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YEAR 55, NO. 15 APRIL 12-18, 2017

Resident Tourist

SERVING MARIN COUNTY

PACIFICSUN.COM

ISSUE

Seashore Safari

DANIEL DIETRICH’S POINT REYES WILDLIFE VIEWING AND PHOTOGRAPHY TOURS P7

Boxed Treats P10 ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’ P11 The Battlefield P13


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Just a few minutes north of the Golden Gate, yet a million miles away. Call today to reserve your beach house...for a week, a summer or a lifetime.

Real Estate Sales and Premium Vacation Rentals www.seadrift.com or 415.868.1791 PacSun halfpage resident tourist 040717.indd 1

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Daniel Dietrich

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851 Highway 116 South Sebastopol

707.829.8544

1200 Fifth Ave., Suite 200 San Rafael, CA 94901 Phone: 415.485.6700 Fax: 415.485.6266 E-Mail: letters@pacificsun.com

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Publisher Rosemary Olson x315 EDITORIAL Editor Molly Oleson x316

CONTRIBUTORS Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Charles Brousse, Tom Gogola, Tanya Henry, Howard Rachelson, Nikki Silverstein, Charlie Swanson, David Templeton, Flora Tsapovsky, Richard von Busack ADVERTISING Advertising Account Managers Danielle McCoy x311, Marianne Misz x336 Classified and Legal Advertising x331 legals@pacificsun.com ART AND PRODUCTION Design Director Kara Brown Art Director Tabi Zarrinnaal Production Operations Manager Sean George Graphic Designers Jimmy Arceneaux Alfred Collazo ADMINISTRATION Accounting and Operations Manager Cecily Josse x331 CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano PACIFIC SUN (USPS 454-630) Published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc. Distributed free at more than 500 locations throughout Marin County. Adjudicated a newspaper of General Circulation. First class mailed delivery in Marin available by subscriptions (per year): Marin County $75; out-of-county $90, via credit card, cash or check. No person may, without the permission of the Pacific Sun, take more than one copy of each Pacific Sun weekly issue. Entire contents of this publication Copyright ©Metrosa, Inc., ISSN; 0048-2641. All rights reserved. Unsolicited manuscripts must be submitted with a stamped self-addressed envelope. ON THE COVER Design by Tabi Zarrinnaal Photo by Daniel Dietrich

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Letters Trivia/Hero & Zero Upfront Feature Film Food & Drink Talking Pictures Theater Music Movies Sundial Classifieds Astrology/Advice

16th Annual Courtesy of Ross Valley Players

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Movie Page Editor Matt Stafford Copy Editor Lily O’Brien

Tickets on Sale Now

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SALE

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7TH ANNUAL

Letters

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This week, writer Nikki Silverstein encourages an unhappy letter-writer to enjoy the amazing spring that surrounds us.

Resenting Criticism

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Dear [Nikki], As a very content Corte Madera resident, I highly resent your criticism of our proposed new electronic message board, which, according to you, ridiculously obstructs our view of Mt.Tam [Hero & Zero, March 29]. Instead of expressing gratitude about living in one of the most beautiful places in the country or perhaps even the world, you choose to be a yenta and kvetch! Perhaps you’d be happier moving back to Florida. It’s no wonder that the Pacific Sun pulled your “Single in the Suburbs” column and you have such difficulties forming and remaining in long-lasting relationships. YOU are the Zero! —Michael Rubin

Nikki Silverstein’s reply: Dear Mike, I’m pleased that you care about where you live, which is why I’m surprised that you want an electronic sign in the midst of your beautiful town. These signs produce light pollution, making it

more difficult to view the night sky. Drivers’ eyes will be averted from the road and the lovely view of Mt. Tam toward the beckoning lights of an LED sign. (Please note that I do not believe the sign will obstruct any view, yet it will distract from the mountain vista.) We agree that Marin is one of the most beautiful places in the world, and like you I am appreciative every day to be able to live here. I have no desire to move anywhere else, which is why I want to preserve the beauty that surrounds us. That necessarily includes keeping mini-jumbotrons off of our roadways. If that makes me a Zero, I readily accept the charge. I hope you’ll be happy to know that I decided to stop writing the “Single in the Suburbs” column when my beau and I began a committed relationship several years ago. Luckily I found someone who has taken a liking to a kvetching yenta. Enjoy the amazing spring that we’re having. Take care. —Nikki


1

2 What is the best possible hand in poker? It’s produced

by what set of cards?

3 What city of Ohio is named for an ancient city of

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northern Spain?

4 What seafood restaurant chain was created as a result

of the 1994 Academy Award-winning Best Picture film?

5 Identify the currency used in each of these countries before they adopted the Euro. Example: France (franc).

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a. Germany b. Italy c. Greece d. Ireland 6 What technology company in 1972 produced the first

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successful computer arcade game, Pong?

8 What woman served as George W. Bush’s first national security advisor? 9 The stunning World Heritage Site of Thingvellir National Park is home to the world’s oldest standing parliament building (10th century), the hot springs of the Great Geysir and the dramatic Gullfoss waterfall, in what isolated country?

10 A symphony orchestra typically includes what four woodwind instruments? BONUS QUESTION: Hiram Cronk, who died in New York in May, 1905, was the last surviving veteran of what war?

Hero

Answers on page

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Zero

Take a day to celebrate the bounty given to us by Earth, and take action by giving back. Earth Day is Saturday, April 22—and you’re invited. Get together with your neighbors and treat Marin’s Mother Earth to some special attention. Here are a few ideas: 1) WildCare and Marin County Parks join forces for a habitat restoration project around the Creekside Marsh and Corte Madera Creek in Greenbrae. For more information, visit wildcarebayarea.org. 2) Gather at the Mountain Theatre on Mt. Tam to improve trails and maintain the historic theater. To register, visit ggnpc.convio.net. 3) Get on board and pick up trash from San Rafael Creek and the bay with a free paddleboard rental. Call 101 Surf Sports at 415/524-8492 to reserve your spot.

Spring Open Studios +Artist’s Party HUNTERS POINT SHIPYARD SAN FRANCISCO

sat.

7 The chemical symbols for bromine and barium are featured in the title sequence of what popular TV series?

Howard Rachelson invites you to exciting upcoming Trivia Café team contests at the Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley, Wednesday, April 26, 6:30pm; free, with prizes, and a Big Trivia Bee fundraiser for Project Avary, Friday, May 19 at the Mill Valley Community Center, 5:30pm. For more information, visit projectavary.org, or contact Howard at howard1@triviacafe.com.

FIND iT. love it.

▼ Heavy winter rains bring out ticks in Marin County. The Bay Area Lyme Foundation studied a dozen of our popular trails recently and picked up almost 2,000 ticks to test for Lyme and other bacteria. Think Lyme isn’t here? Depending on the area, 1 to 9 percent of adult ticks carried Lyme, and the nymph infection rate was 2 to 13 percent. Study sites included the Bay Area Ridge Trail, Bolinas Lagoon, Cascade Canyon, China Camp, the Owl Trail, Point Reyes, Samuel P. Taylor State Park, Mt. Tam, Tennessee Valley, Tomales Bay State Park and Walker Creek. To prevent infection, use repellant on clothing and avoid sitting on logs, leaning on trees and lying in grasses. Most importantly, tick-check your body. Save removed ticks for testing and bring them to Marin Health and Human Services in San Rafael.—Nikki Silverstein

Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeros at ›› pacificsun.com

22 23 SUn.

11am– 6pm

2017

1 What high school in Marin County is in the process of completing a brand-new, state-of-the-art science building?

April

By Howard Rachelson

www.shipyardartists.com

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Trivia Café


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Upfront The latest figures from Caltrans find Marin County easily at the top of the state list of storm-related 2016–17 damage.

