Page 1

After School Program for the Performing Arts


the link

Afterschool Program for the Performing Arts Melissa A. Gambino

[1]


the link Melissa A. Gambino Comprehensive Project Interior Architecture Program Department of Architecture University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon Submitted for Completion of a Bachelor of Interior Architecture Degree, June 2012 Design Studio Professor: Alison Snyder Comprehensive Project Professor: Erin Cunningham [2]

Melissa Ann Gambino


Table of Contents Part I. Formal Project Statement of Intention [4] Part II. Building Conditions and Codes [16] Part III. Final Program [38] Part IV. Reference Archive [52] Part V. Design Archive [62]

[3]


PART I. Formal Project Statement of Intention

[4]


A. Abstract: Problem Statement The Link is an afterschool community program for children ages 5-18 located in Eugene. The program provides music, dance instruction, theater and performance as a means to improve students’ academic, social and personal abilities through learning, sharing and collaborating. The Link is a non-profit public organization, mostly funded through grants and donations to make it available to all families. Based on the nature of the program, the proximity to nearby businesses generates an ideal location. The Link will be a new interior built environment that the broader community in Eugene will identify as a safe and fun place for the youth to inhabit, and will also be intriguing and exciting. There is a great demand for a facility that provides after school services to the Eugene community. From the hours of three to six in the evening, children who are left alone and unsupervised are at a higher risk of making destructive choices that may lead to drug abuse, drinking, teen pregnancy, crime, and other life threatening activities.1 Though Eugene offers community organizations like the YMCA and The Shedd Institute Music Academy, there is no specific after school program that targets these at-risk youth. This program will have a positive impact on Eugene by providing a “wayout” for the youth who are headed towards making wrong decisions. This proposal investigates how community youth programs impact learning through facilitating creative expression and how music, dance and performance help students grow socially and academically. The development of this facility will contribute to the rehabilitation of downtown and will create a sustaining relationship with the greater community. This program will use the performing arts as a connective tissue between professionals and artists in the community to the youth.The Link teaches and uses the arts in this program as a tool to help these kids ultimately succeed in life. 1 “Afterschool Alliance :: America After 3PM .” Afterschool Alliance. http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/AA3PM.cfm (accessed March 7, 2012).

[5]


[6]


B. Statement Summary The Link is an after school community program for children ages 5-18 located in Eugene. The program provides music, dance instruction, theater and performance as a means to improve students’ academic, social and personal abilities through learning, sharing and collaborating. The

Link is a non-profit public organization, mostly funded through grants and donations to make it available to all families. Based on the nature of the program, the proximity to nearby businesses generates an ideal location. The Link will be a new interior built environment that the broader community in Eugene will identify as a safe and fun place for the youth to inhabit, and will also be intriguing and exciting.

There is a great demand for a facility that

provides after school services to the Eugene community. From the hours of three to six in the evening, children who are left alone and unsupervised are at a higher risk of making destructive choices that may lead to drug abuse, drinking, teen pregnancy, crime, and other life threatening activities. Though Eugene offers community organizations like the YMCA and The Shedd Institute Music Academy, there is no specific after school program that targets these at-risk youth. This program will have a positive impact on Eugene by providing a “way-out� for the youth who are headed towards making wrong decisions. This proposal investigates how community youth programs impact learning through facilitating creative expression and how music, dance and performance help students grow socially and academically.

The development of this facility

[7]


will contribute to the rehabilitation of

investigate the need and demand for after

downtown and will create a sustaining

school programs and how that need is

relationship with the greater community.

being met. In 2009, along with this survey,

This program will use the performing

Oregon pronounced itself to be “on the

arts as a connective tissue between

move towards providing after school

professionals and artists in the community

care,” (Afterschool Alliance, 2009) but is

to the youth. The Link teaches and

slower and behind most other states that

uses the arts in this program as a tool to

are already on track with this movement.

help these kids ultimately succeed in life.

Ma jority of the parents who responded to the poll stated their recognition of the need

“Links

have

been

found

consistently

for a built environment. In general parents

and

who appreciate after school programs

emotionally

listed their concerns and obstacles with

positive and warm and that provide

the movement as addressing the demand,

support

adolescent

affordability of the program, and the

suggests

child’s lack of enjoyment, respectively.

that positive experiences in one are (for

Here in Oregon 83 percent of parents are

example, in the family, among peers, at

happy with the cost, 68 percent of parents

school, through community service…) may

were satisfied with their child’s enjoyment

lessen the effect of negative experiences

of the program and a low 57 percent of

in other areas. Adolescents who spend

parents thought the level of safety was

time in communities that are rich in

adequate (Afterschool Alliance 2009).

developmental opportunities for them

On average, Oregon parents/guardians

experience less risk and show evidence

spend 49 dollars per week on after

of higher rates of positive development,”

school programs, which can be a very

(After School All-Stars, 2011). The Link is

large hurdle for some families to get over

a new built environment that redefines

financially. The Link is solely funded

the use and methods of after school

through

programs. The youth in Eugene identify

raising, which alleviates the financial stress

The Link as a safe and fun place to inhabit

for low-income families that work full-time

that is conducive to social development,

and leave their children unattended and

between

teen’s

environments

autonomy.

for

that

well-being are

developing

Some

research

academic achievement and prevention of risky behaviors.

donations

and

fund-

the unsupervised. Though the survey showed

In 2009 the Afterschool Alliance

conducted a survey across the United States called “America After 3PM” to

[8]

grants,

that roughly 70 percent of parents are home for some portion of the afternoon, there is still 30 percent of kids K-12 that are responsible for themselves at least 9


hours a week (Afterschool Alliance). The

Link

to make healthy choices for themselves”

helps close the gap for those

(Afterschool Alliance 2011). Kids that have

families who are unable to physically be

extracurricular and athletic activities to be

with their kids after school. Through the

associated with, decreases the percentage

development and integration of The

of delinquent activity, violence and sexual

Link as a built environment, it strives

activity. To accomplish these goals The

to enrich the lives of the youth in Eugene

Link provides free music, dance and

through, social development, character

theater instruction as the backbone of the

growth, and academic achievement.

curriculum. Kids have the ability to choose an instrument (donated to the program)

Social Development

they wish to learn, and can develop their

“Healthy social and emotional development

skills as a musician. Providing instruments

is critical to success in school,” (Afterschool

and equipment allows kids who come

Alliance 2011). It’s important to focus on

from low-income families to have an equal

providing vital resources for kids of ages

opportunity at a creative talent. For those

5-18 because during this phase of their life,

who prefer to be in larger groups and exert

they are most impressionable. Incidents

more energy, dance classes from jazz,

that occur during this portion of their life

lyrical, tap, hip hop and break dancing are

can affect their ability to be successful

offered. Bringing various types of dance

later in life. The Link harbors spaces

into the environment reaches a spectrum

that are designed to foster participation,

of personalities and hopefully appeal to

communication, relationship building, and

even the troublesome kids. Dance is a very

leadership skills ultimately increasing self-

positive and reflective way to express

confidence and self-esteem. Through the

oneself and this can be very therapeutic

use of hierarchy, spaces vary and promote

to kids who struggle with speaking their

small to large group interaction and

thoughts and feelings.

relationship building. These social spaces are interrelated with the activities and

Academic Achievement

games that are housed within.

Studies conducted by the Afterschool Alliance have shown that students who

Prevention of Risky Behaviors Having

activities

for

youth

have an after school program that they to

be

attend has “improved school attendance

involved in plays a crucial role to their

and

their

success and lowers the risk of getting in

Many kids don’t have the support they

trouble. “When students feel connected,

need at home to be successful in school

supported and safe, they are more likely

due

to

engagement

lack

of

in

learning.”

encouragement

and

[9]


accountability.

The

Link provides auditorium

is

intentionally

designed

spaces that facilitate sessions for tutoring

to exhibit to the community seasonal

and nurturing those relationships being

performances that the students learned,

built between the students and the

and also be available for the community to

mentors. There is currently a growing

rent out for other venues, having flexible

relationship between The Link and

design to suit­­­. The design of this facility

University of Oregon students to open the

promotes people to inhabit the spaces for

opportunity for students to volunteer and

longer periods of time, creating a sense

tutor the kids at the after school program.

of “community.” For the parents who pick

By providing this spatial resource, The

up their kids and are waiting can use the

Link is a place of encouragement and lounge and café to watch classes finishing accountability that these kids need to be

up and converse with other parents.

triumphant in their studies.

Since this building contains a very active environment, deliberate circulation will be

The original goal of this recreational

key for quick way finding and transition

facility was to look at how design can

between activities. The Link is a place

choreograph spaces for both the classes

that facilitates a stronger connection

as well as open free time for the users.

between school and home, as well as

Through design the variety of spaces

bridges community and students together.

facilitate both individual growth, and growth in team building. The Link provides

The city of Eugene has been continuously

space and design requirements to reach

working on the revitalization of downtown,

across the age groups and caters to each

making it a desirable place to inhabit by

learning level. The Link has enough space

‘cleaning up the streets.’ By locating The

to serve up to 300 students across the city

Link downtown, the program becomes a

of Eugene. A large team of 30 employees

central “hub” for the youth in Eugene as

work together each day with the youth.

well as promotes a better and cleaner

During the day when school is in session,

downtown area by keeping in an active

the facility is open to the community to

environment. Placing the facility downtown

rent and use the spaces for their personal

is appropriate because it is in proximity

endeavors.

to other resources like the Eugene Public

Spaces and rooms in The Link

Library, the LTD Bus Station, and the Hult

are designed in such a way that encourage

Center. The proposed building is the Old

interaction between community members

Market Building adjacent to the new Lane

and students by linking them together

Community College building and housing

with a common gathering “hub.” The

in the downtown business district. This

[10]


building is a “medium road” building with

community facilities and the structural

one and a half levels. The building is in

grid is very open and non constrictive

decent condition but has lost all historic

which is important for dance studios. This

details and qualities through multiple

building was clearly outdated and run-

renovations. The scope of this project

down which provided room for a lot of

is 30,000 square feet with no exterior

potential for design and repurposing the

work included. The new building use

building.

maintained existing floor conditions but added a mechanical room to the roof. Due

The idea for my project was inspired by

to the facility type, the design consistently

two main interests in my life.

projects use of sustainable and durable

I have been involved in dance since I was

materials through repurposing of objects

young and have actively been involved in

and raw construction materials.

a performing company for the past ten years here in Eugene.

