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Module 3: Fabrication

Matthew Greenwood 641211 Tutorial Group 4 Semester 1


in Module 1 I looked at the movement in a nuatulis shell and the process of formation and scaling as the creature grows creating the characteristic chambers. We created 1:5 scale models of our pattern using clay and I particularly liked the simplistic conical/circular shapes. Module 2 saw me digitising these shapes into rhino and again playing with the form of the model to create new patterns and shapes. The final look had scaling “arms” or “wings” that gave it the movement and scaling that I loved about the original natural pattern. I then experimented with 2D and 3D panelling tools in rhino to find a panel that didint distort the shape too much but also linked back with my original patterns and models.

Module 1 & 2 Review VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


Architecturalmoleskine.blogspot.com.au.

Image: Architecturalmoleskine.blogspot.com.au.

I also looked at lighting and how the model would eventually be held by the user. I wanted something delecate that rested on a singular upturned hand that would project light away from the user. I also looked at the light and shadow in the Suntory Museum by Tadao Ando. Throughout the first two modules and well into the third I always kept looking back to one of my first models with the scaling triangles.

Module 1 & 2 Review VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


Colour was used to differentiate panels. When unrolling my first prototype I used numbers to identify which pieces started where.

Over the last few weeks I found that my rhino model had very limited connection to my original pattern concept. After the feedback from the Module 2 presentations I decided to take a look at my earlier models and bring forward some elements into my current designs. I looked at my first model, and tried the implement the ideas of repetition, scaling and the play on light that the triangular shapes offered. The scaling in my current model manifest itself within the cut out sections within certain panels. At the back (the edge closet to the user) these cut outs are small and towards the front these cut outs become progressively larger. I also implemented a triangular 3D pattern to the surface of the model, this harkened back to the triangular and edgier form of my original model. To easily flatten and assemble my model, I grouped certain clusters of panels and separated each of these groups with different colours. I also labeled these pieces so once printed I knew exactly which part corresponded to what section of the model.

Unrolling Prototype VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


I used the grasshopper plug in to create neat tabs for my model, the neatness of the tabs is very important as I had considered allowing them to be visible on the exterior of the model to further create a different texture to the surface. I found the grasshopper plugin to be very helpful and quite straightforward to use however I imagine creating a rule/ recipe from scratch would be quite challenging.

Grasshopper VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


The model making process for the 2D portions of my panelling is quite straightforward and I enjoy crafting these pieces. I used small pegs to hold the tabs together while the glue dried. Originally I had been using a glue stick however I found that the glue was not strong enough so I experimented with other alternatives, using tape which was unsightly and super glue at one stage which soaked through and stained parts of my paper. Finally I settled on PVA craft glue. Letting the glue semi dry on a separate piece of cardboard before using a skewer to apply it to my model tabs. I found this was the strongest adhesive and the most practical. The 3D panels of my model proved to be more challenging however they worked and I will just have to be patient when creating my final model.

Prototype Construction VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


I tested the prototype with a couple of the LED lights and batteries from the fabrication lab. The main concerns were the light coming through the join lines and how close the LED lights could be to the surface before it came through to bright.

Prototype Testing VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


I brought my model into class on week 8 to dicuss with peers and tutors. We discussed the material thickness. and the join types. I learned a few things from my first 1:1 prototype. - The material thickness plays a large part in the stability of the design. - Ofset border cutouts were too larger and direct and there was the possibilty of my lantern looking too hollow if I used it extensively. - The 3D panels werent following my original pattern of scaling and movement. They were too static and rigid. - Tabs stuck together running vertically strengthened the structure incredibly.

Design Optimisation VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


Optimisations for my final model. - A new panel was to be created. One that fitted with my narrative and had intrigue. - Consideration of where the tab “spines� are placed and using horizontal tab intersections to create cross beams that shortened the effective length of the spines improving stability/ - From my prototype I decided I wanted to use the ivory card from the FABLAB for my final model. The new panel (as seen in sketch to the left) was far more complex than my original triangulated surface. However it fit my narrative much more clesely while also fixing the problem of having opening that were too direct and transparent. The new panels also felt like an entity themselves. They are self contained cells/pods much like the chambers of a nautalis shell.

Design Optimisation VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

The new panels as created in Rhino and exported into Illustrator.


TOP

PERSPECTIVE FRONT

Isometric Drawings VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


The model splits neatly into 12 vertical sections.

This hollow is the final peice that gets attached to the model. It will support the switch and LED lights.

Exploded Isometric VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


This diagram shows how the model can be unrolled into the 12 vertical strips. I used colour coding to help identify the peices within Rhino.

Construction Drawing VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


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Nested Panels in Rhino

Construction VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

The Construction Process


Final Build VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


Final Build VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS


The first reading, Architecture in the Digital Age discusses the challenge of constructability and how through computer aided three dimensional design, Architects are becoming more involved in the fabrication process. Computer aided design was pioneered by Frank Gehry and his use of the software, CATIA, which was used to design and manufacture aircraft. The reading also talks about the different fabrication equipment that is available. 2 Dimensional Fabrication A very common form of fabrication used in many industries which can include the Plasma-Arc, Laser Beam, Water Jet and Blade machines. They move in two axis with either a moving head, bed or both. Subtractive Fabrication The removal of a specified amount of material through electrical, chemical or milling means. These machines can have many different axis. Additive Fabrication These are characterized by incremental forming that works on a “sliced� model. 3D printers are becoming increasingly affordable such as the Maker Bot talked about in the lectures. Formative Fabrication These are machines that create a product through bending and reshaping/deformation. Perhaps Glass blowing is a form of formative fabrication? Because of the ease of fabrication equipment and the manipulation of designs it is becoming ever more easier to have mass customization with products with hardly any extra cost. The second reading, Digital Fabrications, talks about the innovative qualities of digital fabrications which are ever more closing the gap between physical and virtual. It goes on to discuss how digital fabrication is affecting the way that we learn and that students can now readily create models to convey what they are designing with precision that before would have been impractical. The process of digital fabrication can also effect the way that we designed our lanterns. For example the fact that the surfaces had to be flat and triangulated not curved effects the way that all the models will look and gives them all a similar quality.

Reading Reflection VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

Image: http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/01/09/MakerBot_ Replicator_610x407.jpg

Module 3 Fabrication  

Module 3 Fabrication

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