Storm’s Toll

Caltrans says winter damage to state to eclipse $1 billion By Tom Gogola

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his year’s winter storms will cost California $866 million in road repairs, according to the latest estimates from the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). That figure is a significant uptick from the $617 million in damages assessed at the end of February, and doesn’t include damage estimates from last weekend’s wind-blown deluge which knocked out electricity throughout Marin County, along with the usual array

of rockslides, washouts and local road flooding. The latest figures from Caltrans find Marin County easily at the top of the state list of storm-related 2016–17 damage with $91 million total spread over 17 different projects. The latest damage spreadsheets are a chorus of slip-outs and rockslides, road washouts and sinkholes, failed culverts and accelerated pavement failures. To date, Caltrans has identified 402 damage sites spread throughout the state’s 58 counties. Napa County has 14 damage sites and

Sonoma County has 17, according to Caltrans spreadsheets that detail the statewide damage. The respective price tags for repair are significantly lower than Marin’s: Caltrans says it will cost $16.5 million to repair Napa’s storm-damaged roads and $44 million to fix Sonoma’s. That Marin County figure of $91 million translates into an eyebrow-raising fact: Roughly one in 10 dollars spent by Caltrans this spring and summer will be spent on one coastal county. And of the $91 million in damages to Marin

roads, $78 million is accounted for in 13 damage sites spread along Highway 1. Several of the Sonoma County damage sites are also on Highway 1, and comprise about $10 million of the total $44 million damage estimate. Marin County also fields the third highest single-job estimate of the 402 damage sites identified by Caltrans in its latest damage report, a $17.4 million job to fix a slip-out on Highway 1 with a tie-back wall. Only Santa Clara and Monterey counties have single-ticket items that eclipse Marin’s $17.4 million project. Caltrans pegged $30 million for a wall repair in Santa Clara County, and Monterey’s got a pricey $28 million line item on the spreadsheet to replace the Pfeiffer Canyon Bridge, representing about half of that county’s $60 million in damages. Clearly the Bay Area and North Coast took the biggest hits in the winter-spring storms of 2016 and 2017. The top counties after Marin are Santa Clara, on the hook for $72 million; San Mateo, $63 million; Humboldt, $60 million; and Mendocino, $65 million. Caltrans estimates that when local costs are factored into their estimate, the total damage price tag is $1.27 billion. Recent reports estimated Marin County’s road damage obligations at $10 million, out of the estimated $400 million that localities will pick up this year. The agency reports that it will spend $700 million on emergency projects this year, “leaving $170 million for permanent restoration projects.” “This total will likely rise as we continue to assess damage and estimate repair and restoration costs,” says Caltrans spokesman Mark Dinger via email. Help is on the way—generally speaking. Last week, the California Legislature passed SB 1, which will raise California’s gasoline excise tax by 12 cents a gallon and enacts other auto-related fees in the state to fund a long-awaited, $55 billion road repair plan over 10 years.Y Read the full story on pacificsun.com.


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Courtesy of Daniel Dietrich

Into the Wild

Point Reyes National Seashore safaris with Daniel Dietrich

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eing a resident tourist sometimes takes effort. While gems may be hidden on a neighboring street, or in an unassuming parking lot, sometimes discovering the richness and boldness of your surroundings means driving for a few miles, immersing yourself in nature and, to your own surprise, finding a safari experience— minus the plane ticket to Kenya. Marin County-based professional photographer Daniel Dietrich has made a whole career of it. Born in Buffalo, New York, Dietrich moved to Point Reyes from San Francisco three years ago, and now lives on the coast with his family. “Photography has always been a passion hobby of mine,” he says. “I developed my first roll of film in the darkroom when I was 13 years old. A camera went with me on every trip I took growing up, but it wasn’t until four years ago that I dropped

my high tech industry job to pursue wildlife photography full-time.” Since moving, Dietrich launched a service under the intriguing name Point Reyes Safaris, offering authentic safari experiences for groups of up to eight people. “Wildlife is my only focus,” Dietrich says, “and I am very fortunate that I don’t have to supplement my income with any other form of photography.” On a full-day safari, visitors go from sunrise to sunset exploring Point Reyes National Seashore, photographing wildlife and barely stopping for lunch to spot as many animals as possible. Sound too good to be true? We asked Dietrich to tell us more. Flora Tsapovsky: How did you come up with the safari idea? Daniel Dietrich: “I have been fascinated with bobcats for years. They are elusive and shy, powerful and regal. As I spent more and more time observing them, I was able to

obtain better and better images of them. Being one of the only places in the country where you can find and photograph them with any consistency, I invited a few friends to come shoot with me. With that, the idea to guide to photograph bobcats was born. But it really is the [Point Reyes] National Seashore that makes it all possible. Over 50 percent of North America’s birds have been documented here, as well as 85 species of mammals. It is a highly overlooked park for wildlife, but one that needs to be on any wildlife photographer’s list.” FT: What kind of animals do you encounter on the safari? DD: “The animals we encounter really depend on the season and what my guests want to see. The animals we see most often are tule elk, elephant seals, bobcats, coyotes, great horned owls, barn owls, whales, peregrine falcons and so many other birds. We get lucky

By Flora Tsapovsky at times seeing badgers, eagles and long-tailed weasels. I am still waiting to see a mountain lion with one of my guests. Each safari is quite different, which is great. They are wild animals so we never know what we’ll see, but we always see something exciting.” FT: Have you done safaris in other countries? How is the Point Reyes experience different? DD: “I am very lucky to have traveled quite a bit. Growing up, I was always saving for a plane ticket instead of saving to buy some material item. I have done quite a few safaris overseas. On these safaris, you cover vast amounts of land in pursuit of viewing wildlife. Point Reyes is quite small in comparison to the likes of a Masai Mara. So we don’t have to cover as much ground to encounter wildlife. And of course the wildlife itself is quite different. Point Reyes is home to many animals not »8

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With his wildlife viewing and photography safaris, Daniel Dietrich helps locals and visitors alike discover the natural wonder of Point Reyes National Seashore.


Courtesy of Daniel Dietrich

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Professional photographer Daniel Dietrich shares the magic of Point Reyes National Seashore through his wildlife viewing and photography safaris.

found in any other country.” FT: What are some of your tips on ethics and safety while on a safari? DD: “Ethics are of the utmost importance to me. Keeping the safety of the animal first should be at the top of every photographer’s list. Never purposefully flush an animal or bird to get a shot. And never, ever, bait or feed an animal for the purpose of photography. The best tip I can give to anyone photographing wildlife in Point Reyes National Seashore is, use your binoculars first. Stop and scan. Walk to higher ground and search the hills for wildlife. It is there; you just have to find it. When you do find a bobcat or a coyote, work out the best plan to help you photograph it. Position yourself to where you think you can get a good shot without running after the animal. Patience is the number one thing needed to capture great wildlife images.” FT: Who typically signs up for these experiences? DD: “The diversity of people who have joined me on safari has been incredible. I have had guests fly in from overseas specifically to photograph bobcats. I’ve taken out many people who live right here in Point Reyes. I’ve taken out families with kids as young as 2 and retired folks who aren’t getting around like they used to. Since I typically take out very small groups, the itinerary is totally up to my guests, which I think makes it very personal and enjoyable for them.” FT: Are there any photography pointers specific to West Marin and the Point Reyes area? DD: “Point Reyes has so many different faces when it comes to

weather. This gives incredible diversity to photography. Shooting the tule elk during a cool, foggy morning one day to a red, fiery sunrise the next is really exciting and creates such drastically different images. You always have to be prepared for any kind of weather here, so dress in layers, even in the middle of summer. Bring a variety of lenses with you. It is great to have a long telephoto lens for wildlife, but don’t forget your landscape lens. There is a magical scene around every corner.” FT: And finally, what can we do to enrich our daily ‘resident tourist’ experience and be more open to our surroundings? DD: “Point Reyes National Seashore sits within striking distance to millions and millions of people. Yet when I was living in San Francisco, I met an enormous amount of people who had never visited this magical place. We have national parks and public lands all around us here in Northern California. Get out and visit some of them. Connect with these special places that are right at your doorstep. You will be amazed at what a sighting of a whale can do to you, or the feeling you get standing on a sun-drenched cliff at sunset with the wind blowing on your face. There is growing pressure on these special places, and who knows what the future holds for them. By connecting with them, we will be more inclined to protect these national treasures for many years to come.”Y Point Reyes Safaris; 303/929-8443; pointreyessafaris.com.

In ‘Truman,’ two friends, one of them dying, try to give an elderly rottweiler away.

