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YEAR 55, NO. 43 OCTOBER 25-31, 2017

SERVING MARIN COUNTY

PACIFICSUN.COM

Nonprofit Issue

Thicker Than Smoke MARIN OFFERS OUTPOURING OF LOVE AFTER NORTH BAY FIRES P8

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NORTH BAY FIRES The ravaging North Bay fires have been nothing short of devastating. The terror, confusion and loss that our neighbors have experienced is heartrending. It must also be acknowledged that thousands of people have stepped up in the most meaningful and selfless ways to support their fellow residents. Homes were opened. Pets were rescued. Supplies were donated. And miraculously, countless lives were saved. But the work of recovery has only just begun.  With the fires approaching containment, the focus is not only on how immediate needs can best be served, but also on the mid- and long-term issues that each of the communities will face. The effects of this disaster will be felt for years to come. Housing, jobs, mental health services, environmental restoration – these issues and more will need a coordinated and well-funded approach to enable the region to get back on its feet. So how can help be extended? The community foundations of Napa, Sonoma and Mendocino continue to be the best direct source of leadership and information in their respective communities.  Each has established a fund specifically to support fire relief efforts now and in the months to come.  If you are looking to support organizations that you can be assured are fully vetted and executing essential work in those counties, these community foundations are your most reliable resource. General operating grants into their funds are hugely beneficial at a time like this, so dollars can be prioritized and directed to the community nonprofit organizations most effectively addressing the areas of greatest need. Links to these funds can be found on the home page of the MCF website – www.marincf.org. You can also find a PDF which provides a roster of specific organizations, here in Marin and in the region, that are providing essential services. This will be regularly updated as needs and conditions change. Our MCF staff is out in the community meeting with county officials and organizational leaders to stay apprised of the rapidly-changing situation.  And we are enhancing our grant support to a number of local organizations addressing issues such as food, housing, child care, legal services and more. This is a heartbreaking time for our region. But the compassion, heroism, and love that has emerged from this tragedy will keep us going. We are resilient, and we’ll get through this as we always do. Together.


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ALASDAIR NEALE | MUSIC DIRECTOR

MASTERWORKS 1

Romance

JOIN US FOR OUR SEASON OPENER! SUNDAY OCTOBER 29, 2017 / 3:00 P.M. TUESDAY OCTOBER 31, 2017 / 7:30 P.M. ALASDAIR NEALE, CONDUCTOR JENNIFER KOH, VIOLIN

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Movie Page Editor Matt Stafford Copy Editor Lily O’Brien CONTRIBUTORS Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Charles Brousse, Tom Gogola, Tanya Henry, Howard Rachelson, Nikki Silverstein, Charlie Swanson, Richard von Busack

Jessica Palopoli

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Letters

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This week, a letter-writer refers to a movie industry mogul who has been accused by multiple women of sexual assault and harassment.

Silence

Trip for 2 to

Donald Trump has defined his hatred for California with his and his administration’s complete silence concerning the horrendous firestorm that has consumed Northern California. Not a word of compassion and concern—simply silence, which speaks volumes. —Alfred Auger

plus film tickets

‘A Great Future’

Enter to Win

© Scott DW Smith

pacificsun.com

Saturday, Nov 18, 8pm Marin Center, San Rafael

Seriously? Your Hero of the week is a group that helps lawbreakers evade the law [Hero & Zero, Oct. 11]? When I rob a bank will you help me not get arrested? “What Happened?” Well, there was a backlash against illegal immigrants and Trump got just enough votes. So now we’re all screwed. Unexpected consequences are a bitch: Well-off liberals’ desire for cheap labor comes home to roost. Support for illegal immigrants is

very divisive and could easily turn people on the fence into racists. Of course, Pac Sun doesn’t notice that California is already overcrowded, and the No. 1 cause of population growth is pretty obvious. Drought, traffic, pollution, overcrowded living conditions … sounds like a great future. —Carlo V. Gardin

Real Life

Wait, are you telling me that a well-known leader of a successful major organization, a male, took advantage of his position of power and authority by abusing and degrading less powerful people, in this case females, in his own industry? I thought that only happened in the movies. —Craig J. Corsini


By Howard Rachelson

1 A nearly 100-year-old courthouse burned

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down in 1971, in what city of Marin County?

2 What is the origin of the word ‘November?’

BONUS QUESTION: Plastic was invented in 1907 partially as a substitute for what luxury item, then in short supply (partially due to environmental concerns)?

3 What series of four science-fiction ad-

venture films, released from 2012-2015 and based on novels for young adults by Suzanne Collins, featured a 16-year-old action heroine?

5 This essential food item was considered

so valuable that Roman soldiers were given an allowance to purchase it. What common English word evolved from this?

6 What object used in a sport has a diameter of 1.68 inches?

7 What king (name and number) was the main character of the Oscar-winning 2010 film The King’s Speech, and what actor portrayed him in that movie? 8 In how many different ways can a committee of three people be selected from a group of six candidates?

9 North America’s largest flying birds can coast for 10 miles without flapping their wings. What are they?

10 What part of the human brain, with a 10-letter name, controls coordination, language, attention and precision?

▲ Trash in Marin’s waterways often starts as litter on our streets. When it rains, untreated refuse goes straight into the storm drain and out to the bay. Help stop the trash flow by connecting with Clean Marin, a coalition of anti-litter groups, and the Marin County Stormwater Pollution Prevention Program (MCSTOPPP) at the inaugural Trash Summit on Wednesday, November 1, at the Marin Center Exhibit Hall. “The event will provide valuable information and resources on how to join or start your own Clean Marin group,” says Rob Carson, program manager at MCSTOPPP. “Longterm, this is about inspiring all the people and groups to get involved in trash cleanup and work together to find solutions for our watershed.” To register for the free Trash Summit, visit tinyurl.com/cleanmarin.

Answers on page

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Zero

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4 MA, ME, MI and MO are the abbreviations for what U.S. states?

Hero

Howard Rachelson invites you to his next team trivia contest on Tuesday, November 14 at Terrapin Crossroads in San Rafael at 6:30pm; free, with prizes. Contact Howard at howard1@triviacafe. com, and visit triviacafe.com for the web’s best questions.

▼ If you’re searching for the most offensive Halloween costume, look no further. For around $15-$20 plus shipping, you can dress up your daughter as Holocaust victim Anne Frank. Halloweencostumes.com featured a girl model, with a smile on her face, wearing an outfit described as “WWII Anne Frank Girls Costume.” After public outrage, the company pulled it and apologized. Other sites, however, including Amazon, are still selling it pre-Halloween, promoting it as an Anne Frank costume for “Heroes in History day” at school or a World War II evacuee girl. Whatever. We’re flabbergasted that multiple companies missed the vulgarity of this product. Oh, by the way, Amazon is also hawking a Hitler mask, just in case white supremacists want to pair up the two costumes.—Nikki Silverstein

Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeros at ›› pacificsun.com

TRUE WILDFIRE ATTORNEYS YOU CAN COUNT ON E. Elliot Adler

Please Join Us for FREE Legal Information on Pursuing Reimbursement for Fire-Related Losses If you were affected by the fires and are insured or uninsured, join us to learn more about how you may obtain reimbursement for total costs to rebuild, damaged trees and vineyards, evacuation expenses and your annoyance and discomfort.

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NAPA

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Trivia Café


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Upfront Homeowners insurance is not mandated by the state of California, but is a requirement for anyone who wants to get a home mortgage from a bank.

Fair Questions

High-risk fire insurance pool grapples with new normal of urban wildfires By Tom Gogola

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s the historic North Bay fires are brought under control, data coming out of the state insurance industry tells a tale of massive destruction: Nearly 5,500 residential losses, 601 commercial losses, up to 3,500 noncommercial auto losses and 39 boats burned up in the blazes that killed 43 and caused more than $3 billion in damage.

But there’s one fire-related statistic that’s interesting for its small size: 23. That represents the number of people who have so far filed insurance claims through the California FAIR Plan (CFP), the fire insurer of last resort for those who can’t otherwise get a policy because they live in an area at high risk for wildfires. As it now appears that highdensity parts of Santa Rosa are at

high risk for wildfires, what will that mean for the CFP moving forward and for homeowners insurance policies in places like devastated Coffey Park? Will those folks still be able to access the private homeowners insurance market? Will the CFP see a spike in participation as the state insurance industry also grapples with a “new normal” of potentially non-anomalous urban wildfires?

