Issuu on Google+


MARK HORTON / ARCHITECTURE, Machinations of a Small Office, presents not just a selection of work from my office over the last twenty years, but the thoughts and values that have guided their creation. We have endeavored to make architecture that is engaged with the real world concerns and needs of our clients, the building trades, and the regulating agencies that control building activities, while bringing their resolution, in the form of building, to the level of art.

Mark Horton, MH/A


MARK HORTON / ARCHITECTURE Machinations of a Small Office

SELECTED WORKS 1987-2007


First edition Š 2007 by Mark Horton All Rights Reserved. No part of this work covered by the copyright hereon may be reproduced or used in any form or by any means - graphic, electronic, or mechanical, inlcuding photocopying, recording, taping, or information storage and retrieval systems - without written permission of the author. Design: MH/A Production Design: Heather Williams Editor: Keith Dubinsky Running: Tulip Graphics Type in Helvetica Neue Printed in USA ISBN 978-1-4243-3569-5 3A 101 South Park San Francisco, CA 94107


HEALDSBURG I PACIFIC HEIGHTS I

17 21

GOOD SAMARITAN

RUSSIAN HILL II

23 25 27

TEMPLE SINAI

31

MARKET STREET HOUSING SUGAR BOWL MARINA

33 35 37

BANK OF STOCKTON

41

MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S CENTER HEALDSBURG II PACIFIC HEIGHTS II

43 45 47

PINE MOUNTAIN

51

THE LITTLE SCHOOL RUSSIAN HILL I LIVE/WORK LOFT

53 55 57

‘WICHCRAFT BLUXOME LOFTS SEBASTOPOL WINE BARN

61 63 65

FARALLON TRADING DESK WORLD SAVINGS BANK SF HOUSING MH/A INFO

OTHER

13 15

CRISSY FIELD AVIATION MUSEUM

OAKLAND FIRE

UNBUILT

INSTITUTIONAL

COMMERCIAL

HOUSING

RESIDENTIAL

11

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

67 69 73+


Miles, Kirk, Reed and Tule In comparison to you, these projects are insignificant. Megan Without you, none of this work would have been possible.


MACHINATIONS OF A SMALL OFFICE

Ensconced in the psyche of the subculture of architecture is the romantic idea of the sole practitioner, or described in different terms, the lone artist as the solitary iconoclast. This idea was reinforced early on by singularly strong-willed individuals such as Frank Lloyd Wright, and remains today an ideal despite the globalization of all things, including architecture, through such people as Glenn Murcott, Zaha Hadid and Peter Zumthor, to mention only a few. The will to remain individual, and somehow true to inner and self-held ideals, drives many architects, including myself to one extreme of the spectrum of architectural practice, the single practitioner. The choice of individual architecture comes with rewards and at a price; the scale of work can be limiting both in scope and volume, while the requirement for justification and aesthetics remains simple and directed. My portfolio reflects these realities; the work is consistent and focused - it is a collection of architectural exercises which reflect an idea that human progress is linear and inclined, that good design can affect people positively, and that architecture remains a craft rooted in construction. I begin each project with the understanding that the questions which should be asked are immensely more important than knowing the presumed final answers. The solutions will come at the end of a true design process, but only if the correct questions are developed at the start.


Integrating design aesthetics into the functional solution of the program at hand is of the utmost importance. In the end, this becomes the primary goal of a design process my office is centered around - engaging in the aesthetics of construction, that is, of architecture. To aspire to something different would be to resign the process to the idea that building alone would suffice, and that the need to engage an architect on the project would not be required. Evident in both my built and proposed work is the primary belief that lives can be positively affected by design, and that the task of the architect is to insure that this occurs. Because MH/A remains an “emerging” design practice, the projects that are proposed to the office, and are most often undertaken, tend to be of unusual scope and constrained budgets. Working within these restrictions becomes a normal task for us, as well as a set of tools used to generate design. Our ability to integrate the intangible world of design with the real-world conditions of budget, constructability, and bureaucracy, are skills many past clients attest to. As is often repeated in the process of projects of the type we undertake, the assumption on the part of MH/A is that architecture inhabits not an “either-or” universe, but rather a “both-and” universe, and that one of the tasks of the architect is to discover the point in space where the disparate arcs of these desires and constraints coincide.

9


TEN POINTS TOWARD ARCHITECTURE

Hermetic worlds entice. Between womb and grave the yearning to define a limited universe within which we exist pulls at us with a siren’s call. Architects, more than most, tend to fall victim to this song. Unfortunately, the true victim is not the architect, but the unsuspecting public who is burdened with the by-product of this trap. As architects we must recognize and resist this call; we must remain a part of the larger vibrant whole. Within the machinations of a small office, my work has taken many cues from a series of ideas that continue to ground us in the real world. These ideas help to pull us back from the co-synchronous orbit of architectural thought to a world that is interactive with its public, and society at large; they are used to adjust the architectural process, and keep our purpose in focus.


