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PARTA

CONCEPTUALISATION MATTHEW GREENWOOD


CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 2 DIGITAL DESIGN EXPERIENCE 3 DESIGN FUTURING 4 DESIGN COMPUTATION 5 COMPOSITION & GENERATION 6 CONCLUSION 7 ALGORITHMIC SKETCHBOOK 8 BIBLIOGRAPHY 9 RESEARCH FEILDS 11 CASE STUDY 1.0 13 CASE STUDY 2.0 14 TECHNIQUE: DEVELOPMENT 16 TECHNIQUE: PROTOTYPES 20 LEARNING OBJECTIVES 22 ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES 23

DSAIR 01


INTRODUCTION

MATTHEW GREENWOOD

Hi my name is Matt I am 23 and I am studying my Bachelor of Environments at the University of Melbourne with the aim of starting my Masters of Architecture in 2015. My journey in Architecture began at the university of Tasmania studying a Bachelor of Environmental Design, there I learned a variety of Design Communication tools such as Archicad, Google Sketch Up, Adobe Creative Suite and hand technical drafting skills. Having lived in Tasmania all my life and thinking about future employment opportunities I applied to the University of Melbourne and relocated in 2013. Here I have learned the use of Rhino 3D modeling software in Virtual Environments and my knowledge of Architectural Design is growing. I love the works of Herzog & De Meuron, Zaha Hadid and I am absolutely taken by the beauty of historical works suchs as the Hagia Sophia in Istanbul. I believe the future of design is sustainability through technological and scientific advancement, I want to shape the world around me and I don’t want to limit that to buildings or installations.

DSAIR 02


DIGITAL DESIGN EXPERIENCE

Most of my digital design experience comes from my studies at university. At UTAS (University of Tasmania) the majority if my digital design work was using Archicad, Photoshop and inDesign. Once moving to UniMelb I started experimenting with Rhino 3D modelling software in Virtual Environments to creating a lantern. In this class we went through the process of modelling with clay and paper models and importing them into Rhino to form the basis of our 3D models. From there we tweaked and perfected our models for further fulfill the brief. The next step was to a pre made grasshopper formula that created tabs on the paper model for construction. From there is was a process of printing the flattened models and assembling it for exhibition (Right). Rhino was a fantastic tool for prototyping models. Sections of the model could be isolated flattened and printed to test lighting effects and structural integrity.

DSAIR 03


a1:

DESIGN FUTURING CH2 - Melbourne Mick Pearce with DesignInc.

The Ch2 building in Melbourne has become a focal point for sustainable design in Australia. The building achieved a 6 star energy rating and the Architect describes the process of design as a form of biomimicry. Biomimicry is expressed in the design through how the building reacts to the external environment. For example the wooden panels that make up the ‘Face’ of the building change there angle depending on the sun position and time of day. It creates its own energy using wind turbines and solar panels. I am unsure if it is a good example of design futuring however is certainly paves the way for future constructions to explore sustainable design.

East Gate Centre - Harare Mick Pearce

Designed by the same Architect as Ch2, the East Gate Centre in Harare, Zimbabwe again follows the inspiration of biomimicry. In this project the architect looked at termite mounds and how they used opening and closing tunnels to control the internal temperature of the structure. In termite mounds the insects need to control the temperature to grow a specific type of fungus which they eat. In the East Gate Centre, Pearce uses the same techniques albeit mechanical with the aid of fans to regulate the internal temperature of the structure [2]. I see this structure as a better example of design futuring than the Ch2 building as it more closely relates to the natural inspiration rather than energy saving techniques being ‘stuck on’ to achieve a goal.

DSAIR 04


a2:

DESIGN COMPUTATION

THE BENEFITS OF USING COMPUTERS IN THE DESIGN PROCESS.

Computing is the design tool for the future and already the majority of design work is produced on computers. By using computing as a design tool we are able to easily share work and collaborate in a team environment. Information can easily and instantly be sent to contractors and plans can be altered without having to redraw the entire design. As access to design software becomes even more widespread the need for education of these tools is required, Design Studio Air is a perfect example of this. With the growing use of mechanical fabrication techniques the application of computation design is widening. Now people are able to buy 3D printing plans online and granted they have a 3D printer at their disposal can create anything from decorative ornaments to wearable items such as shoes. A major benefit to using computer software is that geometries that would be difficult or painstaking to model physically can be created with relative ease on a computer. This can then be fabricated using a number of methods.

TOP Pavilion by french architect Marc Fornes, an example of some of the interesting forms achievable through computational design [1].

BOTTOM Research Pavilion at Stuttgart University demonstrating material oriented computational design [2].