In places like Coffey Park, “we did not have much in the way of market share,” says Anneliese Jivan, president of the CFP. “Those neighborhoods were not considered high-risk brush or wildfire areas, so we weren’t writing there.” “What I can tell you is that I can’t predict what is going to happen, but we will be there for whoever needs us,” Jivan says. “If the insurance industry, en masse—and I don’t think this will happen—says, ‘We won’t write it,’ we are going to be there, regardless of the number.” Created in the aftermath of the 1968 Watts riots, the CFP is based in Los Angeles and was established by the California Legislature in response to inner-city businesses’ inability to secure insurance after those riots. It soon expanded to include insurance options for people in areas at high risk for wildfires, and 50 years after its inception, it may be more critical than ever. The CFP essentially a privately run high-risk insurance pool that’s audited every three years by the state. It writes policies that are collectively underwritten by all insurance companies that do business in California. That same insurance industry has been running away from fire policies almost as fast as Coffey Park residents ran from their blazing homes—a phenomenon highlighted in the fallout from the 2015 Valley fire in Lake County, says a consumer advocate. “Before this catastrophe, our organization had been involved with people in certain parts of the state who’ve been dropped or had their rates go up a lot,” says Amy Bach, executive director of United Policyholders, a consumer advocacy group based in San Francisco. “We’ve been worrying about this and the [State] Department of Insurance has been worrying,” adds Bach. “Things were a little scary before this—meaning insurers were starting to get the heebie-jeebies about staying in the fire insurance market in California, and you can’t blame them, right?” Homeowners insurance is not mandated by the state but is a requirement for anyone who wants to get a home mortgage from a bank. The CFP won’t deny anyone in a once or future high-risk area, says Jivan. In the aftermath of the devastating Valley fire, access to the CFP was tweaked to ease access


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Jenna Brinkman

business in the state. We’ll see some reduced competition, some reduced availability and some increased pricing,” she adds. Mark Sektnan, president of the Association of California Insurance Companies, a Sacramento-based company that lobbies for the insurance industry, says time will reveal how fire insurance plays out in places like Coffey Park. “At this point, it’s too early to really anticipate what companies may or may not do in the aftermath of the North Bay firestorm,” Sektnan says. “I would anticipate there would still be availability,” he says, noting that some insurers may leave the fire insurance market while others may choose to take on more risk. In the meantime, insurance agents have deployed throughout the region and have already started cutting expense checks for people who will be displaced for many months as their homes are rebuilt. A 2003 reform to the state insurance code now requires that insurers provide up to two years’ worth of expenses to the displaced; other state laws forbid insurance companies from dropping customers for a year after a disaster is declared. That reform was of great help to Lake County fire victims, says Setknan, who notes that one lesson in these cataclysmic fires is that “the cleanup takes forever. Nothing can happen until that happens, and the cleanup is not driven by the insurance industry.” Consumers are also protected by insurance reforms implemented by Proposition 103 in 1988 that prevents the industry from engaging in price gouging, says Nancy Kincaid, press secretary with the California Department of Insurance. “[Proposition] 103 mandates that rates are fair and justified,” she says. When the industry models losses in a rare “anomaly” event such as the North Bay fires, and scopes out the losses over a two- or three-year period, she says, the industry can’t justify a spike in insurance rates to address anticipated losses—they can raise it “maybe 5 percent.” But how does this storyline change if what was once rendered a rare anomaly by the insurance industry is now the norm? Jivan says fire-modeling methods that created the “previously defined high [risk for] brush-fire areas won’t work anymore. It is my opinion that this will be a big wake-up call.”Y

Ceres Community Project volunteers and staff prepared meals at North Bay fire relief sites.

FOOD & DRINK

With Love

Ceres Community Project nonprofit celebrates 10 years By Tanya Henry

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his year, the Ceres Community Project celebrated 10 years of empowering teens, building community and nourishing critically ill folks. The Sebastopol-based nonprofit serves organic meals to around 150 families weekly throughout Sonoma and Marin counties. And when the recent fires started, the Ceres staff and volunteers sprang into action and began preparing meals for folks arriving in shelters. “We all developed new skill sets that day,” says Communications Director Deborah Ramelli. “Before calls were even made, we had farmers, grocery stores and neighbors dropping off food— everyone wanted to help.” The Ceres team developed simple menus, and on top of regular deliveries to sick clients, delivered and served 400 to 500 meals daily to various evacuation sites. It wasn’t just adults doing the heavy lifting—

teens came from all kitchen sites (Sebastopol, Santa Rosa and San Rafael), and according to Ramelli, “the teen chefs were rock stars.” What began with Ceres founder, Cathryn Couch, meeting in a church kitchen with six teens to prepare healthy meals for four families struggling with serious health issues, has become a community-based organization that has served more than 500,000 meals and counts love, generosity and compassion as deeply held values. Because Ceres is so rooted in community, it was able to react quickly during the devastating fires. Before the national organizations were even on the ground, Ceres was there, nimbly doing what it does—nourishing and feeding communities with healthy food prepared with love.Y To learn about volunteering in Marin, contact Linda@ceresproject.org.

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for consumers now faced with an industry in retreat from writing fire policies. “We went to the [state] insurance commissioner,” says Jivan, “and said, ‘Look, we’re making it hard to let people come in, because three companies would have to have denied them coverage.’ We just made it easier to come to us if they need us.” The coverage offered by the CFP isn’t as comprehensive as one would find in the private market, says Bach. “The coverage is basic,” she says, while also crediting the state for creating the program and expanding it. The insurance offers two separate tiers of coverage, one more comprehensive than the other. “Generally speaking,” says Bach, “you don’t want to be in the FAIR Plan unless you don’t have a choice.” The CFP covers up to $1.5 million in losses at a single residential location, according to online resources. Bach expects that in places like Coffey Park, homeowners will likely experience an increase in their insurance rates, regardless of any new official high-risk designation that may come from state fire officials or insurance actuarians. Before the fire, says Bach, “their home insurance was probably quite affordable, relatively speaking, and people were paying between $800 and $1,200 a year for their home insurance. I think we are going to see some changes in the market. The days of people paying under $1,000 for fire insurance in California I think are numbered. That is certainly where insurance companies have been saying they are headed.” A report in the online Insurance Journal that appeared while first responders were still plunging into the variously horrible infernos that broke out across three counties on October 8, reported that a hazard-risk analysis undertaken by the Irvine-based analytics firm CoreLogic, found that 172,117 homes “with a combined reconstruction cost value of more than $65 billion are at some level of risk from the wildfires in the Napa and Santa Rosa metropolitan areas alone.” That’s a lot of newly identified risk—but consumer advocates say the insurance industry can absorb it. “As big as the fire was,” says Bach, “it’s still a drop in the bucket in terms of the number of policies that they have in force in the state. They should be fine, and these fires shouldn’t prevent them from doing


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Staff photo

The Marin County Free Library’s Bookmobile was on site at the Marin Center for North Bay fire evacuees.

Generous Spirit

Marin offers outpouring of support to North Bay fire victims By Pacific Sun Staff

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ou’re going on a boat in Cambodia and you’re paddling out; you can stand on top of a giant skyscraper and look down; dinosaurs come out and chase you if you’re adventurous,” says John MacLeod, director of Virtual Augmented Reality (VAR) Libraries, under a smoky peach sky at the Marin Center. It’s Friday, October 13, five days after the deadliest fires in California history began ravaging the North Bay. MacLeod is on his way to set up a virtual reality

station for the hundreds of children and adults who have been evacuated from their homes in Sonoma and Napa counties, and find themselves at the temporary evacuation center. “We’re just trying to get people to step outside themselves, and be able to relax a little bit,” MacLeod says, before passing long tables overflowing with colorful, donated clothes of all different sizes, and stacks of bottled water. MacLeod is one of thousands of people in Marin, from nonprofits and the general public, who

have come together to donate time, food, clothing, art, yoga, meditation, money, gift cards and more to neighbors in need. “This community has truly come out in droves with incredible generosity and support for these people,” says Libby Garrison, marketing and communications manager for Marin County’s Department of Cultural Services, noting that on Monday, the first day of operation, the Marin Center sheltered 525 people. And according to the Center for Volunteer & Nonprofit Leadership

(CVNL), a Marin-based nonprofit that was activated as an Emergency Volunteer Center (EVC), around 12,000 people had signed up within the week to volunteer. “There was a lady on the first day that people were here that donated $1,000,” Garrison says. “She went to Target and bought $1,000 worth of socks and underwear and just dropped them off.” Another woman, Garrison says, came up to her and said, “I can teach a zumba class in a heartbeat.” There was such an outpouring of support, in fact, that organizers