11


Responding to an acute need for affordable housing for its students, CCA constructed its first dedicated dormitory. The new building is adjacent to the idyllic Oakland campus, and acts as a strong edge, as well as a transitional element, between the commercial / institutional urban fabric to the west and the residential neighborhood to the east. The 14,000 square foot parcel is built out with a two story concrete podium housing a 38 car parking structure and the building lobby. A three story wood-framed structure above houses 124 beds in 64 bedrooms. Lounges and kitchens are in an attached, sculptural volume.

CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS / Oakland, CA


13


This single-family residence in Sonoma County’s Alexander Valley uses regional agrarian buildings as prototypes for its form. To emphasize the building’s formal connection to its context, the module of the surrounding vineyard is used as a building block in both plan and elevation. Materials reinforce the rural and utilitarian nature of the structure. The three elements of the house are given specific programmatic functions; the cylinder is the garage, the barrel-vaulted ‘shed’ houses the public elements of the program, and the tower contains, and makes intimate, the master bedroom and study.

HEALDSBURG I / Healdsburg, CA


15


A classic San Francisco English Tudor home is transformed at the main level from a series of small discreet rooms to a single unified space that accommodates the many functions of an active family. The spaces required - dining, family room, kitchen - are provided for in semi-discreet areas, which can be further delineated by a series of sliding glass panels. Design elements operate on many levels - door lite division, fireplace mantle, heat riser column - and continue outside the house into the landscape, with cannon skylight, garden gate, fence and translucent garage enclosure.

PACIFIC HEIGHTS I / San Francisco, CA


17


The new Crissy Field Aviation Museum would reintroduce history into one of San Francisco’s geographic treasures. Perhaps the only extant condition in the world where both the original hangars and the airstrip for biplanes exist together in their original condition, Crissy Field would come back to life with a museum dedicated to an important phase of its history. The structures to be reused include both the original landplane and seaplane hangars. Restoration of these structures to their historic appearance on the exterior, along with the introduction of functional spaces in the interior, would create a world class aviation museum facility at the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge.

CRISSY FIELD AVIATION MUSEUM / San Francisco, CA


19


1. It’s not either / or, it’s both / and. What one wants, to paraphrase Kenneth Frampton, is a critical regionalism of the mind – a resistance to the prescription of architecture as a total package; a willingness to block out certain kinds of information and desires in order to get a project done; a willingness to collect scraps of information without placing upon them the burden that they add up to a whole. One wants texture as well as structure.1 Architects are obsessed with the structure of their work; the public is much better at understanding the texture. As architects, we must attempt to come closer to the end reading – we must realize how our work is perceived and move in that direction, or we will continue to fall into the trap of marginalizing what we do. We must resist our urges to produce an architecture that fulfills only our own specific and narrow goals. 2. Who’s going to pay for that? The architectural avant-garde, the engineers, the politicians and the town planners have moved farther and farther apart. Their languages have become mutually incomprehensible. Once upon a time, architectural theory was concerned with notions of beauty, canons of excellence, standards of technique, or matters of social context. More and more it has been invaded by the idiom of cognate disciplines: aesthetics, linguistics, philosophy, psychology. The result dazzles and confuses. Unless architectural criticism can get its feet back on the terra firma of good building and plain speaking, we are faced with the prospect of an endless dialogue of the deaf.2 Architecture must ground itself in the world of the rational and the real. The linguistic games played to elevate what at best has become a tangentially appreciated and required profession serve only to counteract any real elevation which would truly help the profession maintain its appropriate place and purpose in the world. We must continually remind ourselves that we are not the patrons of architecture.


21


A twenty-unit housing project and community center was constructed on a 16,000 square foot parcel in San Francisco’s Mission District, replacing an existing building condemned after the Loma Prieta earthquake. A series of objects, the family resource center and a portion of the housing, were placed at the front of the site, behind which with the majority of the housing acts as a backdrop. A series of tight, highly activated, exterior spaces occur between the separate buildings. This project was undertaken in association with Simon, Martin-Vegue, Winkelstein, and Moris Architects.

GOOD SAMARITAN FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER AND HOUSING / San Francisco, CA


23


This house in Oakland’s firestorm area consists of two discreet architectural volumes positioned adjacent one another and linked together by a glass and metal connector. The tautness and density of their skin, a cement board panel, and the precise definition of their edges characterize the two objects. These cubic forms are then punctured by separate systems of metal and glass balconies, bays, and a prominent skylight. The change in material causes the dense skin to read as a datum against which the protruding elements appear to be sub-objects of the composition.

OAKLAND FIRE / Oakland, CA


25


An existing condominium in a classic Russian Hill high-rise is transformed from a collection of small, disparate, utility-driven spaces into an open plan in which functions are connected visually as well as spatially. The floor plan is defined by a series of independent objects inserted into the space, including a fireplace surround / mantle, a sculptural column wrap, and a visually prominent display case for the client’s wine collection. The materials - anigre wood and bead blasted stainless steel - hold the various pieces together as a single composition, delineating the existing from the new.

