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THE BRUIN December 3, 2016

VOLUME 99

NUMBER 2

NEWS

The Great Barrier ReefIs it dying or already dead? Page 8

FEATURES

The best spots in town to get volunteer opportunities and community service hours Page 12

IT’S STILL ABOUT THE KIDS DOERNBECHER REMAINS THE FOCUS OF MISSION MAC HIGH PAGE 12


whoweare

a guide to navigating the issue JACOB GROUT

mhs bruin. com

National Pace Maker award-winner for 2001, 2002, 2004 National Pace Maker Finalist for years 2000-2005 National Design of the Year 2001, 2002 All National awards are distributed by the National Scholastic Press Association

opinions Mari Sato discusses misconceptions about feminism and how it affects men too on page 6.

Letters to the Editor Policy Letters should be limited to 200 words and may be subject to editing for libelous and/or obscene content as well as length. All letters must be signed and names will be published. Submission of material is not a guarantee of publication. Letters may be dropped off in Room 227 or mailed to The Bruin, McMinnville High School, 615 E. 15th St., McMinnville, OR 97128.

The Bruin is a member of Quill and Scroll, International Honorary Society for High School Students, The Journalism Education Association, and Northwest Scholastic Press.

inside this issue

Sweater Weather

Get all the details about the new and improved Mission Mac High on page 4.

Sophomore Esme Alvarez keeps warm in her stylish scarf.

page 23

Inside AVID AVID teachers expand and improve the program to include both freshmen and sophomores. page 3

features

Young Conductor Senior Ethan Keleher shares his love of music by helping to conduct the choir.

Read about Daniel Salewski’s tribute to his mother on page 19.

page 22

Three Musketeers Drama students performed a successful and entertaining show this fall. 2

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HANNAH SIEPMANN Editor-in-Chief EMMA BEYER Editor-in-Chief DIANA DENNEY Managing Editor CHEYENNE DROVER News Editor EMMA SIEPMANN Opinions Editor MARI SATO Features Editor KEVIN CHANG A&E Editor DEVON MILLER Sports Editor TOMMY DOUGLASS What’s Bruin Editor LEO MARTINEZ Art Focus Editor CAITLIN PELLETIER Business Manager SOPHIE BROCKIE Fashion Editor KATHY BEYER Adviser

Contact The Bruin (503) 565-4159 www.mhsbruin.com

REPORTERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS

ANDRES MORALES ANGELA TISZKUS ANNIE CHRISTMAN BRADY SHIELDS CELESTE SHEARER CORRIN WILMARTH DEREK MYERS DEVIN BALDWIN ELIZABETH KOKORUDA ERIKA BARNES GABE ROMERO GRACE LEE JAKE FOWLER JENNA FOLLIN LUIS STRAUB MARY STEEPROW MIGUEL LOEZA OMAR HERNANDEZ ORION ANDERSON ZOE HAYES


DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT EDITOR CHEYENNE DROVER

news

AVID Expansion

The Great Barrier Reef faces extinction if nothing is done to stop the bleaching of corals

AVID teachers welcome new students from the freshman class, as well as sophomore students continuing with the program

BY KEVIN CHANG out & about editor GRACE LEE

BY ANDRES MORALES writer

THE QUALITY OF CORALS IN THE GBR HAS BEEN DETERIORATING BECAUSE OF RISING OCEAN TEMPERATURES

ANDRES MORALES

As most students know, a new class was introduced to freshmen last year called AVID. It is a program that helps prepare students for college in the near future. AVID has been around for a while, at schools all across the U.S. Last year MHS teachers Darcy Houston and Nichole Long heard about this program and were amazed. Long said, “Honestly, I was super excited! After attending the Denver AVID conference that first year, I couldn’t help but be excited about what this program could do for our school. I just knew I had to be a part of it and next thing I knew, I was one of the coordinators for the whole program.” Houston said, “I was so excited to start the AVID program at MHS because it benefits all students, not just the students who are in the elective. I want students to realize their potential and see that college is a possibility.” Last year there were group bonding activities to get students working together in order to improve their communication skills and work ethic, and they continue these practices this year too. In class, students are assigned a TRF (Tutorial Request Form) to be presented at the start of the following class period. A TRF is a sheet of paper which contains questions that you fill in with the class/subject that you are having complications with. Every year each AVID class takes a field trip to a college. Long said, “With our tenth graders we are getting to really focus on academics, grades and improving their tutorial and Cornell note skills. We also are getting to do two college visits this year (instead of one). We had our visit to OSU last week and are planning to visit a private college as well AVID ADVISORS NICHOLE LONG AND DARCY HOUSTON this year in the spring.” WERE THE FIRST TO BRING THE PROGRAM TO MHS The first generation of AVID students from Mac High might be attending an out of state college this following year or their senior year. AVID students of all grades are required to take the SAT’s and PSAT’s. Before joining AVID class students have to sign a contract agreeing that they will maintain a GPA above 2.5 and sign up for an AP or Honors class. Some new things are going to be happening this year. Long said, “This year we have both tenth grade and ninth grade AVID. Last year we only had our ninth grade group for half the year, so the majority of the time was spent building relationships with the students, setting goals, and getting them excited about going to college. With our new freshman group, we are able to spend more time on practicing tutorials and Cornell notes.” Their plan for this year is, “to also incorporate some more team building with some sort of fun field trip as well. Our freshman will visit U of O this spring and will have their team building scavenger hunt later this month.” Long said. Long was asked how long are you planning to keep the AVID program alive at Mac High? Long responded in “Forever... Well, for as long as we can. We are so excited about what this program can do for our school. Its focus on college and career readiness is essential. We are not just trying to support good grades, but we are working to support good people. The skills that are learned in AVID are not just academic. We are teaching communication skills, organizational skills, collaboration, etc. It’s about providing teaching and support to develop a whole person.”

The Great Barrier Reef, located just off the northeast coast of Australia, is an amazing wonder. It covers more than 300,000 square kilometers and consists of more than 3,000 reefs, 600 islands, and 300 coral cays. Within these reefs live thousands of different types of plants, birds and marine life, making it one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. It ranks as the number one place in the world to visit according to U.S. News, ahead of Paris, Maui, Rome and many other beautiful and historic places. The reef can been seen by air, sea, and explored by scuba diving. Its accessibility leads to over two millions tourists visiting the natural wonder each year, earning Australia five to six billion dollars. Sadly, the wonder may not be around for much longer. On Oct. 11, 2016, Rowan Jacobsen for Outside Magazine wrote an obituary for the 25 million year old reef. This sparked controversy, with CNN and The Guardian both stating that this was untrue. Despite refuting this claim, both news conglomerates agree that the Great Barrier Reef is in serious danger and will become extinct if nothing is done. The corals within the reef get their vibrant colors and much of their nourishment from algae that live on their surfaces. The algae make sugars through photosynthesis, which the corals feed on. But when temperatures rise too high, the algae produce too much oxygen, which is toxic, and the corals must eject their algae to survive. Without the algae, the corals turn bone white and begin to starve. This process is called bleaching. This has been happening for millions of years, as ocean temperatures rise and fall with the season, so the corals gain and regain their algae annually. Unfortunately rapidly rising ocean temperatures over the last 50 years have not given the reef enough time to regain their algae back. All hope for the reef is not lost though. There are many things that everyone across the globe can do to save this natural wonder. It all starts with a couple simple steps like planting a tree, which reduces harmful runoff into the oceans and reduce greenhouse gases, or even just researching which lawn fertilizers are toxic or not before buying, as even runoff from thousands of miles away eventually lead into the oceans. If we all begin to actively be more environmentally conscious, we can make a huge impact on not only the health of the Great Barrier Reef, but the entire world as well. Hopefully we can do enough to save the reef, and let its beauty be seen for generations to come. The Bruin NOVEMBER 30, 2016 mhsbruin.com