The design of the exterior shell is very unusual. The exterior had a concrete/

Also, building relationships with youth and

stucco construction which was removed

teenagers has always been an interest in

and

It

my life and something I value. I believe

appears, the concrete stucco finish was

it’s important for the community to help

later applied to the building in attempt to

them grow and develop into young adults

hide doors from original building design.

through mentoring and support.

refinished

with

new

plaster.

The exterior facade had signage from a previous tenant (Shaw Med) which showed

There is a great demand for a facility that

the lack of attention paid in recent years.

provides after school services to the youth

With the new design for The Link, the

of Eugene. From the hours of three to six in

North facade was reconfigured to create

the evening, youth and teenagers who are

outdoor niches for sitting. When the

left home alone and unsupervised are at a

building was originally built in the 1960’s it

higher risk of making destructive choices

was well used and maintained, however as

that may lead to things like drug abuse,

the tenants changed and in most recent

drinking, teen pregnancy, crime and other

years the building has lost it’s quality and

life threatening activities. The After School

desperately needed updating.

All Stars state that “Adolescents who spend time in communities that are rich

The two main reasons I wanted to use

in developmental opportunities for them

this building is that it is located in the

experience less risk and show evidence of

downtown district in proximity to other

higher rates of positive development.”

[11]


defined

with the community area, the

With this project I was interested in the

dance wing, music wing and education

current use of after school programs

wing. Each activity results in a showcase

and their impact on local communities,

which is demonstrated in the experimental

specifically Eugene. Eugene is also a town

theater in the core of the building.

that largely supports the performing arts and I was interested in providing

[Layer 2.] There is an axis that is created

a place that was another resource to

through the placement of open gathering

the community. The Link is a new

spaces for collaboration between users.

prototype for an after school program

These spaces delineate shared space by

with a focus on the performing arts as a

the use of flexible walls and boundaries.

means to bring success into the lives of the

I chose to make these spaces feel like a

youth. The link provides free music, dance

unit by wrapping them in a homogeneous

and theater instruction as the backbone

material. Focus Space. As you can see,

of the curriculum along with educational

the two student lounges on the north and

and life skills resources.

south wings have built in stadium seating and

with removable upholstered high density

schematic design, there were four key

cushions. To continue the language of

design intentions that were important to

breaking down spaces in scale, there

me.

are large moveable ottomans that can

1. Developing a dialogue between the

be taken away, creating an informal

functional design of the building to the

demonstration or performance space.

existing truss system.

The track lighting is meant to mimic the

2.

During

Creating

initial

investigation

spaces

that

promote

collaboration, communication, exploration

setting in the experimental theater yet provide task lighting.

and exhibition on various levels of scale. 3. Creating a strong connection to the

[Layer 3. ] Connection to the community.

local community and creating interaction.

The entry extends from the street into

4. Creating a design that demonstrates a

the main foyer, pulling people into the

consciousness of budget and durability.

experiment theater. Focus Space. The

With those things in mind, the conceptual

design intention for the materials is to stay

parti is comprised of several layers which

simple and playful. By using raw materials

creates

the

dialogue

“Wrapping like OSB plywood, there is practicality

the Core.�

and durability in the material that still

[Layer 1.] The program is organized into

creates a warm and inviting atmosphere.

five main categories. The perimeter is

Using the same materials throughout the

[12]


building creates uniformity between all of

Link is partnering with local groups like

the spaces.

the Umbrella Arts Association and other dance programs. These organizations

[Layer 4.] The roof grid partitions the

will rent out the facility during off-hours,

building into three zones which acts as an

creating more of a community.

organizational agent.

Youth

and

teens

need

more

resources that provide safe environments Levels of scale: throughout the building

which are interesting and desirable to

there is a language of breaking down

inhabit. The Link helps close the

spaces

unique

gap for those families who are unable to

experiences for each type of person. For

physically be with their teens after school.

each wing, there is a collaboration lounge

The development and integration of The

where users can view adjacent activities

Link as a built environment strives to

and communicate with each other. The

enrich the lives of the youth in Eugene

experimental theater is wrapped with a

through social development, character

thick wall that has niches cut out along

growth and academic achievement. The

the perimeter to provide spaces for more

hope is that through this program, a

intimate and separate activities.

strong and dynamic relationship between

Focus Space. The theater construction is

the youth and the local community would

steel stud framing with typical gyp board

be created.

in

scale

to

provide

and plaster. The outside layer is perforated mild steel with a custom pattern that reveals pops of color in the background. Focus Space. Providing flexibility and variety are two key aspects of the smaller spaces. -The music wing is separated from the main corridor with a thick wall that houses cubby space for personal belongings, acts as visual display and storage of instruments and ultimately creates a sound barrier. Connection to the community: The after school program runs during specific times of the day which leaves the building vacant for ma jority of the time. The

[13]


Thesis Issues/Questions User] Issue 1 | The design needs to create an environment that promotes collaborative relationships between the staff and at-risk students. [1] How do the relational needs vary by age, and is this, or should this, be reflected in a hierarchy of spaces? [2] How can the arrangement of faculty spaces and student’s spaces facilitate a stronger relationship between the users? [3] How can design promote interaction between kids? [4] How will the program be supervised? (What spaces need it?) [Interior Space] Issue 2 | This proposal investigates community youth programs and how the built environment can impact learning through the support of or by facilitating creative expression? [1] How can the built environment support/ enhance/promote dance & physical movement? [2]How can physical activity and education be incorporated into a single, cohesive physical environment? [3] What is currently lacking from the design of youth centers? [4] How does music and dance relate spatially to one another and what are design implications for musical spaces?

[14]


[Activity] Issue 4 | The Link will explore current and new supplemental activities. [1] What types of activities do after school programs support already? [2] What additional spaces are required that the community can use/or rent out? [3] How often will these additional activities occur? [Social] Issue 5 | The built environment needs to understand the role of the users parents. [1] What are the spatial requirements of the parents and what types of spaces are needed to support them? [2] How often will parents be using the facility and what time of day? Issue 6 | The built environment plays a role in the growth of high-risk kids. [1] What aspects of color, light and form create a positive and encouraging atmosphere? [2] What are the different social needs of the users and how can design address them? [3] How can design be proactive rather than reactive to how students use the space? [4] How does music and dance help students grow socially?

[15]


PART II. Building Conditions and Codes

[16]


A. Building Site + Quick Information The Old Market Building 194 West Broadway Ave. Eugene, OR 97401 USA Downtown Business District : C-3 Footprint Dimensions: 24,025 SF = 155’W x 155’L x 21’-2”H Gross Available Square Footage: 29,636 SF Net Total Program Square Footage: 27,082 SF Gross Available Exterior Space Square Footage: N/A No. of Levels: Two Floor-to-Floor Height: 10’ (first floor), 8’ (second floor) existing conditions Year Built: 1915 (remodel and face-lift in 1960) Structural Type: Column Grid 70’ spacing, roof truss system Historical Register: No Building Type: Medium Road Renovation Architect: Gary Moye, Eugene, OR Current Use: Mixed-use, Lord Leebrick Theater

[17]


B. Building + Site Visual Documentation

EUGENE, OREGON

DOWNTOWN BUSINESS DISTRICT

1/2 MILE RADIUS AROUND SITE

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

W. 8TH AVENUE

OLIVE STREET

CHARNLETON STREET

LINCOLN STREET

LAWRENCE STREET RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

W. BROADWAY

WILLAMETTE STREET

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

NEW LCC CAMPUS

THE DAC

W. 10TH AVENUE EUGENE PUBLIC LIBRARY RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

LTD MAIN STATION W. 11TH AVENUE

PROXIMITY MAP

[18]

MCDONALD THEATER


historic photos

historic facade - broadway street

historic facade - charnelton street

[19]


existing site documentation

[20]


interior photos

156’-0”

76’-0”

38’-0”

N

N

b

164 W BROADWAY

39’-0”

E

E C

C

C

b

b

adjacent building

adjacent building

second floor plan- no scale 156’-0” 38’-0”

76’-0”

38’-0”

N

N

190-194 W BROADWAY

174 W BROADWAY

164 W BROADWAY

a

39’-0”

38’-5”

E

155’-0”

W

a

164b W BROADWAY

C

115’-10”

40’-0”

198 W BROADWAY

b

a

W

37’-4”

b

39’-0”

164b W BROADWAY

a

a

adjacent building

a

115’-10”

174 W BROADWAY

W

190-194 W BROADWAY

adjacent building

198 W BROADWAY

b

adjacent building

38’-0”

C

C

b

adjacent building

b

adjacent building

ground floor plan- no scale

[21]


existing elevations

broadway elevation

east elevation

charnelton st. elevation

[22]


existing sections

east-west section facing north

north-south section

east-west section facing south

[23]


existing structure diagram

[24]


solar analysis on site

January 15 | 9:30a m

January 15 | 1:30p

m

January 15 | 4:30p

m

July 15 | 9:30a

m

July 15 | 1:30p

m

July 15 | 4:30p

m

[25]


[26]

LINCOLN STREET

LAWRENCE STREET

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

LINCOLN STREET

OLIVE STREET

MCDONALD THEATER

LTD MAIN STATION

THE DAC

CHARNLETON STREET

38’-0”

schools in a 3 mile radius

W. 11TH AVENUE

EUGENE PUBLIC LIBRARY

W. 10TH AVENUE

WILLAMETTE STREET

site

PROXIMITY MAP

CHARNELTON STREET

NEW LCC CAMPUS

W. BROADWAY

OLIVE STREET

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

W. 8TH AVENUE

W. 11TH AVENUE

WILLAMETTE STREET

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

STREET MAP

LAWRENCE STREET

W. 10TH AVENUE

W. BROADWAY

W. 8TH AVENUE

DOWNTOWN BUSINESS DISTRICT

1/2 MILE RADIUS AROUND SITE

EUGENE, OREGON

155’ x 155’

Ground Floor: 23,797 sf Second Floor: 5,839 sf Total: 29,636 sf

Gross Areas:

Foot print:

1/16” = 1’-0”

76’-0”

156’-0”

HISTORICAL PHOTOS

3

38’-0”

HISTORIC BROADWAY AVE. ELEVATION

1/16” = 1’-0”

1/32” = 1’-0” 0’

10’

2 HISTORIC CHARNELTON STREET ELEVATION

1

SITE PLAN

This building was constructed in 1915 when the city of Eugene opened it’s first public market. The market was for farmers and merchants to sell their local goods, similar to how the Saturday Market and Farmer’s Market is run today. The details of the building’s original architecture was influenced by Islamic architecture, with tall grandiose openings as entries and carvings and tile inlay on the facade. The structure of the building is CMU block with applied concrete stucco. The interior structure of the building is comprised of concrete columns and large timber trusses. Later in 1960 the building was renovated and separated into four tenant spaces for retail merchants. During the renovation, all historic detail was demolished and replaced with a streamlined modernist stucco face. The building is appropriate for The Link because of the large span between the column grid as well as being in a central location of Downtown Eugene.