RUSSIAN HILL II / San Francisco, CA


27


Temple Sinai, an historic synogogue located near downtown Oakland, recently purchased several adjacent parcels and is expanding their facility to provide for a growing congregation. Centered around a new chapel (which will not replace the significant sanctuary), the new facility will include preschool, religious school and midrasha facilities, as well as administrative offices and a library. Bringing together a variety of disparate uses, the new project will act as an organizer / unifier for the community. This project is undertaken in association with Michael Harris Architect.

TEMPLE SINAI / Oakland, CA


29


3. Sooner rather than later. Mr. Letterman’s dazed expression – by turns baffled, irritated and delighted – mirrored the emotions of every New Yorker who found it nothing short of miraculous that the city still somehow worked. The mystery is not why subway cars occasionally stop dead in their tracks. It’s why all the trains didn’t long ago grind to a halt between stations and just stay there, leaving passengers to climb out and find their way over precarious bridges and tunnels to more civilized quarters.3 The preoccupation to produce the unique and singular must be moderated with the concern to create a world that works. The excesses of narcissistic high modernism must be left behind; architecture must meet the demands of the everyday, and through an attempt to produce an art, elevate these to a higher, but tangible, level. Architecture must strive to restore a confidence in the public that it both works, and matters. 4. This is not a test. Designers say they are professional problem-solvers; here are some problems: 1. In 1991, 6,019 people were wounded or killed by gunfire in New York; 530 were children. 2. The number of U.S. welfare recipients increased more in 1990 and 1991 than in the previous 16 years combined. 3. One of every 53 New Yorkers is infected with HIV. 4. Each day, some 137 species become extinct mostly because of rain forest destruction. 5. Coffee filters are often a hassle to pull apart.

Which one of these looks like a design-sized problem? Well, here’s the solution: the One-ata-Time Coffee Filter Dispenser from Black & Decker.4 Design has become the profession of solving very small problems. Larger problems are left unsolved because everybody is too busy designing. The urgency and banality of the above examples have only increased today. Inherent in the attempt to travel in the margin of the everyday, as a way of extracting their work from the normative, architects have cast aside the real concerns of the world for the seductive idiosyncrasies of the fringe. Exciting constructs, complex narratives, and tangential relationships create products that architects enjoy, but which seldom solve problems.


31


A twelve-unit market-rate housing project with structured parking and retail on the ground level was constructed on a 7,300 square foot parcel on Market Street near San Francisco’s Castro District. The project occurs at a highly visible point along this central boulevard and reinforces the urban setting through its architectural form and order. The building is organized as a simple block, allowing for efficient construction, providing a continuation of the street wall at the front, and creating a significant open space at the rear for the housing.

MARKET STREET HOUSING / San Francisco, CA


33


A new home, on a site accessible only by foot in the winter, takes its cues from the surrounding Sierra Nevada Mountains. A stone base of Sierra White granite holds a strongly profiled natural cedar wood exterior above the normal twelve-foot snow line. The house is capped with a simple, planar, zinc roof to shed the heavy snowfall. Structural “trees� inside carry the heavy roof snow loads allowing the south-facing wall to open extensively for views and passive solar gain. A three-story atrium allows light to penetrate to the lower level, and provides a twenty-four foot climbing wall for use on days spent inside.

SUGAR BOWL / Norden, CA


35


An existing top story flat in San Francisco’s Marina District is transformed from a warren of awkward rooms to a series of refined spaces linked by a 50-foot long pear wood spine. This link, stretching from the entry landing to the flat’s end, shifts and wraps to both hide and reveal renovated service spaces, material cues, and formal maneuvers. A common language of flush and recessed details is shared by renovated spaces and surfaces that are carefully juxtaposed with the remaining, more classically detailed rooms.

MARINA / San Francisco, CA


37


Located at the edge of an expanding new community, this branch bank provides a modern facility for an institution that is rooted in the history and landscape of the Central Valley. The building is composed of two simple enclosures joined at the transaction counter – a glass public banking hall and an opaque money-handling area. The roof structure, both sculptural and functional, is a folded plane that reaches over the site to shelter both the covered parking and drive-through bays, and shade the glass walls. The roof is supported by tree-like columns – their shape echoes the canopy of the orchards that once stood there.

BANK OF STOCKTON / Modesto, CA


39


5. It’s the reality of a small profession. Whenever people lose power – and certainly the phenomenon of architects losing or not understanding power extends way beyond the schools – they start to create a magical language that no one else can understand, as if by hoarding the magic you could also somehow hoard the power.5 Concentric worlds orbit within our society; those who best understand that their own world is one of many, and significantly dependent on the others, are in the best position to affect society and take advantage of potential power. Architects, more often than not, assume that their world is independent, and the envy of, others. The result turns them into remote satellites, isolated, and unable to exert any influence.

6. We’ll figure it out somehow. What is clear today, and necessarily concerns us in terms of the evolution of our discipline, is that the tabula is no longer rasa. The question is no longer, as it was in the euphoria of rising industry and blossoming modernity at the dawn of the 20th century, to invent the city of tomorrow with the aesthetic, cultural, and ethical criteria of a generation that saw progress as the driving force behind infinite possibilities.6 Architects must work within the web and frame of the world they find. When they step outside this world they remove themselves from the possibilities of having an effect upon it. When they operate within this world, they wield great power, including the possibility of changing people’s lives.