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DEVIN BALDWIN

The largest fundraiser of the year faces a major change, but students must remember to focus on its purpose BY CHEYENNE DROVER news editor

NANCY MACIAS, REPRESENTING CHEERLEADING www

JUNIOR BAUTISTA, REPRESENTING SPANISH 4

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JESUS CAMACHO, REPRESENTING DRAMA

SKYLER SCHUCK, REPRESENTING CROSS COUNTRY

Mission Mac High shares the same goal with its predecessor: to raise money for the Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. There are still giant fundraisers, students are carrying around plastic water containers, and there will be a pageant near the end of the year. In previous years, the high school has only allowed male participants, but this year anyone was welcome to audition for a spot. “I’ve received positive feedback (about the change). There may be different opinions, but I haven’t received them,” said school dean Steve Cooper. Other students reported that there was discontent among the student body, but it seems as if these individuals are keeping their opinions to themselves. “People are upset because they saw Mr. Mac High as a tradition, but they’re still supportive,” said senior Nancy Macias. The change to the fundraiser is permanent, and it seems as if most of the feedback about the modification is positive. Whether this is because those in opposition refuse to speak openly about it or have simply accepted it as a new tradition is questionable. There are two girls and eleven boys participating this year. With the decision skewed one way, some students are questioning whether or not this was truly a push for inclusion. Cooper provided the details on how participants are chosen; they fill out an application and go through an audition and interviewing process. He also mentioned that academics, attendance and behavior are taken into account. With only seven girls auditioning and a lot of information to take into account, the Doernbecher club board members had to decide which students “People are would best represent the high school. The committee discusses all of the upset because auditions before making a final they saw Mr. Mac decision. This group includes High as a tradition, Kerrie Savage, Cooper, Madeline but they’re still Gibson, and the leadership for the Mission Mac High show. “At the end of supportive.” the day it isn’t about who is involved,” - Nancy Macias said senior Daniel Salewski. He noted that it has nothing to do with the genders of the individuals involved, and that the only purpose is to fundraise for the hospital. Many of the people involved with Mission Mac High have personal reasons for auditioning for a spot, which only makes their decision to try out more understandable. Macias’s father passed away because of an illness, so she wants to help families that are struggling with the cost of medical expenses, and Salewski’s brother was often at Doernbecher as a young child, so he feels a strong connection with the hospital. Mission Mac High is such an important fundraiser, and it brings the entire school together for a single cause. It raises money and awareness for Doernbecher Children’s Hospital through large fundraising events and small personal donations. Mac High has kept this tradition for over two decades, but aspects of the fundraiser must change from time to time, and this year the change happens to affect who can participate.


A Change of Scenery Changes to Mac High will affect student activities day-to-day during the current sophomores’ senior year BY CELESTE SHEARER writer MCMINNVILLE SCHOOL DISTRICT

There has been buzz about the school bond that passed earlier this year, but not many people actually know what it’s about. The bond’s primary goal is “to improve the safety and security of our school and the other schools,” according to principal Tony Vicknair. “I just think that when this whole thing is finished, we’re going to be really pleased with the product. We’ll see some of the things that are really valued in McMinnville finally get what they deserve: the pathway classrooms, music, our drama program, and our athletic facilities will all be improved. I think our kids deserve that,” he said. This means major renovations and added facilities to our school. “Nearly every school has something that the bond is going to be fixing. We’re the only school that’s getting any new building piece,” Vicknair said. McMinnville will continue to have only one high school. Vicknair said, “the Long Range Facilities Taskforce is a bunch of community and staff members working together to help figure out what our school needs for the long term. They decided it was better to continue forward with [the 2007 renovations].” A completely new high school would cost much more than tax payers would be willing to pay. With this bond taxes will not raise. “The bond that payed for Columbus and Grandhaven to get built is expiring,” he said, so this new bond will take its place and continue to tax people the exact same amount. This year will bring only minor inconveniences to

students and staff. Vicknair said, “starting in February, [students will] start seeing the parking lot torn up between here and Wortman. They are going to start building a 14,000 square foot professional/technical center there.” Several pathway programs, such as construction, welding, horticulture and engineering will eventually move to that building. There are many changes happening in the coming years, but the 2017-2018 school year will bring no changes. The plans need a lot of work, so next year is the calm before the storm. The current sophomore students’ senior year will be when most of the initial disruption occurs. Parking will be disrupted next semester, which is why the school only sold parking permits for the first semester only. “We’ll have to use those requirements- attendance, grades, and behavior- to make sure that we have enough parking spaces,” Vicknair said. Also, the new cafeteria will be expanded. “It will be an L-shape cafeteria. So the grass will be covered in cafeteria, which will double its size,” says Vicknair. Other changes this year include the grass field that’s to the north side being ripped up to store the construction equipment during the remodel, synthetic surface put down on Baker Field, and some minor renovations in first through fourth halls. Eventually, the new cafeteria will be the only one in the school. The Commons will be turned into our library,

and in turn, the performing arts classes will occupy the library’s old spot. More space upstairs will be added onto as well. There have been mixed feelings from the students about the coming changes. Feshman Kaylani Kam said; “I’m excited to see the outcome! I am kind of nervous about how classes will change in the process of building.” As an EASA student, she said the movement onto our campus will be “kind of bittersweet… The bus ride and change of scenery is nice.” The Career and Technical Center will improve zones for most of the pathways. Chip Ford, the Fabrication and Welding teacher, said, “I’m excited to have more space, and the space will be in one big room instead of three rooms so supervision and safety will be enhanced. I think it’s a great opportunity for our school to have a first-class facility, and use it to its fullest.” Vicknair is not in charge of what is being changed. His job for the renovations is to facilitate the conversations with people and staff. He said, “I’m the bridge between them and the architects. My main job will be to keep students safe and secure and keep academics able to move forward.” So far, to keep the community informed, Vicknair said he has had two parent meetings in September, and students can go to the McMinnville School District webpage to see all the pictures of the facilities and new information will be released as it becomes available.

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opinions

DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT EDITOR EMMA SIEPMANN

Feminism for All Mari Sato explains how feminism benefits not only women but everyone in society Each issue the The Bruin Editorial Board meets to discuss the topics of the school and give their opinion. The board is chaired by Hannah Siepmann & Emma Beyer [Co-editors].

BY MARI SATO features editor

BASKETBALL EQUALITY

A B C D F

The girls and boys basketball programs will be closer to equal, starting this season. According to the federal law of Title IX, the girls and boys are required to be provided with equal venue, practice time and other factors. The teams will begin to alternate playing at the primetime spot of 7p.m, so that girls can finally get the same opportunities as our boys’ teams. BRAVO!

SUCCESSFUL BLOOD DRIVE

Trust me. I love men. A common misconception in our developing society is that feminists are man-hating manipulators seeking a female dictatorship. But I would beg to differ. The Merriam Webster Dictionary definition or feminism is “the belief that men and women should have equal rights and opportunities” which, despite the name, means that feminism is a belief in the support of equal rights for both males and females. Through historical uprising we have seen the benefits of feminism for women from higher education to the gain of voting rights: but are there benefits for men MARI SATO as well? Men have more power, money, and freedom; what could they possibly gain? The benefits of feminism for males differ from that of females; but they are no-less meaningful. Feminism challenges the stereotypical standards for masculinity (tough,strong, and aggressive) by opening up gender roles. This notion for men has been influenced by the long standing support of male patriarchy in our society and the idea that men must be the bread winners of every family. Feminism challenges these standards for men and opposes gender roles. Obviously, not all men 6

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relate to the traditional standards set for them; and they shouldn’t have to. In this day and age, diverse qualities of all human beings should accepted and celebrated. Besides acceptance of each other, feminism advocates a greater awareness of male violence and sexual abuse. Male domestic violence is more common than you might think, yet it is frequently disregarded as an illegitimate problem; bringing shame upon male victims. Therefore, men are less likely than women to seek emotional help, which brings to further difficulty in coping by themselves. Feminism fights the myth that men are not victims of domestic violence and abuse. Another cause for feminism for men is the fight for less of a stigma around spending time with their children. The idea that women have absolute responsibility to raise children is old school. With all genders working and raising children; advantages like taking paternity leave from work to spend crucial time with their children should apply to all parents, and feminism advocates that this should not be a shameful act. For children, spending time with both parents has nothing to do with what society deems acceptable. In a world where equality is constantly challenged; be an advocate for the rights of everyone. Feminism benefits all genders, and supporting feminism benefits us all; don’t let misinformed people tell you otherwise.