THE PRODUCERS PUBLIC MARKET BUILDING

After School Program for the Performing Arts

Current tenant:

The Lord Leebrick Theater Company/Shaw Med 194 West Broadway Ave Eugene, Oregon 97402

pipe columns

WEST FACADE

WEST FACADE

BROADWAY, LOOKING EAST

NORTHWEST CORNER

EXISTING CONDITIONS : INTERIOR PHOTOS

WEST FACADE

CHARNELTON ST. LOOKING SOUTH

second level floor and ceiling joists

large timber truss

roof joists, 16” oc

July 15 | 4:30pm

July 15 | 1:30pm

July 15 | 9:30am

January 15 | 4:30pm

January 15 | 1:30pm

January 15 | 9:30am

SOLAR DIAGRAMS

Melissa Gambino . Instructor Alison Snyder . Comprehensive studio . Winter Term 2012

EXISTING CONDITIONS : EXTERIOR PHOTOS

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

concrete column grid

cricket truss system

History:

Old Market Building Year Built : 1960’s Historical Register: No No. of floors : 2 Structural type : Column grid, timber truss

existing site boards


site

37’-4”

40’-0”

38’-5”

39’-0”

W

adjacent building

b

1 EXISTING GROUND FLOOR PLAN

1/16” = 1’-0”

N

76’-0”

190-194 W BROADWAY

b

156’-0”

174 W BROADWAY

HISTORICAL PHOTOS

1/16” = 1’-0”

3 EXISTING EAST-WEST SECTION -A

1/16” = 1’-0”

0’

bottom of (e) ceiling framing +(15’-6 1/4”)

10’

164b W BROADWAY

164 W BROADWAY

38’-0”

C

a

E

6 EXISTING NORTH (BROADWAY AVE.) ELEVATION

C

a

198 W BROADWAY

38’-0”

schools in a 3 mile radius

W C

a

1/16” = 1’-0”

5 EXISTING SECOND FLOOR PLAN

2 EXISTING NORTH-SOUTH SECTION -B 1/16” = 1’-0”

adjacent building

b

N

bottom of (e) ceiling framing +(15’-6 1/4”)

a

BROADWAY, LOOKING EAST

WEST FACADE

b

NORTHWEST CORNER

WEST FACADE

9 EXISTING EAST (ALLEY) ELEVATION 1/16” = 1’-0”

adjacent building

155’-0”

1/16” = 1’-0”

115’-10” 39’-0”

3 HISTORIC BROADWAY AVE. ELEVATION

C

E

[27]

adjacent building

1/16” = 1’-0”

4 EXISTING EAST-WEST SECTION -C

1/16” = 1’-0”

SHAW-MED

TENANT SPACE #3

SHAW-MED

7 EXISTING WEST (CHARNELTON ST.) ELEVATION

SHAW-MED

TENANT SPACE #4

SHAW-MED

EXISTING CONDITIONS : INTERIOR PHOTOS

WEST FACADE

bottom of (e)ceiling framing +(10’-2 1/2”)

top of (e) sub-floor +(12’-10 3/4”)

bottom of (e) ceiling framing +(20’-11 3/4”)

July 15 | 4:30pm

July 15 | 1:30pm


site

C. Building + Site Affect on Design of The Link

schools in a 3 mile radius

Hult Center. The Old Market building is located in a section of downtown that is more quiet and less populated due to the

The Old Market Building is located along

surrounding business that are positioned

the perimeter of downtown Eugene.

there. This area is included as part of the

It is surrounded by commercial retail buildings with apartment condos to the west of it’s location. The new Lane Community College facility is currently being built directly behind the South end of the site. Other buildings in proximity are the Eugene Public Library one block South, the McDonald Theater two blocks East, and other facilities like the Downtown Athletic Club and The

[28]

downtown initiative to make downtown better, making it more eventful, safe and enjoyable. The building is surrounded by two alleys on the East and South ends as well as streets located on the North and West sides which allows for potential access. The existing main entry is located on the Northwest corner of Broadway and Charnelton.


The elevation that bring in the most

recent years the building has lost it’s

daylight is the North elevation which

quality and desperately needs updating.

faces Broadway street with storefront

The Lord Leebrick Theater Company is

windows. The rest of the elevations

temporarily renting out the central retail

have limited fenestration however there

space for rehearsals but the other retail

is potential for the roof to open up for

tenant spaces are currently vacant.

skylight construction to bring in more daylight as well. The existing condition

The two main reasons I wanted to use

of the building is separated into three

this building is that it is located in the

retail spaces that are determined by

downtown district in proximity to other

the structural grid. The structure has a

community facilities and the structural

column grid which roughly creates 30-

grid is very open and non constrictive

70’ bays and a truss roof structure which

which is important for dance studios. This

allows for a very open floor plan. The

building is clearly outdated and run-down

exterior shell appears to have a concrete/

which provides room for a lot of potential

stucco construction. The interior walls

for design and repurposing the building.

are non load-bearing walls and can be

Hopefully this new proposal will bring

removed for the remodel. The overall roof

in more people to the area, making it a

height changes and reaches it’s highest

more lively part of downtown.

point on the South end. This unusual ceiling condition limits the location and square footage of the second level and will need to be further investigated. The design of the exterior shell is very unusual. Further investigation is needed but from it appears, the concrete stucco finish was later applied to the building in attempt to hide doors from original building design. The exterior facade has signage from a previous tenant (Shaw Med) which just shows the lack of attention paid in recent years. When the building was originally built in the 1960’s it was well used and maintained, however as the tenants changed and in most

[29]


city of eugene zoning

[30]


Zoning Why do you need to know the zoning? What does this mean for your project? Zoning is important to understand because there are use-specific codes that pertain to different building types and zoning laws. Every parcel or area that can be developed has zoning laws that control parameters like building height, area, amount of parking, and how far the building can be placed from the street. The building site for The Link is located downtown Eugene in the business district, however it is also adjacent to apartment and residential blocks. There are specific zoning laws that will control how much I can expand/ change the building envelope. Source Cited : 1 Research and Report: What are the Permitted uses in your zone or zones? Purchaser Goods, Educational opportunities, entertainment, offices, travel accommodations, and services that attract people from the entire metro area, Lane County, and adjacent counties. [9.2120] Source Cited : 2 If you have a discrepancy (for ex. you want to place an assembly in an area zoned industrial) stemming from your hypothetical project’s needs and/or the site location you have chose, please explain what the listing is and what it allows, then explain how you are attempting to modify the situation. Building Zone : C-3 Ma jor Commercial [9.2120] Overlay Zone : Transit Oriented District (TD) [9.4500], Broadway Overlay (BW) [9.4070] [BW 9.4070]

Code Research

Purpose: -Implementation of the Metro Plan and TransPlan. -Establishing, maintaining a high quality urban environment with commercial and recreational uses -Pedestrian friendly environment -Encouraging Active retail uses and eating establishments on the ground floor -Prohibiting development and activities that are antithetical to pedestrian activity along the street -Creating development standards that improve quality and appearance of city, encourage crime prevention, increase alternatives for alternate modes of transportation, promotes streetscapes that are consistent with the desired character of the underlying commercial zones, safe pedestrian circulation systems, encourage residential usage above ground floor. Overlay Zone Development Standards [apply to]: -A proposed expansion of 30% or more of the total existing structure square footage on the site. -A proposed modification affecting 30% or more of the ground floor wall surface facing Broadway Source Cited : 2

Design regulations/restrictions: including heights, setbacks, façade design, landscape requirements, historic pres. issues? Height: A building shall provide either a floor-to-ceiling first floor minimum height of 12 feet for new construction, or a twostory entry space with corresponding glazed area of no less than one-third of the building width along Broadway. Setbacks: At least 70% of Broadwayfacing linear footage of first and second floors shall have a maximum of two-foot

[31]


building set-back. Façade Design: At least 75% of Broadway-facing first floor wall area shall have openings, glazing, display windows or doorways with and least 75% of the total door faces being glazing or combination. Landscape Requirements: N/A Historic Pres: N/A

OL = 800/50=16 B [offices]: OL = 600/100=6 S [storage]: OL = 400/300=1 Source Cited : 3, page 80-81 What is the Construction Type of your existing building?

Source Cited : 2 Any other special requirements applicable to your project’s zone? Rain Protection : Awnings, canopies, or recessed entries, or combination, shall provide at least 30 inches of rain protection along at least 50% of the buildings wall on Broadway.

Type III-B:Combustable -No fire resistance requirements except for exterior bearing walls = 2 hours rating. Source Cited : 3, page 95 What is the finish class rating for this type of space?

Source Cited : 2

Atrium Spaces = Class B rating

Occupancies/Occupant Load and Construction

Source Cited : 5

What are the occupancy group[s] in your program? Why is this important? A-1-Theaters A-2-Food/drink A-3-Recreation B-Business S-2-Storage Understanding the occupancy groups is important because codes may vary depending on the group.