41


On San Francisco’s rugged Pacific coastline, a new 4,000 square foot preschool building provides modern facilities for an established Montessori program. A pre-engineered steel frame and roof system creates a long rectangular shed into which a series of framed prisms, housing the ‘hard’ functions of the program, are inserted. Oriented along the east-west axis to maximize solar gain and light through the glazed southern façade, the shed’s roof slopes to collect rainwater for irrigation. The two classrooms open out through the porous south wall onto a generous landscaped play area.

MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S CENTER /San Francisco, CA


43


This new small home set on a knoll overlooking the town of Healdsburg has been constructed of undecorated materials and shapes. The client’s request to simplify as many aspects of home ownership and program as possible has been addressed with a paired down, rational, and minimalist composition of the most basic elements of dwelling. To the north, the house is protected, via a standing seam metal skin, from the neighbors’ views in. To the south, the house opens up toward views of the rolling hills beyond. The plan is defined by two “C”-shaped walls, shifted about a central spine which, in turn, has several functions. The spine acts as a portal between the public and private realm, a hub for services, and a constant point of reference, blending the lines between inside and out.

HEALDSBURG II / Healdsburg, CA


45


The lower level of this historic Victorian in San Francisco’s Pacific Heights is transformed from a series of small, enclosed, service rooms to a single large open plan area. This plan change is accomplished through the use of both hidden elements (concealed seismic braces) and exposed objects (an aluminum egg-shaped volume). The plan objects animate the open space, and allow the floor to act as a unified whole which flows around a series of discrete elements.

PACIFIC HEIGHTS II / San Francisco, CA


47


A private retreat in Sonoma County draws reference from the agricultural structures of nearby vineyards, rising from the hillside as a vertical barn or inhabitable fire tower. In response to siting and climate, the building adopts a double skin enclosure: the inner glass house opens to the wind through sliding glass walls, while the exterior, core-ten steel surface opens to vistas through louvers that afford increased views as one ascends. A repositionable roof trellis serves as a beacon when reaching skyward and a sunshade when aligned with the horizon. When dormant, the rusted skin presents a mute face; when inhabited, shutters, like leaves, unfold revealing the transparent interior.

PINE MOUNTAIN / Cloverdale, CA


49


7. Architecture should not be a practice of triage. Mr. Koolhaas and O.M.A. “perceive the city as a survivor.” Survivors are not victims. They have earned the right to set their own terms. Cities shouldn’t be competing with the suburbs by trying to be more like them. They don’t have to turn themselves into theme parks. They have better things to do than indulge the fear that their best days are behind them by encouraging architects to design new buildings that look old.7 Architects should act as a force to raise the common denominator; from within the system they should attempt to lift the norm. Acting on their own, without a public, architects have no greater power than if they were to have not acted, while maintaining the status quo removes the process, or act of building, from the world of architecture. 8. Now, how exactly are we supposed to build that? The architect’s job, in my opinion, and I must close on this, is to find those spaces, those areas of study, where the availabilities, not yet here, and those that are already here, can have better environments for their maturing into those which talk and say things to you and really make evident that the spaces that you make that are the seat of a certain offering of man next to man. It is not an operational thing. You can leave that to the builders and the operators. They already build eighty-five percent of the architecture, so give them another five percent if they’re so stingy, so very selfish about it, and take only ten or five percent and be really an architect and not just a professional. A professional will bury you. You’ll become so comfortable. You’ll become so praised, equally to some one else, that you’ll never recognize yourself after a while. You get yourself a good business character, you can really play golf all day and your buildings will be built anyway. But what the devil is that? What joy is there if joy is buried? I think joy is the key word in our work. It must be felt. If you don’t feel joy in what you’re doing, then you’re really not operating. And there are miserable moments that you’ve got to live through. But really, joy will prevail.8 Architecture is a struggle that must be strategically planned; architects must choose their battles carefully, and execute them fiercely. To confront all battles burdens the process and the product, and wears the architect down. The power of a singular building needs to be realized by architects; this will then be cognitively translated to, and understood by, the public. Choosing our battles carefully will allow architecture to triumph over construction.


51


An existing interior volume is translated into a series of spaces for a San Francisco preschool through the use of a strong architectural element. A sinuous wall which defines inside / out, open / closed, public / private, acts as a Rubicon over which children must cross to discover new worlds. The thick wall and its platforms and boxes can be occupied within, to become spaceship or forest as object, dense mountain range or thin garden as divider, and bear cave or ocean liner as container.

THE LITTLE SCHOOL / San Francisco, CA


53


This is a new home on a highly visible street, with significant views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Alcatraz Island, and Bernard Maybeck’s Palace of Fine Arts. Tight height constraints, a large street-front room for entertaining, and the unusual topographic conditions of a side-sloping site, contribute to a highly compact, efficient, and visually stimulating project.

RUSSIAN HILL I / San Francisco, CA


55


This remodel of a corner loft in the historic Clocktower Building provided an opportunity to update and expand a utilitarian kitchen and bath and replace a bulky stair volume. Opening the space created expansive views of the San Francisco Bay and the dramatic sweep of the Bay Bridge. The project presents a unified solution to multiple programmatic and structural problems by grafting a singular steel frame construct to the existing condition in a straightforward yet subtle manner.