[1] Biomimetic Architecture <http://www.biomimetic-architecture.com/2012/nonlinlin-pavillion-by-marc-fornes/> [accessed 25 March 2014]. [2]Futures Plus, ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, Inhabitat, (2012), <http://futuresplus.net/2011/12/14/icditke-research-pavilion-2010-stuttgart-university/> [accessed 25 March 2014].

DSAIR 05


a3:

COMPOSITION & GENERATION

The generation of idess in Architecture is moving away from traditional composition towards a more generative process. Traditionally architects would use a computer program to mimic the same process as hand drawing techniques. They can viualise the desired end result and within the boundaries of that design idea work towards a solution. As discussed in the reading by Peters, 2013 [1], this form of design can be reffered to as ‘computerisation’. ‘Computation’ however allows the designer a new prccess in which to tackle design. By using algorithms as a sketching tool we can come to a design conclusion through unexpected results and inspiring new forms can be discovered that we unintentional.

ABOVE Columns designed by Micheal Hansmeyer. Each is unique through various generation parameters [2].

“ We are moving from an era where architects use software to one where they create software” - Peters, 2013. I believe that the generative process can produce incredibly beautiful designs and really break the designer free of linear constraints. The only time I can see generative design not being able to be used to its fullest is when there are very restrictive design breifs. However prehaps these situations need to be looked at as a way to educate clients and fellow designers to move forwards into a new process of design.

[1] Peters, Brady. (2013) ‘Computation Works: The Building of Algorithmic Thought’, Architectural Design, 83, 2, pp. 08-15. [2] DesignBoom.com, ‘ornamented columns’ by michael hansmeyer’, Inhabitat, (2012), <http://www.designboom.com/architecture/michael-hansmeyerornamented-columns/> [accessed 27 March 2014].

DSAIR 06


a4&5:

CONCLUSION AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

From what has been discussed in Part A I can start to think about the direction of my design for the brief. Not so much in the desired outcome of the installment but the process in which to come to the solution. In order to go about this I will need to further practive in Rhino and Grasshopper and begin to create my own algarithms and codes in which to create my desing. As a group we are looking at harnessing the suns energy in order to create power, so in my algarithm ill need to consider the angles of the sun, how to maximise surface area in to harness the most energy. In constrast to this prehaps ill want to have as little surface area as possible in the areas in which no sunlight hits the buildings. These are just two examples of data that I could input into Grasshopper when generating ideas. I am really excited about the prospect of an unexpected outcome that I really like. As we have learned in Part A, its about designing the prcess rather than desiging the outcome. A greater understanding of grasshopper and computational design would have been very helpfull in my Virtual Environments subject in 2013. I know that I was too focused on the final shape of my design that it limited my discovery of new forms. The inspiration for the design brief was nature and biomimicry and using a more cumpotational design method could have helped me a achieve a much more organic and natural looking outcome. IMAGE Baoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;an Internation Airport. The facade treatment is the outcome of paramteric data controlling the size, slop and positioning of openings. [1].

[1] I am Architect, studio fuksas expands shenzhen baoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;an international airport <http://www.iam-architect.com/studio-fuksas-expands-shenzhen-baoaninternational-airport/> [accessed 27 March 2014].

DSAIR 07


a6:

ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Shell Shelterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; This shelter idea was the algorithmic task for week 2. I chose it to display here as I really suprised myself with ow fast I was able to create it.

Structure 2 My second attempt at the week 3 task produced an object that looked more like a sculpture than play equipment or a shelter.

Structure 1 This was my first outcome with the week 3 task. I imagine it to be a standing structure with shade and room to stand underneath.

DSAIR 08


BIBLIOGRAPHY Biomimetic Architecture. 2012. NonLin/Lin Pavillion by Marc Fornes - Biomimetic Architecture. [online] Available at: http://www.biomimetic-architecture.com/2012/nonlinlin-pavillion-by-marc-fornes/ [Accessed: 27 Mar 2014]. designboom | architecture & design magazine. 2014. michael hansmeyer: ornamented columns designboom | architecture & design magazine. [online] Available at: http://www.designboom.com/architecture/ michael-hansmeyer-ornamented-columns/ [Accessed: 27 Mar 2014]. Doan, A. 2014. BIOMIMETIC ARCHITECTURE: Green Building in Zimbabwe Modeled After Termite Mounds. [online] Available at: http://inhabitat.com/building-modelled-on-termites-eastgate-centre-inzimbabwe/ [Accessed: 27 Mar 2014]. Iam-architect.com. 2014. studio fuksas expands shenzhen baoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;an international airport. [online] Available at: http://www.iam-architect.com/studio-fuksas-expands-shenzhen-baoan-international-airport/ [Accessed: 27 Mar 2014]. Melbourne.vic.gov.au. 2014. [online] Available at: http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/AboutCouncil/ MediaCentre/CH2HighRes/CH2_2_HR.jpg [Accessed: 27 Mar 2014]. Peters, B. 2013. Computation Works: The Building of Algorithmic Thought. Architectural Design, 83 (2), pp. 8--15. Plus, F. 2011. ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2010 - Stuttgart University. [online] Available at: http:// futuresplus.net/2011/12/14/icditke-research-pavilion-2010-stuttgart-university/ [Accessed: 27 Mar 2014].