If appropriate, what is maximum aggregate area for a mezzanine? Maximum total aggregate area of a mezzanine should equal no more than 1/3 of the area of the room it is located in. My building first level = 23,797 sf -Total aggragate area of potential mezzanine = 7,932 sf Source Cited : 1, page 303

What are the occupant loads for each occupancy group (can use spreadsheet to relate to program spaces)

What is head height for a mezzanine or any ceiling minimum as in under stairs, etc.?

A-1 [theater]: OL = 3000/7=428 OL = 3000/15=200 A-2 [food/drink]: OL = 1200/15=80 A-3 [Recreation]: OL = 1800/50=36 OL = 1400/50=28

Minimum ceiling height = 90” Minimum head height = 80”

[32]

Source Cited : 3, page 130 Egress and Fire Rating What is maximum travel distance to an


exit for your occupancy if the space is sprinkled and if it is unsprinkled? Assembly (A): Sprinklered : 250ft Unsprinklered : 200ft Business(B) Sprinklered : 200ft Unsprinklered : 300ft Storage(S) Sprinklered : 200ft Unsprinklered : 250ft Source Cited : 1 What are dead end corridor lengths limits? Maximum Length = 20ft Source Cited : 3, page 171 What is the minimum egress width? – Estimate the minimum for your particular occupancies For 250 Occupants (.2 inch per person) = 50” min Source Cited : 3, page 156

What is the minimum width requirement for egress doors? Calculate this for specific occupancies. A, B: Minimum width for egress doors = 32” (provided with a 36” door) Source Cited : 1, 3 page 157 What is the minimum distance allowed between two exits? Equation = 1/2D : Distance between two exits be at least one-half of the longest diagonal distance within the building or the building area the exits are serving. Source Cited : 3, page 164 What is the minimum stairway width? How is this calculated for specific occupancies? Show diagrams to clarify, if you like. 44” min for an occupancy load 50 people or greater 36” min for an occupancy load of 50 people or fewer Source Cited : 1, page 267

What is the minimum number of exits required in the building for this type of occupancy? 1-500 people = minimum of 2 Exits per story/area Source Cited : 3, page 152 When does a room need more than one exit, for what occupancy?

Are “places of refuge” required for all projects? A “Place of refuge” is not required for sprinklered buildings (NFPA codes), however the 2006 IBC requires all buildings to have accessible means of egress, which typically has an “area of refuge.” Source Cited : 3, page 147

A, B: When the occupancy load is 50 people or greater S: When the occupancy load is 30 people or greater

When is a stair to be completely enclosed for fire and egress? When can a stair be open at the first level but not above?

Source Cited : 3, page 153 1. An egress stair must ALWAYS be

[33]


enclosed if it is designated as such. 2. There are very specific exceptions to when a stair can be open; if and when the stair is not desigated as an egress stair (there are already ones that exist), or when the exit stairway only serves transition to an adjacent floor.

Depth of landing to be at least as wide as stair. -One landing for every 12’ of rise For ramps, typically a minimum of 60” is required. -1 landing for every rise of 30” Source Cited : 3, page 133

Source Cited : 4, page 174 How many enclosed stairs will you need in your project? Technically I don’t think I need any enclosed stairs since I will only have a partial second floor. Stairs/Ramps

What is head height clearance and max. requirement for stairs? Ceiling Height = 90” Head clearance = 80” Source Cited : 3, page 130 If you have an elevator, are they used in time of a fire emergency?

Stairs: What is the maximum Rise/Run? NO. Rise: Max = 7”, min = 4” Run: Minimum = 11”

Source Cited : Note inside elevator.

Source Cited : 5

Plumbing

What is the Handrail height for stairs? What are the proper minimum lengths of the extensions at top & bottom of the stairs or at the top or bottom of a ramp?

Bathroom fixture and drinking fountain counts? What are the per person requirements for the various occupancies that you have in your building? Occupancy A: Water Closets: Male: 1 per 125 Female: 1 per 65

Handrail: 34” – 38” Above finished floor Extensions of rail: Stairs at Top = 12” Minimum Stairs at Bottom = Tread depth Ramp at Top/Bottom = 12” Minimum Source Cited : 3, page 132-134

Lavatory: 1 per 200 Drinking Fountain: 1 per 500, 1 service sink

What is the Ramp Rise to Run ratio?

Source Cited : 3, page 134

Occupancy B: Water Closets: 1 per 25 for first 50 Lavatories: 1 per 40 for first 80 Drinking Fountain: 1 per 100

When are landings required? On ramps and stairs...how do you size the landings?

Source Cited : 5 What are the number of bathroom

Ratio = no steepr than 1:12

[34]


fixtures that you need for your project? What are the % of fixtures needed for being accessible, and % of rooms that need accessible bathrooms (for ex. in hotels and other public situations)? Look for requirement of changing baby station in public bathrooms. Look into the Unisex, or bathrooms for all. Use diagrams as appropriate. The Link: Water Closets: Male: 4 Female: 5 Lavatories: 4 Drinking Fountains: 1

What are the Hinge side approaches-Pull side & Push side? Pull Side : 36”-42” Push Side : 54-60” Source Cited : 6, page 14 What are the Latch side approaches- Pull side & Push side? Pull Side : 24” x 48” Push Side : 24 x 42” Source Cited : 6, page 14

Source Cited : 5 Fixture Accessibility: Bathrooms: At least one type of fixture element should be accessible in each toilet room, or with single user toilet facilities, 5% or one per cluster of single user facilities needs to be accessible Drinking fountains: 50% need to be accessible Source: 4, page 203, 204

What are the requirements for protruding objects? Give an example of a few of these objects. 4” max -Trash Receptacle -Drinking fountain -Door pull Source Cited : 3, page 283 What is the clear floor space for a lavatory (height)?

Accessibility What does clear floor space mean? ADA requires 60” diameter turning circle that is uninterrupted by protruding objects or fixtures.

Clear floor space: 30” x 48”d Knee space: 8” Min Toe space: 6” max Depth of lavatory: 17” min Height of Lavatory: 34” max Source Cited : 3, page 273

Source Cited : 3 What is the Required clear floor space needed for door swings: What are the Front approachesPull side & Push side dimensions? Pull Side : 18” min Push Side : 12” min Source Cited : 3

What are the different requirements for water closet clear floor space (height)? What is the min. center line dimension to a wall? Wall to centerline of toilet: 18” Clear floor space: 60”w x 56”d Source Cited : 3, page 280

[35]


Sources Cited 1. Allen, Edward, and Joseph Iano. The architect’s studio companion rules of thumb for preliminary design. 3rd ed. New York: Wiley, 2002. 2. “Planning and Development .” City of Eugene . www.eugene-or.gov (accessed January 28, 2012). 3. Harmon, Sharon Koomen, and Katherine E. Kennon. The codes guidebook for interiors. 4th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2008. 4. Ching, Frank, and Steven R. Winkel. Building codes illustrated: a guide to understanding the 2000 international building code. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley, 2003. 5. “INTERNATIONAL CODE COUNCIL.” INTERNATIONAL CODE COUNCIL. http:// publicecodes.citation.com (accessed January 28, 2012). 6. McMorrough, Julia. Materials, structures, and standards: all the details architects need to know but can never find. Gloucester, Mass.: Rockport Publishers, 2006.

[36]


[37]


PART III. Final Program

[38]


Name of Space

Qty.

Occupancy

Sq Ft.

Adjacencies

Lighting

COMMUNITY

Entry Vestibule Lobby Front Desk Cafe + Lounge

1 1 1 1

1-20 150 2 125

400 1,711 150 1,235

Lobby, information desk Theater entry, cafe Lobby, entry vestibule Theater, lobby

Daylight, electric light Daylight, electric light Daylight Daylight, electric light

DANCE +THEATER

Large Studio Small Studio Costume Lab “Black Box” Niche

1 2 1 1 8

40 15 30 250 seated 1-2

1,463 550 815 4,075 15

Lobby, studios Large studio, theater Theater, lockers, wc WC, lobby, entry Theater, lobby, classrooms

Daylight, electric light Daylight, electric light Daylight, electric light Theater lights, electric Electric light

MUSIC

Band Room Recording Lab Small Practice Digital Music Lab

1 1 1 1

60 seated 5-8 15 5-20

1,060 350 275 400

Theater, sm music rms Band Room, lounge Lounge, recording lab Lounge, WC, band room

Daylight, electric Electric light Electric light Electric light

LEARN

Digital Media Room Homework Lab Teaching Kitchen

1 1 1

20 50 30

550 950 850

Homework Lab Digital media room Lounge, WC, cafe

Electric light Electric light Electric light

ADMINISTRATION

Girls Locker Room Boys Locker Room Administrative Office Conference Room Kitchenette

1 1 1 1 1

60 50 20 20 1-5

810 735 415 500 100

Boys locker room Girls locker room Conference room, kitchenette Administrative office Administrative office

Electric light Electric light Electric light Electric light Electric light

SERVICES

Bathrooms Elevator Front Stair Egress Stair Storage Mechanical Circulation

6 1 1 1 4 2 23%

1 1-5 30 50 2-5 n/a -

75 70 270 600 545 total 250 4,765

Theater, office, classrooms Entry, lobby, cafe Entry, lobby, cafe Recording lab, homework lab Misc. Entry stair, egress stair

Electric light Electric light Electric light Electric light Electric light n/a

TOTALS

short program

Total Occupancy Net Total Sq. Footage Gross Available SF Building Footprint SF

1054-1100 25,264 29,095 24,025

[39]


diagrammatic program

[40]


program adjacencies

DIAGRAMMATIC PROGRAM STUDY SPACES

TEACHING KITCHEN

EDUCATION

CLASSROOM

COMMUNITY

DANCE LOCKER ROOMS MULTIPURPOSE

STUDIOS GREEN ROOM

THEATER COSTUME SHOP

LOUNGE

CAFE KIOSK

LOBBY

MUSIC

RECORDING ROOMS

COLLABORATION ROOMS

[41]


C. Long Program

[Entry Vestibule]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 1-20 SQ. Footage: 400 SF Adjacency: Lobby, entry to theater, information desk Daylight/Electric: Daylight, task lighting Main Activities: Transition space meant to add level of safety for access to building Design Mood: Should feel secure(due to location), welcoming/inviting drawing people into the building, flexible and open. FF&E: Open for circulation, donor names engraved into interior wall of vestibule, benches for waiting.

