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YEAR 56, NO.7 FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

Comfort Cuisine

SERVING MARIN COUNTY

PACIFICSUN.COM

ISSUE

Comfort Food CELEBRATING TWO MARIN INSTITUTIONS P8

Cannabis Lawsuit P6 ‘Widowers’ Houses’ P10 Danny James in Marin P11


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Don’t Let a Fall Ruin Your Healthy, Happy Life By Dina Griffith, Director of Rehabilitation & Inpatient Physical Therapy

A

ccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), falls are the leading cause of injuries in people age 65 and older. Common injuries are fractures of the shoulder, forearm, spine, pelvis, and hip. Falls can happen anytime, anywhere, and at any age; however, older adults fall more easily and more often and may incur more severe fall-related injuries, including head injuries. Falls do not have to be an inevitable part of aging, and while accidents do happen, you can keep falls from disrupting your life and your health.

One of the best ways is to keep your body strong throughout your lifetime with exercise and activity. If you have been a walker, runner or cyclist, keep up these activities at a level appropriate to your age and your health.

If you haven’t been active throughout your life or you don’t especially like exercise, you can also build strength through everyday activities. Walk everywhere you can, or use the stairs (with railings of course). Do some simple exercises at home such as getting up from the edge of a chair or pushing yourself up from a chair with arms several times in a row. When it gets too easy, add more repetitions. Good posture is more important to maintain as we age and can also help reduce falls. You are better balanced when upright as muscles and joints are better aligned to respond and act quickly and effectively to changes in the environment. You will be more able to catch yourself from falling if you can step backwards and sideways, swiftly. Though balance declines as we age, simple balance exercises can be done: stand on one foot while waiting for the tea kettle; or while in line at the grocery store; or while brushing your teeth. Maintenance of your abilities is critical; safely pushing to improve is even better. The little stuff adds up!

If you do find yourself losing your balance and almost falling, pay attention to the circumstances. Were you in a hurry or were you distracted? Was there something you almost tripped on in your home or when you were out with friends? If you know what caused the incident, you have a better chance of preventing a fall next time.

Medications also play a role in preventing falls. If you take more than four medications, have the list reviewed by your doctor to be sure the drug interactions are not making you sleepy or dizzy. If you are prone to dizziness when waking up, you may want to put a commode at your bedside. To prevent dizziness when getting up from a chair or bed, sit on the edge of the bed or chair and pump your ankles or elbows to get the blood moving and take a couple of deep breaths before getting up. If you live alone and if you are concerned about falling, wearing a falls monitoring device can bring you or your family greater peace of mind. Don’t let a fall keep you from feeling good, healthy and happy, and doing the most that you can with your life.

The majority of falls happen at home so it could be time to make your home safer. 1. Remove trip-hazards such as throw rugs.

2. Make sure there is good lighting around bathrooms, stairways, and stairwells. Consider nightlights and having handrails professionally installed on both sides of the stairs, in the bathroom, in the tub, and shower area. Falls in the home often involve rushing to the bathroom so try to establish a regular bathroom schedule such as going right before bed and avoiding drinking fluids after dinner. 3. Mark thresholds going into a room or into the house where there is a surface change in texture or height.

4. Remove delicate or wobbly furniture; use only heavy furniture for balance. In the kitchen, never use stools. Arrange items used most on the counter or in the easiestto-reach cabinets.

5. Check to see your pants or nightgowns aren’t too long or that the hems aren’t raveled. Wear only low, closed heeled shoes and house shoes, no backless slippers. Make sure your shoe laces are tied. 6. Pets can also be a safety hazard, especially if they get tangled up in your feet or cause you to trip as you are walking in the house or outdoors. Sometimes it just takes an adjustment in feeding or other routines to decrease the hazard.

For more resources about fall prevention visit www.maringeneral. org/fallprevention

250 Bon Air Road • Greenbrae, CA 94904 • 1-415-925-7424 • www.maringeneral.org


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Thank you

In a Marin business or school with extra food? Please contact us for a spontaneous or scheduled pickup at www.ExtraFood.org or 415-997-9830.

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Helping to end hunger in Marin

www.extrafood.org 415.997.9830

David Allen

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Upfront

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By Howard Rachelson

1 Name the professional sports teams (baseball, football, basketball, hockey and soccer) of the Bay Area.

2

2 Give the full name of the London artist who painted Whistler’s Mother in 1871. 3 Which small explosive device has a fruity name? 4 Around 1880, about three-fourths of all of the

5c

steel produced in American steel mills was intended for what purpose?

5a. What celebrity will host this year’s Academy Awards on Sunday, March 4?

b. How many films are nominated for this year’s Best Picture award? c. The Bay Area’s Pixar is nominated for the Best Animated Feature Film

FEBRUARY 17-18, 2018

award, for what movie?

6 What big cats can swim to hunt for food? 7 What personal care product was brand-named in 1914 after the phrase ‘no

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8 What is the sum of the first 100 odd numbers beginning with 1+3+5+7+ ... ? How can you add them in an orderly manner?

Sunday, February 18 | 11AM - 4PM

9 From the 1890s through the 1950s, France controlled a number of countries

Benefiting

in the western part of what continent?

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10 Classify each of these Shakespearean plays as tragedy, comedy or history: a. Hamlet b. The Merchant of Venice c. Henry VI BONUS QUESTION: If all of the U.S. state names beginning with “M” were listed in alphabetical order, what would be the first two and last two on the list?

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Two of my favorite things are sitting on my front porch smoking a pipe of sweet hemp, and playing my Hohner harmonica.   Abraham Lincoln    

Editor’s Note

Dear readers, As much as we like publishing your political rants and raves, we’re wondering what your thoughts are on the articles that appear in the Pacific Sun. What have you enjoyed recently? What haven’t you liked? What would you like to see more of ? Please let us know at letters@pacificsun. com. We look forward to your letters relating to our content. And as always, thanks for reading.

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As a big fan of the brilliant and witty perspectives of the Advice Goddess, her absence in the last few issues is like a big hole in the newspaper! Hopefully she is just enjoying a vacation and we will see

Howard invites you to a new Saturday Night Trivia Night team contest on Saturday, Feb. 17, 8pm, at Iron Springs Pub & Brewery in Fairfax. Have a great question? Send it in and if we use it, we’ll give you credit. Contact Howard at howard1@triviacafe.com, and visit triviacafe.com.

This week, a letter-writer sends a cartoon reminder.

her brilliance back on your pages again soon! —Regina

Paraphrasing

To paraphrase Donald Trump, get that son of a bitch out of the White House—he’s fired! —Craig Whatley

▲ The volunteers of the Marin County Sheriff’s Office Search & Rescue team are true heroes. In their 50 or more operations each year, they search for folks missing in the wilderness or urban settings, hunt down evidence for Marin law enforcement agencies and assist during natural disasters. Right now, they’re searching for new volunteers. Team members are of various ages, backgrounds and experience levels, but share a common interest in helping people and serving their community. The work is rewarding, but it isn’t easy. Youths and adults have to make a two-year commitment, pass basic fitness requirements and go through boot camp to qualify. If you’re prepared to carry out missions during difficult circumstances, visit marinsar.org/apply/ to learn more. The application deadline is February 23.

Answers on page

»17

Zero

Discounts for Medical Patients

This week, a letter-writer tells the president that he’s not happy with the way things are going.

Hero



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Trivia Café

▼ Marinites sure do covet their million-dollar vistas and go to great lengths to preserve them. In Sausalito, on Stanford Way, a moron permanently trimmed a tree guilty of blocking bay views by climbing said tree, drilling holes in the top of it and pouring diesel fuel into the trunk. The poor tree succumbed to the vandalism and had to be cut down to a stump. Apparently, we’re so entitled that NIMBYism is no longer good enough. We’ve now graduated to not in my neighbor’s backyard either. The poisoned tree, located on the property of the Terraces of Sausalito Homeowners Association, was removed by a hazmat team. To date, each of the 23 homeowners has forked over a grand to cover the expensive chopping and disposal.—Nikki Silverstein

Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeros at ›› pacificsun.com

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Letters

4


By Howard Rachelson

1 Name the professional sports teams (baseball, football, basketball, hockey and soccer) of the Bay Area.

2

2 Give the full name of the London artist who painted Whistler’s Mother in 1871. 3 Which small explosive device has a fruity name? 4 Around 1880, about three-fourths of all of the

5c

steel produced in American steel mills was intended for what purpose?

5a. What celebrity will host this year’s Academy Awards on Sunday, March 4?

b. How many films are nominated for this year’s Best Picture award? c. The Bay Area’s Pixar is nominated for the Best Animated Feature Film

award, for what movie?

6 What big cats can swim to hunt for food? 7 What personal care product was brand-named in 1914 after the phrase ‘no

eczema’?

8 What is the sum of the first 100 odd numbers beginning with 1+3+5+7+ ... ? How can you add them in an orderly manner?

9 From the 1890s through the 1950s, France controlled a number of countries in the western part of what continent?

10 Classify each of these Shakespearean plays as tragedy, comedy or history: a. Hamlet b. The Merchant of Venice c. Henry VI BONUS QUESTION: If all of the U.S. state names beginning with “M” were listed in alphabetical order, what would be the first two and last two on the list?

▲ The volunteers of the Marin County Sheriff’s Office Search & Rescue team are true heroes. In their 50 or more operations each year, they search for folks missing in the wilderness or urban settings, hunt down evidence for Marin law enforcement agencies and assist during natural disasters. Right now, they’re searching for new volunteers. Team members are of various ages, backgrounds and experience levels, but share a common interest in helping people and serving their community. The work is rewarding, but it isn’t easy. Youths and adults have to make a two-year commitment, pass basic fitness requirements and go through boot camp to qualify. If you’re prepared to carry out missions during difficult circumstances, visit marinsar.org/apply/ to learn more. The application deadline is February 23.

Answers on page

»17

Zero

Hero

Howard invites you to a new Saturday Night Trivia Night team contest on Saturday, Feb. 17, 8pm, at Iron Springs Pub & Brewery in Fairfax. Have a great question? Send it in and if we use it, we’ll give you credit. Contact Howard at howard1@triviacafe.com, and visit triviacafe.com.

▼ Marinites sure do covet their million-dollar vistas and go to great lengths to preserve them. In Sausalito, on Stanford Way, a moron permanently trimmed a tree guilty of blocking bay views by climbing said tree, drilling holes in the top of it and pouring diesel fuel into the trunk. The poor tree succumbed to the vandalism and had to be cut down to a stump. Apparently, we’re so entitled that NIMBYism is no longer good enough. We’ve now graduated to not in my neighbor’s backyard either. The poisoned tree, located on the property of the Terraces of Sausalito Homeowners Association, was removed by a hazmat team. To date, each of the 23 homeowners has forked over a grand to cover the expensive chopping and disposal.—Nikki Silverstein

Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeros at ›› pacificsun.com

5 PA CI FI C S U N | FEB R U A RY 1 4 - 2 0 , 2 0 18 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

Trivia Café


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Upfront A recent lawsuit charges that the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s lifting of grow limits is contrary to what voters agreed to when they passed Proposition 64 in 2016.