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were forced to put a cap on donations. A handwritten poster at the entrance reads, “Thank you … donations closed—at capacity.” Another larger, digital sign on the side of the road flashes with the message, ‘No Donations Accepted.’ The Marin County Free Library Bookmobile, offering books and other reading materials is parked out front, along with the Flagship, a “preschool on wheels.” “We’ve started to provide some physical activities like hula hoops and Nerf balls,” says Damon Hill, interim deputy director for the Marin County Free Library. “Anything to do to kind of just relieve the pressure of the day.” Inside the shelter, a children’s activities room features hands-on art projects, and story time with the San Rafael Public Library. A young boy pushes a plastic yellow truck around a plastic house; in the hallway, a man cradles a small, blanketed child on his chest and checks a map taped to the wall that illustrates areas where fires are still burning. In the exhibit hall to the right, hundreds of American Red Cross cots are lined up side-byside under hanging loops of white Christmas lights; small suitcases full of personal items are tucked underneath. A medical clinic staffed by the Marin County Medical Reserve Core and the San Francisco-Marin Medical Society provides nurses and doctors for 24-hour coverage, and counselors are also on hand. A room has been set up where evacuees can sleep with their pets, and according to Lisa Bloch, of Marin Humane, close to 400 pets—including dogs, cats, birds, turkeys, rabbits, reptiles and fish— of evacuees were boarded for free at the nonprofit; more than 200 Marin Humane volunteers were helping with efforts to look after them. “We are housing several hundred evacuees here, but since our role for the county is cultural services, we wanted to make sure that our guests are housed and fed and safe, but also entertained,” Garrison says. “And we have had incredible support from our cultural community, who have stepped up and sent musicians, and art teachers and yoga teachers and meditation teachers, so it’s really been a nice, positive spin on what is such a tragedy—that our community here in Marin and the

Donated clothes were piled high at the Marin Center, which transformed on Monday, October 9 from an events space to a temporary shelter for hundreds of North Bay fire evacuees.

Bay Area from the cultural side, is really stepping up.” The hope, Garrison says, is to make the place where so many people have fled, due to the unfortunate circumstances, not just an evacuation center, but a place where they feel comfortable. “And I believe art and music helps in the healing process, and I think that we want to provide that for everybody.” Bread & Roses, a Marin nonprofit that provides free live music and entertainment to people in places that include hospitals, homeless shelters, detention facilities and more, realized that they might be able to boost morale among fire victims at the shelter, so put the word out to their long list of volunteer performers. The response was huge, and over three days, the organization provided evacuees with multiple professional musicians and children’s performers. “It was just great to hear the

peals of laughter from the kids,” says Marian Hubler, Bread & Roses communications manager/ producer, describing Tyler Parks’ Circus of Smiles performance for nearly 40 kids and their parents. “They were transported to a different place during that time.” Among others who donated time and resources were the San Rafael Public Library, The Bay Area Discovery Museum, the Marin Symphony, Music with Megan and more. “It’s really amazing to see what people are willing to do,” Garrison says of the inspiring outpouring. The Marin Center was just one of many shelters set up in Marin to help evacuees, and more than 900 hosts on Airbnb have opened their homes in the region, for free, to displaced neighbors and relief workers. Meanwhile, multiple Marin restaurants continue to donate a percentage of proceeds to fire relief efforts, and music venues

continue to host benefit concerts. As Sonoma and Napa residents return north to begin to rebuild their lives, reverberating throughout Marin is the mentality that “the love in the air is thicker than the smoke.” Art from local schools that adorned the walls of the Marin Center shelter, before all evacuees had left on Sunday, Oct. 15, expressed the following words of hope: Difficult roads lead to beautiful destinations. Remember, You are never alone. Never forget that you are loved. Never doubt that someone surely cares about you.Y To learn more about some of the Marin nonprofits that offered support, and to see how you can continue to help, visit marinhumane.org, cvnl.org, breadandroses.org and redcross.org.


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Jessica Palopoli

A family get-together in the park becomes an intervention in the San Francisco Playhouse production of ‘Barbecue.’

THEATER

Black Satire

Spotlight on family problems in ‘Barbecue’ By Charles Brousse

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n a brief but wide-ranging interview with @ THIS STAGE magazine in September, 2016, just prior to the opening of Barbecue at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles, playwright Robert O’Hara aired his views on “conventional” theater, racism, TV reality shows, the general concept of artistic realism, Hollywood and the notion of American exceptionalism. That this gay black author looks at all of these with a jaundiced eye should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with his earlier work, but the arrival of Barbecue on the San Francisco Playhouse stage provides an excellent opportunity to judge how

his forcefully expressed positions integrate in a very dark social satire. Act 1 is divided into two extended scenes. In the first, O’Hara transports us to a rundown city park somewhere in middle America (nicely rendered by Scenic Designer Bill English), where the barbecue from which the play takes its name, takes place. There’s a realistic-looking grill on a pedestal and some desultory miming with tongs during the performance, but no actual food is ever present. Instead, we get razor-sharp volleys of dialogue among the O’Mallery clan as they await the arrival of an absent member named Barbara (Susi Damilano). Soon, it becomes clear that this isn’t an ordinary beer

and burger family outing. Despite reservations by some, the majority, led by strong-willed Lillie Anne (Anne Darragh), decides that with her drug and alcohol dependency out of control, Barbara must be pressured into entering a rehabilitation center—in Alaska, of all places! If these were normal people acting under normal circumstances, this would seem to be a perfectly logical response. But the O’Mallery family is anything but normal. They’re archetypal trailer trash, and every last one of them has some kind of substance addiction that would qualify for rehab. This glaring contradiction is the basis for most of the comedy that surrounds their

arguments. The result is absurd black satire at its best, beautifully performed by a talented acting ensemble. After Barbara’s entry in the final minutes of the scene, O’Hara throws us a curve that displays his disdain for conventional play structure. With slight adjustments, the same characters are onstage— wearing the same clothes, answering to the same names, disputing the same issues—only this time they’re African-American and Barbara is being played by Margo Hall, the esteemed black actress who also directs the show. Their chatter is no longer the country-style locutions of white trash; it’s the jivey street jargon of the black community. At first, the repetition, odd though it is, has its own rewards in the actors’ energy and colorfully expressed dialogue. As it dragged on over familiar territory, however, I found myself wondering about the playwright’s objective. Was he asking his viewers to compare the impact of the two versions? Was he making a point about AfricanAmerican and white families facing similar problems? Or, was he simply solidifying his reputation as an iconoclast who refuses to be constrained by the generally accepted rules of the game? Act 2 supplies the answer, though many may find it unconvincing. I won’t offer any details, but what I can say is that the substance and style are completely different—which accords with the author’s expressed desire to be consistently inconsistent as he reflects on a world in chaos. In that respect, at least, he is a worthy successor to the absurdist playwrights of the last century. It remains to be said that Act 2, which replaces black comedy with a heavy burden of personal philosophizing, is not nearly as entertaining as what preceded it, even when the repetition is factored in. Returning to the interview in L.A. which began this review, when O’Hara was asked what he would like the Geffen audiences to take away from performances of Barbecue, his reply was that he wants them to “laugh until they choke.” I am tempted to ask, “Then what?”Y NOW PLAYING: Barbecue runs through November 11 at the San Francisco Playhouse, 450 Post St., San Francisco; 415/677-9596; sfplayhouse.org.


Sunday, November 5 1:00 – 5:00 pm Osher Marin JCC, San Rafael Free, pre-registration is required

This symposium will explore Muslim-Jewish relations in the United States and the Bay Area.

SAN RAFAEL

RARE COIN

Maha Elgenaidi

COMPANY

Since 1973 PCGS • ANACS • ANA MEMBER

BUY • SELL • TRADE Estate Appraisals & Purchases U.S. & Foreign Coins and Notes Gold, Silver, Platinum Coins or Bars Coin & Estate Jewelry Collectibles

457-2646 • 1219 Fourth Street • San Rafael

Reuven Firestone

Presenters Prof. Fred Astren, San Francisco State Sister Amal Crespo, Islamic Center of North Marin Pastor Ben Daniel, Montclair Presbyterian Church Lea Delson, Kehilla Community Synagogue Maha Elgenaidi, Islamic Networks Group Prof. Reuven Firestone, Hebrew Union College/JIR Dr. Patricia Hellman Gibbs, Author of A New Song Joanne Greene, Osher Marin JCC Ali Sheikholeslami, Islamic Cultural Center of Northern California Rabbi Peretz Wolf-Prusan, Lehrhaus

Register: lehrhaus.org

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A Golden Age in the Golden State? Muslims and Jews Creating a Culture of Understanding

11


Movies

By Matthew Stafford

Friday October 27 - Thursday November 2

• New Movies This Week • •

All I See Is You (R) A Bad Moms Christmas (R) Blade Runner 2049 (R)

Faces Places (Not Rated) The Florida Project (R) The Foreigner (R) • Goodbye Christopher Robin (PG) Guiseppe Dezza

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Mario Guarneri, center, gives young people opportunities to play with professional musicians through his nonprofit Jazz in the Neighborhood.