[Lobby Space]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 150, varies on time of day SQ. Footage: 1,711 SF Adjacency: Theater entry, information desk, cafe and seating Daylight/Electric: Daylight, task lighting Main Activities: Used as transition space, flexible use for receptions and intermissions Design Mood: Welcoming/inviting drawing people into the building, flexible and open. Lots of light and accents of color to direct people into spaces. FF&E: Flexible and moveable seating

[Front Desk]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 2 SQ. Footage: 150 SF Adjacency: Theater entry, information desk, dance studios Daylight/Electric: Daylight, task lighting Main Activities: Kids come to check in, wait for parents, visitors get information Design Mood: Focal point to help with way finding, industrial, repurposed materials FF&E: Desk for employees, shelving for “cubby” space for kids’ possessions, task chair, filing storage, computer system, moveable chairs for waiting.

[42]


[Cafe and Lounge]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 125 SQ. Footage: 1,235 Adjacency: Entry vestibule, lobby, academic wing, main stair Daylight/Electric: Task, ambient Main Activities: Food prep, drink prep, service, users sitting and eating in lounge. Design Mood: Colorful and vibrant string as a ceiling element to create a focal point in the lounge area and draw people in. FF&E: Register, espresso machine, blenders, counter space, ice machine, refrigerator, menus

[Lounge + Informal Performance]

Qty. 3

Occupancy: 50 Standing + sitting SQ. Footage: 520 SF Adjacency: Small dance studio, teaching kitchen, music practice rooms Daylight/Electric: Ambient electric light Main Activities: Sitting, conversation, informal performance and practice space Design Mood: Spaces stand out in contrast to the surrounding materials to create focal point, loud atmosphere with softer materials to absorb sound. Space seen as one unit. FF&E: Stadium seating, lounge seating removable to use floor space.

[Large Studio]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 40 standing SQ. Footage: 1,463 SF Adjacency: Lobby, information desk, small studios, lounge, theater, bathrooms Daylight/Electric: Daylight, ambient Main Activities: Dance classes for larger groups Design Mood: Should promote activity and energy, simple color scheme with colorful ceiling elements FF&E: Removable marley floor for flexibility, stereo and sound equipment, acoustical treatment for sound

[43]


[Small Studio]

Qty. 2

Occupancy: 15 standing SQ. Footage: 550 SF Adjacency: Lounge, bathrooms, theater, large studio Daylight/Electric: Daylight, ambient Main Activities: Dance classes for small groups Design Mood: Should promote activity and energy, this studio should feel more intimate,simple color scheme with colorful ceiling elements FF&E: Removable marley floor for flexibility, stereo and sound equipment, acoustical treatment for sound

[Costume Lab]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 30 SQ. Footage: 815 SF Adjacency: Bathrooms, theater, lockers, large music room Daylight/Electric: Daylight, ambient Main Activities: Room for creativity and costume design and construction. Design Mood: Should promote activity and energy, kids should feel free to be inventive and expressive. Room should promote collaboration. FF&E: Full writable wall, storage for fabric and sewing supplies, tables with sewing machines and workstations, task lighting is important in this room.

[“Black Box�]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 250, seated SQ. Footage: 4,075 SF Adjacency: Lounge, Cafe Kiosk, bathrooms, studios, lockers, storage, costume lab, music rooms Daylight/Electric: Ambient, Stage lighting with tension grid Main Activities: Musical and dance showcases, performances, large activities and games, team building Design Mood: Should promote activity and energy and should be able to bring focus to the stage when needed. Space should reflect the flexibility of activity that takes place. Materials should be neutral and mostly black, able to be painted over or changed frequently. FF&E: Sound equipment, stage equipment, curtains, flexible/removable seating for up to

[44]


250, acoustical ceiling and wall treatment.

[Niches] Qty. 8 Occupancy: 1-2, seated SQ. Footage: 15 SF Adjacency: Lounge, Cafe Kiosk, bathrooms, studios, lockers, storage, costume lab, music rooms Daylight/Electric: Ambient, mood lighting Main Activities: Sitting, studying, conversation with others Design Mood: Small and fun spaces that break down scale of space and create interaction in a more intimate level. FF&E: Upholstered cushions for inside of niche, bright and colorful paint

[Large Band Room]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 60 seated SQ. Footage: 1,060 SF Adjacency: Theater, costume lab, digital music lab Daylight/Electric: Daylight, ambient lighting Main Activities: Practice space for large ensembles, used by both The Link and Umbrella Arts Design Mood: Simple and open space for flexibility, large tall ceilings to let a lot of light in. FF&E: Removable stadium platforms for seats, stackable seats, piano, built in “cubby� space for belongings

[Recording Lab] Qty. 1 Occupancy: 5-8 SQ. Footage: 350 SF Adjacency: Lounge, small practice rooms, homework lab Daylight/Electric: Ambient, task lighting Main Activities: Small groups recording songs and music with instruments and equipment Design Mood: Interactive and collaborative environment, lots of noise and use of acoustics materials. FF&E: Recording system, sound booth, desk, task chair, several moveable chairs, simple

[45]


materials palette.

[Small Practice Room]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 15 SQ. Footage: 275 SF Adjacency: Lounge, large band room, recording lab, theater Daylight/Electric: Ambient, task lighting Main Activities: Employee working with and teaching kids to use instruments, Design Mood: Interactive and collaborative environment, lots of noise and use of acoustic materials. FF&E: Stackable chairs for flexible seating arrangements, wall hooks for instruments to hang, “cubby” space for kids to store belongings

[Digital Music Lab]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 5-20 SQ. Footage: 400 SF Adjacency: Lounge, small practice room, lounge, large band room Daylight/Electric: Ambient Main Activities: Playing digital instruments (i.e. Guitar Hero, Wii) FF&E: Projector, large screen or blank wall, bean bag chairs, “cubby” space and storage

[Digital Media Room] Qty. 1 Occupancy: 20 SQ. Footage: 550 SF Adjacency: Homework Lab, teaching kitchen, lounge, bathrooms, theater Daylight/Electric: Ambient, task lighting Main Activities: Kids can come in and check out computers, surf the internet, project movies onto wall, use as study space FF&E: Bean bag chairs, tables and chairs for workspace, wall storage, projector

[Homework Lab] Qty. 1 Occupancy: 50 seated SQ. Footage: 950 SF Adjacency: Bathroom, lounge, digital media room

[46]


Daylight/Electric: Task, ambient lighting Main Activities: This is where students will come during a set time to work with tutors and mentors on their school work, and also where they develop life skills. Design Mood: Should be colorful and lively to promote enthusiasm and motivation. Seating and tables should be flexible for various types of use. FF&E: Flexible seating and tables, desks and task chairs for mentors. Projector and screen.

[Teaching Kitchen]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 30 SQ. Footage: 850 SF Adjacency: Lounge, theater, digital media room Daylight/Electric: Task, ambient lighting Main Activities: This space is used for educational lessons as well as the resource room for meal prep for the program. Design Mood: Clean, simple materials and lighting, collaborative environment, teaching counter as focal point in room FF&E: Several kitchen areas for students to work in groups, large commercial refrigerators

[Locker Rooms] Qty. 2 (Girls + Boys) Occupancy: 60, 50 SQ. Footage: 810, 735 SF Adjacency: Office, conference room Daylight/Electric: Ambient Main Activities: Storing belongings, changing in/out of clothes Design Mood: Calm and quiet atmosphere, lower lighting setting FF&E: Lockers, benches, mirrors, trash receptacles, outlets, lounge seating

[Office] Qty. 1 Occupancy: 1-20 SQ. Footage: 415 SF Adjacency: Lobby, Kitchenette, Conference room, storage Daylight/Electric: Task, ambient, daylight

[47]


Main Activities: Administration, directors use this space for background work and information Design Mood: The office should feel like an open and collaborative environment through use of color and spatial layout. This is a place that employees can come to take a break and be removed from activity. FF&E: Desks, task chairs, storage, computers, lounge seating.

[Conference Room] Qty. 1 Occupancy: 20 seated SQ. Footage: 500 SF Adjacency: Office, kitchenette Daylight/Electric: Ambient, fluorescent ceiling mounted lights Main Activities: Meetings, gatherings, presentations, FF&E: Large conference table, 20 moveable flexible chairs, screen, AV hookup, outlets, osb plywood table, simple furniture

[Kitchenette]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 1-5 SQ. Footage: 100 SF Adjacency: Office, conference room Daylight/Electric: Task, fluorescent recessed can lighting Main Activities: Prepare/heat up food, store food/meals FF&E: Counter space, fridge, microwave

[Bathrooms]

Qty. 6

Occupancy: 1 SQ. Footage: 75 SF Adjacency: Lounge, studios, theater, office, classrooms Daylight/Electric: Ambient, task Main Activities: Service FF&E: Stalls, water closets, sinks, hand dryers, bench, outlets

[Elevator]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 1-5 SQ. Footage: 70 SF Adjacency: Lobby, cafe and lounge, theater

[48]


Daylight/Electric: Ambient. general

lighting

lighting

Main Activities: Store all instruments, needs

Main Activities: ADA accessibility

easy accessibility, food storage, theater

FF&E: Rubber tile floor, metal screens on

equipment

wall, hand rail

FF&E: Open space and shelving for organizing

[Entry Stair]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 30

[Mechanical]

SQ. Footage: 540 SF

Occupancy: 2

Adjacency: Lobby, theater, cafe and

SQ. Footage: 250 SF

lounge, entry vestibule

Adjacency: Entry stair, egress stair

Daylight/Electric: Ambient, focal lighting

Daylight/Electric: Task lighting

Main Activities: Service to get to second

Main Activities: Service, mechanical

floor

FF&E: n/a : houses HVAC units

Qty. 2

FF&E: Concrete stairs with misc. objects and trinkets embedded in tread. Metal stringers powder coated with metal railing. Wall covered with reused spray paint cans.