FILM

Last Holiday ‘Truman’: It’s complicated By Richard von Busack

I

’m so pro-euthanasia that it’s amazing I’m not actually dead yet, so some of the lifechoosing cross-currents in the Spanish import Truman didn’t tug at me. The dying Madrid actor Julian (Ricardo Darin) is surprised by a dear old friend Tomás (Javier Cámara, an elongated and more forlorn Robert Duvall) who has flown in from Canada. Julian informs his friend that he’s about to discontinue chemo and will, before long, pull that final curtain himself. In the meantime, he must adopt away Truman, his elderly rottweiler. During the four days of hanging out, the old friends try to give Truman away to various people. Darin’s a dashing actor with a buttery voice; pale and dying is not a great look. There’s unused room for a backstory—director Cesc Gay slows the process by generally having one bit of information per

scene—and it takes a while to figure out who is whom to who. By the time it’s clear, there’s the aspect of a pity-party. A scene where Julian is fired from the part of Valmont in a Spanish language staging of Dangerous Liaisons seems piled up with extraneous sorrow. While the theater manager’s double-talk is coldly witty, it doesn’t add up. The production is a hit, and Julian shows no weakness on stage as the French scoundrel. Some of the moments could be taken from a dying man’s notebook, like Julian accepting forgiveness from a man whose wife he slept with, and talking with friends who avoid him. The first thing said to him by the producer (José Luis Gómez) who is cutting him loose is both grave and brave: “I have no words of comfort.” But Truman is stuck between realism and romanticism, and neither side works completely.Y


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Pacific Sun.com


Come Join Us for our 21st Year Easter’s Day Lunch Sunday April 16th Featuring a Special Lunch Menu! 11:00-4:00 • Dinner 4:30-9:30

Small Plates

Bruschetta con Cavallo e Burrata, Applewood smoked bacon, kale, burrata, sea salt Cavolfiore, roasted cauliflower, anchovies, garlic, capers, golden raisins, lemon vinaigrette, bread crumbs Burrata, Sliced cured coppa with fig jam, organic greens, truffle vinaigrette, sea salt & toasted olive bread Gamberi Pancetta, Large gulf shrimp wrapped in pancetta with grilled polenta & cajun beurre blanc Torta di Porri, It’s back! Garlic infused leek mushroom tort, sweet crust Insalata Davide, Spring mix with toasted walnuts, feta, golden raisins & balsamic vinaigrette Cesare, Crisp romaine with parmesan cheese & garlic croutons with a lemon, garlic & anchovy dressing Rucola e Bietole, Roasted red beets with gorgonzola, glazed walnuts, aged vinegar & E.V.O.O.

brandy, tarragon, tomato cream sauce Papparadelle ai Tre Funghi, Shitake, porcini, Portobello and button mushrooms in a wine sauce Gnocchi di Manzo, house made potato gnocchi, braised beef short ragu & ricotta salata. Or any sauce

Carne, Pollame, Pesce & Large salads Cannneloni con Gamberi, Crepes filled w/ gulf & bay shrimp, bechamel sauce, mozzarella, grilled shrimp 19 Brasato, Short Ribs Niman Ranch boneless balsamic braised short ribs served over soft creamy polenta 23 Pollo alla Parmigiana Il Davide, Southern fried spicy panko, organic chicken breast, mozzarella, tomato, trofie alfredo 20 Sufagato d Agnello Lamb Stew, Superior Farms grilled lamb loin, butternut squash polenta, onions, chard, carrots 21 Vitello Piccata, Pounded grass fed organic veal, lemon caper white wine sauce, mixed veggies 21 Salmone con Agrumi, Grilled sustainably raised with grilled Pasta Pasta! polenta, tarragon citrus cream & aged balsamic 22 Pasta served with choice of soup, Cesare or Insalata Davide Gluten free pasta is available upon request Insalata di Agnello Grigliato, greens, grilled lamb loin & chops with gorgonzola, balsamic vinaigrette & rosemary Trofie di Mele, prosciutto, carmelized apples, garlic cream sauce, toasted breadcrumbs Gamberi alla Scampi, Sauteed gulf prawns in a garlic white wine butter lemon sauce, mixed veggies 19 Tortelli Davide, Large Tortellinis filled with sweet potato & mascarpone cheese, sage infused cream Capesante al Tartufo, Sautéed sea scallops in black truffle sauce with shitake mushrooms & white truffle salt 19 Capellini del Diavolo, Rock prawns with pancetta, spinach, garlic, green onions, Il Davide’s marinara “Sandy” Salmon Salad, Grilled Loch Duart salmon, baby spinach, bacon, egg, strawberries & white balsamic vin 16 Crab Tordelli, Dungeness crab and bay shrimp filled large ravioli, with a tomato & basil cream sauce Sogliola Dorata, coast petrale sole, tossed in a light egg dredge with a lemon, white wine, butter & cream sauce 18 Linguine agli Scampi, Rock prawns with frazzled garlic in a cream, lemon & dry white wine reduction Wild Blueberry Stuffed French Toast, Sourdough French toast stuffed with wild blueberries, mascarpone cheese 11 Due Ravioli, 1/2 ricotta ravioli, cream and pancetta & 1/2 short rib ravioli, gorgonzola, demi-glace Wild Mushroom Frittata, Wild mushrooms, spinach, fontina cheese, crème fraiche, house potatoes & fruit 11 Orecchiette alla Davide, Ground veal & prosciutto with a

NOW ACCEPTING RESERVATIONS • 415/454-8080 901 A STREET SAN RAFAEL • WWW.ILDAVIDE.NET

Join our

OPEN STUDIO EVENT Friday April 21, 5-8pm & meet our Exhibiting Artists from BECOMING INDEPENDENT 3 Showroom Galleries & 13 Artisan Studios in one building! Gallery Hrs: Sat & Sun 11–5pm • 1200 River Rd, Fulton • Fultoncrossing.com

Courtesy of Kathryn Tjosvold

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Kathryn Tjosvold, founder of Box Trot Gifts, carefully curates local products for her heartfelt boxes; succulents add an original twist, and a refreshing change from cut flowers.

FOOD & DRINK

Beauty Box Box Trot Gifts combines local products with thoughtfulness By Tanya Henry

E

verybody loves a bestkept secret. That feeling when you stumble upon something so special and so sweet that part of you wants to keep it all to yourself, yet you know the world would be a better place if you spread the word. So, you heard it here first—Box Trot Gifts. Marin native Kathryn Tjosvold’s business crafting beautiful gift boxes filled with succulents and expertly selected specialty items is less than a year old, but budding. “I’ve always loved making gifts for people—that steered away from typical, generic gift boxes,” Tjosvold says. “I think including succulents adds a unique touch.” Tjosvold grew up in Corte Madera, attended Redwood High School and earned a teaching credential at Dominican University. When she graduated, she decided to put the classroom on hold, and instead got married, had a baby and began making the boxes. Along with doing extensive

research on mostly locally made, highquality food and beauty products, Tjosvold took cues from her mom’s passion for succulents. Her boxes are crafted from distressed woods and galvanized tin, and organic, natural products await recipients. Tjosvold hasn’t quit her day job working for her dad’s winemaking software company, but she does find time to make deliveries in Marin and fill orders from her San Anselmo home—complete with a potting shed straight out of Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Peter Rabbit, and plenty of open space for seasonal sales and special events. A variety of available boxes include everything from chocolate, caramel corn and wine, to bubble bath and luffa sponges. Boxes can be ordered and picked up by appointment, or delivered.Y Box Trot Gifts; 415/891-2113; boxtrotgifts.com; boxtrotgifts@gmail.com.


TALKING PICTURES

Soft Animals Poet Prartho Sereno on kindness, humanity and ‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’ By David Templeton

‘‘T

he film has a very poetic heartbeat, perhaps because it’s based on a book written by a poet,” observes Prartho Sereno, sipping a cup of coffee this rainy Saturday, while discussing The Zookeeper’s Wife, a new film based on the bestselling book of the same name. “It’s funny, I know, but different poems kept coming to me, popping into my head, all the time I was watching the film.” “Actually,” I suggest, silently acknowledging that Sereno herself is an award-winning poet, “that’s not really that surprising.” An acclaimed teacher and author, Sereno is a regular participant in the California Poets-in-the-Schools program. She just completed a two-

year term as Marin County Poet Laureate, and only just passed the honorary title to 2017-2018 Poet Laureate Rebecca Foust. Sereno’s books include Elephant Raga, winner of the 2014 Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry, plus Call From Paris, Everyday Miracles, Garden Sutra and Causing a Stir, the latter a series of poems exploring “the secret lives and loves” of kitchen utensils. The Zookeeper’s Wife, the book, is, in fact, the work of a poet: Naturalist and author Diane Ackerman (A Natural History of the Senses, Jaguar of Sweet Laughter, One Hundred Names for Love). The book, and the movie version— directed by Niki Caro (Whale Rider)—tells the true-life story of Warsaw zookeepers Antonina and

Jan Zabinski ( Jessica Chastain and Johan Heldenbergh), who risked their lives during WWII following the Nazi invasion of Poland, by using their zoo to secretly smuggle Jews from the ghetto to safety. Antonina’s profound empathy for animals and humans alike drives much of the action. And for a tale in which bombs drop from the sky and death comes suddenly, it’s amazing how quiet the whole enterprise is. “There was this one line, from a Mary Oliver poem, that I kept thinking of during the movie,” says Sereno, searching her mind for the line, and quickly finding it. “‘You only have to let the soft animal of your body love what it loves,’” she recites. “‘Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.’

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‘The Zookeeper’s Wife’ is the story of Antonina and Jan Zabinski, a Polish couple who hid Jews in their Warsaw Zoo during WWII.