MHS hosted the Red Cross for the first blood drive of the year. Many students volunteered to donate their blood to those who need it, including people with emergency trauma as well as patients with certain chronic illnesses. Way to step up and lend a helping hand.

BRIAN BARNES IS COLLEGE BOUND Senior wrestler Brian Barnes has officially committed to attend the University of Northern Colorado, on a full-ride scholarship. Although there was a last minute announcement to go to the library for the Letter of Intent signing, we feel these athletes deserve schoolwide recognition. Barnes is one of the best wrestlers to ever walk MHS hallways, let’s celebrate him and other athletes continuing to college to play.

KIRBY LEAVES MAC HIGH Beloved history teacher Ms. Kirby is no longer teaching at MHS, due to unexpected family circumstances. Her position has been fiilled by Mr. Gebauer and Ms. Haley, who we are sure will do an excellent job in her absence. McMinnville High School supports her decision to put family first, but we will miss her!

POST-ELECTION DIVISION While most students are grateful that 2016’s Presidential election is over, they cannot seem to forget the ups and downs over the course of the long election season. This is causing great divides in our student body, with students becoming more focused on defending their preferred candidate than their educations.


Free College? The possibility of free or reduced costs for higher education gets seniors excited about attending college

Are freshmen really responsible enough to leave school for

BY CELESTE SHEARER writer that… you have to meet certain requirements to get that tuition.” According to PSU’s website, students must “have a 3.4 grade point average and… be eligible for the Federal Pell Grant for low-income families.” Ester Lipke warns, “it is misleading. I don’t think there is actually free tuition.” Free Four Years covers only tuitionnot books, housing, or other fees. PSU is not the only college to offer free tuition. “With Chemeketa Scholars, for students who have the 3.5 GPA, meet the required scores on the ACCUPLACER testing, they can also qualify for free tuition,” said Johnson. Politicians have been buzzing about tuition lately. During the primaries, Bernie Sanders supported free tuition for colleges, claiming “education should be a right, not a privilege.” “I want [students] to know that we are a good resource… we’re definitely here for them to come and talk to about those types of things like colleges, scholarships, how they’re going to pay for it. There are requirements… so it’s not equalized across the board,” said Lipke.

CORRIN WILMARTH

The fall for underclassmen is the time of back to school. Probably a little bittersweet: excitement for the year ahead, but still not ready for yet another year of school. For seniors, however, it’s the ‘great scrambling act.’ Fall is the last chance for SAT and ACT tests, teacher recommendations, FAFSA, and many scholarships. Early action and early decision deadlines have passed for most schools and suddenly teenagers are facing their impending adulthood. An important question is on many seniors’ minds: how in the world am I going to pay for college? Well don’t despair! How does free tuition sound? Portland State University is offering a new program called Four Free Years. This is the first year the program has been in effect, so no one CELESTE SHEARER is sure how it will work out. Lisa Johnson, from the College and Career Center said, “there are some restrictions on

Two MHS students share their take on current politics through art

BY DEVIN BALDWIN photographer

“NO. WE CAN’T EVEN KEEP THE DEN CLEAN OR SIT STILL IN CLASS.” KYLEE LONGAKER, 9

“NO! THEY’RE IMMATURE AND THEY’RE NOT READY TO HANDLE GOING OFF CAMPUS.” ZEILA MEDINA, 12

“NO. THEY’RE UNREADY AND MOST PROBABLY WOULDN’T EVEN COME BACK TO THE SCHOOL.”

BY ORION ANDERSON AND CORRIN WILMAR TH

EMANUEL ROMERO, 12

ORION ANDERS ON ERZSI OLSEN, 9

“I’D SAY NO, BECAUSE WE’RE STILL FIGURING OUT HIGH SCHOOL AND CAN’T EVEN TURN IN HOMEWORK.”

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Seniors to State Schools

TELL ME something good

Mac High’s seniors with 4.0 GPAs are tending to lean towards state universities instead of aiming for Ivy League colleges

A regular column to celebrate the goodness at MHS

BY DEVON MILLER sports editor

Senior Junior Bautista received some good news recently-- he won the Daughters of the American Revolution scholorship, potenially winning him up to $5,000. According to the Daughters of the American Revolution website, “This award recognizes and rewards individuals who possess good citizenship qualities of dependability, service, leadership JUNIOR BAUTISTA and patriotism in their homes, schools and communities.”’ Bautista can choose to enter an optional extra scholarship contest to possibly win even more money, up to $5,000, which Bautista will be participating in. No matter what happens next, McMinnville High School is proud of you, Junior!

CAITLIN PELLETIER

ORION ANDERSON

ESSAY COMPETION FINALIST

Who would want to leave the beautiful state of Oregon; a place that has nothing but cloudy skies and puddles, to pursue their college education after high school? Apparently, not many of the valedictorians from the Class of 2016. Only three out of the 12 top students at our school decided to venture out-of-state to earn their degrees. This is very unusual because in years past these were usually the type of students who wound up at Ivy League schools or other highly selective universities. Over the past couple of decades, the academic standards for students have drastically increased and so has the tuition, which is why the decision to remain in-state to receive their post-secondary education makes sense. The nine students that decided to stay in Oregon most likely did so because they wanted to take full advantage of all of the benefits that they could procure from being an undergraduate student in the state of Oregon. An important factor that they most likely took into consideration was the difference between in-state and out-of-state cost of attendance. For instance, Oregon State University’s (OSU) total cost is $26,620, while Stanford University is around $62,363 annually. That is a difference of $35,743 per year and if

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these students wanted to earn a bachelor’s degree at OSU they would be saving $142,972 by attending a college in Oregon rather than an out-of-state school like Stanford. Dual credit from Chemeketa was probably another factor that they considered when choosing a university. The Class of 2016 earned 8,560 credits which saved them $782,470. Many out-state-schools, especially the more selective ones, won’t transfer the credits they earned throughout their high school career. This is a complete waste of money and time because McMinnville High School has 190 credits that are qualified to be transferred, and if students took advantage of these credits they could possibly start as a junior in college with an Associate of Oregon Transfer Degree through the Chemeketa Community College. Money was probably the biggest influence in their decisions, no wonder the majority of our top students from the Class of 2016 chose to attend a school in Oregon because they have the benefits of in-state tuition and the opportunity to transfer their credits over from the high school. Additionally, students who choose to stay have the opportunity to meet unique people, see beautiful places in the comfort of their home state and they might miss Dutch Bros a little too much.

HORTICULTURE SUCCESS Recently, a few select students in the horticulture pathway were excited to attend and compete at the National FFA Convention, which took place in Indianapolis, IA over the Oct. 19-22 weekend. Our students made McMinnville proud, as two of the team members (Taylor Ames, Luis Garibaldo) won individual silver medals and the team took home bronze, despite facing a sudden sickness of teammate Nichole Shaw. Great job, Grizzlies!

NEW TENNIS COACH Another exciting piece of news from Mac High recently is that MHS history teacher Wesley Gabrielson will be coaching boys tennis in the spring. We can’t wait to see our boys dominate the court this spring under their new coach.