MUSIC

Giving Back

Building a jazz community through mentoring By Lily O’Brien

W

hen Mario Guarneri was just 13 years old, he played trumpet onstage in a concert with jazz legend Louis Armstrong. The life-changing experience, which he credits to his first teacher, led him to establish Jazz in the Neighborhood (JitN) in 2013, a Marin-based nonprofit that mentors young, aspiring jazz players. JitN offers an Emerging Artists program that gives these young musicians opportunities to perform live at concerts, alongside professionals. Players are selected mainly through teacher recommendations from local schools, and perform at venues throughout the Bay Area. “The reality is that in the tradition of the art form, mentoring has always been a really vital and essential part of the process,” Guarneri, 74, says. “You can learn more in 10 minutes on the bandstand than a whole semester in a classroom.” Most local jazz players are paid very little, Guarneri says, and he believes that relying on tip jars is

demeaning. So he created JitN’s Guaranteed Fair Wage Program (GFWF) to give performers “the dignity that they deserve.” Most of JitN’s concerts are free, because Guarneri believes that giving back to the community is the best way to become part of it. Guarneri, who lives in Fairfax, teaches trumpet at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and performs with two of his own jazz groups, has enjoyed a successful career in the music business, including 15 years with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, 10 years playing on TV and movie soundtracks and recording four CDs. “For me, it’s a way of giving back for the great life that I’ve had in the music business,” he says of JitN. “There’s nothing better than being able to provide some really decently paid work for really great musicians.”Y Jazz in the Neighborhood presents Jazz Caliente on Friday, Oct. 27 at Copperfield’s Books, 850 Fourth St., San Rafael; 415/524-2800; jazzintheneighborhood.org.

Happy Death Day (PG-13) Human Flow (PG-13) IT (R) • Jane (Not Rated)

Northgate: Fri-Tue 11:45, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30 Northgate: Wed 1130, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:10, 1:30, 3:45, 5:15, 7:20, 9; Sat-Tue 12:10, 1:30, 3:45, 5:15, 7:20 Northgate: Fri-Tue 11:35, 6:50; 3D showtime at 3:20 Playhouse: Fri, Mon-Tue 3:30, 7; Sat-Sun 12, 3:30, 7 Rafael: Fri, Mon-Thu 6:15, 8:15; Sat-Sun 1:45, 6:15, 8:15 Regency: Fri-Sat 11:15, 2, 4:45, 7:35, 10:20; Sun-Thu 11:15, 2, 4:45, 7:35 Northgate: Fri-Tue 11:55, 2:35, 5:15, 8, 10:35 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45; Sun-Thu 10:45, 1:30, 4:15, 7 Northgate: Fri-Tue 12:35, 3:05, 5:30, 7:55, 10:25 Rafael: Fri-Sun 3:30; Mon-Wed 8:30 Northgate: Fri-Tue 6:55, 10 Rafael: Fri 4, 7:15 (filmmaker Brett Morgen in person at 7:15 show); Sat-Sun 2, 4, 6, 8; Mon-Thu 6, 8

John le Carré: An Evening with George Smiley (Not Rated) Lark: Sun noon Kingsman: The Golden Circle (R) Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:40, 3:50, 7, 10:15 • K2 and the Invisible Footmen (Not Rated) Rafael: Thu 7 (Skype interview with filmmaker Iara Lee follows the show) • Little Shop of Horrors Director’s Cut (Not Rated) Regency: Sun, Tue 2, 7 Loving Vincent (PG-13) Sequoia: Fri 5, 7:30, 9:50; Sat 2:30, 5, 7:30, 9:50; Sun 2:30, 5, 7:30; Mon-Wed 5, 7:30; Thu 5 Lucky (Not Rated) Rafael: Fri 6:30, 8:30; Sat-Sun 1:30, 6:30, 8:30; Mon-Wed 6:30; Thu 8:45 Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down the White House (PG-13) Lark: Fri 4:40; Sat 6; Mon 6:15; Tue 11; Thu 1:40 Marshall (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Tue 11:20, 2:10, 4:55, 7:40, 10:35 Lark: Fri 7 (director Tao Ruspoli in person); Sun 7:10; Wed 3:30; • Monogamish (Not Rated) Thu 8:50 The Mountain Between Us (PG-13) Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Tue 6:30, 9:15; Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 • National Theatre London: Frankenstein (Not Rated) Lark: Sat 3; Sun 3; Tue 6, 8:30 Lark: Fri 9; Sat 11; Sun 5:30 • The Old Dark House (Not Rated) Only the Brave (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Tue 12:45, 4, 7:05, 10:10 Lark: Thu 6:30 • The Paris Opera (Not Rated) • Royal Shakespeare Company: Coriolanus (Not Rated) Lark: Wed 7:30 Fairfax: Sun 12:55; Mon 7 • Spirited Away (PG) Regency: Fri-Sat 11:50, 2:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:25; Sun-Thu 11:50, • Suburbicon (R) 2:30, 5:05, 7:40 Sequoia: Fri 4:30, 7, 9:30; Sat 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Sun 2, 4:30, 7; Mon-Wed 4:30, 7; Thu 4:30 Northgate: Fri-Tue 11:10, 2, 4:45, 7:20, 10:05 • Thank You for Your Service (R) Cinema: Thu 10:10; 3D showtime at 7 Fairfax: Thu 7; 3D • Thor: Ragnarok (PG-13) showtime at 7:20 Northgate: Thu 7:50, 8:40, 10:20; 3D showtime at 7 Playhouse: Thu 7, 7:20 Rowland: Thu 7; 3D showtime at 10:15 Tyler Perry’s Boo! 2 A Madea Halloween (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Tue 11:40, 2:20, 4:50, 7:25, 9:55 Viceroy’s House (Not Rated) Lark: Fri 2:20; Sun 8:45; Mon 11:30; Tue 1:10; Wed 5:10 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:25, 1:15, 4:05, 7:05, 9:55; Sun-Thu 10:25, • Wonderstruck (PG) 1:15, 4:05, 7:05 Because there were too many movies playing this week to list, we have omitted some of the movie summaries and times for those that have been playing for multiple weeks. We apologize for the inconvenience. Showtimes can change after we go to press. Please call theater to confirm. CinéArts at Marin 101 Caledonia St., Sausalito, 331-0255 CinéArts at Sequoia 25 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley, 388-4862 Cinema 41 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera, 924-6505 Fairfax 9 Broadway, Fairfax, 453-5444 Lark 549 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur, 924-5111 Larkspur Landing 500 Larkspur Landing Cir., Larkspur, 461-4849 Northgate 7000 Northgate Dr., San Rafael, 800-326-3264 Playhouse 40 Main St., Tiburon, 435-1234 Rafael Film Center 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael, 454-1222 Regency 80 Smith Ranch Rd., Terra Linda, 479-5050 Rowland 44 Rowland Way, Novato, 800-326-3264


Lifehouse

Supported Living Program (SLP): Individualized training and support for adults and seniors in their own home. Services range from a few hours weekly to 24-hour care. Specialized Autism Program: Supported Living Services to individuals with autism living in their own homes. A team of staff and an autism specialist collaborate on strategies to support each individual in living a full life. Independent Living Services (ILS): Two licensed group homes designed to provide training and promote independence. Intermediate Care Facilities (ICF): Three group homes staffed to provide intensive personal care and medical support to individuals.

Lifehouse was founded in 1954 by parents struggling to find services for their children with developmental disabilities. Today, Lifehouse serves over 260 people and is recognized as a leader in creating many innovative services and programs.

899 Northgate Drive, Suite 500 San Rafael, CA 94903

Individualized Day Support Services: Tailored day services provided to support individuals to pursue their goals and interests in the community. The Lifehouse Technology Center: Cutting edge technology for the agency and the people we support. Other Services: Teen Recreation Programs (TRIP in Marin & RecLife in Sonoma), Recreation & Vacation Travel for Adults, Affordable Housing Initiatives, and Assessments.