That’s from Oliver’s ‘Wild Geese,’ a beautiful poem.” Sereno says that she thinks the poem coming to mind had something to do with the deep primal innocence of animals. “That was particularly powerful in the scene where Warsaw is being bombed, and the animals in the zoo all respond to it in their own natural way,” she says. “That was terrifying,” I agree. “There’s something about seeing war through the eyes of children, or in this case, of animals, that gets us to see it afresh.” Sereno notes a tearful scene in which Antonina helps birth a baby elephant. “There was so much beauty in that moment,” Sereno says. “Her connection to all the animals was quite powerful, wasn’t it? It felt like the perfect comment on what’s going on right now in the world, all these questions we’re asking about what it means to be human, and what our responsibilities are to take care of each other. But to explore all of that through this woman’s love of animals, that was extraordinary. I think Antonina exemplifies the highest possibility of what humans are capable of, while also showing us the worst possibilities of what humans are capable of—the Nazis and the ghetto and the trains to the concentrations camps.” “In a way, it was a very moral movie, without ever being preachy,” I suggest. “It worked on a very emotional level.” “I heard a scientist once, this utter intellectual, who was asked what it was he thought that could save the planet from destruction,” Sereno says, “and his answer was, ‘The sensation of awe. That’s the only thing that can save us.’ I get chills just thinking about that. “There’s so much awe in this film,” she continues. “I really do feel that it’s ... in a state of connection with other beings, animals and people, children and adults, strangers and family, that we all can rise. That’s our destiny, I believe, to really become caretakers of this planet, and of each other. And we can do that, if we can allow ourselves to experience that transformative state of wonder.” “There’s so much destruction and violence in this world, though,” I counter. “Can we ever really give that up, as a species?” “Yes,” Sereno says. “I think the urge to destroy comes when our impulse to create and connect is frustrated. If that impulse is encouraged, rather than suppressed, then I think healing and connecting and creating is our natural tendency.”Y


Courtesy of Ross Valley Players

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In ‘Way Out West,’ gullible officials and citizens are taken in by a pair of con men who pose as governmental functionaries.

THEATER

Restrained Reset Ross Valley Players stages world premiere of ‘Way Out West’ By Charles Brousse

A

friend recently asked me, “What’s the difference between comedy and farce? Aren’t both supposed to make us laugh?” I referred him to the old banana peel joke. It’s a comedy if a nice but accident-prone young man whom you have come to care about slips on a banana peel while trying to keep up with his fast-moving sweetheart and she rewards him with a kiss. That’s worth an “aww” and a chuckle. It’s a farce if a pompous young man who is forever touting his superiority slips on a banana peel, falls, gets up, nonchalantly brushes himself off and resumes walking

as if nothing happened—only to immediately slip again. The house will probably rock with laughter. Stage farces are composed of multiple scenes like the latter. The distinguishing factor is whether the audience has an emotional involvement with the characters and their predicaments. Of course, there are other differences—in production style, degree of realism, psychological depth, etc.—but both theatrical forms have a long history and can be immensely entertaining if done well. I think farce poses greater challenges because it’s essentially planned mayhem, or organized chaos, whichever term you prefer.

The point is that everything has to be exactly in place. Instead of the linear storytelling found in comedies, farce depends on perfect timing, athleticism and an ability to improvise on the part of the actors, creative staging by the director and a script that features many opportunities for playful absurdity. All of which leads us to the subject of this week’s column: Ross Valley Players’ (RVP) current world premiere of Way Out West, by Marin County author and bookseller Joel Eis. The play is part of the “RAW” (Ross Alternative Works) series, and has been under development for several years.

First, an important disclosure: The following brief appraisal is based on what I saw on what was supposed to be opening night, but wasn’t. Due to the unexpected departure of a performer in the key role of Mayor Andy “Rabbit’s Foot” Monahan two days earlier, director Buzz Halsing stepped in for the Thursday night preview and then yielded to Alex Ross for the remainder of the run. After a few hours of rehearsal, the veteran RVP actor went on for the Friday night opening (now reduced to a preview) with script in hand, and managed the sudden assignment with his usual competence. But the impact of these unsettling events could not help but have a substantial effect on everyone concerned. Against that background, here is what I can say with some certainty about Way Out West as a play and RVP’s ability to handle a project of this nature: For the most part, Eis’ adaptation of Nikolai Gogol’s early 19th century play, The Inspector General, could have a bright future if some simple adjustments are made. Eis resets the action to San Francisco in 1848, then a small town where gullible officials and citizens are taken in by a pair of con men who pose as governmental functionaries sent to look into reports of local corruption, of which there is no scarcity. Anxious to cover up, town officials ply their visitors with bribes, and their women, enthralled by power, throw themselves into their arms. The imposters can’t believe their good fortune! Eventually, though … well, you probably can guess the rest. This scenario is replete with rich opportunities for broad humor, but I had the feeling that Eis, perhaps guided by a desire to stay as close to Gogol’s original as possible, chose to be more conservative than he had to be. As for the performances, it’s really not fair to evaluate a cast that had to work under such difficult circumstances. What I can say, however, is that if a RAW play is to continue to be included in the regular season—as I hope that it will be—RVP should provide the same resources that are given to its other shows. Community theater or not, there should be no second-class productions. Finally, while I’m dishing out unsolicited advice, beware of farces!Y NOW PLAYING: Way Out West runs through April 23 at the Ross Valley Players’ Barn Theatre, Marin Art & Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd., Ross; 415/456-9555; rossvalleyplayers.com.


13

LA GUNS

SATURDAY, APRIL 15

T SATUHIS RDA Y

Featuring: Tracii Guns and Phil Lewis Special Guests KINGSBOROUGH

SATURDAY APRIL 22

Juan Monsalvez

Indie folk-rock band The Battlefield (L-R, Jenny Weaver, James Addison and Matt Ducey, with drummer JJ Moser) got the inspiration for its name from the Pat Benatar song,“Love is a Battlefield.”

MUSIC

STEPHEN PEARCY OF RATT

Performing the RATT Hits and more

FRIDAY JUNE 9

HOUSE OF ROCK 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH THE RETURN OF

BLUE OYSTER CULT

Don't Fear The Reaper ~ I'm Burning for You ~ Godzilla

Solid Blend Trio joins forces in The Battlefield By Lily O’Brien

‘‘I

think sometimes the best art and the best music comes from inner conflict and turmoil,” says Matt Ducey, one of the three singer/songwriter/ multi-instrumentalists who comprise The Battlefield, a Los Angeles-based Americana, indie folk-rock, Fleetwood Mac-inspired band. The band will be performing at the Folkish Festival at the Marin Country Mart on Sunday, April 16. Ducey grew up in San Anselmo, and at 9 years old began acting and singing in local school and community musicals and choirs. When he was a junior in high school, he was invited to become one of the founding members of ’Till Dawn, a teen a cappella group at the San Rafael nonprofit Youth in Arts. After studying drama and music at San Francisco State University, Ducey moved to L.A. to give professional acting a shot, and also began performing and recording original music. In 2013, he met James Addison, a fellow struggling

musician and actor, and crossed paths with Jenny Weaver, who was working on a debut album. “It was perfect timing for all of us to connect,” Ducey says. “All of a sudden we were doing some really significant three-part harmonies— with such ease, and the blend was just really solid.” The trio began performing together, and in 2015 released their first album, The Tipping Point, comprised of original songs. In 2016, the band toured from coast-to-coast. The show in Marin, which Ducey suspects will draw lots of friends and family, will feature drummer JJ Moser, along with multiple instruments—acoustic and electric guitar, banjo, mandolin harmonica and more. “Continually things just get better and better,” Ducey says, “and cool opportunities are coming up.”Y The Battlefield, Sunday, April 16, Folkish Festival, Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur; 12:30pm; free; 415/4615700; marincountrymart.com.