Weed the People

California sued over sellout to Big Bud; North Bay district attorneys say no to mass expungement of cannabis convictions By Tom Gogola

B

ack in November, the state moved to lift acreage limits in place to protect small-time, legacy pot growers as part of the Proposition 64 rollout—causing great consternation and outrage among lawmakers and cannabis activists. The late-game maneuvering as Prop 64 was implemented, undertaken at the California Department of Food and Agriculture

(CDFA), prompted a lawsuit several weeks ago by the California Growers Association (CGA). The CGA is a lobbying organization based in Sacramento that’s been at the forefront in ensuring that the state’s “legacy” growers aren’t squeezed out in favor of Big Bud. The suit, filed in the Sacramento County Superior Court, charges that the CDFA’s lifting of one-acre grow limits that were to be in place through 2023 is contrary to what

voters agreed to when they passed Prop 64 in 2016. “We were shocked to see this recommendation move forward,” says California Senator Mike McGuire via email. His North Coast constituency includes many small-scale cannabis growers who’ve been operating in the shadows for decades—and were wary over legalization for exactly this reason. “For the past 24 months,” McGuire says, “we were all on the same page

to protect small family farmers who are the heart of California’s cannabis industry. Instead, the loophole created by the new regulations will hurt small family farms and instead rolls out the red carpet for the Walmart of weed.” Attorney Patrick Soluri represents the CGA in the suit. In an email, he laid out his legal argument, noting that the goals of the Adult Use of Marijuana Act, and the pot omnibus law MAUCRSA (the


farmers. I went up there personally, in Humboldt, and made that case to everybody there. So I feel a great sense of responsibility to have the backs of those folks, and I’m equally concerned. Again, it’s one of those instances where there’s only so much—well, I’m not the governor. I’m not making excuses, by the way, but respecting what the legislature and the governor just did, I can assure you that at this time next year there will be some amendments and adjustments.” So does Newsom disagree with the CDFA’s interpretation of the acreage rule? “I get the spirit of it,” he says. “I see the argument. God, I am so black and white in so many ways—because I am the guy who said yes to legalization, marry gays, go after the NRA, etcetera—on this, though, there are legitimate arguments from both perspectives. I want in real time to see the evidence of what actually occurs on the ground—not what people are asserting, not what people are suggesting—I want to actually see what happens over the next few months when the dust settles. And I will be very, very sensitive to those facts on the ground and the reality of the situation—not the promoted concerns.” Just a few days after the suit was filed, a Newsom quote popped up in a Los Angeles Times story that broke the news that San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón plans to clear nearly 40 years’ worth of misdemeanor cannabis possession convictions in that city. In a proactive gesture of mass expungement celebrated by everyone from Newsom to everyday potheads, the Democratic Gascón said his office would erase nearly 3,000 misdemeanor pot convictions dating back to 1975. He also pledged to take a look at reclassifying about 5,000 pot-related felony convictions as misdemeanors. Why 1975? Well, for one thing, 1975 was a big year in the annals of California cannabis history. That year the state passed SB-85, aka the Moscone Act, which took a big step toward total decriminalization when it reclassified cannabis possession of up to an ounce as a simple misdemeanor punishable by a $100 fine. Forty-plus years later, most news stories about the Gascón decision were larded with questions to the effect of, will other California

counties take up the call? “With all due respect to him, George has a much larger staff than we do,” says Marin County District Attorney Edward Berberian, Jr. “and we don’t have the attorney resources that would let us do that here.” Berberian’s office will not proactively move to expunge cannabis convictions, he says, as he cited the expungement process afforded by Prop 64, which legalized the sale of recreational cannabis, and pledged to work with people who come forward to have their records reviewed and cleared. “We’re not going to be a roadblock to them.” he says. “We’re going to work with them.” Sonoma County District Attorney Jill Ravitch is similarly sticking to the Prop 64 process. “You know, at this point I’m not planning to follow the lead of Mr. Gascón,” says Ravitch, who is up for re-election this fall. “I think that there’s a petition process in place and if the voters had wanted us to take the affirmative action of recalling and dismissing all of those cases, it would have been part of the initiative. So I plan to follow within the confines of what the initiative requires. And so I’m working with the public defender and I know that we’ll be reviewing those petitions and we will be taking appropriate action.” Prop 64 grants judicial latitude to expunge pot cases if the underlying crime that gave rise to the original charge is no longer a crime. For example, a person arrested in possession of an ounce of cannabis in 2015 was no longer a criminal as of 2016, and could set out to have the conviction expunged from his or her record. According to the state’s Judicial Branch online portal, as of November 9, 2016, Prop 64 authorizes the “resentencing or dismissal and sealing of prior, eligible marijuana-related convictions.” The expungements would likely be of some benefit to cannabiseconomy participants from the preProp 64 period. Between November 2016 and December 2017, counties across the state had received 2,700 resentencing petitions and 1,820 re-designation petitions, on top of 365 petitions for relief involving juveniles. In that time, San Francisco received a total of 232 resentencing or re-designation petitions, according to the court portal.

Alameda, Los Angeles, Riverside, Sacramento and San Diego counties also accepted hundreds of petitions over that time. Sonoma County fielded 24 adult petitions over the same period; Marin County fielded 19; Mendocino, zero. Napa County did not provide data to the court. California’s cannabis-legalization protocols also allow for felony enhancements in certain cannabisrelated crimes. According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws: “Felony enhancements may be charged in aggravated circumstances such as repeat or violent prior offenses, environmental offenses, involvement of minors. Also, prosecutors can charge violators with felony conspiracy to commit a misdemeanor if more than one person is involved in the crime.” But Prop 64 also allows certain cannabis crimes that were felonies to be knocked back to misdemeanors. Those include, for example, the individual cultivation of more than six plants, possessionwith-intent charges and the sale or transportation of pot. The plan to stick with the Prop 64 expunge-the-conviction protocols rankled some in the county’s propot community. Oaky Joe Munson, a grower in the Sonoma County town of Forestville, says he’s not surprised that Ravitch won’t go along with the Gascón program. He says he doesn’t care that he has misdemeanor and felony charges on his jacket, but he recognizes that it’s a critically important issue to some people to clear their names, whether they’re growers or not. “I don’t care if I have those on my record even though I’ve never been convicted of a felony,” says Munson, whose medical crop was confiscated and destroyed by local law enforcement in 2015. “The damage is already done when the cops come” and destroy the plants, he says. Munson’s been providing medical cannabis to AIDS patients for years and says Gascón’s effort “is a step in the direction” that will help people who are trying, for example, to get a government job, or any job for that matter. “I’m glad to see a big metropolitan region go for it,” he says.Y Jennifer Wadsworth contributed reporting to this article.

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Medicinal and Adult-Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act), “was to bring existing small operations out of the shadows so that they could contribute tax revenue and comply with environmental laws.” The rescission hinges on an argument offered by large-scale growers that smaller operators weren’t going to survive new regulatory costs associated with MAUCRSA. Steve DeAngelo of Oakland’s Harborside dispensary made that argument to the Sacramento Bee when the lawsuit was filed two weeks ago. “[T]here is no reasonable debate,” says Soluri, “that larger cultivation operations can easier absorb increased regulatory cost of compliance than smaller operations.” Soluri cites the CDFA’s economic impact analysis of the five-year carve-out. Without the protection, Soluri notes, “as California voters intended, these existing small operations will simply not even attempt to become legal.” Now, as Soluri notes, California risks having two cannabis markets, “a legal market comprised of large, corporate agri-business and an illegal market of small operators.” The CGA’s executive director, Hezekiah Allen, said that every iteration of the legalization push and every regulatory analysis of its impacts, included the 2023 rule. He suspects that pressure from state growers angling for a bigger piece of the cannabis pie drove the CFDA’s reversal. In an email, CDFA spokesman Steve Lyle declined to comment on the lawsuit. Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom headed up a blue-ribbon cannabis commission whose “Pathways Report: Policy Options for Regulating Marijuana in California,” released in July 2015, said the California legalization regime should “ensure that small and midsize entities, especially responsible actors in the current market, have access to the new licensed market, and that the industry and regulatory system are not dominated by large, corporate interests.” In an interview, Newsom, who is running for governor, says this of the CGA-CDFA dust-up: “Well, the governor took the spirit of what he believed was Prop 64, and that was his framework for the first application of the rulemaking. But I completely appreciate the concern because the spirit of what we were trying to achieve with the five-year prioritization was to protect those


Theresa & Johnny’s and Marin Joe’s offer more than comfort food By Tanya Henry

C

omfort food means different things to different people—but regardless of the dish, it should be nourishing, come in generous-sized portions and as our mothers might have said, it should “stick to your ribs.” Two Marin institutions, Marin Joe’s and Theresa

& Johnny’s, have been serving up their unique brands of familiar, nourishing food to happy customers for decades. Massive portions, homey environs and plenty of good old American kitsch is what you’ll find at Theresa & Johnny’s on Fourth Street in San Rafael. This longtime

favorite still has lines out the door, and a waitlist on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Theresa & Johnny’s is the kind of place that if you go for breakfast, you won’t be hungry again until dinner. Their giant breakfast burrito is chock-full of scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage and

Theresa & Johnny’s, 817 Fourth St., San Rafael; 415/259-0182; theresajohnnys.com.

Degree

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Cozy Time

9

M.A. Psychology: Depth Deeply Professional

Courtesy of Theresa & Johnny’s

Courtesy of Marin Joe’s

Caesar salads prepared tableside are a speciality at Marin Joe’s in Corte Madera.

hash browns, and it’s smothered with sour cream and a fresh-made salsa. Not everything is quite as gigantic as the burrito, but hearty and heavy is the ticket here. Aside from fresh fruit bowls and freshsqueezed juice, most of the food is of the you-better-not-be-on-a-diet variety. Leslie Burnside has owned the restaurant since 2004. A formally trained chef, Burnside worked for the original owners (Theresa and Johnny), and then bought it and kept the name. It is her collection of impressive memorabilia that adorns almost every inch of the space. Unique porcelain salt and pepper shakers sit on the tables, and a vast collection of various hot sauces line the front counter alongside a set of Simpson dolls. Road signs, car grilles and pendants line the walls, and a running ticker tape spells out humorous tips, like the warning that if children are unattended they will be given an espresso and a free puppy. Chunky wooden round tables and mismatched chairs provide seating for almost 50. Corned beef hash, Monte Christo and pastrami sandwiches are also wildly popular at the cash-only breakfast/lunch spot. “We import our pastrami from Brooklyn,” says Burnside, who reports that they go through 1,000 pounds a week. Perhaps their most well-known breakfast item is the truly original crispy french toast, deep-fried in rice oil with a filling that includes vanilla ice cream—making it sweet, rich and creamy. Four generous pieces of nicely cooked bacon accompany the dish. Specials include out-of-theordinary concoctions like a grilled cream cheese sandwich made with tater tots and pickled jalapenos. Often these unusual inventions are named after loyal customers who order them on a regular basis. Drink options include milkshakes, sodas, a selection of beer and the always-celebratory mimosas. Come hungry to Theresa & Johnny’s, or plan to take home a doggy bag. There’s a reason that this classic American place is so popular: It’s comfortable, inviting and serves up fresh, familiar food— in hefty portions.Y

Oversized breakfast portions are balanced by fresh fruit bowls at Theresa & Johnny’s in San Rafael.

Equally beloved is family-owned Marin Joe’s in Corte Madera, which has been around for 64 years. Adolph Della Santina opened the restaurant in 1954 with his nephew Romano, and today Romano’s two sons Paul and Ralph run the alwaysbusy establishment. Romano Della Santina’s sons recall their father’s commitment to the restaurant. “It was his baby—he was always there and made sure to greet everyone who came in the door,” says Paul, the younger of the two brothers; they’ve run the business together since their dad passed away two-and-a-half years ago at the age of 86. Between its location (right off the freeway in Corte Madera) and its sprawling interior, complete with multiple seating options, a piano bar and open kitchen, Marin Joe’s is clearly of a different era. Some longtime institutions would begin to tarnish with age and lose appeal, but not this one. Marin Joe’s’ old world charm, and genuinely welcoming vibe continue to draw multiple generations every night of the week. Each night the open kitchen offers customers sitting at the bar a firsthand look into the hot, demanding art of working the grill. Even for non-meat lovers, it’s an impressive display of culinary expertise, physical stamina and showmanship. For the ultimate Marin Joe’s experience—take note— this is where the action is.