No Matter What the Disability, Goals and Dreams Can Be Reached! We’re Hiring! Come Join Our Team! lifehouseagency.org ~ mail@lifehouseagency.org ~ 415-526-5300

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High-Quality Support Services Personalized For Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

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14

Sundial

CALENDAR

Due to limited space this week, most Sonoma and Napa listings have been cut from the calendar. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Concerts MARIN COUNTY Dumpstaween Celebration Second annual party features New Orleans favorites Dumpstaphunk with Jazz Mafia Horns and the Crooked Stuff. Oct 31, 8pm. $30-$35. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850. Jai Uttal Bay Area musician performs an intimate solo acoustic concert to support his recent album, “Roots, Rock, Rama.” Oct 29, 7pm. $28-$34. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800. M Ward Due to the wildfires, the indie singersongwriter’s scheduled concert at Gun Bun Winery in Sonoma has moved to San Rafael. Oct 29, 7:30pm. $40. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773. Marin Symphony The symphony kicks off its Masterworks season with “Romance,” featuring Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4 and guest violinist Jennifer Koh. Oct 29, 3pm and Oct 31, 7:30pm. $20 and up. Marin Center Veterans’ Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.473.6800.

Clubs & Venues MARIN The Belrose Thurs, open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422. Fenix Oct 26, Bond Girl. Oct 27, Freddy Clarke & Wobbly World. Oct 28, the Overcommitments Halloween Party. Oct 29, Greg Johnson & Glass Brick Boulevard. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600. George’s Nightclub Oct 26, Sabor Dominicano. Oct 27, Old School Marin Reunion Halloween Party. Oct 28, DJ party. Oct 29, Banda Night. Oct 31, Sabor Dominicano Halloween Party. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262. HopMonk Novato Oct 27, Rock Candy. Oct 28, Hollywood Halloween with Pride & Joy. 224 Vintage

Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Oct 25, Danny Uzi and Darren Nelson. Nov 1, Susan Copperman Quartet. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005. 19 Broadway Club Oct 25, Void Where Prohibited. Oct 26, Frankie Bourne Band. Oct 27, Joose. Oct 28, Soul Ska with DJ Adam 12. Oct 29, Frank Stickemz. Oct 30, open mic. Oct 31, SunHunter Halloween Bash. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091. No Name Bar Oct 26, Well Known Strangers. Oct 27, Michael Aragon Quartet. Oct 28, Chris Saunders Band. Oct 29, Timothy O & Co. Oct 30, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Oct 31, open mic. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392. Osher Marin JCC Oct 28, costume dance party with California Kind and special guest David Nelson. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000. Osteria Divino Oct 25, Sebastian Monreal Trio. Oct 26, Passion Habanera. Oct 27, David Jeffrey’s Jazz Fourtet. Oct 28, Marcos Sainz Trio. Oct 29, Dan Zemelman Trio. Oct 31, Walter Earl Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355. Panama Hotel Restaurant Oct 25, Lorin Rowan. Oct 26, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Oct 31, Blonde Sided. Nov 1, Todos Santos. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993. Peri’s Silver Dollar Oct 25, the New Sneakers. Oct 26, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Oct 27, Noelle Glory & the Guarantees. Oct 28, Ann Halen. Oct 29, Chrissy Lynne and friends. Oct 30, Billy D’s open mic. Oct 31, Halloween night with Sabbath Lives. Nov 1, the Weissmen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910. Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar Oct 26, singer-songwriter showcase with Mark Nichol. Oct 27, Joan Getz. Oct 28, Audrey Shimkas. Oct 29, Chime Travelers. Oct 29, 4pm, Volker Strif ler. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477. San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Oct 27, 6pm, Jazz Caliente. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.524.2800. Sausalito Seahorse Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Oct 26, Michael Irvine Jazz Ensemble. Oct 27, the Reed Fromer Band. Oct 28, Rock ‘n’ Roll Masquerade with the Marinfidels. Oct 29, 5pm, Halloween Party with Braulio and Somos el Son. Oct

31, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Hop Dance. 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9385.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon Oct 26, Whitherward. Oct 27, the Singing Limbs. Oct 28, the Deadlies. Oct 29, Colby Dee. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Lighthouse Bar & Grill Oct 27, 8pm, North Bay Halloween Costume Party & Dance. 475 E Strawberry Dr, Mill Valley. 415.381.4400.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 25, Antibalas. Oct 26, Midtown Social. Oct 27-28, Gatorators featuring members of the Radiators, Cryptical and Anders Osborne. Oct 29, Sly and Robbie & the Taxi Gang with Bitty McLean. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Events

Terrapin Crossroads Oct 25, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Oct 26, Jimmy Amplifiers Night with Mike Pascale, Scott Law and Greg Loiacono. Oct 27, Chum presents Ghosts of Halloween Past. Oct 29, 3:30pm, spooky stories and songs with Scott Law’s Bluegrass Dimension. Oct 31, Stu Allen & Mars Hotel. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773. Throckmorton Theatre Oct 25, noon concert with MUSA. Oct 26, Led Kaapana with Fran Guidry. Oct 27, José Neto & the Netoband. Oct 29, 6pm, Liz Kennedy album release show. Nov 1, noon concert with RossoRose Duo and Ian Scarfe. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Trek Winery Oct 27, Todos Santos. Oct 28, Chime Travelers. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Comedy Standup Comedy Amateur Showcase Oct 27, 7:30pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato, 415.899.9883. Tim Jackson’s the Power of Laughter Standup show features Diane Amos, Carla Clay, Dana Garrett, John Alston and Al Clethen. Oct 28, 8pm. $18. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600. Tuesday Night Live Halloween edition of the weekly standup showcase includes Dwight Slade, Mark Pitta and others. Oct 31, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Dance College of Marin James Dunn Theatre Oct 28, 7:30pm, the Evolution of Hip

Bon Air Halloween Bash Enjoy live music and spooky activities while supporting a holiday food drive. Oct 28, 11am. Bon Air Center, 302 Bon Air Center, Greenbrae, bonair.com. Day of the Dead Compassionate Memorial Service A day of remembrance in memory of those we have lost and celebrating those who have survived. Oct 27, noon. Center for Domestic Peace, 734 A St, San Rafael, 415.457.2464. Halloween Festival at the Mart Fun, treats and spooks come together, with costume contests for kids and dogs, a scavenger “haunt” and more. Oct 28, 10am. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur, 415.461.5700. Scream on the Green Novato’s city hall turns into a haunted house on Friday night and features a full carnival with costume contests, games, performances and more on Saturday. Oct 27-28. Free admission. Downtown Novato, Grant Ave, Novato, novatochamber.com. Sustainable Enterprise Conference Marin Networking event is for business, education and community leaders seeking the latest in green trends, policies and products. Oct 26, 8am. $39 and up. Embassy Suites Hotel, 101 McInnis Pkwy, San Rafael, greenbizmarin. com.

Field Trips Sunset & Bay Cruises Pack a picnic dinner and bring the whole family for a summer evening on the waters of the bay. Fri-Sat, 6:30pm. Through Oct 28. Angel Island Tiburon Ferry, 21 Main St, Tiburon, 415.435.2131. Telescope Viewing Party Drop in and take a look through a telescope, learn about constellations, and observe the moon, stars and other objects in the night sky. Oct 30, 6:45pm. College of Marin Library, 835 College Ave, Kentfield, 415.485.9475.


Food & Drink

15 Thu 10/26 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $12-$15 • All Ages

Midtown Social

Fri & Sat 10/27 & 28 • Doors 8pm ⁄$42–47 • 21+

GATORATORS

feat Dave Malone (The Radiators), Camile Baudoin (The Radiators), Mitch Stein (CRYPTICAL), Reggie Scanlan (The Radiators) & Eric Bolivar (Anders Osborne) + Special Guests

Film

Sun 10/29 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $30-$35 • All Ages

Italian Film Festival The fest offers great films, both comedy and drama, from Italy. Sat, Oct 28, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $16/$120 full series. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, italianfilm.com.

Sly & Robbie & The Taxi Gang feat Bitty McLean

Sun 10/30 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

Open Mic with Austin de Lone

Serenade for Haiti Bay Area director Owsley Brown and several producers are on hand for a screening of the film about a Haitian music school that must recover from the 2010 earthquake. Oct 26, 7:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

For Kids Change the World One Film at a Time Youth film workshop offers a chance for kids ages 11-18 to create collaborative works based on the theme of change. Oct 28-29. $300. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Lectures Backyard Honey Bee Apitherapy Led by herbal expert and bee lover Tamara Wolfson. Oct 25, 7pm. $55. The Fairfax Backyard Farmer, 135 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax, 415.342.5092. Climate Change & the Gardener Learn how climate affects our gardens and best practices we can employ to adapt. Oct 26, 7pm. Free. Corte Madera Library, 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera, 707.924.6444. Digging Deep Learn the art of the audition. Oct 30, 4pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600. Hillside Gardening 101 Learn to select the best plants for hillsides and overcome challenges. Oct 26, 7pm. Free. Sausalito City Hall, 420 Litho St, Sausalito, 415.289.4117. Mt Tam Astronomy Program Family-friendly evening includes talks and telescope viewing. Sat, Oct 28, 7:30pm. Free. Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, 3801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley,

Dumpstaphunk

with Jazz Mafia Horns + The Crooked Stuff 2nd Annual Dumpstaween Celebration Fri 11/4 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $10-$15 • All Ages

On Oct. 28, the Osher Marin JCC will host California Kind, with special guest David Nelson, for its annual costume dance party. A percentage of proceeds will help California musicians affected by the recent North Bay fires.

friendsofmttam.org. Race Matters Dialogue & Educational Series Several presenters speak on environmental housing. Oct 28, 10am. Free. First United Methodist Church, 9 Ross Valley Dr, San Rafael, unitedmarinrising.org.