FRIDAY, JUNE 16 ROCK GUITAR GOD George Lynch

LYNCH MOB “Wicked Sensation”

RECORD LIKE A PRO AT RSU RECORDING & FILMWORKS

STATE OF THE ART AUDIO AND FILM PRODUCTION CONTACT JARED @ 707.694.1785 FOR RATES & INFO

The Panama Hotel and Restaurant 4 Bayview St | San Rafael | 415 4573993 | PanamaHotel.com

A boutique hotel, very small and charming, with all the amenities you could want, including a fine restaurant with live music. Very special. Trip Advisor review

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ORIGINAL LINEUP


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Movies

• New Movies This Week Beauty and the Beast (PG)

By Matthew Stafford Bolshoi Ballet: A Hero of Our Time (Not Rated) The Boss Baby (PG)

Fri. April 14 - Thu. April 20 • Beauty and the Beast (2:03) Live-action remake of the 1991 Disney musical stars Emma Watson as the abducted beauty who finds herself falling for her beastly captor. • Bolshoi Ballet: A Hero of Our Time (2:45) Choreographer Yuri Possokhov presents Lermontov’s turgid tale of a love’em-and-leave-’em Russian soldier. • The Boss Baby (1:37) DreamWorks cartoon about an overbearing newborn’s effect on his unprepared parents; Alec Baldwin vocalizes. • The Case for Christ (1:52) Atheist journalist Lee Strobel sets out to prove that Christianity is a hoax after his wife gets that old time religion. • Cézanne et Moi (1:53) Eye-filling period drama examines the lifelong friendship between two giants of 19th century France, Emile Zola and his buddy Paul. • Colossal (1:56) Anne Hathaway’s singleton existence is upended when she finds out that that Godzilla-like creature destroying South Korea is all her fault. • Deconstructing The Beatles: Rubber Soul (1:35) Filmed lecture features musicologist Scott Freiman examining the creative process behind the Fab Four’s 1965 masterpiece. • The Fate of the Furious (2:16) Diesel, Statham and The Rock are back, racing from Cuba to Manhattan to the Arctic Circle to bring down an evil supervillain; Helen Mirren and Charlize Theron co-star. • Frantz (1:53) French period drama about a young woman’s search for the truth about the fiancé who died in battle in WWI. • Get Out (1:44) Savvy social commentary underscores Jordan Peele’s horror flick about an interracial relationship, white guilt and a scary old house. • Ghost in the Shell (1:46) The Japanese manga is embodied by Scarlett Johansson as a cyber-enhanced human trained to take down the world’s top terrorists. • Gifted (1:41) The idyllic life of a single dad and his precocious daughter is threatened when it turns out that the tot’s a mathematical genius. • Going in Style (1:36) Remake of the 1979 George Burns classic stars Alan Arkin, Morgan Freeman and Michael Caine as three buddies who turn to a life of crime when their pension fund evaporates. • Kedi (1:19) Rambling documentary tribute to the beloved free-ranging cats who’ve roamed the streets of Istanbul for thousands of years. • Kong: Skull Island (1:58) Reboot of the 1933 classic stars a giant ape and lovely glimpses of Oahu and Vietnam, but no Fay Wray. • Landfill Harmonic (1:24) Documentary focuses on the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, a Paraguayan youth group that performs on instruments entirely made out of garbage. • Life (1:43) The crew of a cutting-edge space station learns more than they want to

about life on Mars; Jake Gyllenhaal stars. • Logan (2:15) The X-Men’s Wolverine returns as an on-the-skids expat cabbie in post-mutant Mexico; Hugh Jackman stars. • Mister (2:15) Bollywood musical comedy extravaganza stars Varun Tej, Lavanya Tripathi and location footage of sunny Spain. • National Theatre London: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (3:20) Direct from the Old Vic it’s Tom Stoppard’s lively comedy about the misadventures of two minor Shakespearean players; Daniel Radcliffe stars. • National Theatre London: Twelfth Night (2:30) Shakespeare’s raucous comedy of mistaken identity and gender confusion gets a saucy update from the thespians of NTL. • The Old Vic: The Crucible (3:30) Live from London, it’s a gripping new production of Arthur Miller’s powerful parable about the Salem witch trials. • Power Rangers (2:04) Modern reboot finds a team of typical teens harnessing strange powers to fight crime; Elizabeth Banks co-stars as Rita Repulsa. • Reset (1:20) Visually stunning documentary follows acclaimed choreographer Benjamin Millepied as he takes on the task of rejuvenating the Paris Opera Ballet. • Smurfs: The Lost Village (1:29) Smurfette and company search the Forbidden Forest for a legendary lost village and meet magical creatures along the way! • Tiburon International Film Festival The 16th annual fest features tributes, parties and an amazing array of movies from around the globe. Call (415) 251-8433 or visit tiburonfilmfestival.com for schedule and showtimes. • Tomorrow (1:55) Prize-winning documentary focuses on 10 communities around the world that practice environmental sustainability in the areas of education, energy, food and finance. • T2: Trainspotting (1:57) Danny Boyle’s mainlining Scottish desperadoes are back, addicted this time to a toxic brew of melancholy and nostalgia; Ewan McGregor stars. • Truman (1:48) Poignant tragicomic road movie follows a cancer patient and his best friend as they cross Spain searching for their dog’s new owner. • White Like Me (1:10) Documentary exploration of American racism past and present and how it’s shaped the nation’s policies, politics and attitudes. • Your Name (1:46) Mystical anime about a boy and a girl who become kindred spirits when a passing comet causes them to swap bodies. • The Zookeeper’s Wife (2:06) True story of Antonina Zabinski, a Warsaw zookeeper who worked with the Resistance to save lives in Nazi-occupied Poland; Jessica Chastain stars.

The Case for Christ (PG) • Cézanne et Moi (Not Rated) • Colossal (R) • Deconstructing The Beatles: Rubber Soul (Not Rated) The Fate of the Furious (PG-13)

Frantz (PG-13) Get Out (R) Ghost in the Shell (PG-13)

Gifted (PG-13)

Going in Style (PG-13) Kedi (Not Rated) Kong: Skull Island (PG-13)

Landfill Harmonic (Not Rated)

Life (R) Logan (R) Mister (Not Rated) National Theatre London: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Not Rated) National Theatre London: Twelfth Night (Not Rated) The Old Vic: The Crucible (Not Rated) Power Rangers (PG-13) • Reset (Not Rated) Smurfs: The Lost Village (PG)

• •

• • •

Tiburon International Film Festival (Not Rated) Tomorrow (Not Rated) Truman (Not Rated)

T2: Trainspotting (R) White Like Me (Not Rated)

Your Name (PG) The Zookeeper’s Wife (PG-13)

Fairfax: Fri-Sat 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:55; Sun-Wed 1:10, 4:05, 7 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 6:30, 3D showtime at 9:25; Sat-Sun 12:30, 6:30, 3D showtimes at 3:30, 9:25 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12, 3:10, 6:10, 9:10; sing-along at 11:05, 4:50 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:10, 1:10, 4, 7, 10:10 Lark: Wed 7:30 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:45, 3:20, 6:45, 9:15; Sun-Wed 12:45, 3:20, 6:45 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 6:45, 9:15; Sat-Sun 11:15, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 Northgate: Fri-Sat 10:45, 12:30, 1:15, 3:50, 6:20, 7:55, 3D showtimes at 3, 5:30, 10:30; SunWed 10:45, 12:30, 1:15, 3:50, 6:20, 7:55, 8:45, 3D showtimes at 3, 5:30, 10:30 Playhouse: Fri 3:45, 6:45, 9:20; Sat 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:20; Sun 12:45, 3:45, 6:45; Mon-Wed 3:45, 6:45 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30; 3D showtime at 1:30 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:30, 2:10, 4:55, 7:35, 10:15 Rafael: Fri, Mon-Thu 5:30, 8; Sat-Sun 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8 Regency: Thu 7 Rafael: Wed 6:30 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:25, 3:35, 6:45, 9:55; Sun-Wed 12:25, 3:35, 6:45 Northgate: Fri-Sat 10:55, 11:45, 12:35, 1:25, 2:15, 3:05, 4, 4:40, 5:35, 6:25, 7:15, 8, 8:55, 9:45, 10:25, 11:05; Sun-Wed 10:55, 11:45, 12:35, 1:25, 2:15, 3:05, 4, 4:40, 5:35, 6:25, 7:15, 8, 8:55, 9:45, 10:25 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10, 11:30, 1:05, 2:45, 4:10, 5:50, 7:20, 9, 10:25 Rafael: Fri-Sat 3:30, 8:15; Sun 7:30; Tue, Thu 8:15; Wed 8:30 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 1:30, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45; Sun-Wed 1:30, 4:30, 7:15 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:20, 2:50, 5:20, 8:05, 10:35 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 7, 3D showtime at 9:40; SatSun 11:30, 2, 7, 3D showtimes at 4:30, 9:40 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:30, 9:55, 3D showtime at 4:30; Sun-Thu 10:30, 3D showtime at 4:30 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20; 3D showtime at 1:45 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:40, 12:15, 1:30, 3:05, 4:20, 5:55, 7:20, 8:45, 10:10; Sun 10:40, 12:15, 3:05, 4:20, 5:55, 7:20; Mon-Tue 10:40, 12:15, 1:30, 3:05, 4:20, 5:55, 7:20; Wed 10:40, 12:15, 3:05, 4:20, 7:20; Thu 10:40, 12:15, 1:30, 3:05, 4:20, 7:20 Sequoia: Fri 4:10, 7, 10:10; Sat 1:45, 4:10, 7, 10:10; Sun 1:45, 4:10, 7; Mon-Wed 4:10, 7 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:05, 2:35, 5, 7:25, 9:50 Rowland: Fri-Wed 12, 2:45, 5, 7:30, 9:55 Rafael: Fri, Tue, Thu 6; Sat 1, 6; Sun 1 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11, 1:45, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10 Rowland: Fri-Wed 2:25, 10:30 Lark: Mon 6:30 (live music by ELM’s Young Cello Ensemble and Flute Quartet precedes the show) Northgate: Fri-Wed 4:45, 9:55 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:50, 5:10, 7:50 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:15, 2:25, 5:40, 8:50 Northgate: Fri-Sat 9pm Lark: Thu 11, 7:30 Lark: Sun 1 Lark: Sat 1 Northgate: Fri-Wed 2, 7:45, 10:35 Lark: Tue (time TBA) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:05, 9:25; Sun-Wed 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:05 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Mon-Wed 7:15, 9:35; Sat-Sun 12:15, 5, 7:15, 9:35, 3D showtime at 2:45 Northgate: Fri-Wed 10:50, 12:15, 1:20, 2:30, 6, 7:40, 8:20; 3D showtime at 3:40 Playhouse: Fri 4, 6:30, 8:45; Sat 1, 4, 6:30, 8:45; Sun 1, 4, 6:30; Mon-Wed 4, 6:30 Rowland: Fri-Wed 11:40, 2, 7:10, 9:40; 3D showtime at 4:30 Runs April 14-20 at the Playhouse and other venues; call 2518433 or visit tiburonfilmfestival.com for schedule Rafael: Sun 4:15 (filmmaker Cyril Dion and ecologist Robert Reed in person) Rafael: Fri 4, 6:20, 8:40; Sat-Sun 1:30, 4, 6:20, 8:40; Mon-Thu 6:20, 8:40 Regency: 1:10, 7:05 daily Rafael: Mon 7 (writer-educator Tim Wise in person; a benefit for Marin City Health & Wellness Center) Regency: Fri-Sat 10:50, 4:40, 10:15 (subtitles), 1:40, 7:30 (dubbed); Sun-Thu 10:50, 4:40 (subtitles), 1:40, 7:30 (dubbed) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:50, 3:45, 6:40, 9:35; Sun-Wed 12:50, 3:45, 6:40 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:10, 1:05, 4, 7, 10; Sun-Thu 10:10, 1:05, 4, 7 Sequoia: Fri 4:30, 7:20, 9:25; Sat 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 9:25; Sun 1:30, 4:30, 7:20; Mon-Wed 4:30, 7:20

