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Module 2 - Design Matthew Greenwood Student Number: 641211 Group: 4

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Semester 1/2011


Response to Readings Ted Talk by Thomas Heatherwick Thomas Heatherwick’s designs are about making beautiful features of rather “soulless” constructions. Why cant an opening bridge be elegant? or a power plant graceful? these are issues to be discussed by emerging designers. His pavilion design for the Shanghai Expo the “Seed Cathedral” used lighting to create a precious encapsulating environment for the displaying of seeds. During the day the effect fas inwards focused and as night falls the attention is drawn to the exterior that glows and floats in the wind. By using one idea the attention is focused and the minimal scale of the “Seed Cathedral” within the context of the pavilion space allowed the creation of a social area.

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Figure 2. Planar projection Figure 3.Nine Abstracting a circle Figure 7. Shigeru Ban, Heasly Bridges Golf Club, Yeoju, South Korea, 2010 Simple 3-D objects with planar faces (left) can be unambiguously described A circle is unambiguously defined by only three points. After discovering allow for continuous girders inbehind all three directions, they split layers by a small set of 2-D plans preserving lengths and angles forTo all edges the shape those 30 points we can throware away 27 ofinto themfive (90 per running parallel to the projection planes. For curved surfaceswith (right),two this lap joints at every centcrossing. of the data) The and still have the same defined insome the drawing. complete rooffigure contains 3,500 approach fails because no projection plane would preserve the metrics. Additionally, the geometric definition of a circle lets us now identify the curved timber components with almost 15,000 lap joints. Even though many exact location of infinitely many more points than the 30 we started with.

IMAGES 1. The Seed Cathedral by Thomas Heatherwick Source: http://www.inhabitat.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/ukpavilion-ed01. jpg 2. Abstraction of a Circle Source: Scheurer, F. and Stehling, H. (2011): Lost in Parameter Space? IAD: Architectural Design, Wiley, 81 (4), July, pp. 70-79 3. Reduction of a Cirlce Source: Scheurer, F. and Stehling, H. (2011): Lost in Parameter Space? IAD: Architectural Design, Wiley, 81 (4), July, pp. 70-79

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Figure 8. Reducing a circle Lost in Parameter Space A circle can be unambiguously described by three points. However, Scheurer and Sterling discuss how modeling is an abstraction of isreality. see this how ourvector models in if the notation changedWe intocan one centre pointinplus normal module one have evolved through the process of first abstracting the size pattern abstracting and radius, the description can be image, reduced from nine values that again parts are similar, 467 individual components with over 2,000 different had so forth. The (threereading points at three coordinates values points (two points through paper, followed by clay, sojoints on and discusses theeach) usetoofseven control such as the to be described in detail. This was only possible by formally describing the whole and a number), saving 22 per cent. ones we have been using in rhino to abstract the model digitally. Also the use of a recipe to simplify a model structure in a parametric system that automatically generated the detailed models integrity also aids the abstraction process. We used such a recipe continuously throughout our from a reference surfacewithout and some loosing numerical its parameters. ideation module. Reduction is about further simplifying the abstracted model through removal of superficial and redundant elements. Removing redundant factors can keep the model flowing and simple however removing to much can damage the form/function and integrity of the model so I happy medium needs to be found. The reading largely focuses on the mathematical properties inherent in CAD. Through understanding these mathematical values that underpin techniques such as abstraction and reduction we can produce sleeker polished work. One quote from the reading truly sums up this point “If we do not want to get lost in parameter space, we need to assess and understand the quality of the algorithmic machines we design, not the designs that we produce” - (Scheurer & Sterling 2011)


Orthographic images of models

I chose to use method one “Produce contours by tracing profile curves� to digitize my clay model. As I found the other methods did not suit the shape of my designs. The pictures are of the front and top of the model and the scale in the back is a 2cm long block. I photographed two models and attempted to digitize both however I ultimately decided to stick with the first circular ball like design rather than the long spiral design as I feel it look to much like a tradition torch.

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Digitizing Model

After importing my photos into Rhino I started to create contour lines. It took quite a few attempt to work out which directions the lines would work best with when using the CSec tool. In the end I decided to run my contour lines vertical and create Csec lines horizontally. This allowed the creation of contours that worked best with the manipulations I wanted to perform.

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3D Modelling to Further Develop

Once I got into the way of manipulating the control points I had great fun in developing my 3D model. I tried splitting it in half and trying to create an interesting way to hold it that way. I flattened the spherical shape to create a more oval disk look. I then manipulated the point to pull “spikes� outwards and around much like the recipe for my original paper model which I really liked the look of. I even went back and experimented with my other torch like design to see if I could evolve the shape into something more pleasing. However I could find a shape that I was happy with and I stuck with my original idea.

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First use of Panelling Tools

The Panelling Tool was a very fast and easy way to further develop the surface of the model. It gave it the geometric surface that I desired. I experiment with using greater and fewer faces/lines some of which enhanced the almost dangerous pointed look while others smoothed the surface giving it a very sleek organic feel.

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Panelled Models

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After my initial experimentation with 2D paneling tools I started to look at creating 3D panels to apply to the skin of my lantern. The first few trails involved using the sample panels given during studio and after that I started to create my own custom panels. In the first image (1) the model is using a triangulated panel which I then punched a few holes through using the border offset tool (2).

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Panelled Models

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I had some initial trouble with curved lines appearing in my skin which when printed would not go together correctly I also appeared to happen alot when I was creating panels that had cutouts from border offsets.(1). After tweaking a few of the setting such as how far points were offset and the amount of panels this soon corrected itself. (2)

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Panelled Model

This model became my favourite, even though it only uses 2D panelling techniques. My lantern model has been shaped in a way to direct the light already and I found that by using 3D panels is was distorting the shape and overall feel of what I originally intended. After created the 2D paneled surface I selected certain faces where I knew I wanted light to be focused and by using the border offset tool I cut holes in these facades.

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Prototyping

I thoroughly enjoyed making the paper models. As I was doing this at home I printed the unrolled surfaces and cut the by hand using a knife and ruler. I ruled the tabs myself after printing the panels which resulted in having a few tabs missing and a few tabs where there shouldn’t be any.

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Light & Shadow The use of panelling tools allowed me to further explore how light is going to be used in my lantern. The hand drawing shows my intention to have brighter exposed light facing away from the holder and conversely the light facing towards the user is dimmer and diffused. I looked at how my paneling models reacted to the light being placed in different locations as well as studying works such as the Suntory Museum by Tadao Ando and Palm Lighting by Janne Kyttanen which show large panels of light and diffused light respectively.

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Continued Research & Design Throughout this module I also looked at other factors important in my design such as the placement of the LED lights as well as how the lantern will interface with the user. LED lights will be placed towards the front of the lantern where I want to light to be brighter and the ambient light given off from these should be enough to light the back of the lantern sufficiently. The lantern will also interface directly with the users hand. On the underside of the lantern I have molded a roughly hand shaped recess, this will allow the lantern to perch securely on the hand and have the user able to walk about without worry of it just falling off. I also believe it gives the lantern a more elegant way of interfacing with the body.

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Module 2 Submission