LIVE/WORK LOFT / San Francisco, CA


57


Chef Tom Colicchio brings his team to San Francisco for a new “fast / casual” restaurant in the Westfield San Francisco Center; ‘wichcraft expands an empire that had its birth in New York City. A corner space with window wall on two sides, the twenty-four foot ceilings allow for a dramatic space overlooked by a mezzanine, opening onto Mission Street. This project is undertaken in association with Bentel + Bentel.

‘WICHCRAFT / San Francisco, CA


59


9. Boy, this is taking longer than I thought it would. If we were to be interested only in those features of our environment which are suggestive of safety, coziness, and comfort, and not at all concerned with those that suggest danger, what sort of recipe for survival would that be? Seeking the assurance that we can handle danger by actually experiencing it is therefore a source of pleasure.9 Architecture must confront all human conditions. We live in a dynamic world that must remain open to us, and integral to our design process. Architecture that attempts to be exclusionary, that longs for single worlds, flattens its context, and diminishes the world within which it exists. Monocular architecture assumes the inability of its public to understand a more complex world. 10. How about this idea... In high school we learned that Caesar was a hero and the Romans very civilized. But if you read closer you see that Caesar killed about 30,000 people in one campaign and he burned the library at Alexandria in the course of a siege. The emperors Aurelian and Theodosius I completed the library’s destruction. Since then I always can see and smell soldiers marching, troops moving, when I look at Classical columns.10 The political baggage of architecture must be considered at all turns. As architects, we must understand our constructs beyond the context of the studio. We must place ourselves within the world our work is intended to inhabit with the knowledge this positioning affords us. We must read our architecture with the eyes of those who will inhabit it.


61


A new multi-unit housing project was constructed in San Francisco’s South of Market district in a highly visible site, adjacent to a highway off ramp, that acts as an entrance into the city. The 102 units consist of two story and one story live/work lofts on a post-tension concrete deck above a 90 unit parking garage. The general exterior aesthetic and interior court of the building is intended to blend with the light industrial neighborhood.

BLUXOME LOFTS / San Francisco, CA


63


This small structure, to be used in the production of wine, acts as an architectural boundary at one end of a parcel of land, with a single-family house at the other end, creating a landscaped precinct between the two structures. Architectural expression is achieved through the manipulation of volume, material, and form.

SEBASTOPOL WINE BARN / Sebastopol, CA


65


A request to provide comfortable working space for eight money managers at a single piece of furniture resulted in a twenty-foot table crafted of polished aluminum and Swiss pear wood. Phone and data requirements were integrated into the central trough of the desk. Additional matching conference tables, desks and reception furniture were also designed and constructed for this client.

FARALLON TRADING DESK / San Francisco, CA


67


With a history of collaborating with leading architects across the country, World Savings asked Mark Horton / Architecture to design a new, highly-visible branch bank in San Francisco’s Marina District. The use of color and light dominates the perception of the space; the rear wall is punctuated by neon-illuminated light boxes, and a large red wall behind bankers’ desks highlights and illuminates exhibited artwork. Finishes, including a resin panel clad “object,” a custom metal check stand, carpeting, terrazzo flooring, and furniture, all contribute to the composition of the whole.

WORLD SAVINGS BANK / San Francisco, CA


69


Responding to the acute need for new housing in San Francisco, as well as the ongoing need to improve the urban fabric, three housing proposals were developed. Through the marriage of new housing types to residual spaces in three distinct areas of the city, 132 units could be added by developing currently unused public agency lands. The designs enrich their particular neighborhoods by accentuating aspects of the context in a positive manner - the freeway/urban environment of the 5th Street Project, the low-scale residential aspects of the Marina Project, and the urban/geological reality of the Bryant Street Project.

SF HOUSING / San Francisco, CA


71


The projects collected here have attempted to create architecture within the context of the real world; real people with real needs inhabit them. They have been designed in a process that is situated between the polar ends of architectural reality and theory. These projects have also been an effort of many people; architects and designers within my office, engineers and consultants who have helped us to bring the designs to fruition, contractors and sub-contractors who have attempted to transform our two-dimensional representations into three-dimensional form, and – perhaps most importantly – clients who have trusted us and invested in early abstract ideas with the faith that they would lead to successful final concrete form. And while architecture appears to be, and is often represented as, an individual art, it requires the harmonious and synchronous involvement of many disparate and individual talents, trades, and interests. We have been fortunate in the projects we have been asked to undertake and even more fortunate in the final results. Our portfolio elicits a great sense of optimism that through our architecture we will positively affect many lives in future years.