Are Dress Codes Sexist? Brady Shields explains the positive and negative aspects of the school dress code and whether or not it is oppressive to female students BY BRADY SHIELDS writer

Doernbecher Club’s annual pageant has changed its name, but has it really changed as much as it claims? BY ORION ANDERSON writer

At many high schools, there is a common question about school dress codes: are they sexist and targeted towards women? McMinnville High School is one of the schools where it is a frequent question. Many female students at McMinnville High School have expressed disapproval for the dress code. They believe that it encourages rape culture and is meant to keep women from gaining power. MHS sophomore Vivian Nice expressed views of the dress code being targeted at women; she said, “girls have to DRESS CODES ARE A follow more rules than boys WAY FOR WOMEN TO BE in terms of OPPRESSED FOR MAKING dress codes.” However, the THEIR OWN CHOICES. administra-VIVIAN NICEtion finds more violations from boys. “Most of our dress code violations come from male students. We have a hard time anticipating women’s fashion trends, since they change very frequently,” said principal Tony Vicknair. A common reason for school dress codes is the fact that when women wear revealing clothing, they are more likely to be sexually targeted. However, many women’s rights activists have expressed views that women should not be targeted for rape because they were “asking for it.” When Nice was asked about whether dress codes encourage vic-

tim blaming, she said, “Women should not be blamed for sexual violence because they were wearing certain clothing. This is what dress codes do. They encourage victim blaming.” Vicknair disagrees that victim blaming is a common effect of dress codes. “Our dress code is not put in place for that purpose. It is to keep the classroom in a professional state free of distractions,” said Vicknair, “I don’t believe our dress code is sexist. It promotes students to have choice, while not causing distractions, whether it is a male or female student.” Nice does believe that dress codes oppress women. “Dress codes are a way for women to be oppressed for making their own choices,” said Nice. Vicknair was asked to respond to the belief that dress codes are enacted to oppress women. He responded, “I don’t believe our dress code is sexist. It promotes students to have choice, while not causing distractions, whether it is a male or female student.” Nice and Vicknair both expressed opinions of the dress code’s potential misogyny, although Vicknair revealed that most of the violations to the dress code of McMinnville High School are committed by men. However, the policies that apply more to women have been enacted in the past to oppress women and keep them from having power. Therefore, the answer to the overall question of whether dress codes oppress women is that they do and they have for years.

This year, “Mr Mac High” went through a change and became “Mission Mac High.” Now gender inclusive, they now feature the first female members, Valeria Solan and Nancy Macias. So if Mission Mac High underwent the change to be gender inclusive, is it? With only two female members, and more who auditioned, Mission Mac High could have been more diverse. Mission Mac High features multiple members from the year before, and is an all senior team. From an outside standpoint, it seems unfair. Mission Mac High appears as if they kept a male bias in their choosing of members, which the feminist in me disagrees with. If they were really showing gender equality, they could have (and should have) chosen the team to be more equal in the male to female ratio.

HONESTLY, THERE SHOULDN’T HAVE EVEN BEEN A FIGHT TO CHANGE MR. MAC HIGH TO MISSION MAC HIGH. Taking into consideration the fact that there may not have been female students who had auditioned, there could have been a bigger push for them to do so. Many teachers or staff could easily identify hard workers and those who are willing to make a change, and suggest them to the team. The goal has always been to collect money, and it is not as if they are going to quit doing so. You don’t need to keep the tradition of an all male team to keep the tradition of raising money for children, which is what it’s been about since the start.

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DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT EDITOR MARI SATO

GABE ROMERO

features

Students volunteer with NHS to bring service to the community BY ANNIE CHRISTMAN writer

Odin Thorson’s Car Project

Thorson works regularly on his car to create a new range of motion BY GABE ROMERO writer/photographer

There is something about process of building a car from rock bottom to something absolutely amazing. McMinnville High School junior Odin Thorson is currently working on a project that most Mac High students don’t yet know about. Odin Thorson has been working on his car for over a year now. So far he has brought it from its purest stock form to a very capable drift car. He has stripped the car of its luxuries and interior seats and fabric to reduce the weight of the car. This is only a minor modification in the grand scheme of where he wants his project to go. He has also welded his differential which allows for the rear wheels to turn at the same speed at all times which is a must for drifting. But wait a second, what kind of car is Odin working on? Well, he is building a 1993 Nissan 240sx. It is a rare convertible model and only has

roughly 155 horsepower. Since the engine is in the front and the drivetrain is RWD, it has the potential for being a monster of a drift car. He plans take the stock engine out and place a Lexus V8 into the car. Swapping the engine to a V8 will add a lot more power and allow for increased ability to slide. After changing the engine, Odin also plans on installing a manual transmission so that he can change gears on command and control the car so much more while sliding. Other mods he plans to install are some steering changes like angle and a new roll cage for added stability and safety. The fact that he can take a 20-year-old car and make it into a fully capable drift machine is amazing. It is creations like this that spark a light of inspiration in other car enthusiasts. It creates an outlet for many people’s creativity and pro-

Senior Odin Thorson works on his 1993 Nissan 240sx. 10

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Those who are a part of the National Honor Society know that while academics and leadership skills are valued heavily, NHS stresses the importance of being active in one’s community and displaying excellence in the area of service. McMinnville’s own NHS club is an active member of our community and plans multiple volunteer projects throughout the year. A standard of 50 percent participation is set for each member, guaranteeing that many helping hands turn out to take part in the service. Sarah Breyer, the advisor for NHS at McMinnville High School, describes why they continuously offer their service to organizations in the area such as Restore, Living History Day, and YCAP. “We volunteer at all kinds of places. A lot of them because we always have, but they’re all helpful to either the schools in our districts, the community, or the students as a whole.” Participants in NHS offer their time and energy to many organizations in the community such as the popular YCAP (Yamhill County Action Partnership), who aids low-income families, senior citizens, and disabled residents through social service and transportation. NHS partners with other similar organizations such as ReStore, who provides low-cost, gently-used furniture and home repair supplies, and Adopt-a-Family, a non-profit that provides tight-budgeted military families with gifts and grocery store gift cards at Christmas time. The altruistic spirit passed on to NHS participants by these organizations are a feature valued NHS focuses by the National Honor Sociits recognition ety, but furthermore, is on students of a great personal virtue. Sarah Breyer agrees, scholarship, stating, “I think it’s imleadership, portant for students to service, and see what’s out in the world. character There’s nothing better than giving back.” But the benevolence of our local NHS team has a special focus on students too. They have actively supported local elementary schools, Living History Day, and the Friday Family Foods organization that provides eligible families in Newberg school districts with a bag of food each Friday. The National Honor Society recognizes well-rounded students. Such students provide excellence in academics, leadership, and of course, service. The virtue of service, actively contributing time, energy, and planning, to making your community a better place, is one that the NHS deems commendable and one that our local NHS club displays proudly.