Showtimes can change after we go to press. Please call theater to confirm. CinéArts at Sequoia 25 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley, 388-4862 Cinema 41 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera, 924-6505 Fairfax 9 Broadway, Fairfax, 453-5444 Lark 549 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur, 924-5111 Larkspur Landing 500 Larkspur Landing Cir., Larkspur, 461-4849 Northgate 7000 Northgate Dr., San Rafael, 800-326-3264 Playhouse 40 Main St., Tiburon, 435-1234 Rafael Film Center 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael, 454-1222 Regency 80 Smith Ranch Rd., Terra Linda, 479-5050 Rowland 44 Rowland Way, Novato, 800-326-3264


Concerts MARIN COUNTY Cabaret 2017 Showcase features talent from Young Performers Theatre and North Bay Repertory companies. Proceeds benefit local theater communities. Apr 14-15. $40$65. George’s Nightclub, 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262. Thunder & Lightning Superband features Phil Lesh and Stu Allen sharing musical duties with acclaimed songwriter Cass McCombs and musicians Scott Guberman and Alex Koford. Apr 18, 8pm. $35. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

SONOMA COUNTY Marco Benevento Avant-garde pop pianist has amassed a body of work that’s both danceable and thoughtful. Apr 13, 8:30pm. $22. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121. Arlo Guthrie Veteran songwriter’s Running Down the Road tour features his most classic cuts. Apr 14, 7:30pm. $35 and up. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040. Whitney Indie-rock duo excels at laidback and melancholic melodies. Ambient folk songwriter Julie Byrne opens. Apr 14, 7pm. $37. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

NAPA COUNTY The Faultliners Traditional bluegrass band kicks off the “Grand Ole Napa Valley Opry House” series with support from folk duo Rainy Eyes. Apr 15, 7:30pm. $25. Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.226.7372.

Clubs & Venues MARIN Don Antonio’s Thurs, 6pm, dinner music with pianist Ricardo Scales. 114 Main St, Tiburon. 415.435.0400.

Don Antonio’s Trattoria Tues, 6pm, dinner music with pianist Ricardo Scales. 455 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.3332. Fenix Apr 13, Pacific Soul. Apr 14, José Neto & the Netoband. Apr 15, Wall Street. Apr 18, West Coast Songwriters Competition. Apr 19, pro blues jam. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600. George’s Nightclub Apr 15, DJ Jorge. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262. HopMonk Novato Apr 13, Country Line Dancing. Apr 14, Hot Grubb. Apr 15, Reisender with the Fell Swoop and Miracle Me. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Apr 12, Michael LaMacchia and April Grisman. Apr 19, Migrant Pickers. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005. Marin Center Showcase Theatre Apr 15, Wild Women: Soul-O. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800. Marin Country Mart Apr 14, 6pm, Friday Night Jazz with Piro Patton Trio. Apr 16, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with The Battlefield. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 19 Broadway Club Apr 13, Phantom Power. Apr 14, 5:30pm, Damir & Derek. Apr 14, 9pm, Friends on Fire with Lender and the Happys. Apr 15, Winstrong with Lumanation. Apr 16, Miles Ahead. Apr 17, open mic. Apr 19, Songwriters in the Round. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091. No Name Bar Apr 13, Jesse Lee Kincaid. Apr 14, Michael Aragon Quartet. Apr 15, Chris Saunders Band. Apr 16, 3pm, Flowtilla. Apr 16, 8:30pm, Migrant Pickers and friends. Apr 17, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Apr 18, open mic. Apr 19, Robert Elmond Stone and friends. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392. Novato Copperfield’s Books Apr 15, 6pm, Michael Aragon Quartet. 999 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.763.3052. Osteria Divino Apr 12, Jonathan Poretz. Apr 13, Yacht Club of Paris. Apr 14, Smith Dobson Trio. Apr 15, Ian McArdle Trio. Apr 16, Marcos Sainz Trio. Apr 18, Ken Cook. Apr 19, Noel Jewkes Duo. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355. Panama Hotel Restaurant Apr 12, Paul VornHagen. Apr 13, Wanda

CALENDAR

Stafford. Apr 18, Panama Jazz Trio. Apr 19, John Hoy. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Trek Winery Apr 14, Amy Wigton. Apr 15, Mythyx Band. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Apr 12, the New Sneakers. Apr 13, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Apr 14, Jethro Jeremiah. Apr 15, Junk Parlor. Apr 16, Grateful Sundays. Apr 17, Billy D’s open mic. Apr 18, the Bad Hombres. Apr 19, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Unitarian Universalist Congregation Apr 15, 3pm, “That’s So Last Century” chamber concert featuring Amanda Morando with the Fools in Unison Piano Quintet and the Scattered Winds Woodwind Quintet. 240 Channing Way, San Rafael. 415.479.4131.

Rancho Nicasio Apr 13, Ruthie Foster. Apr 14, LoWatters. Apr 15, Lee Presson & the Nails. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

SONOMA

Rickey’s Apr 14, Matt Kizer Band. Apr 15, Charles Wheal Band. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477. Sausalito Seahorse Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Apr 13, the Merlins. Apr 14, Joe Tate & the Hippie Voices. Apr 15, Cabani Jazz Project. Apr 16, 5pm, Mazacote. Apr 18, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899. Smiley’s Schooner Saloon Apr 14, Gray Tolhurst & the Early Nineties. Apr 15, Night Train. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311. Spitfire Lounge Second Thursday of every month, DJ Romestallion. Second Friday of every month, DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551. Sweetwater Music Hall Apr 12, Roger Clyne & the Peacemakers. Apr 13, HTK Trio with Howard Wales, Terry Haggerty and Kevin Hayes. Apr 14, Wild Child. Apr 15, Wonder Bread 5. Apr 17, open mic with Austin DeLone. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850. Taste of Rome Apr 15, the 7th Sons. 1000 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7660. Terrapin Crossroads Apr 12, Bob Dylan night with the Casual Coalition. Apr 13, Andy Coe Band. Apr 14, Top 40 Friday dance party. Apr 15, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs with Beso Negro. Apr 16, 3:30pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh & the Camp Terrapin Family Band. Apr 17, Grateful Mondays. Apr 19, Rattlebox. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773. Throckmorton Theatre Apr 15, Bobby Joe Russell and the All-Stars. Apr 16, Karma Moffett’s Tibetan Bowls and Bells. Apr 19, noon, noon concert series. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