73


1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987 CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS

Annie Sajdera

HEALDSBURG I PACIFIC HEIGHTS I

David Yum

Daniel Pitera

CRISSY FIELD AVIATION MUSEUM GOOD SAMARITAN OAKLAND FIRE

Uli Zinnkann

Donna Schumacher Nina Lewellen

Tom Marble

RUSSIAN HILL II

Lisa Rey

TEMPLE SINAI MARKET STREET HOUSING

Christa Hwarluk

Leslie Fernaud

SUGAR BOWL MARINA

Jocelyn Miller

John Gentile

BANK OF STOCKTON

Brett Kelly

MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S CENTER

Abby Turin

HEALSBURG II PACIFIC HEIGHTS II

Katherine Rott

Paul Pasquella

PINE MOUNTAIN

Claudia Merzario

THE LITTLE SCHOOL RUSSIAN HILL I

Chip Debelius

LIVE/WORK LOFT ‘WICHCRAFT BLUXOME LOFTS

Charly Wittock

Victoria Ashley Peter Oberdorfer

Michelle Vitetta

SEBASTOPOL WINE BARN FARALLON TRADING DESK WORLD SAVINGS BANK SF HOUSING

Windy Jetson Guillemette De Bouchard

David Yama


2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

Lyle Gray

Sarah Jaffe

M. Florencia Pita Sarah Granatir

Mary Jane McRory

Daniel Mason

Jessica York See James Stamp

Chris Roach Idoya Oneca

Andrew Dunbar Kristin Freeland

Romain Lovey

Jackie Fung

Keith Dubinsky

Russell Beaudin

Jessica Kleinman

Josh Lobel Jesse Portz

Sven Zihlmann

Tiffany Schrader

Katrina Wiberg

Rebecca Wedel

Christina Orth

Fermin Gonzalez

Line Juhl Hansen

Meg Lopez-Cepero Paul Haydu

David Gill

Dongmin Shim

Hendra Bong

Sheryl Drinkwater Pantea Tehrani

Melissa Braisted

Alastair Reilly Matt Lawton

Maura Fernandez Abernethy

Hiroke Abe Stephanie Szabo

Alex Parsons Rainer Mebus Anette Thogersen

Gretchen Krebs

Amalia Jimenez

Matt Laughlin

Heather Williams Anna Gallagher


SELECTED PUBLICATIONS RESIDENTIAL The San Francisco Examiner: “Modernity in Hyde Street Shack,” February 10, 2007.

“American Playgrounds : Revitalizing Community Space”: Susan Solomon, University Press of New England, 2005.

Santa Rosa Press Democrat: “Easy Living,” August 19, 2006.

School Construction News: “Montessori Preschool Incorporates Elements of Nature,” May / June 2005.

Residential Architect: “2006 Design Awards,” May 2006.

California Home & Design: “San Francisco Design Awards,” May 2005.

California Home + Design: “2006 AIA San Francisco Design Awards,” May 2006.

Architecture: “Kids on the Block,” April 2005.

California Home + Design: “CH+D Award for Residential Architecture,” February 2006.

Archidose: “A Weekly Dose of Architecture - CCAC Dormitory,” February 28, 2005.

The Cabin Book: “Having a Hand in the Seasons : Sugar Bowl,” Universe Publishing, 2004.

Abstract Magazine: “California College of the Arts,” January - February 2004.

The Getaway Home: “A Submerged Ski House in the Snow,” Taunton Press, 2004.

arcCA: “AIACC 2003 Design Award Winners,” February 2003.

California Homes: “Coast to Coast,” January - February, 2004.

The San Francisco Chronicle: “Learning Their Lessons in Building Off Campus,” September 25, 2003.

California Homes: “Sugar Bowl Modern,” November - December 2003.

Surface: “Past Present Future : SF Bay Area Architecture,” Fall 2003.

Architectural Record: “A Playful Twist on a Loft’s Industrial Style,” July 2003.

Interieurs: “Repenser l’Espace des Nouvelles Generations,” April - May 2003.

San Francisco Magazine: “Snow Place Like Home,” February 2002.

Blueprint: “Four Sides to Every Storey,” January 2003, No. 203.

Contemporary World Architecture: “Living : Houses and Apartments,” Hugh Pearman, Phaidon Press, London. 1998.

Confort: “The Little School,” October 2002.

Interiors and Sources: “Five Doors in a Tudor,” January / February 1998.

The Oakland Tribune: “CCAC to Welcome its Largest Freshman Class,” August 19, 2002.

San Francisco Houses after the Fire: “House on a Hilltop,” Peter Lloyd, Ellipsis Press, London. 1997.

Interiors and Sources: “The Wall of Academia,” October 1997.

Architectural Record: “New California Home Rises from the Ashes,” March 1997. The San Francisco Examiner: “Architecture a la carte,” October 6, 1996. Häuser: “Wenn Der Wein Mass Aller Dinge Wird,” March 1994. The Oakland Tribune: “Homes: From First Impulse to Final Product,” January 22, 1993. Northern California Home And Garden: “Functional Form,” November 1992. SF Magazine: “Suitably Scaled,” January 1991.

DBZ: Deutsche Bauzeitschrift: “Kleine Welt: Kindergarten in San Francisco,” May 1997. COMMERCIAL Hospitality Design: “San Francisco Treat,” November 2006. Abstract: “Sonoma Wine Barn,” May / June 2006. Contract: “Branching Out,” March 2006. Abstract: “World Savings Bank,” Nov / Dec 2005.