Readings Book Passage Oct 26, 7pm, “Modern Death” with Haider Warraich. Oct 28, 3pm, “Elites of Eden” with Joey Graceffa. Oct 29, 1pm, “A Kind of Freedom” with Margaret Wilkerson Sexton. Oct 31, noon, “In the Midst of Winter” with Isabel Allende. Sold-out. Nov 1, 7pm, “Two kinds of Truth” with Michael Connelly. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. Book Passage By-the-Bay Nov 1, 6pm, “Amazon Wisdom Keeper” with Loraine Van Tuyl. 100 Bay St, Sausalito. 415.339.1300.

Theater Chicago Broadway’s longest-running American musical comes to Novato. Through Nov 12. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato, 415.883.4498. Pinky Marin Onstage presents playwright David Templeton’s comedy about a nerdy teenager pursuing the girl of his dreams. Oct. 27-28, Nov. 8-9 and 15-16. The Belrose Theatre, 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.290.1433. Thomas & Sally Marin Theatre Company opens its season with Thomas Bradshaw’s drama about Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings, the enslaved woman who mothered six of his children. Through Oct 29. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

Novato Copperfield’s Books Oct 29, 3pm, “Hello From Sammi!” with Susan Mirviss. 999 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.763.3052. Rebound Bookstore Oct 25, 7pm, Hand to Mouth/ WORDS SPOKEN OUT. 1611 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550. San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Oct 29, 2pm, “Nostos” with several authors. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.524.2800.

IrieFuse Native Elements

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Bob Minkin

Young Frankenstein The classic comedy spoof of Universal’s most famous monster screens with food and drinks on hand. Oct 30, 8pm. Free. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael, 415.524.2773.

Tue 10/31 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $30-$35 • 21+

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show Sun

Master Blues Guitarist Oct 29 Volker Strifler 4:00 Chip Roland on Piano

Sat

Nov 4

Foxes In The Henhouse 7:30

Sun

“Elect to Laugh” Nov 5 Will Durst 7:00

Putting the Mock Back in Democracy

Fri

Nov 10

Matt Jaffe &

Sat

Lavay Smith’s

Rancho The Distractions Debut! 8:00 / No Cover Original Rock & Roll Sat 8:30 Rancho Nov 11 Illeagles OU T ! The Bay Area’s Premier Debut! D L O S Eagles Tribute Band

Nov 18

“Speakeasy Supper Club” Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30

Annual

THANKSGIVING DINNER Thursday, November 23

Have an event for the Sundial? Email information to calendar@ pacificsun.com at least two weeks prior to desired publication.

Fri

Nov 24

6th Annual Leftover’s Party

Sat

8:30 13th Anniversary Holiday Party Bud E Luv 8:30

Nov 25

The Jerry Hannan Band Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

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San Anselmo Restaurants Fire Donation Enjoy dinner at the following restaurants (through October 30) in San Anselmo, and they will donate 10 to 15 percent of the proceeds to several nonprofits benefitting Napa and Sonoma county fire victims: Baan Thai Cuisine, Comforts, Creekside Pizza & Taproom, Cucina sa, Flour Craft Bakery, Insalata’s, L’Appart Resto, M.H. Bread & Butter, Madcap, Marinitas, Pizzalina, Sushi 69, Taco Jane’s, Valenti & Co.

Clubs & Venues


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THE YEAR’S BEST DOCUMENTARY.”

224 VINTAGE WAY NOVATO

EVERY WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC NIGHT WITH DENNIS HANEDA

-BRIAN TALLERICO, ROGEREBERT.COM

“IT’S AS CLOSE TO PERFECTION AS ANY FILM CAN GET.” -ALEX BILLINGTON, FIRSTSHOWING.NET

“A STUNNING ACHIEVEMENT.” -ANNE THOMPSON, INDIEWIRE

“IT’S A REVELATION.” -MIKE HOGAN, VANITY FAIR

“TRANSCENDS THE BOUNDARIES OF BOTH NATURE FILMS AND BIOGRAPHIES. A WONDROUS, MOVING, and TRULY STIRRING PORTRAIT.” -DAVID ROONEY, THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

!”

COUNTRY LINE DANCING WITH DJ JEFFREY GOODWIN EVERY 2ND & 4TH THURSDAY!

FRI 10/27 $15 8PM DOORS / 9PM SHOW 21+

ROCK CANDY HALLOWEEN PARTY!

SAT 10/28

$25

(nominee)

BROADCAST CRITICS’ DOCUMENTARY AWARDS

MON 10/30 $5

THU 11/02 $8

7:15PM DOORS / 8PM SHOW ALL AGES

DR. MONTGOMERY

SAT 11/04

NEON VELVET

$10 7PM DOORS / 8PM SHOW 21+

LENDER

+ MAGIC IN THE OTHER, SUN HUNTER

Book your next event with us. Up to 150ppl. Email kim@hopmonk.com

Jai Uttal 1st time ever!

CHRISTOPHER B. SMITH

OPENS FRIDAY OCTOBER 27 REGAL

RIALTO CINEMAS

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Seminars&Workshops To include your seminar or workshop, call 415.485.6700.

SINGLE MEN WANTED. SINGLES GROUP STARTS TUESDAY, 10/31/17! Single & Dissatisfied? Tired of spending weekends and holidays alone? Join with other singles to explore what’s blocking you from fulfillment in your relationships. Advance sign-up required; space limited. Also offering: ongoing coed (emotional) INTIMACY GROUPS (married/partnered or single), WOMEN’S GROUP and INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY & COUPLES THERAPY. Central San Rafael. Possible financial assistance (health/flex savings accounts or insurance). Call (415) 453-8117 for more info. Renée Owen, LMFT#35255. www.therapists. psychologytoday.com/183422 Inner Guidance: Getting Answers for Everyday Challenges. 11/4/2017. Attend a FREE spiritual workshop and share your experiences with other like-minded souls. Learn Spiritual exercises that open your heart and let God’s voice speak to you! All that lies ahead is already within your heart. Sponsored by Eckankar: The Path of Spiritual Freedom. Saturday, November 4, 2017. 1:00pm -3:00pm. Terra Linda Community Center, 670 Del Ganado Rd. San Rafael. For more information call 415-226-9635. www.eck-ca.org

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2017-143033. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: FULL STREAM GROUP, 329 BUTTERFIELD ROAD, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960: DAWN PATROL INC., 329 BUTTERFIELD ROAD, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Sept 20, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 04, Oct 11, Oct 18, Oct 25 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142991. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: VOYAGE SOCKS, 4306 REDWOOD HWY., SUITE 200, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: DANIEL WEIZMAN, 5 LILAC AVE., KENTFIELD, CA 94904. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Sept 13, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 04, Oct 11, Oct 18, Oct 25 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-142959. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 01) THE ARTISAN’S REP, 2) MARIN WOMEN AT WORK, 91 GLENSIDE WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: KAREN KILIAN, 649 1ST STREET WEST #18, SONOMA, CA 95476. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Sept 08, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 04, Oct 11, Oct 18, Oct 25 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-143172. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: WILLIS VENTURES INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE, 700 LARKSPUR LANDING CIRCLE, SUITE 150, LARKSPUR, CA 94939: DANIEL D. WILLIS, 22 SUMMERHILL WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Oct 13, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 18, Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08 of 2017)

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2017-143170. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: WEST BAY TRUCKING, 108 JEFFERSON DRIVE, TIBURON, CA 94920: ALBERTO LEON, 108 JEFFERSON DRIVE, TIBURON, CA 94920. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on Oct 12, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08, Nov 15 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2017-143199. The

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-143174. The following individual(s) is (are) doing businessMJ4MEDS, MARY JANES MEDIBLES, 374 HOLLY DRIVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: BETH BUCKLEY, 374 HOLLY DRIVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Oct 13, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 18, Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08 of 2017)