[Egress Stair]

Qty. 1

Occupancy: 30 SQ. Footage: 600 SF Adjacency: Music recording room, homework lab, theater Daylight/Electric: Ambient, emergency

[Circulation]

Qty. n/a

Occupancy: n/a SQ. Footage: 4,765 SF Adjacency: Main circulation Daylight/Electric: Ambient lighting, ceiling mounted pendants Main Activities: Service, walking, transition space FF&E: n/a : houses HVAC units

lights Main Activities: Service, fire egress FF&E: Concrete stairs with metal stringers.

[Equipment Storage] Qty. 4 Occupancy: 2 standing SQ. Footage: 545 Total SF Adjacency: Studios, music rooms, classrooms, cafe Daylight/Electric: Task, recessed can

[49]


user scenarios Name : Rebecca Johnson User : High School Senior Female| 17 Q: How did you hear about The Link? A: My teachers are the ones that told me. Ya, they started telling us at school about how this was going to start up soon. A few friends and I thought we could at least come check it out once, and if it was lame.. then we wouldn’t come back. We have been hoping that it would be cool though, because sometimes we just get sick of staying at home and doing nothing but watch TV and check Facebook. Q: What have you liked the most about this program so far? A: A few people I know are into dance, and I have been wanting to try it out but it’s really expensive to join a studio here in town. We’ll spend about an hour learning new choreography in the dance studios, which is really fun. I also really like that they give us time to work on homework and get it out of the way. There is one lady who supervises us and she started helping me plan for college and figure out application processes for each school, she was really nice-Iiked her. Q: How much do you interact with the younger kids? A: We don’t even really see them much. They keep us pretty separated because we have our own spaces to work in. My friends and I were hanging out in the lounge earlier though, and a bunch of middle school kids were running around, so I guess that’s where we see the younger kids the most. Which I’m glad we don’t have to be in the same spaces as them.

[50]

Name : David Reynolds User : After School Instructor Male | 24 Q: What do your regular activities look like while at work? A: I have a full time job that is during the day and I just come straight here afterwards. Our office and lounge area have been very useful for me because I need a few minutes to get settled and place my belongings somewhere. For the days I decide to bring food, I’m able to keep it in the fridge over in the kitchenette. I typically prepare my lessons a week early so when I get to work each day I just have to look it over to see what I’m doing. Our days alternate. Today we are meeting the kids in one of the larger studios-I have ages 11 to 14 in mine, working on break-dancing. After that, I will meet with smaller groups of kids in our study rooms to go over homework or tutor those who need it. We try to create a variety of group sizes to meet different social needs of the kids. Our day usually ends with a few of the multipurpose spaces opening up for activities and games for the kids to do until they go home. Q: Are the kids separated by age? A: Ya, my coworkers and I each have an age group that we work with, and during the week we alternate who gets what size space. The only time all the kids will interact with each other is during free time at the end. Q: What has been the most useful space for this facility? A: I would say the multi-purpose rooms have been great for our program. It allows us to hold events for the kids like movie nights, large game activities, etc. Also, when the spaces are not being used for the kids, we have been able to use the spaces for banquets or other gatherings.


Name : Jacob Stanley User : Middle School, 6th grade Male | 12 Jacob is a very sweet but difficult boy to work with. He comes from a single parent home who works full time trying to support Jacob and his sister. Before The Link opened up, Jacob would sometimes get stuck at school late in the afternoon until his mom would be able to pick him up, and on days when that didn’t happen he would go to a friends house. Jacob had too much time on his hands and became curious about his friends older brothers drugs and began getting in trouble and making poor decisions. He has always been interested in playing the guitar but his mom has never been able to afford all the equipment so as soon as Jacob found out about the music program he became very interested in going. He really works best in the environments that are designed for smaller amounts of people like the practice rooms and study rooms. In those smaller environments he is able to get the attention he needs and can work closely with the mentors. Jacob has already shown growth and change in his behavior and it’s clearly visible he enjoys being around people who are interested in his life.

Name : Mary Weaver User : Parent Female | 47 Mary is a middle school parent from South Eugene who has a work schedule that varies each day. There are weeks where she is unsure of what time she is able to leave work and go home. Mary has been really wishing for a program like The Link because her daughter is unsupervised after school until Mary is able to get home from work. She appreciates that the program not only provides activities and encourages the kids to learn a new talent, but that it provides a space and setting to learn and grow personally and academically. Her daughter is able to work with mentors which is really great because she looks up to people who are older than her. Now that her daughter attends The Link regularly, Mary is able to swing by the building on her way home and pick up her daughter. Since her schedule is uncertain at times, she will arrive before a study session is over and will need to wait around. On days where the program ends with dance and music activity, Mary is able to watch the end of the session through the viewing windows into the studio. The lounge has been a great place for Mary to sit and read and sometimes grab a cup of coffee while she waits for her daughter to finish. She also doesn’t mind waiting in the lounge because it give her an opportunity to connect and chat with other parents that are waiting.

[51]


PART IV. Reference Archive

[52]


FULL BIBLIOGRAPHY After School Programs After School All-Stars. “Factoids: Facts about After school Programs & At Risk Youth.” 2011. Web, Oct. 2011. http://www.afterschoolallstars.org/site/ pp.asp?c=enJJKMNpFmG&b=854685 Corvino, Trenton (Direct Contact). Portland Tennis & Education Program. “PAST&E Program Goals.” 2011. Web, Oct. 2011. http://pastande.org/ “Issue Briefs.” Afterschool Alliance. 2009. Digital. Web Nov. 26, 2011. http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/ Hirsh, J. Barton. A Place to Call Home: After School Programs for Urban Youth. Published Feb. 2005. Pgs 1-165, Print. Dance and Music “Trying to Address a Growing Youth-At-Risk Problem.” Americans for the Arts. Pgs 1-16. Digital Print. <http://www.americansforthearts.org/NAPD/files/9209/Arts%20 Programs%20for%20Youth%20At-Risk_Pamphlet.pdf> “After School Programs.” Inner-City Arts. Web. 2011 http://www.inner-cityarts.org/what-we-do-programs-after-school.php American Dance Therapy Association. “About Dance/Movement Therapy,” 2009. Web, Oct. 2011. http://www.adta.org/Default.aspx?pageId=378213 Hancock Center for Dance|Movement Therapy. “About Dance/Movement Therapy.” 2011. Web, Nov. 2011 http://hancockcenter.net/index.php?page=about-dancemovement-therapy Goodill, Sherry. “The Healing Power of Dance.” Art Works. May 3,2011. Web, Nov. 2011. http://www.arts.gov/artworks/?p=6871#more-6871 Buildings Brand, Stewart. How buildings learn: What happens after they’re built. New York: Penguin Books. 1995. De Chiara, J., Panero, J., & Zelnik, M. Time-saver standards for interior design and space planning. New York: McGraw-Hill. 2001 Harmon, S. K. & Kennon, K. E. The codes guidebook for interiors. Illinois: International Code Council. 2008

[53]


Interview List Tim Sinatra - Director of Salem Boys and Girls Club

[Tim is the director for several clubs in Oregon and has a lot of knowledge of how the program runs and the important issues of spatial needs and logistics.]

Perry Williams - High school student and dancer

[The most important user to interview is a high school student because it is the age category that is the toughest to please and get involvement from.] -If there were a place you and your friends could go to after school, what would you like to see there? -What are your main means of transportation? -How do you balance your social life with dance, homework, and family? -What would deter you from going to an after school program?

Trenton Corvino - Mentor and Employee at Portland Afterschool Tennis & Education [Trenton is a teacher and mentor at this program and it would be useful to see how they managed to turn a big warehouse into the facility they needed.] -How can the spaces better suit the needs for the academic and tutoring portion? -What is the most utilized space in the building for faculty? Students? -What are the some of the kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; favorite spaces?

Susan Goes - Director of CT Play at The Cottage Theater

[They offer a theater summer camp for young kids but only during the summer. They recently added new construction to create new spaces that they were lacking.]

[54]


Full Interview

With Tim Sinatra from Salem Boys and Girls Club - Can you talk about the difference between age groups and their needs spatially?... how segregated should the spaces be for the various ages (my program is 5-18). 6-9, 10-12, 13-15..1618.. three groups.. little kids-focus on eye level, whats in the environment… environment conducive to activity.. experiential learning.. -What are the security issues that need to be addressed with high school students? Cool issue.. separate entrance is preferred… security issuewant to keep older kids away from -How does the program provide resources and availability during offhours(weekends/no school days)? Nonprofit renting spaces.. -What is the most utilized space in the building for faculty?.... Students? -What is your building currently lacking(dream big)?the verizon connect center:communication career fields… communications to teach..academy theme(sustainable energy/culinary theme).. -The music/recording room.. Is it working well? What could make it better? How many kids use it in a day? 30-35 lessons… sound booths, 4-5 studios for different purposes… vocals/editing/ drums -What are some important elements/ qualities to consider spatially for the educational classrooms?(Dealing with different ages... how should they be different...etc) see above.. walls to write on… to come alive.. create interaction.. -Could you see any benefits of having some sort of lounge/café in a central part of the building? How successful is the café at “the Club?”Teach heathy eating… very social thing to do.. -do you think it is crucial to have a kitchen and provide meals(I currently do not have a kitchen/mean setup for

the daily routine)? Need a kitchen for sure!!(food gets outsourced)…make it a teaching/demonstration kitchen.