Equally impressive are the Caesar salads prepared tableside. There aren’t many places that offer this kind of old school, personalized service anymore—Marin Joe’s is one of the few. The menu is massive and includes everything from liver and onions, petrale sole and veal scaloppini to prime rib and boiled tongue (on Wednesdays only). Soups, salads and sandwiches are also offered, but anything prepared on the mesquite grill is consistently a solid choice— especially the burger. Marin Joe’s is a good example of a restaurant that offers so much more than just food. Once inside, one feels as though they’ve been scooped up into a large familial embrace, complete with all that comes along with a boisterous and happy family.Y Marin Joe’s, 1585 Casa Buena Drive, Corte Madera; 415/924-1500; marinjoesrestaurant.com. Clearly, comfort food embodies much more than simply ingredients and dishes. Both Theresa & Johnny’s and Marin Joe’s provide diners with a certain nostalgia that might conjure up feel-good memories and tastes. And whether the food is good or bad, it doesn’t much matter. If the environs and food make us feel nourished and content, then its comfort food. These two restaurants deliver in spades.Y

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Cozy Time

Theresa & Johnny’s and Marin Joe’s offer more than comfort food By Tanya Henry

C

omfort food means different things to different people—but regardless of the dish, it should be nourishing, come in generous-sized portions and as our mothers might have said, it should “stick to your ribs.” Two Marin institutions, Marin Joe’s and Theresa

& Johnny’s, have been serving up their unique brands of familiar, nourishing food to happy customers for decades. Massive portions, homey environs and plenty of good old American kitsch is what you’ll find at Theresa & Johnny’s on Fourth Street in San Rafael. This longtime

favorite still has lines out the door, and a waitlist on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Theresa & Johnny’s is the kind of place that if you go for breakfast, you won’t be hungry again until dinner. Their giant breakfast burrito is chock-full of scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage and

Theresa & Johnny’s, 817 Fourth St., San Rafael; 415/259-0182; theresajohnnys.com.

Degree

9

M.A. Psychology: Depth Deeply Professional

Oversized breakfast portions are balanced by fresh fruit bowls at Theresa & Johnny’s in San Rafael.

Equally beloved is family-owned Marin Joe’s in Corte Madera, which has been around for 64 years. Adolph Della Santina opened the restaurant in 1954 with his nephew Romano, and today Romano’s two sons Paul and Ralph run the alwaysbusy establishment. Romano Della Santina’s sons recall their father’s commitment to the restaurant. “It was his baby—he was always there and made sure to greet everyone who came in the door,” says Paul, the younger of the two brothers; they’ve run the business together since their dad passed away two-and-a-half years ago at the age of 86. Between its location (right off the freeway in Corte Madera) and its sprawling interior, complete with multiple seating options, a piano bar and open kitchen, Marin Joe’s is clearly of a different era. Some longtime institutions would begin to tarnish with age and lose appeal, but not this one. Marin Joe’s’ old world charm, and genuinely welcoming vibe continue to draw multiple generations every night of the week. Each night the open kitchen offers customers sitting at the bar a firsthand look into the hot, demanding art of working the grill. Even for non-meat lovers, it’s an impressive display of culinary expertise, physical stamina and showmanship. For the ultimate Marin Joe’s experience—take note— this is where the action is.

Equally impressive are the Caesar salads prepared tableside. There aren’t many places that offer this kind of old school, personalized service anymore—Marin Joe’s is one of the few. The menu is massive and includes everything from liver and onions, petrale sole and veal scaloppini to prime rib and boiled tongue (on Wednesdays only). Soups, salads and sandwiches are also offered, but anything prepared on the mesquite grill is consistently a solid choice— especially the burger. Marin Joe’s is a good example of a restaurant that offers so much more than just food. Once inside, one feels as though they’ve been scooped up into a large familial embrace, complete with all that comes along with a boisterous and happy family.Y Marin Joe’s, 1585 Casa Buena Drive, Corte Madera; 415/924-1500; marinjoesrestaurant.com. Clearly, comfort food embodies much more than simply ingredients and dishes. Both Theresa & Johnny’s and Marin Joe’s provide diners with a certain nostalgia that might conjure up feel-good memories and tastes. And whether the food is good or bad, it doesn’t much matter. If the environs and food make us feel nourished and content, then its comfort food. These two restaurants deliver in spades.Y

Graduates develop depth-oriented programs in their communities, teach at universities, work with nonprofits, in human resouces, and beyond.

Info Session

Saturday, February 24 2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

Stevenson 3042, SSU sonoma.edu/depth

laurel.mccabe@sonoma.edu

707.664.2130

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We offer researched, nutritional & quality products that meet the highest standards.

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Courtesy of Marin Joe’s

Caesar salads prepared tableside are a speciality at Marin Joe’s in Corte Madera.

hash browns, and it’s smothered with sour cream and a fresh-made salsa. Not everything is quite as gigantic as the burrito, but hearty and heavy is the ticket here. Aside from fresh fruit bowls and freshsqueezed juice, most of the food is of the you-better-not-be-on-a-diet variety. Leslie Burnside has owned the restaurant since 2004. A formally trained chef, Burnside worked for the original owners (Theresa and Johnny), and then bought it and kept the name. It is her collection of impressive memorabilia that adorns almost every inch of the space. Unique porcelain salt and pepper shakers sit on the tables, and a vast collection of various hot sauces line the front counter alongside a set of Simpson dolls. Road signs, car grilles and pendants line the walls, and a running ticker tape spells out humorous tips, like the warning that if children are unattended they will be given an espresso and a free puppy. Chunky wooden round tables and mismatched chairs provide seating for almost 50. Corned beef hash, Monte Christo and pastrami sandwiches are also wildly popular at the cash-only breakfast/lunch spot. “We import our pastrami from Brooklyn,” says Burnside, who reports that they go through 1,000 pounds a week. Perhaps their most well-known breakfast item is the truly original crispy french toast, deep-fried in rice oil with a filling that includes vanilla ice cream—making it sweet, rich and creamy. Four generous pieces of nicely cooked bacon accompany the dish. Specials include out-of-theordinary concoctions like a grilled cream cheese sandwich made with tater tots and pickled jalapenos. Often these unusual inventions are named after loyal customers who order them on a regular basis. Drink options include milkshakes, sodas, a selection of beer and the always-celebratory mimosas. Come hungry to Theresa & Johnny’s, or plan to take home a doggy bag. There’s a reason that this classic American place is so popular: It’s comfortable, inviting and serves up fresh, familiar food— in hefty portions.Y

Courtesy of Theresa & Johnny’s

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David Allen

In George Bernard Shaw’s play ‘Widowers’ Houses,’ which premiered in London in 1892, the themes of love and greed intertwine.

THEATER

Comic Satire

Love and capitalism in ‘Widowers’ Houses’ By Charles Brousse

I

f your impression of AngloIrish playwright George Bernard Shaw is that he was a doctrinaire liberal who is often amusing but also verbosely argumentative in support of progressive causes, you may be surprised by the Aurora Theatre Company’s sparkling production of Widowers’ Houses. Originally scheduled to close on February 25, favorable early reviews and brisk ticket sales have resulted in a oneweek extension to March 4. Houses debuted on December 9,1892 at London’s Royalty Theatre. It was the first of three works during the ’80s decade (the others being The Philanderer and Mrs. Warren’s Profession) that have collectively been dubbed “Plays Unpleasant” because they follow the lead of the Norwegian writer Henrik Ibsen by

insisting on a realistic view of human nature, rather than the melodramatic exaggerations that prevailed earlier in the 19th century. As viewed through the lens of realism, there are no unsullied heroes or dastardly villains—only ordinary people who manifest a variety of good and bad attributes, occasionally at the same time. This can be uncomfortable for audiences to sort out, and Shaw later responded to their appetite for more straightforward, warmblooded emotional release with plays like Pygmalion (which was later adapted into the hit musical and film My Fair Lady), Heartbreak House, Major Barbara and Arms and the Man, among many others. However “unpleasant” as the truth about the characters and situations in Widowers’ Houses may be, it offers fascinating insights into the author’s

complex, sometimes contradictory artistic and personal preferences-— traits that lasted throughout his long life (he died in 1950 at the age of 94). It is also to the credit of director Joy Carlin and her superb cast and designers that all of the disparate fragments ultimately come together as an intensely satisfying evening of theater. Shaw’s plot is relatively simple. His erstwhile protagonist, an ingenuous young medical doctor named Harry Trench (sympathetically portrayed by Dan Hoyle) is vacationing in Germany with his older friend Cokane (Michael Gene Sullivan), who acts as a sounding board and occasional counselor. They meet up with a pretentious London property manager named Sartorius (Warren David Keith) and his spirited daughter Blanche (Megan

Trout). Before you can say, “I know what’s coming,” Harry and Blanche fall madly in love and are planning marriage when Harry discovers that Sartorius is actually one of London’s most notorious slumlords, who dispatches his cunning lackey, Lickcheese (Howard Swain) to collect exorbitant rents from tenants who reside in their squalid dwellings. This creates a moral crisis for Harry. Without being aware of how the funds were generated, he has invested the 700 English pounds he receives annually from his father’s estate in Sartorius’ real estate company and uses the income to help him start a medical career. Having been informed that it is “dirty” money, how can he possibly accept the dowry that Blanche and her father are promising? But when he broaches the subject, Blanche angrily breaks off the engagement, explaining that she has no intention of marrying someone who is “crazy” enough to reject Sartorius’ generous offer of the financial assistance needed to sustain her expensive lifestyle. What a conundrum! How it is resolved I won’t reveal, except to say that no one comes out with his or her honor intact. Most commentators whose writings I have consulted, contemporary reviewers included, credit Widowers’ Houses as a powerful indictment of the excesses of contemporary capitalism and the misery it engenders among the poor. They cite it as beginning Shaw’s lifelong mission of defending society’s weaker members against their voracious oppressors. A closer look, however, reveals that on the most important issue that separates liberals from conservatives—having an optimistic or pessimistic view of human nature, and how that determines whether the fortunate are morally bound to help those in need—Shaw was a fence-sitter. Sartorius’ arguments about why the poor will never be eliminated have an uncomfortable ring of truth about them, as does this exchange between the liberal Cokane and the conservative Lickcheese: Cokane: “ … the love of money is the root of all evil.” Lickcheese: “ … and we’d all like to have the tree growing in our garden.” This ambiguity runs through most of Shaw’s work. Widowers’ Houses is a wonderful show. See it.Y NOW PLAYING: Widowers’ Houses runs through March 4 at the Aurora Mainstage Theatre, 2081 Addison St., Berkeley; 519/843-4822; auroratheatre.org.


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MUSIC

Old School

Danny James gets weird in West Marin By Charlie Swanson

B

orn and raised in Oakland, musician and songwriter Danny James has always gone about making old-school music that pushes modern-day boundaries. From his proto-punk origins to his current ’70s-inspired glam-rock project, James’ voice has stood out in the crowded Bay Area scene for his explosive musical presence and energetic arrangement of psychedelic-pop pastiches. James first turned heads locally in the late 1990s as the singer, songwriter and keyboardist for the garage punk band The Cuts. Through a string of well-received albums, The Cuts denounced the bland sheen of the era’s pretentious pop-punk and dialed the clock back to the heyday of acts like the Stooges, erupting onstage with hardworn angst while edging towards New Wave electronic flourishes. After The Cuts disbanded in 2006, James spent several years looking to re-invent his sound, and found an R&B and funk aesthetic inspired by

In director Sebastián Lelio’s film ‘A Fantastic Woman,’ the transgender actress Daniela Vega plays a waitress who is also a nightclub singer.