DSAIR 09


PARTB CRITERIA DESIGN MATTHEW GREENWOOD


b1:

RESEARCH FEILDS

STRIPS & FOLDING

1

THE PAVILION REACHES OUT WITH STRIPS LIKE A LIVING ORGANISM MESONIC FABRICS BY BIOTHING The Mesonic Fabrics algorithm looks at magnetic fields to compute the direction of the structure. The structure appears to be composed of simple linear components that sprawl out from central focus points and avoid crossing paths with one an other. Initially it may appear to seem like it would be simple to construct however I believe no two of the arms would the be same length or shape meaning each one would have to individual cast/ cut. There is no immediately apparent repetitive element in the design. The aesthetics of the pavilion however are very appealing, the openings play with the direction of light and shadow and it has a very biomemetic feel to it like am organism stretching out with many feelers or some sort of flora branching out to cover an area.

Image: Biothing.org, (2014). Biothing. [online] Available at: http://www.biothing.org/ [Accessed 3 May. 2014]

DSAIR 11


Line charge square grid

Line charge

Line charge pframes

Line charge rectangle

Bezier Grid

Conic Graph

Freeform Pipe

Freeform Sweep

Pop’Geom Plane

Pop’Geom 3D

Pop’Geom 3D 2

5 Divisions

Circles Radius

Length of Lines

Height Manipulation

Positive Height Changes

Low Divisions

Different Curve Points

Curves Arrayed

Sweep & Piped Curves

Circle Radius Changes

Sweep, Pipe and Raised Graph

Piped Circles with Spin Force

Higher Vector Force

Extruded Curves

Pipes and Graph Change

Loft between curves

Vector Spin with Boxes

DSAIR 12


b2:

CASE STUDY 1.0

EXTRAPOLATION OF OUTCOMES

The two outcomes above were quite interesting as they played with changing the surface area with something other than just piping the curve. The experiment on the top right is also very interesting as it plays with the different effects of spin forces and it has a lot of movement to it. The experiment below I thought was interesting however I was focusing too much to soon on trying to make a structure for the site instead of exploring the algorithm and discovering something new. I was designing with the final intent in mind rather than designing the algorithm.

DSAIR 13


b3:

CASE STUDY 2.0

REVERSE ENGINEERING PAVILION BY BIOTHING

PROCESS

Image: Biothing.org, (2014). Biothing. [online] Available at: http://www.biothing.org/ [Accessed 3 May. 2014]

After playing around with the Biothing pavilion in the first case study we decided to use it again in the reverse engineering stage of Part B. This time we created the algorith from scratch without using the original algorith as a reference. As you can see from the 5 steps pictured below the attempt we feel was succesfull. Even though it doesnt have the exact form of the originall pavilion pictured above, it still retains that look of tendrils extening from points along a curve. It still incorporated the major elements of using Field Lines, Charges and Interpolated Curves.

DSAIR 14


DSAIR 15


b4:

TECHNIQUE: DEVELOPMENT

SELECTION CRITERIA SURFACE AREA FOR SOLAR EXPOSURE Does the surface allow ample solar exposure? Larger surface areas on the “top” and “exterior”. VISUAL INTRIGUE Does the design create a visual experience? Does it draw attention and provoke exploration? HUMAN INTERACTION Does the design faciltate human interaction, can you explore and dicover the structure?

STARTING ITERATION Below is the final itteration from our Biothing Reverse Engineering task. We really like the form which was created and decided to base out criteria research on this form.