Residential Lighting: “Creating Dynamic Living Spaces.”

FURNITURE

HOUSING

DBZ : Deutsche Bauzeitschrift: “Achter Ohne Steuermann,” October 1992.

Builder: “Golden Harmony,” June 2005.

I.D. : The International Design Magazine: “The 38th Annual Design Review,” July / August 1992.

Residential Architect: “Residential Architect Design Awards,” May 2005. San Francisco Magazine: “A Style All Their Own,” February 2001. The San Francisco Examiner Magazine: “Winning Sites : AIA / San Francisco Does the Honors,” 22 February 1998. Architecture: “California Collective,” August 1997.

Northern California Home And Garden: ASID Awards, “Furniture Design,” April 1992. COMPETITIONS Progressive Architecture Magazine: “Young Architects,” July 1993.

SF Magazine: “2020 Visions: Waste No Space,” February 1992.

OTHER

INSTITUTIONAL

Line: “It’s a New World (Housing) Order,” Journal of The American Institute of Architects, San Francisco, March 2000.

Architectural Record: “A New Slant on Preschool,” January 2007. “Preschool and Kindergarten Architecture”: Arian Mostaedi, Links Books, 2006. Metal Architecture: “Modern Metal,” June 2005.

OZ: “Ten Points Towards Architecture,” Journal of the College of Architecture Planning and Design, Kansas State University, Volume 18, 1996.


SELECTED AWARDS

SELECTED EXHIBITS

“Grand Award,” Residential Architect Design Awards, Custom Homes, 2006.

SFMOMA: “California College of the Arts at 100: Innovation by Design,” 2007.

“Honor Award,” American Institute of Architects Northern Nevada Design Awards, 2006.

San Francisco Design Center : Summer Design Day, “SF Design Award Exhibit,” 2005.

“Citation - Unbuilt Design Award,” American Institute of Architects San Francisco Design Awards, 2006.

3A Garage, “Space / Face : Entries for a New Museum,” 2004.

“Achievement Award,” California Home + Design, 2006.

American Institute of Architects East Bay, “2003 Design Awards Exhibit,” 2003.

“Honor Award,” Metal Architecture Design Awards, 2005.

American Institute of Architects San Francisco, “Best of the Bay 2003,” 2003.

“Merit Award,” Residential Architect Design Awards, Campus Housing, 2005.

UC Berkeley, “Making Spaces for Small and Young Children to Play,” 2002.

“Citation - Unbuilt Design Award,” American Institute of Architects San Francisco Best of the Bay, 2005.

California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo, “CCAC’s New Dormitory - The Design Process,” 2002.

“Honor Award for Architecture,” American Institute of Architects Redwood Chapter Design Awards, 2004.

American Institute of Architects San Francisco, “Small Firms Great Projects 2002,” traveling show to four venues, 2002.

“Award Winner,” Metal Building Awards, Metal Construction News, 2004.

Timkin Gallery, California College of Arts and Crafts, “Design Process - The New Residential Hall,” 2002.

“Merit Award for Architecture,” American Institute of Architects East Bay Chapter Design Awards, 2003. “Excellence in Design Award,” American Institute of Architects San Francisco Best of the Bay, 2003. “Merit Award,” California Council, American Institute of Architects, 2003. “Achievement Award,” California Council, American Institute of Architects, 2002. “Award of Honor for Design Excellence,” American Institute of Architects San Francisco Best of the Bay and Beyond, 1997. “Award of Merit,” American Institute of Architects San Francisco Interior Architecture Awards Program, 1996. “Honorable Mention,” SF Prize Design Competition, 1996.

Limn Gallery, “Drawings From Experience,” an exhibit of Masterworks from The UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design Archives and Art by Contemporary Architects, 2001. Falkirk Cultural Center, “Small Firms Great Projects 2000,” traveling show to four venues, 2000. Limn Gallery, “Time Passed,” a retrospective of past shows at the gallery, 2000. “Unwon / Unsung,” 2AES / Center for Critical Architecture, Lecture Series on Unrealized Competition Entries, 1998. “Critical Foundations,” an exhibition of work by California College of Arts and Crafts Architecture faculty, 1996.

“First Prize - Architectural Abstract Rendering,” American Institute of Architects San Francisco Computer Forum, 1994.

San Francisco International Airport Museum Exhibition, “New Buildings: Rebuilding After the Oakland / Berkeley Firestorm of 1991,” 1994.

Progressive Architecture, “Young Architects,” 1993.

Limn Gallery, “New Architecture in the Oakland Hills,” selected to show work in exhibit on new homes in the East Bay firestorm district, 1992.

“Citation,” American Institute of Architects and Sunset Magazine Western Home Awards, 1993.

AP Gallery, selected to show work in group show of architectural profiles, 1991.

“First Prize - Architectural Delineation,” American Institute of Architects San Francisco Computer Forum, 1993.

2AES / Center for Critical Architecture, “Architecture Represented / Furniture Realized,” selected to show work in exhibit of architectural drawings and furniture, 1990.