Culturas Unidas Club

Ballet in Philadelphia

BY EMMA SIEPMANN opinions editor MARI SATO

Mia Audova shares her professional ballet experiences

BY EMMA SIEPMANN opinions editor

When thinking about moving away from home, most people think about attending college or even after that. However, one Mac High freshman defied this standard and departed McMinnville when she was an incoming eighth grader. Mia Audova moved across the county to Philadelphia, PA at only 13 years old to pursue her interest in becoming a professional ballet dancer, a scary decision for someone of her age. She attended The Rock School, a pre-professional ballet boarding school where she intensely trained in ballet while doing online school in the moments when she wasn’t dancing. This incredible adventure started in McMinnville and ended back here, when Audova returned to her hometown to attend MHS and live the life of a “normal teenager”. Her dream originated when she was young and wanted to take singing lessons. She enrolled in the musical theater dance/vocal class at Van de Veere Productions in McMinnville. “There was a jazz dance class right after my musical theater class, and I asked my mom to let me take that too. From there, it was recommended that I take ballet also, to build technique for my other classes. That’s when I really got interested in ballet.” After making the decision to attend this prestigious program, she had MIA AUDOVA

to face the reality of moving away from her home, friends, siblings and parents. “It was hard, but it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be. I had lots of really good friends and supporters in Philadelphia, so once I settled in, it kind-of felt like they were family. I did miss my parents sometimes, but I was so busy it was hard to be very homesick”. Once she got used to it and dove into boarding school life, she had a great time. Being homeschooled since sixth grade made for quite a change when she returned to public high school, but she’s in favor of MHS. “I love it. I learn better with hands-on projects and materials that I can touch, so online school didn’t work very well for me. I’m relieved to be back at a place where I can really learn.” Besides attending McMinnville High School this year, Audova is swimming on the swim team, like her siblings before her. “I’m so excited to be swimming this year; my family likes to say that it’s in our blood”. She is also ready to relax a bit, focus on school, and hang out with her friends. She plans to take the occasional dance class because she still loves to dance, but will be focusing on other things this year. After such an eventful year, this young dancer is excited to take a break from the pressures of the pre-professional ballet world and live her life like a normal high schooler. Despite the fact that she moved across the country by herself for a year, Mia Audova is really just like every other freshman student at Mac High; she is just a normal 14-year-old who is trying to survive the next four years.

One of Mac High’s less well-known clubs is Culturas Unidas, a club aimed at uniting the different groups, races and cultures within the high school. The club’s advisor and teacher of MHS’s Spanish for Spanish Speakers program, Cecilia Casillas, strives especially to unify the Hispanic students with their peers from other backgrounds. Casillas shared, “It is aimed at being a ‘safe place’ of sorts for our Hispanic students to share their culture and feel empowered within our school environment.” Senior Jaquelin Madrigal, the club’s president, added some of the key components that she wants to tackle this year as well. “I really just want everyone to be involved with school and each other. I want this club to help students at MHS get the full high school experience while they are here.” The vice president, Esmeralda Contreras, also hoped to get more students involved, along with many other goals. “I really would like to see more cultural awareness in our school, which is partially what this club is about. Both the club’s president and vice president joined as freshmen, and were hooked. “I thought it would be a fun way to become more involved in my new school and meet new people,” shared Contreras. They were interested in the concept of what the club stood for, and are now very glad that they ventured to join this club. They originally joined for fun, but their roles have now escalated far beyond that. Madrigal added, “I wanted everyone to experience high school in a positive atmosphere, providing support for students who feel like they are judged for being a minority.” Casillas also included that Culturas Unidas club is not solely for cultural representation, but also for the more traditional side of school. “We strongly emphasize academics as well, helping students with scholarships and college applications.” She made it clear as well that the club is almost entirely student-run, her only job being to meet with the executive board before each meeting and help them decide what to bring up in the meetings. Madrigal agreed, “The officers on the executive board work together to get things done. If one person needs to do a project, though, it is not our advisor; it’s me and the vice president.” Casillas added that, “Really, my main job is to make sure the board has everything they need as well as organizing trips and volunteer opportunities. It’s all up to them, which helps build great leadership skills for our students.” While this club is mostly advertised towards Hispanic students and those from Spanish-speaking homes, Culturas Unidas really does try to live up to its name. “We really want to unite our student body. I want to see everyone involved,” said the club president. For both those from Hispanic backgrounds and our students from many other diverse cultures, this club is an excellent way to learn more about a common culture here at MHS.

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HOMECO

A TRIBUTE TO HIS MOTHER BY SOPHIA BROCKIE fashion editor PICTURE BY EMMA BEYER editor


Nine candles shed their warm light across the walls of nine churches in the heart of Europe, their flames dancing and flickering with a wonderful purpose. Each candle stands in honor of a cherished mother, Lynne Spann Salewski, who passed away after a brave fight with cancer. In July of 2014, Lynne Spann Salewski said goodbye to her husband and two sons, leaving them with memories of her compassion, kindness, and love of people. These memories sparked passion in her oldest son, Daniel Salewski, as he embarked on his exchange to Germany the summer before his senior year at McMinnville High School. Salewski left America, enlivened by the change of culture he was about to experience in Germany. Specifically, Salewski felt eager for the chance to see the foreign churches. The ancient architecture of the churches in Germany caught Salewski’s interest from the beginning; He felt that churches in America lacked individuality. Salewski stated, “Here in America, churches were built just to be

OMING 2015

built to enable religious practices. But, over in Germany,they spent so much time and dedication building the churches.” He then went on to describe his experience in the first church he visited Salewski said, “The first church I went to was in Bad Bellingen.... My host sister took me there [to the church] and it was probably the best experience I have had in a church. All the churches in America are very similar, with carpet floors and a long line of pews that all look the same. Everything about those churches is uniform. But this church was different.” Salewski described the artistry of the church. He was enthralled by the rose pink walls and soft, decorative, gold accents encircling a spectacular mural portraying a Biblical story. The pews were weathered, possibly having been there for hundreds of years. The whole atmosphere of the church was peaceful and heartening. Salewski simply pronounced, “Everything was stunning.” As Salewski marveled at the sophistication of the church he was sitting in,

he began to feel a tug at his heart. He began to think about his mom and he began to miss her presence. “My host sister and I sat in that pink church for a while, in silence, taking all of it in,” Salewski reminisced,“and it really just made me think about my mom and everything in my life. It made me think about broken relationships at home that needed restoration. As we were leaving, my host sister asked me if I wanted to light a candle for my mom. In that moment, my immediate response was yes. As we were walking out, I felt different. I decided it was a good idea to keep doing it.” After that first experience, Salewski visited eight more churches across Germany, Switzerland, and France. In each church, he lit another candle for his mother. Now, nine candles stand for Lynne Spann Salewski, the woman who loved people and would sacrifice her time and comfort just to make one person feel special. She is greatly loved to this day and her family and friends will cherish her memory forever.


Students discuss their plans for Winter Formal night and their creative proposals for asking dates to the dance

MARI SATO

Winter Formal Plans

“I JUST GOT A BORDER COLLIE NAMED BAILEY FROM CALIFORNIA.” KARINA GARCIA (10)

MARI SATO

BY THOMAS DOUGLASS writer

“I FINALLY SWITCHED TO STICK SHIFT... IT’S A LOT HARDER THAN AUTOMATIC.” KODY PHILLIPS (10)

Love is in the air, and so is friendship among the many Winter Formal proposals. Winter Formal, a girl ask guy dance, will be held this year at the Community Center on Dec. 10. Winter Formal for many is a chance to spend some time with their good friends while for others it serves as an elegant date with a significant other. Senior Annelin Stephens is excited to go to Winter Formal with her new boyfriend. “It’s just super fun. It depends on the person you’re with,” Stephens said. Sophomore Josh Flores is also excited to go to Winter Formal with his new girlfriend. “I think it makes it a little more meaningful,” Flores said. Winter Formal is also a great time to spend with friends. Freshman Emma Smith asked a good friend to Winter Formal. “He’s a good friend of mine and he’s a lot of fun and energetic like I am so I thought he’d be a good date,” Smith said. Aside from all the dancing many people make Winter Formal a fun filled night. “We’re going to Bodie Zollinger’s house and we are having elk burgers,” Smith said. “We’ll probably go to dinner, go to the dance, and watch a movie at someone’s house,” Stephens said. At this time of year, the halls are filled with girls asking their friends and crushes to go on a date to Winter Formal. Stephens asked her date by digging into his love of superheros. “I wore a Marvel shirt and I had the poster and gave him cupcakes,” Stephens said. Flores was asked through an inside joke. “I mispelled amazing with an I, like ‘amaizeing’ like ‘maize’ in the middle of the word. ‘Maize’ is corn in spanish and then we just kept that as a running joke. And that’s how she asked me, she was like ‘it’d be amaize-ing if you went to Winter Formal with me’,” Flores said. Regardless of the plans, regardless of the dates, Winter Formal is about spending time with those you are close with. When asked what he is most looking forward to Flores said, “Just spending that night with her and with other friends too.” “I’m expecting to have a lot of fun,” said Smith. Stephens added that she will make her last winter formal a night to remember, “I’m just going to have the best time I can have.” 14