DSAIR 16


Number of Points on Curve #1

Number of Points on Curve #2

Number of Points on Curve #3

Number of Divides on Curve #1

Number of Divides on Curve #2

Number of Divides on Curve #3

Number of Divides on Curve #4

Number of Divides on Curve #5

Number of Steps on Curve #1

Number of Steps on Curve #2

Graph Changes Conic

Graph Changes Conic

Conic Graph Piped

Surface Variables Delaunay

Surface Variables Piped

Pipe Variables

Surface Sweep

Surface Sweep Reduced Numbers

Surface Cones

Circle Radius

Graph Parameters

Extrusions

Original Curve Changes #1

Original Curve Changes #2

Original Curve Changes #3

Original Curve Changes #4

Original Curve Changes #5

Original Curve Changes #6

DSAIR 17


Piped Curves as Circles #1

Curve Numbers #1

Curve Numbers #2

Curve Numbers #3

Extruded Curves

Exruded Curves with Intersecting Planes #1

Exruded Curves with Intersecting Planes #2

Exruded Curves with Intersecting Planes #3

Offset Curves

Piped Spin Curves

Piped Spin Curves Graph Changes

Surface Experimentations

Surface Experimentations

Surface Experimentations

Surface Experimentations

Spin Force Experiments

Spin Force Experiments

Spin Force Experiments

Spin Force Experiments

Spin Force Experiments

Spin Force Experiments

Spin Force Experiments

DSAIR 18


b4:

TECHNIQUES: DEVELOPMENT

SUCCESSFUL ITERATIONS

ITERATION 1

ITERATION 2

ITERATION 3

ITERATION 4

NOTES ON THE FOUR SUCCESSFUL ITERATIONS. Iteration 1: This explores the use of a more geometric surface that from initial observation would seem easier to fabricate if we decide to use card. Iteration 2: We really liked the form that appeared in this iteration, it looks like a structure with interesting spaces, its intriguing and there is the potential for interesting fabrication techinques using perspex and card. However we were deterred from this form as it may appear to be a simple shelter form and wasnt as â&#x20AC;?Uniqueâ&#x20AC;? as some of our piped forms. We also wanted a challenging form for our technology of dye solar, something that wasnt a typical flat surface. Iteration 3: The perpendicular surfaces of iteration 3 create interesting spaces and play on light. The joints between the curves and the planes also seem quite practical to fabricate. Iteration 4: This is one of our earliest forms however it is the one the like the most. Its complex and tangled yet this provides a really interesting visual experience.

DSAIR 19


b5:

TECHNIQUE: PROTOTYPES

PROTOTYPES

We decided to prototype several ideas so that we could explore the constructablilty of multiple designs. Below is my experimentation with Iteration 1.

ITERATION 1 The look of iteration 1 can be achived through the replication of one single element. By isolation one ‘arm’ of the model I was able to generate a developable surface through the use of the paneing tools plug in for Rhino.

The end result was not as successful as hoped. The time it would take to craft enough “arms” to achieve the same effect would be impractical and the joints between pieces was an issue.

DSAIR 20


FURTHER PROTOTYPING PROTOTYPING

The top two prototypes were experiments in using ink and perspex to represent the dye solar technology. They are the result of thinking about other ways to fabricate the structures such as slicing and stacking elements. The photo to the left shows experimentation with resin to create the tubular arms of the model. The experiment wasnt as sucessful as it could have been however the molds were made of plasticine which wasnt the best material so any future attempts at creating resin casting would be with 3D printed molds to create elements that could then be repeated and joined.

DSAIR 21


b1:

LEARNING OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES FEEDBACK FROM INTERIM PRESENTATION

The interim presentation was a good chance to receive feedback on our work as there had been no classes for a few weeks and it was good to be able to present our work before the Part B submission date. One of the main critisisms of our works was the models constructed and the method of fabrications. Some more work will need to go into making components and joints and fabricating these directly from our digital model. After the class we looked at how we could achieve this and we are considering researching two avenues, either slicing the model and constructing it from planes using a desigined joint or creating a mold in which to cast the model as a monolithic structure. To aid in the research of casting our model we downloaded and installed 3D coat which we will experment with over the coming weeks. The second critisism of our work was the intergration of the dye solar cells and their angle and placement to the sun paths. In order to explore this we are looking at programs such as ARCSIM and Ladybug.

PART B

CRITERIA DESIGN group 5: lucy, steph, matt

DSAIR 22


b1:

ALGORITHMIC SKETCHES

“CACTUS” The idea of this weeks algorithmic sketch was to arrange objects on a lofted surface. After that I created a base for the object using lofts and intersects.

“BIOTHING EXPERIMENTATION” This is my extrapolation of the biothing task. We were asked to recreate the biothing and take it further. I lofted different curves and added intersects to create a frame. My intention was to create something that may appear like a habitable structure.

REFERENCES

Biothing.org, (2014). Biothing. [online] Available at: http://www.biothing.org/ [Accessed 3 May. 2014]

DSAIR 23


AIR: Part B Submission