane advises that you not read any further. Help. I have a dark secret – dark brown, that is. My girlfriend is constantly dieting and uses laxatives to stay thin. Sometimes when we are intimate and she is in the throes of ecstasy, she soils. What should I say? It sometimes ruins the moment for me. – Lou Stoolz

Hello Reader, Before I give you the magic words to say to your girlfriend when she sullies the sack, I think we need to take a step back and reassess the problem. The issue does not lie in your inability to receive pleasure in bed. The real issue is what your girlfriend is doing to her body by using laxatives. I am not a doctor, but I do know that abusing laxatives can take its toll on the body. The overuse of laxatives can cause dependence and throw off the delicate balance of minerals and electrolytes that your body needs, causing nerves and muscles in vital organs like your colon and

heart to function improperly. Dehydration can occur, causing tremors, weakness, blurred vision, fainting and even death in the most extreme circumstances. Abusing laxatives is incredibly harmful. From the wording of your question, your concerns seem more focused on yourself, rather than the more serious (and embarrassing) problem that your partner faces. Your choices are the following: either step it up and care about someone aside from yourself, or get out of the relationship so that your girlfriend can take care of herself, rather than your libido. If you choose the latter, this

dear ...

discussion is done, as it is unfair and unethical to ignore something so serious affecting someone you “care” about. If you choose the former, then I applaud your courage and offer you the magic words that you are looking for. You need to confront this problem with your girlfriend. Do so by showing her how much you care about her. Remind her that you will be on her side no matter what happens and that she is beautiful and does not need to lose weight. If you have a tough time finding the right words for her, the Counseling Center on campus can be of assistance, and it is completely confidential.

Encourage her to visit the center as well. You can even take this one step further by embarking on a healthier lifestyle as a couple. Go for walks. Cook dinner together. It can be fun for both of you to bond and is a great way for her to feel better inside and out! Of course, this is not a slight task. Remember to enlist your resources and make sure your girlfriend seeks medical attention to guide her through her laxative withdrawal safely. Best of luck, V P.S. The Counseling Center can be reached at (305) 284-5511

WANTED Fun male mentor for 10 year old boy 3 days a week in Coral Gables (just blocks from UM) 4-6 p.m.

Additional money for gas to pick boy up from school (Sunset) $10/hour Call Estella at 786-546-5159

January 29 - February 1, 2009

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DEAR V

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The Miami Hurricane - Jan. 29, 2009  

The Miami Hurricane - Jan. 29, 2009