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“I WEAR WOODEN SHOES WHEN I DO YARD WORK. I USED TO WEAR THEM ALL THE TIME BACK IN THE NETHERLANDS.” JEROME VERYUDN (STAFF)

“I PLAY FORWARD IN SOCCER AND HAVE BEEN PLAYING SINCE FIRST GRADE.” MADELINE SMITH (9)


sports

Pin and Win

Michael Abeyta and Stevie Ryan are both hoping for an excellent start in their season and hopes to place well in state

SIDELINE

WITH DEVON MILLER A FEW NOTES ON MHS ATHLETICSHat”s BARNES ARGUABLY BEST WRESTLER EVER AT MHS

EMMA BEYER

BY THOMAS DOUGLASS what’s bruin editor

FROM THE

DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT EDITOR DEVON MILLER

Brain Barnes had many options for college wrestling, but he accepted a scholarship from University of Northern Colorado(NCU) and was signed to the school’s wrestling team on Nov. 9. With two state championship and a fourth place his freshman year he is one of Mac High’s greats in wrestling. Get to The Furnace to see this guy.

EARLY INJURIES PLAGUE GIRLS BASKETBALL The season has barely started for the girls team and there are already two athletes who have to sit out. Ally Legard is hoping to be back by January after receiving a stress fracture to her tibia, and her fellow senior teammate Sydni Dix is the only player not returning to the game. Dix decided that focusing on softball was the safest route for her after tearing her ACL twice while playing basketball.

MARIOTTI CAN’T SWIM FOR MHS, SATO BACK

With wrestling season just underway, juniors Stevie Ryan and Michael Abeyta, are both entering their third year wrestling and have high expectations for their team which placed fifth in state last year. “I want the team to take six guys to state,” said Abeyta. Ryan, on the other hand, stressed how he wanted the team to go out there and have fun while giving it their all.

IF YOU WORK HARD YOU CAN BE AN INSPIRATION TO ANYONE -STEVIE RYAN-

Abeyta and Ryan have both been putting in the work to see personal improvements as well, “I want to go undefeated to the state title,” said Abeyta. According to sophomore wrestler Tyler Olsen, Abeyta is not afraid to put in the work during the offseason, “Michael taught me new moves and coached me during the offseason.” Abeyta is used to performing under pressure attending the state tournament both his freshman and sophomore years, placing second in his weight class last year. He has also been maintaining his fitness during the offseason by running both varsity track and varsity cross country. Of the three sports he does, wrestling is his favorite. Abeyta said he plans to wrestle in the 145 weight class. Ryan also strives for a high level of competition this year, hoping to qualify for his first state tournament. He

too has been putting in the time on the mats. He describes the pride he feels after every workout, “My favorite part is that feeling you get after a hard workout.” Ryan is ready to take on a leadership role being a returning upperclassmen, “I realized that anyone can be a leader.” Ryan also described the work ethic he will set for the newcomers, “It’s about how hard you work.” Ryan also participated in varsity football in the fall, and plans to wrestle in the 182 weight class. Both Abeyta and Ryan spoke to the fact that they love the bond the team develops. “It’s about the good times and getting closer,” Abeyta said. Ryan enjoys spending time with his teammates, “My favorite part about the team is getting to know the guys.” According to Olsen, the team is composed of many new wrestlers, so Abeyta and Ryan will no doubt be tasked with helping these young kids become successful. Olsen stated that Abeyta was crucial to his wrestling development as well as feeling welcome on the team his freshman year, “When I first came in, Michael shook my hand and introduced himself to me and he was the main reason I improved.” Olsen described how he looks up to Abeyta, “He is my hero and I want to be like him when I grow up.” As for Abeyta and Ryan the road to state began long before the season, and the countless hours of practice and conditioning are sure to pay off on the mats. “If you work hard you can be an inspiration to anyone,” said Ryan.

Giovanni Mariotti was a huge contributor to the boys swimming team’s success last year, and after his return, many were excited about the upcoming season. Unfortunately, Mariotti will be unable to participate in the 2016-2017 swim season because he is considered a second year senior. Mari Sato returns as a standout swimmer after enjoying her year- long exchange in Finland.

GIRLS BB GETS PRIME TIME SLOT The Federal law, Title IX, that mandates equal access to facilities for boys & girls for athletics and activities appears to finally be applied to varsity basketball time slots at MHS. This basketball season the teams will share the prime time 7p.m. start time, alternating game times. A step forward to the obvious. Fair is fair. Game Dates: Girls Basketball: Nov. 30 Boys Basketball:Dec. 2 Wrestling: Dec. 3 Boys and Girls Swimming: Dec. 1

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The Grizzly boys’ soccer team wraps up a great season being first in the Greater Valley Conference and second in state BY ELIZABETH KOKORUDA writer Mac High’s varsity boys’ soccer team finished second in state this year. During the beginning of the OSAA championship against Oregon City they had a great win. In Round 2, the McMinnville soccer team played an intense game against McKay, and with a shocking 8 seconds left on the clock the boys scored a goal, having the final score being 1-0. During the quarter-finals, the varsity boys played against West Linn and ended with a score of 3-1, winning again. At the semi-finals the team played at home against Wilson and won 3-1, qualifying for state. How come the boys are doing so well? Junior Jivan Sanchez said, “We try having this mindset of forcing on one game at a time and we can’t really look ahead.” Sanchez also talks about last year’s soccer team, “That was the problem with last year’s team and they were doing really well too, but they only got to the semi-finals because they underestimated their opponents, but we can’t do that. We just give it our all.” All the players have worked really hard to get as far as they did with their de-

termination and outstanding coach, Jory Shene. “He’s a pretty great coach- he tries to get us to interact with one another, and if we need help on something he’d talk to us individually,” said sophomore Diego Gil. Shene always motivates his players by saying, “Do the best that you can, play your hardest, don’t have any regrets when you go out there and play, and do all the simple things right. When the boys do that they have lots of success.” During the state game at the Hillsboro Stadium against Lakeridge, the boys started off with a very intense first half: both teams scored 1-1. But at the end of the first half team captain Renee Resendez got injured and was taken out of the game. “It was a normal kick like a kick I would always to take and I kicked it and I felt my leg just pop and went into a burst of pain. I tried to play it off and play for as long as I could,” said Resendez. “I was in really bad pain and it was 10 minutes left in the half until I had to sit down and ask for a sub.” In the beginning of the second half the Grizzlies scored their second goal, but their lead didn’t last long because Lakeridge soon tied the score 2-2. The game

went 20 minutes into overtime and no more goals were scored in that time. The game finally went into a “chances” where the teams have only five chances to score a goal, and whoever scores the most wins. Sadly, McMinnville Grizzlies lost with the final scored being 3-2. Resendez told his whole experience about this season, “The whole season was awesome. It was disappointing that we couldn’t get the cherry on top. Besides from that everything was not much more that I can ask for- we had a great group of guys and awesome coaching experience; I had a really good time this season.” Cameron Autencio talks about next year’s soccer team, “We have another opportunity to make it to the state championship even though we lose Renee [Resendez]and Junior [Rivas]who are all big players that help us a lot, but we still have our back force and our keeper and I think that we can progress and make it again.” There have been many great moments for the team, such as winning the semi-finals. “We finally won our semi-final game, and it took a lot of us to get through that, so it was the perfect experience,” said junior Nick Denley. JACOB GROUT

TEAM CAPTAIN RENEE RESENDEZ PREPARES TO BALL PAST A MCKAY PLAYER

KICK THE www 16

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COACH JORY SHENE KICKS AROUND A SOCCER THE SIDELINE AT THE SEMIFINAL GAME

BALL ON www

JUNIOR JIVAN SANCHEZ CONCENTRATES A BREAK IN THE GAME

DURING www


PHOTOS BY JACOB GROUT

THE BOYS VARSITY SOCCER TEAM LINES UP AT THE START OF THE STATE CHAMPIONSHIP GAME ON NOVEMBER 12. DESPITE THEIR HARD WORK IN A CLOSE GAME, THE TEAM LOST TO LAKERIDGE 2-3 AND PLACED SECOND IN THE STATE OF OREGON.