A’Roma Roasters Apr 15, Blue Groove. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765. Annie O’s Music Hall Apr 15, Square Squad presents Candyland with JimmyHits. Apr 16, RF7. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455. Aqus Cafe Apr 14, the Incubators. Apr 16, 2pm, Gary Vogensen & the Ramble Band. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060. Arlene Francis Center Wed, Open Mic. Apr 13, Samvega with TV Heads and Americas. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009. Barley & Hops Tavern Apr 13, Flat Broke and Busted. Apr 14, Dave Hamilton. Apr 15, Miss Moonshine. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037. The Big Easy Apr 12, Cygne. Apr 13, Migrant Pickers with Joel Alan Taylor. Apr 14, Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra with the Dixie Giants and Sebastian St James. Apr 15, B & the Hive with Ismay. Apr 16, Trevor McSpadden. Apr 18, the Mountain & the Moon with Hannah Mayree. Apr 19, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631. Brixx Pizzeria Apr 15, Mike Saliani. 16 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.766.8162. Corkscrew Wine Bar Apr 18, North Bay Jazz Guitar Collective. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.789.0505. Flamingo Lounge Apr 14, SugarFoot. Apr 15, Stereo Bounce. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530. Green Music Center Schroeder Hall Apr 15, 2pm, SSU Alumni Recital. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040. HopMonk Sebastopol Apr 13, Rhythmstar and Naughty Princess. Apr 14, the John Brothers Piano Company with the Creak. Apr 15, Lazyman

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presents Dead Beatles. Apr 17, Monday Night Edutainment with Selekta Kurious. Apr 19, Songwriters in the Round. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

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HopMonk Sonoma Apr 14, Frankie Bourne. Apr 15, Brian Dolzani. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Clubs & Venues

Hotel Healdsburg Apr 15, the Ruth Ahlers Quartet. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800. Jamison’s Roaring Donkey Wed, open mic night. Apr 14, Domenic Bianco & the SoulShake. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478. Jasper O’Farrell’s Apr 14, Hype It Up with DJ Konnex and DJ Jacalioness. Apr 15, Casa Rasta Camo Party with Guerrilla Takeover. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062. Lagunitas Tap Room Apr 12, Jason Bodlovich. Apr 13, Delphi Freeman. Apr 14, Arizona & the Volunteers. Apr 15, Trevor McSpadden. Apr 16, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Apr 19, Shelby, Texas. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776. Main Stage West Apr 12, “Players on the Stage” with David T Carter, Jon Gonzales, Doug Jayne and Katie Phillips. 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177. Main Street Bistro Apr 13, Eric Wiley. Apr 14, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Apr 15, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Blues Band. Apr 16, Willie Perez. Apr 18, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501. Mc T’s Bullpen Apr 14, DJ MGB. Apr 15, Manny & the Maniacs. Apr 16, George Heagerty. Apr 17, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377. Murphy’s Irish Pub Apr 14, Sean Carscadden Trio. Apr 15, Peace of G. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660. Mystic Theatre Apr 15, Spawnbreezie and Gonzo. Apr 17, BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet. Apr 19, Katchafire with Inna Vision and Mystic Roots Band. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121. Newman Auditorium Apr 14, 8pm, Bennett Friedman Jazz Quartet with organist Brian Ho. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372. Phoenix Theater Apr 14, Erra with Phinehas and Auras. Apr 15, Trebuchet with Mare Island, Brown Bags and Horders. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565. Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Apr 13, Elizabeth Boaz. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226. Redwood Cafe Apr 13, Kevin Russell and friends. Apr 15, the String Rays. Apr 16, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Apr 17, open mic with DJ Loisaida. Apr 19, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868. Rock Star University House of Rock Apr 15, L.A. Guns reunion tour. 3410

Three-time Grammy Award nominee Ruthie Foster will rock the Rancho Nicasio stage on Thursday, April 13 when she sings her own blend of blues, gospel, soul, folk and rock. Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. Russian River Hall Apr 15, Daniel Patchin with Sandy Geller. 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873. Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub Apr 15, Sticky Notes. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610. Sonoma Speakeasy Apr 12, the Acrosonics. Apr 13, Vitamin Girl with King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. Apr 14, 6:30pm, Jim Caroompas. Apr 14, 8pm, New Copasetics with Tim Eschliman and others. Apr 15, 5:30pm, Full Circle Band with Bob Edmonson and guests. Apr 15, 8:30pm, Les Amis Zydeco Band. Apr 18, R&B House Band. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364. Twin Oaks Roadhouse Apr 13, Country Line Dancing. Apr 14, Void Where Prohibited. Apr 15, Derek Irving & His Combo with Bears Belly. Apr 16, David Thom Invitational Bluegrass Jam. Apr 17, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Apr 18, open mic night with RoJo. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

NAPA Blue Note Napa Apr 12, Kellie Fuller & the Mike Greensill Quartet. Apr 13-16, Stanley Jordan Trio. Apr 18, locals night with Roem Baur. Apr 19-21, Bill Charlap Trio. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258. Ca’ Momi Osteria Apr 14, Ragtag Sullivan. Apr 15, Self Proclaimed Heroes. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664. Jarvis Conservatory Apr 15, 7pm, the Trinity Alps Chamber Players. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445. Napa Valley Roasting Company

Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeff Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233. Silo’s Apr 12, David Kelleher. Apr 13, Nate Lopez. Apr 14, Obsidian Son with Jessi Adele & the Starling Curve. Apr 15, Steelin’ Dan. Apr 19, Silo’s Idols preliminary show. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Art OPENING MARIN Art Works Downtown Apr 14-29, “Tonal Range,” works exploring range and value as applied to time and humanity shows in the Underground Gallery, while “Signs of Hope” shows artistic protest signs in the Donor’s Gallery. Reception, April 14 at 5pm. 1337 Fourth Street, San Rafael. 415.451.8119. MarinMOCA Apr 15-May 20, “Altered Book & Book Arts Exhibition,” annual show displays the work of 150 Bay Area artists who reconstruct and rework books into unique pieces of art. Reception, Apr 15 at 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

SONOMA Graton Gallery Apr 19-May 28, “Transparency,” group show is all about glass. Reception, Apr 22 at 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912. History Museum of Sonoma County Apr 15-Jul 9, “Home & Abroad: Sonoma County & World War I,” marking the 100th

John Carrico

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Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Apr 15-Jun 18, “Memory & Resistance: The Work of Joseph DeLappe,” several key works from the artist cross the realms of protest art, gaming, technology and new media. Reception, Apr 15 at 2pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

NAPA Napa Main Library Apr 12-30, “Travis N White: Watercolors,” the artist and art consultant displays his highly technical watercolor works. Reception, Apr 14 at 6pm. 580 Coombs St, Napa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 9; Fri-Sat, 10 to 6. 707.253.4070.

ONGOING MARIN Bay Model Visitor Center Through May 20, “Vanishing Species,” award-winning artist Rita Sklar explores the wonders of nature and the decline of many beautiful creatures. Beverly Mayeri’s art highlighting endangered species also shows. Reception, Apr 22 at 1pm. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871. Desta Art & Tea Gallery Through May 18, “East West Rhythmical Harmony,” featuring mixed-media works by Modern Chinese and French Impressionism expert Anita Wong and acrylics by eclectic California artist Elizabeth Geisler. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6. 415.524.8932. Gallery Route One Through May 14, “Rising to the Surface,” Inverness artist Zea Morvitz exhibits largescale drawings of found objects in the center gallery, with a Lucid Art Residency and Mary Mountcastle Eubank’s mixed-media sculptures in the annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347. Marin Art & Garden Center Through Apr 16, “Between Nature & Technology,” multimedia artworks by New Orleans-based Courtney Egan and David Sullivan criss-cross the two realms. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260. Marin Center Redwood Foyer Gallery Through Jun 2, “Animalia Musicale: A Chorus of Critters,” artist Leslie Lakes paints images of animals over musical score sheets. A portion of the proceeds benefits Enriching Lives through Music (ELM). 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800. Marin Society of Artists Through Apr 30, “Sculpture Exhibition,” juried show in celebration of International Sculpture Day represents a wide variety of media and styles. Reception, Apr 14 at 5pm. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Apr 20, “Landscapes: Real or Imagined,” the creatively interpreted group show is juried by Marin landscape artist Kathleen Lipinski. 616 Throckmorton

Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

power. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Robert Allen Fine Art Through May 31, “Landscapes Reimagined,” works on canvas by Amy Donaldson, Beatrice Findlay, William Leidenthal and John Maxon. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Sep 10, “It Was a Dark and Stormy Night,” explore the theme of writing in “Peanuts” through original cartoons and family-friendly activities. Through Jul 16, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown,” on the 50th anniversary of the stage show, this retrospective exhibit features rare memorabilia from the production’s worldwide history. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

The Room Art Gallery Through May 31, “Modern Masters,” the gallery that houses works by Picasso, Matisse, Dalí and more paints the walls black and display contemporary artists in a significant showing. 86 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Mon-Fri, 10 to 6; Sat, 10 to 4. 415.380.7940. San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Apr 30, “Marty Meade & Her Friday Morning Art Groups,” long-time instructor of glass art and watercolor displays alongside her students. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888. Throckmorton Theatre Through Apr 30, “Gardens Markets Landscapes,” Muriel Schmalberg Ullman’s garden paintings show with Laurie Curtis’ watercolors and Kathryn Strietmann’s silkscreens. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Tiburon Town Hall Through Apr 30, “The Creative Spark,” the Golden Gate/Marin Artists group shows with unique art, gifts and cards on hand. 1505 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon.