Trivia answers «5 1 San Rafael, at Fourth and A

streets; it was built in the Greek revival style

2 ‘Novem’ means ‘9’ in Latin; it was originally the ninth month of the 10-month ancient Roman calendar, before July and August were added 3 The Hunger Games 4 Massachusetts; Maine; Michi-

gan; Missouri

5 Salary, from ‘salarium’

(salt money)

6 A golf ball 7 King George VI of Great Britain; Colin Firth

8 Twenty ways (a combination of six things taken three at a time)

9 California condors 10 The cerebellum BONUS ANSWER: Ivory

17 PA CI FI C S U N | OCT OB ER 2 5 - 3 1 , 2 0 1 7 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

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18

PublicNotices following individual(s) is (are) doing business: SPRIGANDGLOW, SPRIG & GLOW, 300 BOLINAS AVE, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960: ALLISON QUISTGARD SCHERER, 300 BOLINAS AVE, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Oct 18, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08, Nov 15 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-143127. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: ELLLIE FRITZ STUDIO, 2015 5TH AVENUE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: CUSTOM MEDIA SR INC, 2015 5TH AVENUE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Oct 06, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08, Nov 15 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-143111. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: J & L MOBILE MECHANIC, 915 EAST BLITHEDALE AVE #6, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: JARDEL MACEDO DINIZ, MARIA LUANA SILVA, 915 EAST BLITHEDALE AVE #6, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941. The business is being conducted by A MARRIED COUPLE. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on Oct 04, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08, Nov 15 of 2017) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-143178. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: RAGTIME CITY CLOTHES, 35 A CLORINDA AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: LISA VANCOR, 35

A CLORINDA AVE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Oct 16, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08, Nov 15 of 2017)

OTHER NOTICES STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT FROM USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No: 304790. The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of a fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the Marin County Clerk-Recorder’s Office on MARCH 16, 2016, Under File No: 2016-139431. Fictitious Business name(s) MARIN 24/7 LIMOUSINE SERVICE, 8 MIWOK WAY, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: SALIM SURTI, 39 SAN CLEMENTE DRIVE #1094, CORTE MADERA, CA 94925, OGYEN THRINLAY, 8 MIWOK WAY, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Marin County on Sept 26, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 04, Oct 11, Oct 18, Oct 25 of 2017) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1703494. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ANDREW ELLOWAY AND JAMIE SALVO filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: MICHAEL BRANDON SALVO to MICHAEL BRANDON SALVO ELLOWAY. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted.

If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 11/08/2017 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT: E, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: Sept 21, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 04, Oct 11, Oct 18, Oct 25 of 2017) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN C. WALLACE; Case No. PR-1703633 filed on OCTOBER 02, 2017. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOHN WALLACE, JOHN C. WALLACE. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed in the Superior Court of California, County of MARIN by ISABELLA WONG. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ISABELLA WONG be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action). The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: NOVEMBER 13, 2017 at 9:00 am. In Dept. J, Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at Superior Court of California,

County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94913. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under Section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California Statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: ROBERT I. SIMON, 45 BELDEN PLACE, SAN FRANCISCO, CA~ 94104. Telephone: 415-434-3608. (Publication Dates: October 11, October 18, October 25 of 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT FROM USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME| File No: 304787. The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of a fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the Marin County ClerkRecorder’s Office on APRIL 12, 2017, Under File No: 2017141994. Fictitious Business name(s) V & C CLEANING, 768 DIABLO AVE, NOVATO, CA 94947: CAROL MOCK, 768 DIABLO AVE, NOVATO, CA 94947: VICTOR

CASTANEDA, 35 A OLIVA DRIVE NOVATO, CA 94947. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Marin County on Sept 13, 2017.) (Publication Dates: Oct 11, Oct 18, Oct 25, Nov 01 of 2017). ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1703634. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TIELI ZHANG GOTHELT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: TIELI ZHANG GOTHELT to CAROL Z GOTHELT, RUOSI LIU TO AUSTIN GOTHELT. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 12/04/2017 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT: B, ROOM: B, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive Room 113, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: Oct 02, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 18, Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08 of 2017 of 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT FROM USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No: 304795. The following person(s) has/have abandoned the use of a fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed

at the Marin County ClerkRecorder’s Office on Sept 07, 2016, Under File No: 2016140606. Fictitious Business name(s) H.M. PROPERTIES, 88 BELVEDERE STREET STE. 201, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: PEDRO I. HERNANDEZ M., 2825 CUTTING BLVD APT B, RICHMOND, CA 94804: SAMUEL HERNANDEZ, 47 WOODLAND AVE. APT #1, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Marin County on Oct 19, 2017.) (Publication Dates: Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08, Nov 15 of 2017) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1703634. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner TIELI ZHANG GOTHELT filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: TIELI ZHANG GOTHELT to CAROL Z GOTHELT, RUOSI LIU TO AUSTIN GOTHELT. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 12/04/2017 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT: B, ROOM: B, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive Room 113, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: Oct 02, 2017. (Publication Dates: Oct 18, Oct 25, Nov 01, Nov 08 of 2017)


By Amy Alkon

Q: A:

I’m a very envious person, though I don’t act on it (meaning I don’t try to mess things up for people who are doing well). Where does envy stem from? How can I get rid of it?—Begrudging Woman

You see a friend achieving some success and you say, “So happy for you. Well-deserved!”—which is a more polite way of saying, “I hope you are stricken with a rare deadly form of full-body adult acne.” We think of envy as an ugly, counterproductive emotion, but it’s really just a tool, like a jackhammer or a blender. To understand this, it helps to understand that even emotions that make us feel crappy have a job to do—motivating us to act in ways that will help us survive and make a bunch of little buggers who’ll totter off through the generations, passing on our genes. In other words, envy is adaptive. Envy is a form of social comparison that probably evolved to help us keep tabs on how well we’re doing relative to our rivals. As evolutionary social psychologist Abraham (“Bram”) Buunk and his colleagues explain, envy pushes us to dial up our game so we can “narrow the gap” between ourselves and “the superior other” (aka that annoying co-worker who likes to start sentences with, “Well, when I was at Harvard … ”). Buunk and his team explain that there are actually two kinds of envy—malicious envy and benign envy. Each kind motivates people to try to shrink that “status gap” between themselves and others. The difference is in how. Benign envy pushes people to work harder in hopes of matching or beating the competition. Malicious envy is the nasty kind—the kind that motivates a person to loosen the ladder rungs, hoping to cause their golden-girl co-worker to topple to her (professional) death. The upshot? Envy isn’t something to be ashamed of. You should just see that you use it in a positive way—as a tool for self-motivation instead of co-worker sabotage. However, getting ahead isn’t just a solo act; it’s often a cooperative endeavor. To decide when to cooperate and when to compete, consider the level of “scarcity.” When resources are scarce—like when there’s just one job available—go after it with everything you’ve got (within ethical boundaries, of course). But when the rewards aren’t limited, it’s good to be the sort of person who brings along other people. This tends to make others more likely to do nice things for you in return— even helping you get ahead … and without your hiring a hacker to reprogram Miss Fabulous’ computer so her screen saver is a pic of the boss with a Hitler mustache.

Q: A:

My girlfriend’s wonderful. Unfortunately, whenever we have a disagreement, she shares it on social media. She feels she has a right to do that because it’s part of her life. Am I not entitled to a private life while I’m with her?—News Object Some favor the social media approach to the “examined life,” Instagramming their medical records and crowdsourcing their flatulence problem. Others take a more guarded tack—encrypting everything … including their cat videos. The longing for privacy—keeping certain info about yourself from public consumption—is a very human thing, a desire that probably evolved out of our need to protect our reputation. In ancestral times, having a bad reputation could lead to a person being booted from their band and made to go it alone. Contrary to your girlfriend’s notion that “relationship” is just another way of saying “two-person surveillance state,” you have a right to privacy. This is a fundamental human right, explained Louis Brandeis and Samuel Warren in the Harvard Law Review in 1890, and it comes out of our right to be left alone. So, yes, you are entitled to pick the “privacy settings” on your own life, because the information about your thoughts, emotions and romantic interactions belongs to you. Nobody gets to dispense that info publicly without your permission—even if this means that they have to keep part of their life (the part with you) under wraps. To stop your girlfriend from turning your relationship into a giant data breach, trigger her sympathy—explaining how awful it feels to become infotainment for a bunch of strangers (and, worse, people you know). Better yet, help her feel it: “Honey … just imagine going on Twitter and finding your therapist’s new account: ‘Heard In Session.’”Y

Worship the goddess—or sacrifice her at the altar at adviceamy@aol.com.