FILM

Under Pressure ‘A Fantastic Woman’ is sharp By Richard von Busack

Bay Area icons like Sly & the Family Stone. At first, the new project was called Danny James & PEAR, though in 2013, James dropped the fruit from his moniker and titled his debut album PEAR when it was released as a cassette by Burger Records. Recently reissued, PEAR is an epically brazen master class in the last 50 years of rock ’n’ roll. Some songs soar with psyche-rock acidity, others strut with synthesized electro-pop wizardry and still other tracks seem to spin like a disco ball. This week, the ambitious elements will be on display when James performs with his band, featuring members of Oakland’s Once & Future Band, in Point Reyes Station. The show also features songwriter Danny Vitali, along with the talented DJ Sam Swig, who will be spinning vinyl. A percentage of the door sales goes to West Marin community radio station KWMR.Y Danny James, Saturday, Feb. 17, Old Western Saloon, 11202 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes Station; 9pm; $15; 21 and over; 415/663-1661.

T

he subject matter of the Chilean drama A Fantastic Woman is “Almodóvaran.” It’s visually lush like the Spanish director’s work, and yet it’s not as caught up in the world of old Hollywood dramas as Pedro Almodóvar was. The transgender actress Daniela Vega, playing a transitioning woman named Marina, maintains a slow-burning dignity in the face of repeated humiliation. And the reverie-prone director Sebastián Lelio continues to study Vega’s face. She’s fascinating. Vega has a resemblance to Natalie Wood, with large, burning brown eyes, and a firm, melancholy mouth. She’s also a fighter—taking swings at punching bags, and shadow-boxing a bit. In one shot she clings to the safety bars inside a city bus, staring us down like an MMA fighter facing a challenger. Leave it to Lelio (Gloria) to tell what could have been a social justice melodrama from fresh, challenging

and romantic angles. Vega’s Marina, a waitress at a café next to a carnival, is the lover of Orlando (Francisco Reyes), a man who is 30 years older than her. He dies suddenly of an aneurysm. Orlando was a man of some property. His offended family members do their best to punish Marina, whom they consider a freak—“chimera” is the poisonous word that Orlando’s notyet-divorced wife uses. They keep Marina dispossessed and barred from Orlando’s funeral. Meanwhile, a police investigation of Orlando’s death is possibly the handiwork of the family. The color is superb. I’ve never been to Santiago, so I can’t tell if it’s a beautiful city. But in following this wronged woman past the graffitied walls and public fountains, Lelio makes the place ravishing. Even in the Bay Area, where one can usually choose the name one wants, and claim the gender that one’s soul demands, this movie has serious tartness and sharpness.Y

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Danny James, center, known in the late 1990s as a member of the garage punk band The Cuts, will perform with his band this week in Point Reyes Station.


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Movies

• New Movies This Week By Matthew Stafford

• •

Annihilation (R) Black Panther (PG-13)

Friday February 16 - Thursday February 22 • Annihilation (1:55) A group of scientists venture into an environmental disaster zone that’s no walk in the woods; Jennifer Jason Leigh, Natalie Portman and Tessa Thompson star. • Black Panther (2:14) Chadwick Boseman stars as the African superhero in a comic-book movie with an actual beating heart. • La Boda de Valentina (1:47) An expat Mexican woman’s tidy Manhattan existence is upended when her wealthy, scandal-ridden family arrives on the scene, ex-bf in tow. • Coco (1:49) Colorful Disney/Pixar cartoon about a Mexican musician’s adventures in the Land of the Dead; Gael Garcia Bernal, Benjamin Bratt and Edward James Olmos provide the vocals. • Comedie Francaise: The Misanthrope (3:00) Moliere’s acerbic comedy of manners gets a 21st century update from Paris’ renowned theatrical troupe. • Early Man (1:29) Nick Park cartoon about those good old caveman-anddinosaur days; Eddie Redmayne and Tom Hiddleston lend voice. • Every Day (1:35) Romantic fantasy about a teenage girl’s affair with a mysterious fellow who inhabits a different bod every day. • Faces Places (1:29) Documentary follows legendary filmmaker Agnès Varda and acclaimed muralist JR as they travel the French countryside, creating enormous portraits of the locals and posting them on barns and factories. • A Fantastic Woman (1:44) Acclaimed Chilean portrait of a transgender singer in love with an older man from a conservative family. • The 15:17 to Paris (1:34) Real-life thriller about the three Americans who thwarted a 2015 terrorist attack; Clint Eastwood stars. • Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool (1:45) Annette Bening stars as aging movie icon Gloria Grahame in the true story of her torrid affair with a young English writer. • The Florida Project (1:55) Acclaimed drama juxtaposes the fanciful fantasy world of children against the harsh reality of being a disenfranchised adult in blue-collar America. • Game Night (1:40) Comedy thriller about a couples game night gone awry in a murder-and-espionage sort of way; Rachel McAdams stars. • Hostiles (2:15) Epic Western follows cavalryman Christian Bale, aging warrior Wes Studi and widow woman Rosamund Pike on a perilous journey from New Mexico to Montana. • In Between (1:43) Israeli drama about two liberated Palestinian women living la dolce vita in Tel Aviv and the devout Muslim student who moves in with them. • The Insult (1:52) Acclaimed Lebanese drama about a personal conflict between a Muslim and a Christian that escalates into a social-media lynch mob. • Is Genesis History? (2:00) Faith-based

look at Adam & Eve, evolution, dinosaurs and other complex topics. • Jane (1:30) Documentary examines the life and work of legendary anthropologistenvironmentalist Jane Goodall through never-before-seen National Geographic footage; music by Philip Glass. • Lady Bird (1:33) Greta Gerwig’s breakout comedy stars Laurie Metcalf and Saoirse Ronan as a blue-collar mother and daughter bonding in circa-2002 Sacramento. • A Matter of Life and Death (1:44) Dazzlingly inventive Powell & Pressburger fantasy about an RAF pilot living on borrowed time; David Niven, Kim Hunter and Jack Cardiff ’s Technicolor cinematography star. • Maze Runner: The Death Cure (1:54) The saga concludes with Thomas and company breaking into a deadly labyrinth to rescue their fellow gladers. • National Theatre London: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (3:05) Direct from the West End it’s Tennessee Williams’ torrid tale of secrets and lies in midcentury Mississippi; Sienna Miller stars as Maggie the Cat. • New York Dog & Cat Film Festival Fido and Fluffy star in canine- and feline-centric animated, documentary and narrative short films from around the world. • Oscar-Nominated Animated Shorts Catch five cartoons from around the world up for this year’s Academy Awards. • Oscar-Nominated Documentary Shorts Program of five minimalist documentaries on a wide range of subjects with one thing in common: a shot at Academy bling. • Oscar-Nominated Live-Action Shorts The Academy’s picks for the year’s top five live-action short subjects screen at the Rafael this week. • Peter Rabbit (1:34) Beatrix Potter’s gentle bunny reborn as a wiseass rodent on a grudge spree against Mr. McGregor. • Phantom Thread (2:10) Exquisitely crafted Paul Thomas Anderson period drama about a 1950s London couturier and the women/woman who inspire him; Daniel Day-Lewis stars. • The Philadelphia Story (2:00) Katharine Hepburn stars as a haughty socialite torn between her disreputable ex, a cocky newspaperman and the doofus she’s supposed to marry tomorrow; Cary Grant and James Stewart co-star. • Rigoletto (2:45) The Royal Opera presents Verdi’s classic tale of a randy duke and his cursed, hunchbacked jester. • Rumi: Poet of the Heart (1:00) Celebration of the 13th century Persian mystic and romantic poet features tributes from Robert Bly, Deepak Chopra and other devotees. • Samson (1:56) Biblical epic about the devout strongman and his battle with the Philistines; Caitlin Leahy is Delilah. • The Shape of Water (1:59) Otherworldly Guillermo del Toro fairy tale about forbidden secrets, sexual longing and the Cold War; Sally Hawkins stars.

La Boda de Valentina (R) Call Me by Your Name (R) Coco (PG) • Comedie Francaise: The Misanthrope (Not Rated) Darkest Hour (PG-13)

Early Man (PG)

Every Day (PG-13) Faces Places (PG) • A Fantastic Woman (R)

The 15:17 to Paris (PG-13)

Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool (R) The Florida Project (R) • Game Night (R) The Greatest Showman (PG) Hostiles (R) • In Between (Not Rated) The Insult (R) • Is Genesis History? (Not Rated) Jane (PG) Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (PG-13) Lady Bird (R)

A Matter of Life and Death (PG) Maze Runner: The Death Cure (PG-13) • National Theatre London: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (R) • New York Dog & Cat Film Festival (Not Rated) Oscar-Nominated Animated Shorts (Not Rated) Oscar-Nominated Documentary Shorts (Not Rated) Oscar-Nominated Live-Action Shorts (Not Rated) • Peter Rabbit (PG) Phantom Thread (R)

The Philadelphia Story (PG) The Post (PG-13)

• • •

Rigoletto (Not Rated) Rumi: Poet of the Heart (Not Rated) Samson (PG-13) The Shape of Water (R)

Northgate: Thu 7:10, 9:55 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:45; Sun-Thu 12:40, 3:40, 6:40 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:45, 12:35, 1:25, 3:05, 3:55, 6:25, 7:15, 9:45, 10:30; 3D showtimes at 10:55, 2:15, 4:45, 5:35, 8:10, 8:55 Playhouse: Fri 3:30, 6:45, 9:45; Sat 12, 3:30, 6:45, 9:45; Sun 12, 3:30, 6:45; Mon-Thu 3:30, 6:45 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10, 12, 1:10, 3:10, 4:20, 6:20, 7:30, 9:30, 10:35; 3D showtimes at 11, 2:10, 5:10, 8:15 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:40, 2:20, 4:55, 7:40, 10:15 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 6:30, 9:35; Sat-Sun 12:20, 3:20, 6:30, 9:35 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:15, 1:55 Lark: Sat 1 Lark: Fri 9; Sat 6:30; Sun 9; Tue 11; Wed 1:30; Thu 4:30 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:30, 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 10:15; Sun 10:30, 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 9:45; Mon-Thu 10:30, 1:25, 4:25, 7:20 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:15, 2:35, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:45, 1:50, 4:30, 7:15, 10 Northgate: Thu 7, 9:30 Lark: Fri 12:20; Mon 7; Tue 6 Rafael: Fri, Wed-Thu 4:15, 6:30, 8:45; Sat-Mon 2, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45; Tue 6:30, 8:45 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:40, 3, 5:25, 7:55, 10:15 Rowland: FriWed 11:30, 2, 4:40, 7, 9:45 Sequoia: Fri, Mon-Wed 6:55; Sat-Sun 1:50, 6:55 Lark: Fri 4:10; Wed 8:30 Northgate: Thu 7:05, 9:40 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 7:50, 10:25 Northgate: Fri-Wed 4:25, 7:25 Rafael: Fri, Wed-Thu 3:45, 8:30; Sat 1:30, 8:45; Sun 8:45; Mon 1:30, 8:30; Tue 8:30 Rafael: Fri, Tue-Thu 6; Sat-Sun 6:15; Mon 3:45, 6 Playhouse: Thu 7 Lark: Fri 10:39; Mon 5; Tue 1:30 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:05, 1:50, 4:40, 7:35, 10:20 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:20, 2:20, 5, 7:45, 10:30 Lark: Fri 2:10; Sat 4:25; Sun 7; Thu noon Regency: Fri-Sun 11:15, 1:40, 4, 6:45, 9:15; Mon-Thu 11:15, 1:40, 4, 6:45 Rafael: Sun 4:15 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:25, 3:40, 7, 10:10 Lark: Thu 7:30 Regency: Thu 7 Lark: Cat Film Fest Sun 1, 3; Dog Film Fest Mon 1, 3 Rafael: Fri, Tue-Thu 6:15; Sat-Mon 12, 6:15 Rafael: Sat-Mon 12:15 Rafael: Fri-Mon, Wed-Thu 4, 8:15; Tue 8:15 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 9:55 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:10, 1:40, 4:10, 6:45, 9:15 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:15, 1:15, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; Sun 10:15, 1:15, 4:10, 7:10, 10:05; Mon-Thu 10:15, 1:15, 4:10, 7:10 Regency: Sun, Wed 2, 7 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 7:10, 9:55; Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55 Rafael: Sun noon Rafael: Sat 4:15 (filmmaker Haydn Reiss in person) Northgate: Fri-Wed 11, 1:45, 4:35, 7:20, 10 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 6:50, 9:45; Sat-Sun 1, 3:50, 6:50, 9:45 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:40, 1:35, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20; Sun 10:40am, 10:10pm; Mon-Tue 10:40, 1:35, 4:40, 7:30; Wed 10:40am; Thu 10:40, 1:35