Notes from Susan Goes @ CT Play First camp is ages 5-8, takes place in childrens workshop and rehearsal hall -informal demonstration at the end of camp in the theater -full dance floor and mirrors with curtains -extra space for furniture to sit down and watch, -piano -half day morning camp -sit in the auditorium first to get oriented -snack break mid way through Second camp ages 9-14, performance camp -reading the kids for performance, melodrama -teaching/formal/dance tech/vocal tech/ rehearsal/costume fittings/line read through -one group uses the theater for singing technique wish list-space works well since it is a short term camp -rehearsal hall-to make it a second performance space but more informal Theater space -need to think about where the actors get ready if you have a black box theater -should have separate bathrooms for actors and audience -create some sort of space for cast members to hang out/wait while not on stage -Think about enough clearance for lighting and need to create an elevated space for the light tech platform for controls -spring boards in dance floor -2 adults per 10 students… look up adult to kid ratio

[55]


A. Topical Research Information “Trying to Address a Growing Youth-At-Risk Problem.” Americans for the Arts. Digital Print. This article specifically looks at the use of creative arts and the social and academic impact they can have on the youth in communities. It suggests that art is “a powerful crime preventive tool,” that “attracts and engages even the toughest kids.” The article continues to address the doubt that people have regarding how effective art really is in children’s lives. Kids who have something like the arts to put their time and energy into, grow to feel like they are part of a larger picture and see their potential. The information is pertinent to the design proposal because it looks at the success in lives of delinquent youth. The proposed site is located downtown Eugene where a lot of troubled youth hang out and get themselves into trouble. Looking at this article for ways to address the growing issue of where kids go and what they do after 3pm will help develop the unique focus The Link has on music and dance. Hirsh, J. Barton. “A Place to Call Home: After School Programs for Urban Youth.” Print. This book investigates the debate regarding the format of after school programs. Some say that an after school program should be more intense and rigid, making the focus about academics and success, however this writer precedes to explain that students grow when they feel connected to a community, and ultimately feel like they are part of a “second family.” Barton gives evidence that there are greater chances of success in the lives of these kids when the core focus isn’t academics and school. He conducted studies and gathered information about The Boys and Girls Club organization to see how successful their program is and what they are doing to get there. It’s important to have an understanding of other after school programs that implemented and successful in their communities. This book will give me insight on how to shape my other spaces in the program involved physical activity, tutoring and mentoring. “Issue Briefs” Afterschool Alliance. 2009. Digital The Afterschool Alliance is a nation wide organization that is dedicated to raising awareness regarding the need for after school programs. “The Afterschool Alliance is working to ensure that all children have access to affordable, quality after school programs. Afterschool programs are critical to children and families today, yet the need for programs is far from being met.” The organization provides data from research that has been done in 2005 and 2009. The “Issue Briefs” page discusses topics surrounding the need for after school programs. There is a section devoted to the correlation between after school programs and success in school, explaining the various reasons why it has such a large impact on the lives of the youth. Studies have shown that students who have a program to be involved in, improved their social and communication skills, and decreased their behavioral problems. The website also gives pertinent data regarding the state of Oregon which clearly demonstrates the lack of support and the large need for after school programs to be implemented.

[56]


B. Design Case-Study Research [Music] SubCat Studios Syracuse, New York | 2011 Fiedler Marciano Architecture, LLP Project Area: 18,300 SF Royal Welsh College of Music & Drama Cardiff, Wales | 2011 BFLS Architects Project Area: 4,400 SM [Performing Arts/Dance] Williams College â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;62 Center for Theater and Dance | 2008 Williamstown, Massachusetts William Rawn Associates, Architects Inc. Project Area: 126,000 SF Young Centre for the Performing Arts Toronto, Ontario, Canada | 2006 Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg Architects Project Area: 44,000 SF Houston Ballet Center for Dance Houston, Texas | 2010 Gensler Project Area: 115,000 SF [After School Program] Portland Afterschool Tennis and Education Portland, Oregon

[57]


subcat studios

http://www.archdaily.com/154884/subcat-studios-fiedler-marciano-architecture-llp/

[58]


royal welsh college of music and drama

http://www.dezeen.com/2011/10/29/royal-welsh-college-of-music-and-drama-by-bfls/ [59]


williams college

http://archrecord.construction.com/projects/bts/archives/perform/06_62Center/ [60]


young centre for the performing arts

http://www.archdaily.com/142776/young-centre-for-the-performing-arts-kpmb-architects/ [61]


PART V. Design Archive

[62]


Week 6 : Initial Parti Investigations

[63]


Week 5 : Initial Parti Investigations

[64]


Week 5 : Initial Parti Investigations

[65]


Week 5 : Initial Parti Investigations

[66]


Week 6 : Midterm Review - 3 Schemes

[67]


Week 6 : Midterm Review - 3 Schemes

[68]


Week 6 : Midterm Review - 3 Schemes

[69]


Week 6 : Midterm Review - 3 Schemes

[70]


Week 6 : Midterm Review - 3 Schemes

Review 1: Erin Cunningham -Don’t isolate entry or bottleneck it -Further develop the inner core of the building where the theater is -Think about ways to create space without using solid walls or partitions and how each space blends into the adjacent room/space -There needs to be a very clear logic and legitimate reason for having a second floor and what goes in it. -Think about making the costume shop an exciting place to look into rather than tucking it back into the dark corner of the building. -Suggested making a lighting model to mock up daylight conditions Review 2: Allison Hirzel -What am I trying to showcase? -Think about the purpose of this place and what you are trying to show -Pay attention/think about the spatial layout and push barriers, break boundaries and limits with space -How does this project/building reach out to the community? Building Scheme 3: -Weird location for office… walk straight into building and see a blank wall… think about views from the street and entry. -Consider combining scheme 1 and 3… idea of theater taken and put in scheme 3

-Make second floor full strip rather than squares… too impractical and choppy -Think about levels of permeability, similar to scheme 2 -Look up the contemporary art academy in Boston. 1. Is/Was my work clear? -Diagrams are abstract but were easy to understand and read -Models begin to lose translation and are confusing. They need to be able to represent the spaces but still be somewhat simple -2nd floor drawings are very confusing and not well thought out -Program diagram needs to change -I try to make big moves in my plan with the theater or other spaces but then ruin the moment by putting an office in the way or by making the entry bottleneck into the larger space

[71]


Week 7 : Materials + Atmosphere Charrette

Charrette from February 24th, 2012 Reflection notes + ideas 1. Perspective A [Second Level including stairs] The intention of this perspective was to show how the design intersects and relates with the existing structure. Once a person arrives at the top of the stairs, they will have a visual connection to the first floor through the existing truss structure. Rather than trying to conceal the truss, this way calls attention to it and uses it as a gateway for viewing. This perspective was successful in showing the relationship to the existing building structure and shows a hint of playfulness, but it doesn’t convey the desired openness I was going for. This feels very boxed and compartmentalized, and I would rather it feel open and inviting. 2. Perspective B [Exterior view looking into dance/lounge area] As I was imagining how people would approach this building, I had this idea that people would get a glimpse of the activities and excitement taking place inside as they approach the main entry. In the perspective, there is a portion of a wall that is visible and is called out with color. This is the main theater/multipurpose space that is meant to be a focal point in the building. The intention is that it will grab the attention of those on the street. This perspective could have been more successful in showing “excitement” or busyness inside. It could have framed the theater space more rather than only giving a glimpse. 3. Perspective C [Lounge looking into theater space] The lounge is a space that should feel busy, somewhat loud and conversation friendly. Lots of interaction and movement should be happening in this space and the design intention is to echo that level of activity. This space should feel open and large, yet create an intimate and comfortable feeling. I imagine this space to be occupied by all ages between 5-18 in addition to staff and parents. The materials and atmosphere should feel exciting and bright but cater to multiple ages. This space could play with light more and look at the other adjacent spaces and how they interact. Overall the colors and materials chosen were meant to convey the idea that this place is fun and enjoyable and playful and facilitates interaction and activity.

[72]


Week 7 : Materials + Atmosphere Charrette

[73]


Week 8 : 3/4 Review - 2 Schemes

[74]


Week 8 : 3/4 Review - 2 Schemes

[75]


Week 9 : Scheme Development

[76]


Week 10 : [Term 1] Final Review - 2 Schemes

[77]


Week 10 : [Term 1] Final Review - 2 Schemes

[78]


Week 10 : [Term 1] Final Review - 2 Schemes

[79]


Week 10 : [Term 1] Final Review - 2 Schemes

[80]


Week 10 : [Term 1] Final Review - 2 Schemes

[81]


Week 11 : Charrette - One Scheme

Melissa Gambino Comp Studio : Spring Term A. Snyder Spring Term Charrette : One Scheme + One Parti [1] Pro’s and Con’s Scheme 1 - Wrapping the Core

Scheme 2 -

PRO’S -Building interior stays true to existing conditions with second level. -Language of lounge spaces creates potential for way finding and gives an “identity” to each section of buliding -Openness and ability to remove walls and boundaries allows facilitates a safe and collaborative environment between staff and students -This design has unique spaces that allow me to address the roof structure better. -The design also suits after hours use by the community.

PRO’S -Entry vesitibule pulls people in from street and also provides extra saftey barrier for childiren -Using space differently by adding a second floor in the front part of the builiding -Has the informal performance space/stadium seating area which offers unique experiences -Spatial organization is clear and easy to navigate, not cluttered -Offers more flexibility with square footage

CON’S -Using the existing entry doesn’t make sense, because the location is bad. -Spaces seem smaller and more cramped in this design, and will need to be re-worked.. some spaces may need to be compromised -This design doesn’t have some of the components of the second scheme like the dance hall arrangment and informal performance space SCORE a. Use of building site [5] b. Ease of fulfilling the program [6] c. Attention to social issues and thesis [8] d. Challenging and interesting design [8] TOTAL = [27]

CON’S -The open connection between the the floors in the theater causes problems for acoustics and also the type of views that will be available. The opening is too small and awkward -Doesn’t relate to roof structure at all, completely covers up the existing trusses and does a diservice to the design -Needs additional egress for front second level. This design has too many egress issues to deal with. SCORE a. Use of building site [7] b. Ease of fulfilling the program [8] c. Attention to social issues and thesis [7] d. Challenging and interesting design [8] TOTAL = [30]

[2] The most critical issue I need to consider for moving forward is how each scheme currently addresses the existing roof structure and how it can better relate and how easy that change will be to make. My building has a complex roof system and contains a lot of potential. The other issue I need to consider while moving forwards is how well the design benefits the children using the spaces. They need to facilitate collaboration and community between the children and staff. [3] CHOSEN SCHEME : #1 “WRAPPING THE CORE”

[82]


Week 11 : Charrette - One Scheme

[83]


Week 11 : Charrette - One Scheme

[84]


Week 12 : Pin Up

[85]


Week 13 : Charrette - Materials and Lighting

[86]


Week 13 : Charrette - Materials and Lighting

[87]


Term 2 : midterm review in portland

[88]


Term 2 : midterm review in portland After School Program for the Performing Arts

a

entry + lobby : east side

b

b

up

up

A

entry + lobby floor plan : west side

1 ground floor plan

1/4” = 1’-0”