AND FAST-PACED www

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out&about

DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT EDITOR KEVIN CHANG

Three Musketeers

McMinnville High School put on a wonderful performance in front of hundreds this November

BY ANNIE CHRISTMAN writer CELESTE SHEARER

MARIAN LARSEN AND ROBERT SAGERS THEIR LINES FOR THE AUDIENCE

www DELIVER

THE CAST OF THREE MUSKETEERS SINGS ON STAGE

Over the weekend, the drama department wowed audiences with its first production of the year “The Three Musketeers.” The performances, which were given on Nov. 4-6, mark the completion of the annual fall production that the MHS Drama Dept. takes pride in every year. The drama department performed an adaptation of the classic tale we all know and love: “The Three Musketeers.” This adaptation, written by Ken Ludwig, follows the adventures of Athos, Porthos and Aramis. The play stays true to the original story, but incorporates humorous aspects in order to keep the audience engaged and entertained. Broen McLosky, who’s character is a lead in the play, describes the story as a perfect mix of, “a little action, a little romance, and a little bit of comedy.” What really stood out to audience members in this production was the complex fight and dance scenes our drama department executed perfectly on their opening nights. The cast choreographed complex scenes in the hope of conveying to their audience the action-packed theme of this classic. Sophomore Colin Salewski weighs in, “The fight choreography is something we have to be kind of cautious about because we actually have metal sabers for the show.” These intense and well-done scenes captured audience’s attention over the weekend, keeping us at the edge of our seats. With the excellent performance our drama department gave, they surely made it look all too easy. But members of the cast reveal the time and commitment such a big

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COLIN SALEWSKI AND JUAN PEREZ ACT OUT A FIGHT WITH REAL SWORDS

SWORD www

production really warrants. Cast members as well as other members of the production team dedicate long hours to fine-tuning their performance as McLosky reveals, “You’re here every day. It was until 5:30p.m., then it was until 7:30p.m., and this week it’s going to be until 9.” and, “Sometimes we have to come in on the weekends.” In their quest to put on this iconic production, the drama department reveals that there were some roadblocks. Their intense and intricate fight scenes were practiced and choreographed with the use of wooden replacements, seeing as their metal sabers didn’t arrive until two weeks prior to opening night. Time was also an issue for the department, as Salewski reveals when talking about their struggles. He states, “One of the biggest difficulties of this show is the time constraints that we’ve had and a lot of little things were getting messed up and delayed. We had a choir concert that set us back on building the set.”’ Regardless of the potential challenges our beloved drama department faced, they executed a fascinating, immersive, intense, and overall well-done performance over the weekend, and audience members were undoubtedly glad they came. By the reception of the play, we can assume Salewski was right in saying, “I think this is something MHS is really going to enjoy.” Surely viewers of the MHS production of “The Three Musketeers” by Ken Ludwig eagerly await the upcoming spring production.


Travel Plans

what to do this winter break . . . Christmas Lights Trail: Lighting of Maddax Woods

Follow colorful lights through Maddax Woods to a viewing platform on the Willamette River. Open: Nov. 19-Dec. 31 2016 [4-9p.m.] Location: 5785 River Street, West Linn 503-722-2137

Christmas Train

Take a one hour ride along the Willamette River and meet Santa on the decorated Holiday Express train. Open: Dec. 3-18 Location: The train leaves from 7805 SE Oaks Park Way, Portland To Purchase Tickets call: 800-9928499 or visit www.orhf.org/the-holiday-express/

Lights at the Grotto

Christmas Festival of Lights features 500,000 lights, choirs, carolers, a petting zoo, puppet shows, and hot chocolate. Open: Nov. 25-Dec. 30, nightly from 5-9:30p.m. (Closed Dec. 25) Location: 8840 NE Skidmore Street, Portland 503-261-2400

Christmas Play

Portland Playhouse performs Charles Dickens’ holiday classic “A Christmas Carol” about the miraculous transformation of grumpy Ebenezer Scrooge. Open: Dec. 2-24 (Evening shows start at 7p.m., Matinees at 2p.m.) Location: 602 NE Prescott St. Portland 503-488-5822

Zoolights

Zoolights uses 1.5 million LED lights to transform the Oregon Zoo into a winter wonderland of lighted trees, animal silhouettes, and moving sculptures. Open: Nov. 25- Jan. 1 (5-9p.m.) Location: 4001 SW Canyon Road, Portland 503-226-1561

Ice Skating in Sherwood

Turn your world in to a winter wonderland and skate. 20407 SW Borchers Dr, Sherwood Open 5a.m–11p.m. (503) 625-5757

Wings and Waves Waterpark

Forget about the winter cold at Evergreen’s Wings and Waves Waterpark, which has a 4 slides coming out of a 747 Boeing and a wave pool! Address: 500 Northeast Captain Michael King Smith Way, McMinnville, OR 97128 Open: 11a.m. - 6p.m. Thurs-Sun (503) 434-4185

The Gallery Theater

See a Christmas Story at McMinnville’s very own Gallery Theater. Shows start Nov. 25 Showtimes are every Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Address: 210 NE Ford St, McMinnville (503) 472-2227

BY ELIZABETH KOKRUDA writer

New York City, New York

Portland Trailblazers Game

Watch a very exciting and competitive Trailblazers team at prices starting at just 12 dollars. modacenterportland.ticketoffices.com/ Address: 1 N Center Ct St, Portland Various times throughout the year (503) 235-8771)

Bastille Concert

See the band behind the hits “Pompeii” and “Good Grief” Dec. 12 at the McMenamins Crystal Ballroom Dec. 12 at 8 p.m. Address: 1332 W Burnside St, Portland (503) 225-0047

Amy Schumer Show

Get a taste of Amy Schumer’s comedy at her stand-up show at the Moda Center this December. Dec. 1 at 8 p.m. Address: 1 N Center Ct St, Portland, (503) 235-8771

Band of Horses

Check out the lesser known alternative rock band from Seattle, Washinton at the Crystal Ballroom this holiday season. Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. Address: 1332 W Burnside St, Portland (503) 225-0047

New York City is iconically known for being the best Christmas destination every year because of the classic Christmas Tree at Madison Square. The tree has 30,000 lights and is topped with a 550 pound star. Another popular attraction is The Nutcracker ballet, which is known for its great performances. New York is known for its classic white Christmas and the beautiful lights of the city.

Mexico City, Mexico

Mexico City is a very popular spot for lots of tourists to come visit the hot weather. The city is filled with super bright Christmas lights and lots of loud buoyant music that plays all night.

Munich, Germany

Munich is famous worldwide for its absolutely gorgeous Christmas Market that people travel to from all over Germany to visit. The Christmas Market is very similar to the Saturday Market in Portland but instead it’s filled with Christmas activities, treats, and a 100 foot tall Christmas tree.

Chicago, Illinois

A couple reasons why Chicago is perfect for this Christmas is the holiday lights that are hung around the Magnificent Mile, and a Christkindlmarket, which is a large outdoor German crafts market. There’s also a Navy Pier’s Winter Wonderfest- a holiday themed amusement park with an indoor skating rink.