Because there were too many movies playing this week to list, we have omitted some of the movie summaries and times for those that have been playing for multiple weeks. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Showtimes can change after we go to press. Please call theater to confirm. Cinema 41 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera, 924-6505 Fairfax 9 Broadway, Fairfax, 453-5444 Lark 549 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur, 924-5111 Larkspur Landing 500 Larkspur Landing Cir., Larkspur, 461-4849 Playhouse 40 Main St., Tiburon, 435-1234 Rafael Film Center 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael, 454-1222 Rowland 44 Rowland Way, Novato, 800-326-3264


Q:

I’m a 33-year-old woman. Though I don’t want a boyfriend right now, I have a strong sex drive and don’t want to go without sex. I’ve tried the hookup apps, but besides finding sleeping with strangers sexually unsatisfying, I’m always a little surprised at how emotionally empty I end up feeling. (It’s not like I want any of these guys to be a boyfriend.)—Hungry

A:

It’s possible for a woman to have an orgasm from hookup sex—just as it’s possible to spot a white rhino grazing on a roadway median in suburban Detroit. The reality is, hookups tend to work best if you are a man or a trailer. Research by sociologist Elizabeth A. Armstrong and her colleagues finds that for women, hookup sex is particularly problematic in the orgasm-dispensing department. In first-time hookups, women they surveyed reported orgasms only 11 percent of the time—compared with 67 percent of the time from sex in a relationship. However, the more times a woman had slept with her current hookup partner, the more likely she was to finish with screams of ecstasy—and not the ones that stand in for, “You ’bout done yet?” As for why you feel crappy after your latest Captain Hookup shinnies down the drainpipe, I’ve written before about how female emotions seem to have evolved to act as an alarm system against deficient male “investment.” They push women to crave emotional connection after sex—even when they went into it wanting nothing more than a little sexercise with some himbo. There’s support for this notion. An analysis of findings from 24 brain imaging studies led psychiatrist Timm Poeppl and his colleagues to conclude that “sexual stimulation seems to activate key regions for emotional attachment and pair bonding more consistently in women than in men.” So, it isn’t exactly bizarre that you, as a woman, find hooking up with a stranger about as emotionally and sexually satisfying as a fist bump. This doesn’t mean that you have to rush a boyfriend into your life to have sex. You can eliminate some of the problems of hookup sex by finding a regular sex-quaintance— ideally, a guy friend who’s sweet and attractive but who falls steeply short of the qualifications you have for a romantic partner. This is somebody you can gradually show around your body and train in the magic trick it takes for you to have an orgasm—as opposed to some single-serving Romeo who approaches your body like a burglar in a pitch-black china shop. And, finally, having at least friendly affection for somebody you sleep with should mean that sex leaves you feeling, if not loved, well, less like a rental car somebody just dropped off.

Q:

I’m a 30-year-old gay guy. I was laid off, and I’m freelancing crazy hours to try to pay my rent and bills. My best friend’s birthday was this past weekend, and I did what I could timewise (and put a modest gift on my credit card), but he’s totally bent out of shape because he feels like I neglected him. He equates the attention you pay to his birthday with how much you care, which is so ridiculous.—Feeling Bad

A:

What kind of friend are you that you couldn’t, say, sell a kidney on the black market and buy the guy a proper gift? Yes, it seems that you prioritized frivolities such as paying rent and keeping the lights on. Of course, putting your financial survival first doesn’t mean that you’re a bad friend. The, uh, brat of honor probably just sees it that way because of what psychologists call “attribution bias.” This describes how we tend to be charitable in explaining our own errors and failings—excusing them as situational (the result of something that’s happened to us)—while attributing others’ to the sort of people they are (compassionless, birthday-hating monsters). Have a sit-down with your friend and explain that you care deeply about him. Emphasize that it was a lack of time and funding, not a lack of feeling, that kept you from, say, renting a bouncy house on his special day. Recognize that there’s probably some woundy place in him that makes him this way, basically expecting his birthday to be treated like some major national holiday. OK, maybe the guy’s first name is Martin. Chances are, the two that follow aren’t “Luther” and “King.”Y Worship the goddess—or sacrifice her at the altar at adviceamy@aol.com.

Degree

By Amy Alkon

M.A. Film Studies Choose your path. Creative project, or masters thesis? Follow the path that means the most to you while getting the basics from both sides. Info Session Sunday, February 25 3:30 - 4:15 p.m. Ives Hall 101, SSU sonoma.edu/exed/film 707.664.3977 beth.warner@sonoma.edu

We’re looking for you. The Pacific Sun newspaper is looking for a candidate to join our close-knit team of dedicated, self-motivated sales people. The right person for the job is professional, friendly, outgoing, comfortable with both written and verbal communication, has a positive attitude and excellent customer service skills. You will be responsible for soliciting new business. Reliable transportation required. Must be fluent in digital media. A minimum of two years sales experience is necessary. The Pacific Sun newspaper offers full benefits. Please email your resume to Publisher@PacificSun.com.

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Advice Goddess

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Sundial Concerts

L’Appart Resto Feb 15, Todos Santos. 636 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.256.9884.

MARIN COUNTY

19 Broadway Club Feb 14, One Dollar Check with Honey B & the Cultivation. Feb 15, Ballard Brothers. Feb 16, Don Gallardo with the Battlefield. Feb 17, Niki J Crawford with Stymie & the PJLO. Feb 18, Sara Rodenburg and Amy Obenski. Feb 19, open mic. Feb 20, Late for the Train. Feb 21, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

The Blasters Composed of founding vocalist-guitarist Phil Alvin, drummer Bill Bateman and bassist John Bazz with Keith Wyatt on guitar, the veteran band still rips with a hard-won edge. Feb 17, 8pm. $20. HopMonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Bomsori Kim & Drew Petersen Mill Valley Chamber Music Society presents the only Bay Area concert performance from the violinist and pianist, both considered rising stars of classical music. Feb 18, 5pm. $35. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley. 415.381.4453. Danny James Enigmatic Oakland electro-pop auteur makes his way to West Marin for a show with support from Danny Vitali and DJ Sam Swig. Feb 17, 9pm. $15. Old Western Saloon, 11201 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

Clubs & Venues MARIN The Belrose Thurs, open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422. Community Acupuncture Marin Feb 17, 7pm, Community Drum Circle with Sahar. 7075 Redwood Blvd, Suite H, Novato. 415.250.4009. Fenix Feb 14, Valentine’s Day show with Top Shelf. Feb 15, Jeff Oster. Feb 16, Brown, Sturgis and Brown. Feb 17, Pilar. Feb 18, Greg Johnson & Glass Brick Boulevard. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600. George’s Nightclub Feb 17, DJ Party. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262. HopMonk Novato Wed, open mic. Feb 15, Fistful of Scandal with Jonesy and Harmonic Law. Feb 16, Brickhouse. Feb 18, Laura Love. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Feb 14, Jazzitude. Feb 21, Savannah Blu. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon Feb 15, Ed Masuga and Rainy Eyes. Feb 16, Marty O’Reilly. Feb 17, Highway Poets. Feb 18, the Crushing Spiral Ensemble. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311. Sweetwater Music Hall Feb 14, 8pm, Valentine’s Day show with Tony Lindsay and Jimmy Dillon. Feb 15, Bill Frisell and Thomas Morgan. Feb 16-17, Monophonics. Feb 18, We Banjo 3. Feb 18, noon, Roger McNamee solo acoustic. Feb 19, Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

No Name Bar Feb 15, Michael LaMacchia Band. Feb 16, Michael Aragon Quartet. Feb 17, Fuzzy Slippers. Feb 18, Migrant Pickers. Feb 19, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Feb 20, open mic. Feb 21, Something About Fireflies. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Terrapin Crossroads Feb 14, “Classic Country Love Songs” with Scott Law and friends. Feb 15, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Feb 17, Scott Law and friends. Feb 20, Colonel & the Mermaids. Feb 21, Koolerator. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Osteria Divino Feb 14, Sulkary Valverde. Feb 15, Nathan Swedlow Trio. Feb 16, Ken Cook Trio. Feb 17, David Jeffrey’s Jazz Fourtet. Feb 18, Parker Grant Trio. Feb 20, Michael Fecskes. Feb 21, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Throckmorton Theatre Feb 18, 5pm, Sunday Sessions Songwriter’s Circle. Feb 21, noon, Temescal String Quartet. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Feb 15, Deborah Winters. Feb 20, Wanda Stafford. Feb 21, Audrey Moira Shimkas. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993. Papermill Creek Saloon Feb 14, Judy Radiloff. Feb 16, 5pm, Sebastian Saint James. Feb 16, 9pm, OMEN. Feb 17, Caleb Ford. Feb 18, Papermill Gang. Feb 20, open mic. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235. Peri’s Silver Dollar Feb 15, Tom Finch Trio. Feb 16, Koolerator. Feb 17, the Crooked Stuff. Feb 18, Grateful Sundays. Feb 19, open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910. Rancho Nicasio Feb 14, Le Jazz Hot. Feb 16-17, Petty Theft. Feb 18, 4pm, Lorin Rowan’s Caribbean Blue. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219. Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar Feb 14, Lady D. Feb 20, SwingSet. Feb 21, Tracy Rose Trio. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477. Sausalito Seahorse Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Feb 15, Toque Tercero flamenco night. Feb 16, Reed Fromer Band. Feb 17, Freddy Clarke & Wobbly World. Feb 18, 4pm, Mazacote with Louie Romero. Feb 20, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Trek Winery Feb 17, Domestic Harmony. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

SONOMA Green Music Center Schroeder Hall Feb 17, Sonoma Bach Organ Recital. Feb 18, 2pm, Navarro Trio. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040. Green Music Center Weill Hall Feb 16, Los Angeles Guitar Quartet. Feb 17, Peter Yarrow and Noel Paul Stookey. Feb 18, 3pm, Dorothea Röschmann and Malcolm Martineau. Feb 21, United States Navy Concert Band. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts Feb 15, Johnny Mathis. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall Feb 15, Josh Heinrichs. Feb 16, the Reverend Shawn Amos. Feb 17, Wonder Bread 5. Feb 18, Igor & the Red Elvises. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048. Occidental Center for the Arts Feb 17, 7pm, Cajun Mardi Gras dance party with Suzy Thompson & Aux Cajunals. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

NAPA Blue Note Napa Feb 14, “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” with Kellie Fuller and friends. Feb 16-17, Lee

CALENDAR Ritenour. Feb 20, Three on a Match. Feb 21, “Four and More” with Mike Clark and friends. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Art OPENING MARIN Marin Center Exhibit Hall Feb 17-18, “The American Indian Art Show,” showing and selling antique and contemporary Native American art works. Reception, Feb 17 at 9am. $18-$35. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6400.