“Honorable Mention,” Blacksburg, Virginia Civic Center Competition,1992.

Storefront for Art and Architecture, “Project Atlas,” selected to show work in national competition, 1989.

“First Place - Residential Architecture,” Northern California Home and Garden Design Achievement Awards, 1992. “Merit Award,” American Institute of Architects Redwood Empire Biennial Design Awards Program, 1992. “Honorable Mention - Furniture,” I.D. Magazine Annual Design Review, 1992. “Honorable Mention,” Metropolitan Home Design for Real Life Awards, 1991. “Winner,” SF Magazine Best of Bay Design Awards, 1990. “Honorable Mention,” Mobile, Alabama, City and County Administrative Offices and Courthouse National Competition, 1990. “Finalist,” North Gate Competition for the University of California at Berkeley, 1989.

Western Addition, “Unseen Work: Six Emerging Local Talents,” invited to show recent work in series on art and architecture, 1986. Hanns Kainz Gallery, “Project X,” invited to participate in show of architectural projects for San Francisco, 1986. Americn Institute of Architects Gallery, “Islamic Vernacular,” two-person exhibit, included analysis of Djenne, Mali, housetype, 1985. Limn Gallery, “Mud,” one-man photographic show of Sahelian architecture, 1985.


Mark Horton Designer, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, San Francisco. Designer, Backen, Arrigoni, and Ross, Architects, San Francisco. Harvard University, Graduate School of Design: Master of Architecture with Commendation. Dartmouth College: AB. Adjunct Professor, California College of Arts and Crafts. Lecturer, University of California at Berkeley. Visiting Design Critic / Lecturer, University of Arkansas, Boston Architectural Center, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, University of Detroit / Mercy, California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo. Co-founder, 2AES : The Art and Architecture Exhibition Space. Founder, 3A Garage Architecture, a not-for-profit fine arts gallery dedicated to architectural art. Editorial Board, LINE, AIA San Francisco Quarterly Design Journal. Member, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Architecture and Design Accessions Sub-Committee, 2003 - Present. Juror, American Institute of Architects East Bay Chapter, 2005 Design Awards Program. Juror, American Institute of Architects New Mexico Council, 2005 Design Awards Program. Member, Harvard University Graduate School of Design Alumni Council, 2001 - 2005. Juror, Kirby Ward Fitzpatrick Prize 2004, Architectural Foundation of San Francisco. Juror, American Institute of Architects California Council, 2004 Design Awards Program. Member of Selection Committee, Center for the History of the Computer Museum, 2001. Aga Khan Fellowship, awarded grant to travel to Republic of Mali, West Africa, to document indigenous architecture.


79


CALIFORNIA COLLEGE OF THE ARTS HEALDSBURG I PACIFIC HEIGHTS I GOOD SAMARITAN OAKLAND FIRE RUSSIAN HILL II MARKET STREET HOUSING SUGAR BOWL MARINA MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S CENTER HEALDSBURG II PACIFIC HEIGHTS II THE LITTLE SCHOOL RUSSIAN HILL I LIVE/WORK LOFT BLUXOME LOFTS SEBASTOPOL WINE BARN FARALLON TRADING DESK WORLD SAVINGS BANK

END NOTES 1 Herbert Muschamp, “Proliferations,” in Thinking the Present; Recent American Architecture. 2 J. Mordaunt Crook, “Only Disconnect,” a review of Anthony Vidler’s The Architecture of the Uncanny in The New York Times Book Review. 3 Herbert Muschamp, “Somewhere, Under the Rainbow,” in The New York Times, 7 March 1993. 4 Karrie Jacobs and Timor Kalman, “The End,” in The Edge of the Millennium. 5 Elizabeth Padjen, M.Arch. ’78, in the “GSD News.” 6 Jean Nouvel, “On Designing,” in Domus, October 1992. 7 Herbert Muschamp, “Rem Koolhaas’s New York State of Mind,” a review of O.M.A.’s show at MoMA, in The New York Times, 4 November 1994. 8 Louis Kahn, “Brooklyn, New York,” in Perspecta, Volume 19. 9 Jay Appleton, landscape historian, as quoted by Mr. Hildebrand in Herbert Muschamp’s ”Roadside Attractions to Reckon With,” in The New York Times, 28 February 1993. 10 Wolf Prix, in an interview entitled “Perspectives,” in Progressive Architecture.

MH/A

DAVID DUNCAN LIVINGSTON

GERRY RATO

MARK LUTHRINGER

SHARON RISEDORPH

ETHAN KAPLAN

CESAR RUBIO

MATTHEW MILLMAN

PHOTO CREDITS


Mark Horton, AIA, is a registered architect in California and New York. He has been the principal of MARK HORTON / ARCHITECTURE, a small office in San Francisco, for the past twenty years where he lives with his wife and four children. He has taught as an adjunct professor at California College of the Arts in San Francisco, and has lectured at a variety of other universities. He is also the cofounder of 2AES: The Art and Architecture Exhibition Space, and the founder of 3A Garage Architecture, a non-for-profit gallery dedicated to architectural art.



Machinations of a Small Office