Quebec, Canada

If you want a Christmas in the wilderness, Quebec might be the right place to stop and take a look. Described as a “haven for environmentally friendly, outdoor enthusiastic people,” Quebec offers many opportunities for hiking, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling during Christmastime.

Paris, France

Visiting Paris, France this Christmas will be a time you’ll never forget, with activities such as watching the snow fall on the beautiful European streets and the sparkling lights of the Eiffel Tower constantly glowing in the night. Christmas will never be the same once you go to Paris. The Bruin NOVEMBER 30, 2016 mhsbruin.com

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EMMA BEYER

MARY STEEPROW

comix

CHEYENNE DROVER

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art focus

DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT EDITOR LEO MARTINEZ

Hands on Art Senior Connie Armstrong tells the Bruin about her love for ceramics BY ZOE HAYES online editor LEO MARTINEZ

It’s no secret that McMinnville High School has many talented artists. Their work is in the glass display case, or in the art rooms. The Visual Arts Pathway is one of 18 pathways offered. One great ceramics artist is senior Connie Armstrong. Armstrong got into art when she was young, like many artists do. Art also runs in the family. “My grandma was into art, she actually did pottery too.” She plans on being an artist when she is older. Armstrong has taken many classes in the art pathway, including Drawing, Painting, Exploratory Art 2D and 3D, Ceramics 1, 2, and 3. Even though she has taken all these classes, she says her favorite class is ceramics because “I just like working with clay and forming pieces.” Her favorite piece of artwork is, “a teapot.” She is a very artistic person in many aspects, and

she said, “I sing, I draw, and I write.” Garrison is an art teacher here at MHS. She originally taught photography at the beginning of her career. “Actually, when I first started teaching I was teaching mostly photography,” she said. “Now I get a little bit of everything besides photography.” Armstrong has been a student of hers for a while now. “This will be her fourth year with me,” Garrison said. Garrison has enjoyed watching Armstrong grow as an artist, and she said, “When she came in she was not very constance in her art skills,” said Garrison. “In this last year she really came into her own in ceramics and also in painting, kind of finding a little bit more of a passion for it, and that’s been fun to see.” Armstrong is a senior, so she is thinking ahead. She plans to attend art school,

SENIOR CANSTANCE ARMSTRONG SHOWS US HER LATEST PROJECT, A VASE (SHOWN ABOVE) PAINTED WITH HELP FROM ART TEACHER CHRISTINE A DARK HOLOGRAPHIC GLAZE. GARRISON ARMSTRONG BULIDS A CANVAS. www

WITH www

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Raising His Voice

ARTIST Q&a

Music is a big part senior Ethan Keleher’s life

Get to know senior Rose Pardun, an art student at Mac High who loves to create pieces to inspire herself and others

BY LEO MAR TINEZ art focus editor

LEO MARTINEZ

LEO MARTINEZ

BY LEO MAR TINEZ art focus editor

Q: “Which art classes are you currently taking?” A: “I’m in Painting 1 and AP Studio Art.” Q: “Do you like being part of the Visual Arts pathway?” A: “Yeah, its helped me with my mental illnesses and it’s

Music is a big part of everyone’s day-to-day life. For some people it’s not just a part of it, but it’s their whole life. For senior Ethan Keleher, “[he makes] it a part of [his] life.” “I’ve been in choir since the beginning of my high school career,” said Keleher. Since then the senior has made his way up to the top and into The Twilighters. In addition to singing with both Symphonic Choir and the Twilighters, Keleher has started conducting as well and taking on a leadership role in the choir department. It’s not easy for most to get into Twilighters and he says he loves it. “I like it because it’s a higher level of music than I’ve been able to deal with before,” said Keleher, “it’s challenging and I feel like it makes my brain think a lot more.” Classes in the music pathway at our school are extremely fun for students and Keleher, among other students, likes to think about the other aspects to them, “I actually have to think about what i’m doing.” Ethan Keleher not only takes Twilighters but said, “I make it a part of my life, I take as many classes that involve music as much as I can.” Keleher not only makes music a big part of his life at school, but he also makes music a big part of his life at home. “I play the piano and sing all the time,” said Keleher. An artist loves to hone their craft, and that’s exactly what Keleher is doing with his love for music.

just great to express myself with my art.”

Q: “Would you say that your art inspires people?” A: “I would hope that it inspires other people because art

really inspires me. It would be great to know that my art inspires others to make art themselves.”

Q: “Who are your favorite artists?” A: “I really like surrealism so I really like artists like Dali

and others from that time.”

Q: “What’s your favorite medium?” A: “I like using acrylic paint with a pallette knife because

it’s

freeing and creates more texture.”

Q: “Is art going to be a part of your career?” A: “I would hope so. It’s been a pretty big part of my life so

far.” 22

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fashion

ESME ALVAREZ, 10

SCARVES, SCARVES AND MORE SCARVES THIS THANKSGIVING SEASON

THANKFUL FOR DIEGO GILL, 10

FLANNELS ARE A COZY CHOICE, PERFECT FOR A COLD, FALL DAY

SWEATER WEATHER

ITZEL SERVIN, 10

THE CLASSIC UTLITY JACKET IS A COMMON CHOICE MADE BY MAC STUDENTS.

AS TEMPERATURES DROP, SWEATERS MAKE THEIR POPULAR APPEARENCE IN THE HALLWAYS OF MAC HIGH.

CRISTINA GRIMALDO, 10

EMELY CAZARES, 10

ALL BLACK IS THE GO-TO EDGY

PUFFY VESTS ARE THE POPU-

LOOK FOR GLOOMY DAYS

LAR CHOICE FOR AN ATHLETIC LOOK

MYA VERA, 10

RAINCOATS ARE A NECESSITY THIS TIME OF YEAR. PICK A BRIGHT, FUN

The Bruin NOVEMBER 30, 2016 mhsbruin.com 23


WHAT’S BRUIN? donkey, for the Democrats, their pretty lost right now. We’d really be shocked it an elephant showed up.

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We’re thinking this is not a coincidence . . . a donkey [the party logo for the Democrats] was reported loose on Gopher Valley Road just outside of Mac the week after the presidential election. He was a cute little guy with white feet and nose. His owners were eventually found. All is well with the

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During the Homecoming Pep Rally at the stadium, students noticed a blur from the other side of the football field. When eyes focused, we saw a gorilla-masked streaker clad only in black underwear. As he bolted toward the locked fence, campus supervisor Steve Cooper chased him on his golf cart. The streaker did scale the fence in record speed, alluding campus sercurity. As predicted, the streaker, aka Harambe, was eventually caught.

DONKEY LOOSE

1

THE STREAKER

TOXIC POT As reported in YamCo Watch, which has a great following on Facebook, 130 people bought marajuana from a pot shop in McMinnville that had toxic levels of a pesticide. Patrons who purchased the marajuana were asked to either return it to the store or dispose of it “responsibly.” They warned that there is no safe level of the pesticide to humans.

DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? CONTACT EDITOR TOMMY DOUGLASS

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10

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Give yourself a cool new nickname like “Smash-meister”

Pick up a new skill and never stop talking about it

Go solo into the caffeteria and crash a random friend group

Pretend to pay attention to what our cool new friends are saying

Shameless bribery

Become more personale- that includes lots of hugs and fake smiles

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Sew everybody in your new posse cool new matching pants

The Bruin is bringing back an old tradition on the What’s Bruin page. Those that have been here too long will remember it. Truth is stranger than fiction. The following are true accounts that happened on or around the MHS campus.

Weeks later another streaker appeared at the boys’ semi-final soccer game in the dark. Reports can not confirm if this is the same gorilla streaker. As the weather has now turned cold and rainy, we don’t think the streaker will return soon.

Seniors: 117 Rest of us: 122

9

7

Man Bites Dog

DAYS UNTIL #WEOUTofHERE

Never stop singing Beyoncé . . . never

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