SONOMA Agrella Art Gallery Feb 20-Mar 15, “The Farthest Shore,” six prominent women printmaking artists are featured in an immersive installation. Reception, Feb 22 at 4pm. SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.527.4298. La Crema Tasting Room Feb 16-Mar 31, “The Flowing World,” exhibit features wine country-inspired landscape paintings in oil by Sonoma County artist Clay Vajgrt. Reception, Feb 16 at 4pm. 235 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Daily, 10:30 to 5:30. 707.431.9400.

CONTINUING THIS WEEK MARIN Art Works Downtown Through Mar 6, “Journeys of Renewal,” professional photographer Cindy Pavlinac presents contemplative shots taken at sites of ancient wisdom and community in the Underground Gallery. Through Feb 23, “Color Emotion,” artwork that uses color to evoke, express or contemplate emotion exhibits in the 1337 Gallery. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119. Bank of Marin Through Mar 18, “Unchained Artists,” thought-provoking show features artwork, poetry and handcrafted objects created by inmates in prisons from around the US and prisoners incarcerated on death row at San Quentin State Prison. 19 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. Mon-Fri, 10 to 6. 415.380.4665.


Corte Madera Library Through Mar 22, “Pauline Ivancovich Teller: An Artist’s Journey,” works from 1934 to 2008 represent the career of the noted Marin artist. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444. Gallery Route One Through Feb 25, “Road Maps,” Gallery Route One’s 33rd annual group show is juried by San Francisco art writer and curator DeWitt Cheng. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347. Marin Art & Garden Center Through Feb 25, “Presidio Tunnel Tops,” exhibition traces landscape architect Michael Painter’s Presidio Parkway, a nearly complete parkland that will reconnect the Presidio’s waterfront to its historic core. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260. Marin Community Foundation Through May 18, “Bond,” exhibit features art from three Bay Area couples, six individual artists, displayed side-by-side with their partners. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. Marin Society of Artists Through Mar 3, “The Winter Show,” MSA member artists present works of all styles, ideas and visions in this unjuried exhibition. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. WedSun, Noon to 4. 415.464.9561. MarinMOCA Through Feb 25, “InnerScapes” get a glimpse into several artists’ subconscious in this revealing show. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. WedFri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Feb 22, “Flowers,” conceptual artist Eun Lee takes on the f loral subject. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331. Robert Allen Fine Art Through Mar 30, “Works on Paper,” group exhibit features drawings and mixed-media works by Susan Adame, Tracey Adams, Aleah Koury, Victoria Ryan and others. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800. Seager Gray Gallery Through Feb 28, “Claudia Marseille: Urban Markings,” artist addresses urbanization and globalization in her raw, multicolored collages. 108 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288. Toby’s Feed Barn Through Feb 28, “Unseen Point Reyes,” Richard Blair and Kathleen Goodwin exhibit photographs and paintings of West Marin’s most picturesque places off the beaten trails. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Mon-Sat, 9 to 5; Sun, 9:30 to 4. 415.663.1223.

Comedy Tuesday Night Live See standup comedians Bob Dubac, Brian Copeland, Carrie Snow, Grant Lyon and others. Feb 20, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dance Alma del Tango Studio Tuesdays, Lindy Hop & East Coast Swing Dance. Wednesdays, Tango 1 & 2. 167 Tunstead Ave, San Anselmo. 415.459.8966. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater Feb 17, 7pm, “Sleeping Beauty,” production includes more than 30 distinguished dancers from the nationally acclaimed Atlantic City Ballet. $40-$55. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Events Chinese New Year Open House at Apricot Forest Acupuncture Stop by for refreshments, mooncake, gift certificates and information on acupuncture. Feb 16, 4pm. Apricot Forest Acupuncture, 244 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 510.927.8480. Love Out Loud at Marin Country Mart Evening includes dancing, dinner, cocktails, poetry readings and romance. Feb 14, 7pm. $25. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

Field Trips Bird Walk at Hudeman Slough Walk out on the levees surrounding ponds to view waterbirds, hawks and more. Meet at the Sonoma County Water Agency property on the northern edge of the NapaSonoma Marshes. Feb 17, 8:30am. Hudeman Slough, 25687 Ramal Rd, Sonoma. 707.583.3115. Hiking & History at Healdsburg Ridge Join author and Healdsburg Literary Guild president Ted Calvert for an informative hike. Feb 20, 10am. Healdsburg Ridge, Arabian Way, Healdsburg. Laguna Watershed Perspectives Experience a leisurely walk through Taylor Mountain Regional Park with Laguna Foundation staff. Pre-registration required. Feb 18, 9am. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277. Landscape in Transition Habitat restoration day is open to families Feb 17, 9am. Lake Lagunitas, Sky Oaks Rd, Fairfax. marinwater.org. Pug Sundays A gathering of pugs, pug owners and pug lovers. Third Sun of every month, 9am. Mill Valley Dog Park, Bayfront Park, Mill Valley. Wednesday Wellness Walks Join a healing walk through the redwoods. Wed, 10am. Armstrong Redwoods State

Natural Reserve, 17000 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. stewardscr.org.

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Film CinemaBites See the new film, “Soul,” about different ways of understanding cuisine, and enjoy food from Napa’s chef Curtis de Fede of Miminashi. Feb 19, 5pm. $45. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779. David Hockney at the Royal Academy of Arts Exhibition on Screen Series screens the documentary on the popular British artist with in-depth and intimate interviews. Tues, Feb 20, 1pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840. The Insult Alexander Valley Film Society screens the 2018 Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film from Lebanon. Feb 19, 7pm. Clover Theater, 121 East First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.6347. Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story The City of Novato and event partners Sustainable Novato, ExtraFood and Recology present the second film in the 2018 Green Film Series. Feb 15, 6:30pm. Novato City Hall, 901 Sherman Ave, Novato. 415.899.8900. Let’s Talk About Death Nonprofit Final Passages continues its monthly series with the Albert Brooks comedy “Defending Your Life” followed by a discussion. Feb 14, 6:30pm. $5-$15. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. A Matter of Life & Death Originally released in the US as “Stairway to Heaven,” this newly restored 1946 British romantic fantasy gets a special Valentine’s Day screening. Feb 14, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222. NY Dog & Cat Film Festival Fundraiser for Marin Humane celebrates the bonds between people and their pets in short films, both documentary and narrative. Feb 18-19, 1pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111. Petaluma Cinema Series Petaluma Film Alliance presents significant classic and modern films with guests, lectures and discussions. This week, Oscarnominated indie hit “Lady Bird” screens. Feb 21, 6pm. $6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. petalumafilmalliance.org. Silver Scream Festival Wine Country’s premiere horror and sci-fi film event boasts a lineup of independent features, short films and special screenings with celebrity guests and special VIP events. Feb 16-18. $29 and up. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

Food & Drink Off the Grid Food Trucks Eat your way through the largest

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Wed 2⁄14 • Doors 7:30 ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages Tony Lindsay (Santana)

& Jimmy Dillon Love Songs (seated)

MONOPHONICS TWO DAY PASS $50 Fri 2⁄16 & Sat 2⁄17 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $30–$35 All Ages

Monophonics

Fri + The Grease Traps Sat + The M-Tet Sun 2⁄18 • Doors 11:30am ⁄ FREE • All Ages

FREE Show with

Roger McNamee

of Moonalice (solo) Sun 2⁄18 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22 • All Ages

We Banjo 3 + Ismay

Mon 2⁄19 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $38–$44 • 21+

Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra Thu 2⁄22 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages

Beatles vs. Stones

A Musical Showdown Fri 2⁄23 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25 • All Ages Melvin Seals with the China Cats

+ David Gans

Sat 2⁄24 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $19–$22 • All Ages

Noah Gundersen + Aaron Gillespie www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

Petty Theft Weekend Fri Feb 16 & Sat Feb 17

Sun

Feb 18

Lorin Rowan’s Caribbean Blue

Ken Emerson, Eric McCann, Matt Willis 4:00 / No Cover

Jaffe Feb 23 Matt “Unplugged” 8:00 / No Cover Fri

Smith’s Feb 24 Lavay “Speakeasy Supper Club” Sat

Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30

Jones Gang Feb 25 The High Octane Americana 4:00 Sun

CoMiNG iN MaRCH

Tommy Castro Weekend Fri Mar 2 & Sat Mar 3

Steve Lucky and the Rhumba Bums Mar 17 Jerry Hannan Band Mar 24 Shana Morrison Mar 31 Tom Rigney & Flambeau Mar 10

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

PA CI FI C S U N | FEB R U A RY 1 4 - 2 0 , 2 0 1 8 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

Book Passage Through Nov 30, “Tom Killion Residency,” acclaimed Marin artist returns to Book Passage’s gallery for a year-long exhibition of his original prints and handcrafted books. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. Daily, 9am to 9pm. 415.927.0960.


Keeping The Living Music Alive February 16 • Fri • 8pm Freight & Salvage, Berkeley

Jai Uttal “Valentine’s Day Concert”

with José Neto, Prajna Vieira, Ben Leinbach & others Feb 15 • Thu • 8pm • Fenix Supper Club, San Rafael

Jeff Oster “Live with All-Star Band” w/ Todd Boston Michael Manring, Frank Martin, Celso Alberti, Jeff Tabuloff Mar 11 • Sun • 7pm • Unity in Marin, Novato

Jami Sieber & Kim Rosen “Only Breath” Merging Poetry and Stunning World-beat Music Mar 25 • Sun • 7pm • Unity in Marin, Novato

Adey Bell “Silver Wheel CD Release Concert”

An Intimate Evening with the “Shadow Shaman” Apr 1 • Sun • 7pm • Unity in Marin, Novato Peter Kater feat Peia “She” CD Release Concert Apr 8 • Sun • 7pm • Showcase Theater at Marin Center

R. Carlos Nakai Quintet “Live in Concert” Apr 14 • Sat • 8pm • Showcase Theater at Marin Center

Nina Wise and Vinny Ferraro “Wild Wisdom: SOUL-O”

Fresh Take on Universal Truths: improv & Dharma talk May 12 • Sat • 7:30pm • Marin Center Auditorium

Deva Premal/ Miten w/Manose “Soul of Mantra Tour—Live” in Marin May 25 • Fri • 8pm • Unity in Marin, Novato

Ma Muse “Prayers for Peace” CD Release Concert All Ages • 415.924.4848 • lloydbarde.com

gathering of mobile food trucks in Marin, listen to live music and take in great views. Sun, 11am. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700. Valentine’s Day at Left Bank Offering brunch, lunch and dinner menus plus à la carte dinner specials in the spirit of the occasion. Feb 14. $65. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Lectures Dynamic Emergence Personal dowsing event includes live music and a brief guided meditation. Feb 17, 2pm. Town Center Corte Madera, 770 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.897.4011. The Economics & Psychology of Sexual Harassment & Assault Praxis Peace Institute hosts a talk that explores the cultural patterns that have made such behavior acceptable in certain circles, and addresses how to deal with this abuse of power. Feb 15, 7pm. $10-$20. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. praxispeace.org. Expressive Arts for Self-Care Session provides education and supports cancer survivors’ need to renew the body, mind and spirit after treatment. Feb 20, 11:30am. Marin General Hospital, 250 Bon Air Rd, Greenbrae. 415.925.7000. Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous Twelve-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. Sat, 8am. All Saints Lutheran Church, 2 San Marin Dr, Novato. 781.932.6300. Gardening for Butterflies Learn how to attract butterflies to your garden. Feb 14, 7pm. $5. Hamilton Community Center, 503 B South Palm Dr, Novato.