1/8” = 1’-0” concrete

maharam

maharam

bm paint

a

youth lounge and dance studio b

osb plywood

b

b

maharam

youth lounge and dance studio b : floor plan

1/4” = 1’-0”

bm paint

dn

shaw contract

A

bm paint

2 second floor plan

hallway looking into classrooms

1/8” = 1’-0”

steel

hallway looking into classrooms: floor plan

3 section a: north-south

1/8” = 1’-0”

music recording experimental room

4 section b: east-west

1/4” = 1’ - 0”

floor plan

1/4” = 1’ - 0”

1/8” = 1’-0”

rubber tile

osb plywood

acoustic tile

recycled rubber

[89]


06. 07. 12 final review

[90]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[91]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[92]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[93]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[94]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[95]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[96]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[97]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[98]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[99]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

[100]


Term 2 : final comprehensive review

LOUNGE

COMMUNITY SPACE

ENTRY

SPACE

GE

MUSIC

MUSIC

COMMUNITY SPACE

INTER

[101]


[102]


EXISTING CONDITIONS

HISTORICAL PHOTO

This building was constructed in 1915 when the city of Eugene opened it’s first public market. The market was for farmers and merchants to sell their local goods, similar to how the Saturday Market and Farmer’s Market is run today. The details of the building’s original architecture was influenced by Islamic architecture, with tall grandiose openings as entries and carvings and tile inlay on the facade. The structure of the building is CMU block with applied concrete stucco. The interior structure of the building is comprised of concrete columns and large timber trusses. Later in 1960 the building was renovated and separated into four tenant spaces for retail merchants. During the renovation, all historic detail was demolished and replaced with a streamlined modernist stucco face. The building is appropriate for The Link because of the large span between the column grid as well as being in a central location of Downtown Eugene.

THE PRODUCERS PUBLIC MARKET BUILDING

EXISTING CONDITIONS

HISTORICAL PHOTO

MCDONALD THEATER

LTD MAIN STATION

THE DAC

LAWRENCE STREET

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

LINCOLN STREET

NEW LCC CAMPUS

W. BROADWAY

W. 8TH AVENUE

OLIVE STREET

MCDONALD THEATER

LTD MAIN STATION

10’

20 50 30

60 seated 5-8 15 5-20

6 1 1 1 4 2 23%

1 1-5 30 50 2-5 n/a -

Adjacencies

Lobby, information desk Theater entry, cafe Lobby, entry vestibule Theater, lobby

Homework Lab Digital media room Lounge, WC, cafe

Theater, sm music rms Band Room, lounge Lounge, recording lab Lounge, WC, band room

Lobby, studios Large studio, theater Theater, lockers, wc WC, lobby, entry Theater, lobby, classrooms

Lighting

Daylight, electric light Daylight, electric light Daylight Daylight, electric light

Boys locker room

Theater, office, classrooms Entry, lobby, cafe Entry, lobby, cafe Recording lab, homework lab Misc. Entry stair, egress stair

Conference room, kitchenette Administrative office Administrative office

810

415 500 100

75 70 270 600 545 total 250 4,765

Electric light Electric light Electric light Electric light Electric light n/a

Electric light Electric light Electric light

Electric light

Electric light Electric light Electric light

Daylight, electric Electric light Electric light Electric light

Daylight, electric light Daylight, electric light Daylight, electric light Theater lights, electric Electric light

CHARNELTON STREET ELEVATION 735 Girls locker room Electric light

550 950 850

1,060 350 275 400

1,463 550 815 4,075 15

400 1,711 150 1,235

Sq Ft.

1/8” = 1’-0”

25,264 29,095 24,025

10’

1/8” = 1’-0”

EAST/WEST SECTION LOOKING SOUTH

6 EXISTING NORTH (BROADWAY AVE.) ELEVATION

1/16” = 1’-0”

1054-1100

1/16” = 1’-0”

0’

EAST/WEST SECTION LOOKING SOUTH

3 HISTORIC BROADWAY AVE. ELEVATION

Bathrooms Elevator Front Stair Egress Stair Storage Mechanical Circulation

2

1 1 1

THE DAC

1-20 150 2 125

Occupancy

Girls Locker Room 1 60 HISTORIC Boys Locker Room 1/16” 1 = 1’-0” 50 Administrative Office 1 20 Conference Room 1 20 Kitchenette 1 1-5

1 1 1 1

Band Room Recording Lab Small Practice Digital Music Lab

Total Occupancy Net Total Sq. Footage Gross Available SF schools in a 3 mile radiusBuilding Footprint SF

W. 11TH AVENUE

EUGENE PUBLIC LIBRARY

W. 10TH AVENUE

WILLAMETTE STREET

site

PROXIMITY MAP

1 1 1 1

Digital Media Room Homework Lab Teaching Kitchen

DOWNTOWN BUSINESS DISTRICT

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

Qty.

1

Large Studio 1 40 Small Studio 2 15 Costume Lab 1 30 “Black Box” 1 250 seated SITE PLAN Niche 1/32” 8= 1’-0” 1-2

Entry Vestibule Lobby Front Desk Cafe + Lounge

1/16” = 1’-0”

0’

6 EXISTING NORTH (BROADWAY AVE.) ELEVATION

1/16” = 1’-0”

3 HISTORIC BROADWAY AVE. ELEVATION

1/16” = 1’-0”

2 HISTORIC CHARNELTON STREET ELEVATION

1/32” = 1’-0”

1 SITE PLAN

Name of Space

schools in a 3 mile radius

W. 11TH AVENUE

EUGENE PUBLIC LIBRARY

W. 10TH AVENUE

NEW LCC CAMPUS

W. BROADWAY

W. 8TH AVENUE

1/2 MILE RADIUS AROUND SITE

EUGENE, OREGON

site

PROXIMITY MAP

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

RESIDENTIAL BLOCK

DOWNTOWN BUSINESS DISTRICT

1/2 MILE RADIUS AROUND SITE

pipe columns

1/16” = 1’-0”

July 15 | 4:30pm

July 15 | 1:30pm July 15 | 4:30pm

second level floor and ceiling joists

large timber truss

roof joists, 16” oc

7 EXISTING WEST (CHARNELTON ST.) ELEVATION 1/16” = 1’-0”

January 15 | 4:30pm

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

January 15 | 1:30pm

July 15 | 1:30pm

second level floor and ceiling joists

7 EXISTING WEST (CHARNELTON ST.) ELEVATION

January 15 | 4:30pm

pipe columns

concrete column grid

January 15 | 1:30pm

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAM

concrete column grid

large timber truss

37’-4” 40’-0”

roof joists, 16” oc

a

C

W

EUGENE, OREGON

COMMUNITY

DANCE +THEATER

MUSIC

LEARN

ADMINISTRATION

W C

a

adjacent building

b

190-194 W BROADWAY

N

76’-0”

156’-0”

b

174 W BROADWAY

N

76’-0”

adjacent building

b

190-194 W BROADWAY

b

156’-0”

1/8” = 1’-0”

0’

174 W BROADWAY

1/16” = 1’-0”

10’

C

a

bottom of (e) ceiling framing +(15’-6 1/4”)

1/8” = 1’-0”

0’

10’

164b W BROADWAY

164 W BROADWAY

38’-0”

C

a

C

a

1/16” = 1’-0”

5 EXISTING SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1/16” = 1’-0”

N

adjacent building

b

b

2 EXISTING NORTH-SOUTH SECTION -B

C

a

1/16” = 1’-0”

5 EXISTING SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1/16” = 1’-0”

N

adjacent building

b

b

2 EXISTING NORTH-SOUTH SECTION -B

W bottom of (e) ceiling framing +(15’-6 1/4”)

NORTH/SOUTH SECTION LOOKING EAST

3 EXISTING EAST-WEST SECTION -A

10’

0’

164b W BROADWAY

164 W BROADWAY

38’-0”

NORTH/SOUTH SECTION LOOKING EAST

1 EXISTING GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1/16” = 1’-0”

198 W BROADWAY

38’-0”

1/16” = 1’-0”

3 EXISTING EAST-WEST SECTION -A

1 EXISTING GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1/16” = 1’-0”

198 W BROADWAY

38’-0”

adjacent building

E

SERVICES

a

bottom of (e) ceiling framing +(15’-6 1/4”)

C

a

adjacent building bottom of (e) ceiling framing +(15’-6 1/4”)

C

E

TOTALS

37’-4”

38’-5” 39’-0”

155’-0”

115’-10” 39’-0”

This building was constructed in 1915 when the city of Eugene opened it’s first public market. The market was for farmers and merchants to sell their local goods, similar to how the Saturday Market and Farmer’s Market is run today. The details of the building’s original architecture was influenced by Islamic architecture, with tall grandiose openings as entries and carvings and tile inlay on the facade. The structure of the building is CMU block with applied concrete stucco. The interior structure of the building is comprised of concrete columns and large timber trusses. Later in 1960 the building was renovated and separated into four tenant spaces for retail merchants. During the renovation, all historic detail was demolished and replaced with a streamlined modernist stucco face. The building is appropriate for The Link because of the large span between the column grid as well as being in a central location of Downtown Eugene.

OLIVE STREET

40’-0”

LINCOLN STREET

38’-5”

CHARNLETON STREET

39’-0”

LAWRENCE STREET

115’-10”

WILLAMETTE STREET

W

E adjacent building

E

39’-0”

THE PRODUCERS PUBLIC MARKET BUILDING

TENANT SPACE #3

SHAW-MED

TENANT SPACE #4

SHAW-MED

INTERIOR CONDITIONS

TENANT SPACE #3

SHAW-MED

TENANT SPACE #4

SHAW-MED

INTERIOR CONDITIONS

1” = 1’-0”

WALL SECTION WITH LADDER

NO SCALE

LADDER ELEVATION

WELCOME CENTER + CHECK-IN DESK

Term 2 : final comprehensive review

CHARNLETON STREET

[103]

adjacent building

155’-0”


06. 07. 12 final comprehensive review

interior architecture the department of architecture university of oregon

[104]


The Link Afterschool Program for the Performing Arts  

Comprehensive Studio Project Bachelor of Interior Architecture 2012 University of Oregon

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you