Astrology

For the week of October 25

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I share Vincent

Van Gogh’s belief that “the best way to know life is to love many things.” But I also think that the next 12 months will be an inspiring time for you to be focused and single-minded in your involvement with love. That’s why I encourage you to take an approach articulated by the Russian mystic Anne Sophie Swetchine: “To love deeply in one direction makes us more loving in all others.” Halloween costume suggestion: A lover celebrating a sacred union to the love of your life, to God or Goddess, or to a symbol of your most sublime ideal.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Yes! We Have

No Bananas” is a silly novelty song that became a big hit in 1923. Its absurdity led to its wide use for humorous effect. For example, on the kids’ TV series The Muppet Show, puppets made out of fruits and vegetables sang parodies of the tune. That’s why I find it droll that the “No Bananas” songwriters stole part of the melody from the “Hallelujah Chorus,” the climax of classical composer George Handel’s religious oratorio Messiah. I’d love to see you engage in comparable transmutations, Taurus, making serious things amusing and vice versa. It’s a time when you can generate meaningful fun and playful progress through the art of reversal. Halloween costume suggestion: A tourist from Opposite Land or Bizarro World.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the next two weeks, you may have to navigate your way through careless gossip, distorted “facts,” superficial theories, hidden agendas, fake news and official disinformation. To prevent problems in communication with people who matter, take advantage of the Halloween spirit in this way: Obtain a bicycle helmet and cover it with aluminum foil. Decorate it with an Ace of Clubs, a red rose, images of wrathful but benevolent superheroes and a sign that says “No Bullshit Allowed.” By wearing this crown, you should remain protected. If that’s too weird for you, do the next best thing: Vow to speak the whole truth and nothing but the truth, and ask to receive the whole truth and nothing but the truth. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Watch out for a fake pizza-delivery driver who’s actually trying to issue you a legal summons. Be careful that you don’t glimpse a blood-red sky at dusk, in case it’s a prophetic sign that your cell phone will fall into a toilet sometime soon. Beware of the possibility that a large bird carrying a turtle to its nest accidentally drops its prey into a rain puddle near you, splashing mud on your fancy clothes. JUST KIDDING! All of the scenarios that I just described are stupid lies. The truth is, this should be one of the most worry-free times ever. You’re welcome, of course, to dream up a host of scary fantasies if you find that entertaining, but I guarantee that they’ll be illusory. Halloween costume suggestion: An indomitable warrior. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What is the material

object that you want most but don’t have? This is an object that would serve your soul’s highest purposes, although not necessarily your ego’s. Here’s another question: What evocative symbol might help keep you inspired to fulfill your dreams over the course of the next five years? I suggest that you choose one or both of those things to be the inspiration for your Halloween costume.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Did you get a

chance to go to circus school when you were a kid? How about magic school? Or maybe detective school, time-travel school or superhero school? Probably none of the above, right? Much of your education revolved around what you HAD to learn rather than what would be fun to learn. I’m not saying that it was bad that you were compelled to study subjects that you felt ambivalent about. In the long run, it did you good. But now here’s some sweet news, Virgo: The next 10 months will be a favorable time to get trainings and teachings in what you YEARN to learn. Halloween costume suggestion: A student.

By Rob Brezsny

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Now is an excellent phase in your cycle to scour bathrooms, scrub floors, shampoo carpets and wash windows. But the imminent future will be an even more favorable period to purify your motivations, tonify your emotions, purge your less-than-noble agendas, calm down your monkey mind and monkey heart, disinfect the moldy parts of your past and fact-check the stories that you tell about yourself. So which set of tasks should you focus on? It may be possible to make great strides on the second set as you carry out the first set. But if there’s not enough time and energy to do both, favor the second set. Halloween costume suggestion: A superhero who has wondrous cleaning powers; King Janitor or Queen Maid. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “You never sing

the same song twice,” said chanteuse Billie Holiday. “If you sing it with all the same phrasing and melody, you’re failing your art.” That’s an extreme statement, but I understand what she was driving at. Repeating yourself too much can be debilitating. That includes trying to draw inspiration from the same old sources that have worked in the past. I suggest that you avoid this behavior in the coming days. Raise Holiday’s approach to a universal principle. Fresh sources of inspiration are available! Halloween costume suggestion: A persona or character unlike any you’ve ever imagined yourself to be.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): How can you enjoy the lavish thrills of rebirth later unless you die a little inside now? It’s the trickiest phase of your cycle, when your energies are best used to resolve and graduate from the unfinished business of the last 10 months. I suggest that you put the past to rest as best as you can. Don your funniest sad face and pay your last respects to the old ways and old days that you’ll soon be leaving behind. Keep in mind that beauty will ultimately emerge from decay. Halloween costume suggestion: The mythical phoenix, which burns itself down, then resurrects itself from its own ashes. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There are

no such things as magic healings and miraculous redemptions and impossible breakthroughs. Right? Hard evidence provided by science precludes the existence of exotic help coming from spiritual realms. Right? Well, no. Not right. There is in fact another real world that overlaps the material world, and it operates according to different laws that are mostly imperceptible to our senses. But events in the other real world can have tangible effects in the material world. This is especially true for you right now. Take advantage! Seek practical answers and solutions in your dreams, meditations, visions and numinous encounters. Halloween costume suggestion: White-magic sorcerer or good witch.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Many years from now, in your last hours on Earth, you will have visions that show you how all of the events in your life were crucial to your life story. You will understand the lesson that was provided by each twist and turn of your destiny. Every piece of the gigantic puzzle will slip into place, revealing the truth of what your mission has been. And during that future climax, you may remember right now as a time when you got a long glimpse of the totality. Halloween costume suggestion: The happiest person on Earth; the sovereign of all you survey; the wise fool who understands yourself completely. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You might be able to pass for normal, but it will be better for your relationship with yourself if you don’t. You could try to tamp down your unusual urges and smooth your rough edges, but it will be smarter to regard those urges and edges as fertile raw material for your future happiness. Catch my drift? In the coming weeks, your main loyalty should be to your idiosyncratic intelligence. Halloween costume suggestion: The beautiful, interesting monster who lives in you.Y Homework: Name your greatest unnecessary taboo and how you would violate it if it didn’t hurt anyone. Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

19 PA CI FI C S U N | OCT OB ER 2 5 - 3 1 , 2 0 1 7 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

Advice Goddess

FREE WILL


Roots of Peace 20th Anniversary

Turning ‘Mines To Vines’

Gratitude for Sponsors

h Day Network w.earthday.org

Thursday,M September 28, 2017 ‘ ines to Vines’

With special appreciation to our Marin County ‘roots’ who supported our Roots of Peace ‘MINES TO VINES’ initiative since our inception. 20 Years Ago... In September 1997, following the tragic death of Princess Diana, the vision of MINES TO VINES began—replacing the scourge of landmines with bountiful vineyards and orchards worldwide. Today, with your support, we have turned ‘ideas into reality’ for rural farmers in Afghanistan, Angola, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cambodia, Croatia, Iraq, Israel, Palestine, and Vietnam. ROOTS OF PEACE VIETNAM—2020 Vision

Roots of Peace has a clear vision remove ALL landmines and explosive remnants of war in Quang Tri, Vietnam by Earth Day 2020. Today, there are an estimated 3 million landmines/UXO

your generous donations.

in Vietnam, over 40 years after the war ended on April 30, 1975. Since then, over 60,000 innocent Vietnamese have been killed, and ver 40,000 maimed or injured due to remnants of war. Ken Burns, PBS documentary film producer of the 10-part series THE VIETNAM WAR recently wrote to Heidi Kuhn, Founder/ CEO, Roots of Peace in support of her vision to eradicate ALL landmines in Quang Tri, and restore the land to pepper vines— turning MINES TO VINES:

“Oh I think it’s really huge. When you go to Viet Nam right now you see that the scars are mostly healed but what that means is that a good deal of the danger is just grown over and so these kinds of efforts are hugely important not just for life and limb but for the inevitable reconciliation that is in the process of taking place between our two countries.” —Ken Burns

Thursday, September 28, 2017

the Roots of Peace on Earth...

otsofpeace.org

20th Anniversary The Green Room War Memorial Opera House San Francisco, California

#landminefree2015

The Green Join Room our efforts to turn plant the Roots of Peace in Quang War Memorial Opera HouseTri, Vietnam by Earth Day 2020! San Francisco, California

DONATE: MAKE YOUR HOLIDAY GIFT OF “PEACE” for FAMILiES IN VIETNAM! #rootsofpeace

#landminefree2025

www.rootsofpeace.org

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October 24-31, 2017

Sun1743  

October 24-31, 2017