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EVERY WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC NIGHT WITH DENNIS HANEDA THU 2/15 $10 7PM DOORS / 7:30PM SHOW 21+

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AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! SAT 2/17 $20 7PM DOORS / 8PM SHOW

THE BLASTERS

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+ THE STRING RAYS SUN 2/18 $20 7PM DOORS / 8PM SHOW

LAURA LOVE

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TUESDAY TRIVIA

THU 2/22 $10 6PM DOORS / 7PM LESSON ALL AGES

COUNTRY LINE DANCING WITH DJ JEFFREY GOODWIN EVERY 2ND & 4TH THURSDAY!

FRI 2/23 $15 8PM DOORS / 9PM SHOW 21+

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AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! Book your next event with us. Up to 150ppl. Email kim@hopmonk.com

HOPMONK.COM | 415 892 6200

Art

Meal Plan Your Heart Out “Lunch-n-Learn” series serves up information to help manage diabetes. Feb 14, 11:30am. Marin General Hospital, 250 Bon Air Rd, Greenbrae. 415.925.7000. Michelle Slatalla The former “New York Times”-style columnist speaks on creating outdoor living spaces. Feb 15, 1pm. Free. Outdoor Art Club, 1 W Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2582. Refuge Recovery Join a Buddhist-based recovery group. Sat, 9:30am. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009. Sausalito Woman’s Club Scholarship Recognition Fund Applications Permanent residents living in the Sausalito or Marin City School District planning to initiate or continue education at an accredited college, graduate school, vocational or art school are eligible to apply. Through Mar 1. Sausalito Woman’s Club, 120 Central Ave, Sausalito, swcsrf.org/ applications. Southern Marin Toastmasters Improve your public speaking skills at the weekly meeting. Wed, 6:45pm. Free. Larkspur Recreation, 240 Doherty Dr, Larkspur, eloquent.toastmastersclubs.org.

More than 100 dealers and artists will display their work at the 34th annual American Indian Art Show, February 17-18, at the Marin Civic Center in San Rafael.

Spiritual Healing Weekly meeting covers various topics, with meditation and individual healing treatment. Fri, 7pm. Spiritist Society Towards the Light, 1 Simms St, San Rafael. 707.225.5762. Sunlight Chair Yoga Learn yoga at all ages and levels of health and mobility. Wed, 12:15pm. BodyVibe Studio, 999 Andersen Dr, Ste 170, San Rafael. 415.689.6428. Want to Self-Publish? David Kudler and Ruth Schwartz of the Bay Area Independent Publishers Association offer a wealth of practical advice. Feb 20, 7pm. Corte Madera Library. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Readings

Falkirk Cultural Center Feb 15, 7:30pm, Marin Poetry Center’s Third Thursday, featuring poets John Murillo and Nicole Sealey. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Feb 16, 7pm, “Raising Healthy Parents” with Sid Garza-Hillman. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Theater Cow Pie Bingo Award-winning playwright Larissa FastHorse’s drama about four socially awkward humans and a cow navigating an increasingly immoral world while staying true to a moral compass, makes its world premiere. Through Feb 18. AlterTheater Storefront, 1344 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.2787.

Book Passage Feb 15, 7pm, “In Full Flight” with John Heminway. Feb 17, 11am, “The Chinese Emperor’s New Clothes” with Ying Compestine. Feb 17, 4pm, “Conversations with Mary” with Anna Raimondi. Feb 18, 1pm, “Welcome to Kimmensville” with Lisa Church. Feb 18, 4pm, “Nom de Guerre: Ivan” with Quentin Guerlain. Feb 20, 7pm, “Without Precedent” with Joel Paul. Feb 21, 7pm, “Poison” with John Lescroart. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Death of a Salesman Playwright Arthur Miller’s drama about an aging salesman and his family is a tense examination of the American Dream. Through Feb 18. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Book Passage By-the-Bay Feb 15, 6pm, “It Happened in Marin” with Jim Holden. Feb 17, 4pm, “Earthbound: David Bowie & the Man Who Fell to Earth” with Susan Compo. Feb 20, 6pm, “The Plea” with Steve Cavanagh. 100 Bay St, Sausalito. 415.339.1300.

Skeleton Crew The third of Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit cycle trilogy is a tense drama about an auto plant at the start of the Great Recession. Through Feb 18. $10-$37. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Richard II Birdbath Theatre presents William Shakespeare’s epic. Through Feb 18. $20-$24. Key Tea, 921 C St, San Rafael. 415.426.0269.

Courtesy of American Indian Art Show

PACI FI C SUN | FEB R U A RY 1 4 - 2 0 , 2 0 1 8 | PA CI FI CS U N. COM

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Seminars&Workshops To include your seminar or workshop, call 415.485.6700.

SINGLES WANTED! Single & Dissatisfied? Tired of spending weekends and holidays alone? Join with other singles to explore what’s blocking you from fulfillment in your relationships. NINE-WEEK SINGLE’S GROUP. Advance sign-up required; space limited. Groups starting 2/19/18. Also offering: ongoing coed (emotional) INTIMACY GROUPS (married/partnered or single), WOMEN’S GROUP and INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY & COUPLES THERAPY. Central San Rafael. Possible financial assistance (health/flex savings accounts or insurance). Call (415) 453-8117 or email reneeowen@sbcglobal.net for more information. Renée Owen, LMFT#35255. https://therapists.psychologytoday.com GROUP FOR FORMER MEMBERS OF HIGH DEMAND GROUPS OR “CULTS”, “spiritual,” “religious,” “philosophical,” “Eastern,” “Coaching/Improvement,” etc. Safety and trust in discussing experiences and coercive influence in groups and families with leaders who claim special status and who use unethical, manipulative methods to recruit and indoctrinate with increasing demands on personal lives. Facilitated and developed by Colleen Russell, LMFT, CGP, since 2003. GROUP FOR MOTHERLESS DAUGHTERS, women who have lost their mothers through death, illness, separation, or estrangement in childhood, adolescence or adulthood. A safe place to grieve and to explore many influences of mother loss in relationships, parenting, individual goals, trust, etc. Facilitated and developed by Colleen Russell, LMFT, GCP, since 1997. Kentfield. Individual, Couple, Family & Group Therapy. 415-785-3513; crussell@ colleenrussellmft.com, http://www.colleenrussellmft.com. “Launch Your Millennial” a workshop to share information on jobs, education, and mentorships that will lead Millennials to success. Come find out how you can launch your Millennial into new opportunities. We have helped hundreds of young people. Both parents & Millennials welcome. Thursday, February 22, 6pm - 7pm at VenturePad, 1020 B St, San Rafael. Wine, soft drinks, and appetizers will be served. $20 for one person,$25 for 2. Text or phone Mary Ann Maggiore, at tel: 415-577-6627 or maggiore@five4five.org. Check us out @ www.launch.five4five.org. Open House with Pema Chodron. Please join our meditation group Tamalpais Shambhala as we watch an hour of Buddhist nun, author, speaker Pema Chodron share on topics such as loving-kindness, compassion, loss, and impermanence. We meditate, watch a DVD, and discuss the topics presented by this wise, insightful and humorous, well-known Buddhist teacher. Join us every 3rd Tuesday from 7pm to 9 for Pema Night or join us anytime Sunday morning at 10 am for Meditation or Tuesday at 7 pm for Open House 734 A Street, Suite 1, San Rafael, CA 94901. For more information visit our website tamalpais shambhala.org

Community Spanish Language Learning Center In Downtown San Rafael www.spanishindowntown sanrafael.com

Mind&Body HYPNOTHERAPY Thea Donnelly, M.A. Hypnosis, Counseling, All Issues. 25 yrs. experience. 415-459-0449.

Home Services CLEANING SERVICES All Marin House Cleaning Licensed, Bonded, Insured. Will do Windows. O’felia 415-717-7157. FURNITURE DOCTOR Ph/Fax: 415-383-2697

Real Estate HOMES/CONDOS FOR SALE AFFORDABLE MARIN? I can show you 60 homes

under $600,000. Call Cindy @ 415-902-2729. Christine Champion, Broker.

GARDENING/LANDSCAPING GARDEN MAINTENANCE OSCAR - 415-505-3606

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DRUM LESSONS IN YOUR HOME

Beginning and advanced, Rock and Jazz.

Lean to read with a concept of time. Specializing with children.

Call Joel @ 415.457.5193

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2018-143768.The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: MUD ‘N BISCUITS CERAMICS, 101 MEADOW WAY, SAN GERONIMO, CA 94963: LINDA M PETERSON, 101 MEADOW WAY, SAN GERONIMO, CA 94963-0117. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 19, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2018-143742. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: RGG BUSINESS SOLUTIONS, 314 BAYVIEW ST, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: DARREN RACUSEN, 314 BAYVIEW ST, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This state-

ment was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 16, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2018-143749. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: PING’S MANDARIN RESTAURANT, 817 FRANCISCO BLVD W, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: WEIAN CHEN,1331 STOCKTON STREET, APT. 408, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94133. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant is renewing filing with changes and is transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herin. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 17, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2018-143721. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: ETA-MARIN, 955 DEL GANADO ROAD, STE. A, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: SHERVIN TAJBAKSH ARCHITECTURE, INC. 955 DEL GANADO ROAD, STE. A, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 11,

2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2018-143702. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: MIRACLE MILE CAFE, 2130 4TH ST., SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: FERNANDO LOPEZ, 330 CANAL ST., #100, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 10, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14, 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2018-143763. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: CLOUDVIEW CONSULTING, 301 CLOUD VIEW TRAIL, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: MELANIE CHANCELLOR, 301 CLOUD VIEW TRAIL, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 19, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 21 of 2018)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2018-143797. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: CARDENAS/CARDENAS MARKET/CARDENA MARKETS/CARDENAS RESTAURANT, 330 BELLAM BLVD., SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: MI PUEBLO NEWCO, LLC., 2501 E. GUASTI ROAD, ONTARIO, CA 91761 The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 23, 2018. (Publication Dates: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2018-143774. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 01 AURUM LEADERSHIP, 21A ROWLAND CT, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960: DEVI CAVITT RAZO COACHING AND CONSULTING, LLC, 21A ROWLAND CT, SAN ALSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 19, 2018. (Publication Dates: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018)

Trivia answers «5 1 The Giants, Athletics, 49ers, Raiders, Golden State Warriors, Sharks and Earthquakes 2 James Abbott McNeill Whistler

more precise)

7 Noxzema 8 {1+3+5+7+...+199} = 10,000.

Collect first and last, second and next-to-last, etc., to form 50 groups of 200.

3 The cherry bomb 4 Railroad tracks 5a. Jimmy Kimmel b. Nine c. Coco, directed by Marin resi-

9 Africa 10a. Tragedy b. Tragicomedy c. History

6

BONUS QUESTION: Maine and Maryland; Missouri and Montana

dent Lee Unkrich

Tigers (Bengal tigers, to be

17 PA CI FI C S U N | FEB R U A RY 1 4 - 2 0 , 2 0 1 8 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

To place an ad: email legals@pacificsun.com or fax: 415.485.6226. No walk-ins please. All submissions must include a phone number and email. Ad deadline is Thursday, noon to be included in the following Wednesday print edition.


PACI FI C SUN | FEB R U A RY 1 4 - 2 0 , 2 0 1 8 | PA CI FI CS U N. COM

18

PublicNotices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2018-143840. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: THE SOURCE REAL ESTATE COMPANY, 209 SPRUCE CT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: I STAR PROPERTIES, INC., 209 SPRUCE CT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 29, 2018. (Publication Dates: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2018-143708. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: WH SERVICES HANDYMAN, 757 LINCOLN ST., SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: WALTER HERNANDEZ GODOY, 757 LINCOLN ST., 26, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 10, 2018. (Publication Dates: Feb 14, 21, 28, March 7 of 2018 revised publishing) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2018-143772. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: RAFAEL TREE SERVICE, 616 LINDARO ST., SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: RAFAEL F. CASTANEDA, JR., 1360 RACHEL RD., SAN PABLO, CA 94806. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on JAN 19, 2018. (Publication Dates: Feb 14, 21, 28, March 7 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2018-143898. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: FRONTAL LOBE PRODUCTIONS, 1327 LINCOLN AVE., #315, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: DANIEL POTTER, 1327 LINCOLN AVE., #315, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL.

Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Feb 05, 2018. (Publication Dates: Feb 14, 21, 28, March 7 of 2018)

OTHER NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1800183. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Maha Hussein Saleh Al Naseri filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: MAHA HUSSEIN SALEH AL NASERI to MAHA NASERI EIDE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 03/16/2018 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT A, ROOM A. Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: JAN 18, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14 of 2018) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1800182. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Nancy Lee Malloy filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: NANCY LEE MALLOY to MICAH LEE MALLOY. THE COURT

ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 03/09/2018 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT E. Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: JAN 18, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14 of 2018) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1800175. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Amanda Alcazar filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: TOBIAS JULIO RIVERA to TOBIAS JULIO ALCAZAR. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 03/09/2018 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT B. Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913.

A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: JAN 18, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 24, 31, Feb 7, 14 of 2018) SUMMONS - FAMILY LAW CASE NUMBER: FL 1301889 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: JOSHUA SAMUEL SINGERMAN. You have been sued. PETITIONERíS NAME IS: KRISTIN ANN SINGERMAN. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center www. courts.ca.gov/self help), at the California Legal Services website www. lawhelpca.org, or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICERESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON PAGE 2: These restraining are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. They are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. NOTE- If a judgement or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. The name and address of the court are: MARIN SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORINA, COUNTY

OF MARIN, HALL OF JUSTICE, CIVIC CENTER DRIVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94913-4988. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitionerís attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: EDITH KELLY POLITIS (BAR # 115150), 1101 FIFTH AVENUE, SUITE 200, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901, (415) 453-3055. Clerk, by /s/ KIM TURNER, Court Executive Officer, Marin County Superior Court, By J. DALE Deputy. Date: MAY 1, 2013. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. STANDARD FAMILY LAW RESTRAINING ORDERS Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from: 1. removing the minor children of the parties from the state or applying for a new or replacement passport for those minor children without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, or changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor children; 3. transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in a manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of survivorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be files and served on the other party. You must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your

own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. WARNING IMPORTANT INFORMATION . California law provides that, for purposes of division of property upon dissolution of a marriage or domestic partnership or upon legal separation, property acquired by the parties during marriage or domestic partnership in joint form is presumed to be community property. If either party to this action should die before the jointly held community property is divided, the language in the deed that characterizes how title is held (i.e., joint tenancy, tenants in common, or community property) will be controlling, and not the community property presumption. You should consult your attorney if you want the community property presumption to be written into the recorded title to the property. (Publication Dates: JAN 24, 31, FEB 7, 14 of 2018) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1800280. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Claudia Eklof filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: CLAUDIA EKLOF to CLAUDIA GHIRALDINI-EKLOF. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 03/12/2018 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT A. Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: JAN 24, 2018.


(Publication Dates: Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 21 of 2018)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RANDALL G. TOM AKA RANDALL TOM; Case No. PR-1800372 filed on Jan 31, 2018. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of RANDALL G. TOM AKA RANDALL TOM. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed in the Superior Court of California, County of MARIN by WALTER TOM. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that WALTER TOM be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PHYLLIS M. ONGARO; Case No. PR-1800278 filed on Jan 23, 2018. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of PHYLLIS MARIE ONGARO. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed in the Superior Court of California, County of MARIN by DOUGLAS ONGARO. THE PETITION

FOR PROBATE requests that DOUGLAS ONGARO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action). The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: MARCH 05, 2018 at 9:00 am. in Dept. L, Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94901. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under Section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California Statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: CICELY T. RAY, 4740 GREEN RIVER ROAD, SUITE 314, CORONA, CA 92880. 951.735.2488. Publication Dates: Feb 07, 14, 21 of 2018)

Astrology FREE WILL

For the week of February 14

ARIES (March 21-April 19): At 12,388 feet,

Mount Fuji is Japan’s highest peak. If you’re in good shape, you can reach the top in seven hours. The return trip can be done in half the time—if you’re cautious. The loose rocks on the steep trail are more likely to knock you off your feet on the way down than on the way up. I suspect that this is an apt metaphor for you in the coming weeks, Aries. Your necessary descent may be deceptively challenging. So make haste slowly! Your power animals are the rabbit and the snail.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright made a few short jaunts through the air in a flying machine they called the Flyer. It was a germinal step in a process that ultimately led to your ability to travel 600 miles per hour while sitting in a chair 30,000 feet above the earth. Less than 66 years after the Wright Brothers’ breakthrough, American astronauts landed a space capsule on the moon. They had with them a patch of fabric from the left wing of the Flyer. I expect that during the coming weeks, you will be climaxing a long-running process that deserves a comparable ritual. Revisit the early stages of the work that enabled you to be where you are now. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 2006, 5 percent of the world’s astronomers gathered at an international conference and voted to demote Pluto from a planet to a “dwarf planet.” Much of the world agreed to honor their declaration. Since then, though, there has arisen a campaign by equally authoritative astronomers to restore Pluto to full planet status. The crux of the issue is this: How shall we define the nature of a planet? But for the people of New Mexico, the question has been resolved. State legislators there formally voted to regard Pluto as a planet. They didn’t accept the demotion. I encourage you to be inspired by their example, Gemini. Whenever there are good arguments from opposing sides about important matters, trust your gut feelings. Stand up for your preferred version of the story. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ray Bradbury's

dystopian bestseller Fahrenheit 451 was among the most successful of the 27 novels he wrote. It won numerous awards and has been adopted into films, plays and graphic novels. Bradbury wrote the original version of the story in nine days, using a typewriter that he rented for 20 cents per hour. When his publisher urged him to double the manuscript’s length, he spent another nine days doing so. According to my reading of the planetary configurations, you Cancerians now have a similar potential to be surprisingly efficient and economical as you work on an interesting creation or breakthrough—especially if you mix a lot of play and delight into your labors.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Poet Louise Glück has

characterized herself as “afflicted with longing yet incapable of forming durable attachments.” If there is anything in you that even partially fits that description, I have good news: In the coming weeks, you’re likely to feel blessed by longing rather than afflicted by it. The foreseeable future will also be prime time for you to increase your motivation and capacity to form durable attachments. Take full advantage of this fertile grace period!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 2004, a man named Jerry Lynn tied a battery-operated alarm clock to a string and dangled it down a vent in his house. He was hoping that when the alarm sounded, he would get a sense of the best place to drill a hole in his wall to run a wire for his TV. But the knot he’d made wasn’t perfect, and the clock slipped off and plunged into an inaccessible spot behind the wall. Then, every night for 13 years, the alarm rang for a minute. The battery was unusually strong! A few months ago, Lynn decided to end the mild but constant irritation. Calling on the help of duct specialists, he retrieved the persistent clock. With this story as your inspiration, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you Virgos to finally put an end to your equivalent

By Rob Brezsny

of the maddening alarm clock. (Read the story at tinyurl.com/alarmclockmadness.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Was Napoleon Bonaparte an oppressor or liberator? The answer is both. His work in the world hurt a lot of people and helped a lot of people. One of his more magnanimous escapades transpired in June 1798, when he and his naval forces invaded the island of Malta. During his six-day stay, he released political prisoners, abolished slavery, granted religious freedom to Jews, opened 15 schools, established the right to free speech and shut down the Inquisition. What do his heroics have to do with you? I don’t want to exaggerate, but I expect that you, too, now have the power to unleash a blizzard of benevolence in your sphere. Do it in your own style, of course, not Napoleon’s. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Trees that

are slow to grow bear the best fruit,” said French playwright Molière. I’m going to make that your motto for now, Scorpio. You have pursued a gradual, steady approach to ripening, and soon it will pay off in the form of big bright blooms. Congratulations on having the faith to keep plugging away in the dark! I applaud your determination to be dogged and persistent about following your intuition even though few people have appreciated what you were doing.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The growth you can and should foster in the coming weeks will be stimulated by quirky and unexpected prods. To get you started, here are a few such prods: 1. What’s your hidden or dormant talent, and what could you do to awaken and mobilize it? 2. What’s something you’re afraid of but might be able to turn into a resource? 3. If you were a different gender for a week, what would you do and what would your life be like? 4. Visualize a dream you’d like to have while you’re asleep tonight. 5. If you could transform anything about yourself, what would it be? 6. Imagine you’ve won a free vacation to anywhere you want. Where would you go? CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may

think you have uncovered the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. But according to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re just a bit more than halfway there. In order to get the rest of the goods, you’ll have to ignore your itch to be done with the search. You’ll have to be unattached to being right, smart and authoritative. So please cultivate patience. Be expansive and magnanimous as you dig deeper. For best results, align yourself with poet Richard Siken's definition: “The truth is complicated. It’s two-toned, multi-vocal, bittersweet.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The posh magazine Tatler came up with a list of fashionable new names for parents who want to ensure that their babies get a swanky start in life. Since you Aquarians are in a phase when you can generate good fortune by rebranding yourself or remaking your image, I figure you might be interested in using one of these monikers as a nickname or alias. At the very least, hearing them could whet your imagination to come up with your own ideas. Here are Tatler’s chic avantgarde names for girls: Czar-Czar; Debonaire; Estonia; Figgy; Gethsemane; Power; Queenie. Here are some boys’ names: Barclay; Euripides; Gustav; Innsbruck; Ra; Uxorious; Wigbert; Zebedee. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Now that you

have finally paid off one of your debts to the past, you can start window-shopping for the future’s best offers. The coming days will be a transition time as you vacate the power spot you’ve outgrown and ramble out to reconnoiter potential new power spots. So bid your crisp farewells to waning traditions, lost causes, ghostly temptations and the deadweight of people’s expectations. Then start preparing a vigorous first impression to present to promising allies out there in the frontier.Y

Homework: Confess, brag and expostulate about what inspires you to love. Go to freewillastrology.com and click on “Email Rob.”

19 PA CI FI C S U N | FEB R U A RY 1 4 - 2 0 , 2 0 1 8 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1800147. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Xenia Orellana filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: FERNANDO JOSUE ORELLANA to FERNANDO NICOLAS HERNANDEZ. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 03/09/2018 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT A. Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: JAN 16, 2018. (Publication Dates: Jan 31, Feb 7, 14, 21 of 2018)

interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action). The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: MARCH 12, 2018 at 9:00 am. in Dept. J, Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94901. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under Section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California Statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: ROBERT I. SIMON, 45 BELDEN PLACE, 2ND FLOOR, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94104. 415.434.3608. Publication Dates: Feb 07, 14, 21 of 2018)


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Unique, one-of-a-kind home furnishings, accessories, jewelry and more. All at CONSIGNMENT PRICES!

CORTE MADERA

801 Tamalpais Drive • 415-924-6691 San Carlos

1123 Industrial (Near Best Buy/Ross) 650-577-8979

Campbell

930 West Hamilton Ave. Suite 190 408-871-8890

Danville

1901-F Camino Ramon Danville, CA 94526 925-866-6164

Sun1807  

February 14-20, 2018

Sun1807  

February 14-20, 2018