SONOMA Alchemia Gallery Through Apr 30, “Habitat,” collaboration between the Alchemia visual arts studio and guest installation artist Emile Rosewater transforms the gallery into a lush alternative dimension. 111 Kentucky St, Petaluma. MonTues, Fri, 10 to 5; Wed-Thurs, Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, 11 to 4. 707.775.3794. Art Museum of Sonoma County Through Apr 30, “Outside Voice,” painter Marc Katano debuts his recent series of abstract works, done on massive canvas tarps. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500. The Art Wall at Shige Sushi Through Apr 30, “Contemporary Bay Area Photography,” features works by Bob Cornelis, Janis Crystal Lipzin, Michael Maggid, Colin Talcroft and others. 8235 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Hours vary. 707.795.9753. Arts Guild of Sonoma Through May 1, “Pets Lifeline Fundraiser Exhibition,” Sonoma students draw, paint, collage or otherwise assemble a picture of their special pet. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115. B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille Through Apr 30, “Photographic Show,” featuring works by Steven Krause, Mark Stupich and Tom Deininger. 400 First St E, Sonoma. Open for lunch, noon to 3pm, and dinner, 5 to 9. Bar open noon to midnight. 707.938.7110. Calabi Gallery Through Apr 15, “We Shall Overcome,” showing art of defiance and resistance to

Chroma Gallery Through May 27, “Nature Unbound,” juried exhibit of a wide range of art interprets and reacts to the awesome powers of nature. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051. Gaia’s Garden Through Apr 30, “Food, Flowers and Beyond,” featuring paintings by Riley Street Art students and instructor Donna DeLaBriandais. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Lunch and dinner, Mon-Sat; lunch and brunch, Sun. 707.544.2491. Graton Gallery Through Apr 16, “Spaces Retraced,” featuring works by Susan Ball, Tim Haworth and several guest artists. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912. Guerneville Bank Club Through Apr 30, “Glory Days,” exhibit by Russian River Historical Society is a tribute to Clare Harris, who helped turn Rio Nido into the town it is today. 16290 Main Street, Guerneville. Daily, 11 to 9. 707.666.9411.

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Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through May 14, “Art of Gastronomy II,” exhibit celebrates the bounty of Sonoma County food and its wine industry in the context of art. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970. IceHouse Gallery Through Apr 22, “Body Language,” five artists offer diverse interpretations on the figure. 405 East D St, Petaluma. 707.778.2238. Occidental Center for the Arts Through May 14, “The Spring Equinox: When Day and Night Are Equal,” group exhibit honors the significance of the spring equinox with works that express the power and beauty of new beginnings. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392. Paradise Ridge Winery Through Apr 30, “Geometric Reflections,” sculpture by 10 renowned artists celebrates 10 years of the Voigt Family Sculpture Foundation. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa. Daily, 11 to 5. 707.528.9463. Paul Mahder Gallery Through May 21, “Natural Occurrence,” solo show by artist Barry Masteller features layered paintings that build upon themselves like geological formations. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150. Petaluma Arts Center Through May 20, “theNeuwPolitic,” over 50 artists representing Northern and Central California explore the current political climate as each individual artist envisions it. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

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anniversary of the U.S. entry into “the Great War,” the exhibition explores how the war touched so many lives locally and internationally. Reception, Apr 14 at 5pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.


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Art

Through Apr 30, “Ebb & Flow,” artist Ryan Reynolds visualizes the concept of historical ecology, the interactions between man and nature over time. Through Apr 30, “Embracing Imperfection: Contemporary Expressions of Wabi Sabi,” exhibition explores contemporary artists Adam Chapman, Jim Melchert and Leah Rosenberg through the lens of traditional Japanese aesthetic and philosophy of Wabi Sabi. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Comedy Night with Kabir Singh Fresh off his Comedy Central debut on the show “Gabriel Iglesias’s Stand-Up Revolution,” Singh headlines a hilarious night of standup along with Bay Area comedians David Lew and Noah Gain. Apr 14, 8pm. $25. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305. Laughing Tomato Comedy Showcase Local and Bay Area comics, hosted by Tony Sparks. Third Tues of every month, 8pm. Free. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill Through Apr 30, “Fine Art Collage,” longtime Sonoma artist Augustus Manly shows many of his works. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Claudia Morales McCain juror the group show featuring over 40 works in all mediums. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Ren Brown Collection Through Apr 30, “Robert DeVee Memorial Exhibit,” the late artist and gallery owner’s paintings, silkscreens, monoprints and 3-D photographs are on display in a celebration of his life in art. 1781 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. WedSun, 10 to 5. 707.875.2922.

Upstairs Art Gallery Through Apr 24, “Yellow,” a color-themed collection of paintings from dry Creek Valley artist Donna Schaffer. 306 Center St, Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 11 to 6; Fri-Sat, 11 to 9. 707.431.4214.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts Through Apr 16, “Exhibition 60+,” celebrate artists over 60 and see their perspective on life and the world. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797. Sebastopol Gallery Through May 28, “Windows Round Robin,” Sebastopol Gallery celebrates its 10th anniversary with a rotating exhibit of members’ works in the window. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200. The Spinster Sisters Restaurant Through Jun 5, “s+oryprobl=m :: alternate route,” installation from mixed-media artist CK Itamura turns fragile objects into emboldened beacons of encouragement. 401 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7100. University Art Gallery Through Apr 23, “Juried Student Exhibition,” artist Randy Colosky and SRJC art instructor

NAPA Caldwell Snyder Gallery Through Apr 30, “Kenton Nelson Solo Show,” the artist idolizes the ordinary in his illuminating paintings of figures and landscapes. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755. di Rosa Through May 28, “Based on a True Story,” exhibition illuminates the hidden stories and connections of Northern California art history spanning the last six decades. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10 to 6. 707.226.5991. Jessel Gallery Through Apr 30, “Arts in April at Jessel,” the gallery gets in the spirit with an eclectic show and artist demonstrations each weekend. 1019 Atlas Peak Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.257.2350. Napa Valley Museum

Courtesy of Vickisa (artist)

This poster, inspired by the Women’s March Bay Area in January, is one of the original pieces that will be featured at the Signs of Hope exhibition at San Rafael’s Art Works Downtown opening on Friday, April 14.

Mort Sahl Sahl takes the stage every week to deliver his legendary, take-no-prisoners wit. Thurs, 7pm. $20. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Milt Abel Standup veteran takes the stage. Apr 15, 8pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883. Scott Capurro’s Gay TurnAround Award-winning comedian, actor and writer presents a provocative new show. Apr 13, 8pm. $20-$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Standup Comedy Night The best standup comics from the Bay Area and beyond come to Cotati. Apr 14, 8:30pm. $10. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868. Trivia & Standup Night Trivia contest is followed by a headlining standup set from popular comedian Dan St Paul. Apr 12, 8pm. $3. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Dance Monroe Dance Hall Apr 14, 7pm, JAS Latin Dance with Jose Santamaria. Apr 15, 7pm, Saturday Night Fever Dance. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Events Arts in the Streets Afternoon includes interactive art with Nimbus Arts, poetry from the Napa Valley Writer’s Conference, culinary delights from the Napa Valley Cooking School and music from local bands. Apr 15, 12pm. Lyman Park, 1498 Main St, St Helena.

Democracy Cafe Community gathering discusses democracy, how it affects us and how we can affect it. Apr 17, 7:30pm. By donation. Many Rivers Books & Tea, 130 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871. Food As Medicine Wellness Series Monthly talk focuses on ways to maintain health, slow aging and lower risks of illness through nutritional foods. Third Mon of every month, 6:30pm. Through Aug 21. $10. Sonoma West Medical Center, 501 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.662.6769. Food for Thought Volunteer Orientation Tour the food bank, get information and apply to help provide weekly groceries to men, women and children living with HIV and other illnesses in Sonoma County. Tues, Apr 18, 5:30pm. Food for Thought, 6550 Railroad Ave, Forestville. 707.887.1647. Guide Dogs for the Blind Graduation Ceremony Family fun abounds when guide dogs and those who raise them celebrate graduation. Sat, Apr 15, 1:30pm. Guide Dogs for the Blind, 350 Los Ranchitos Rd, San Rafael. 415.499.4000. IPA 10K & Beer Mile Invitational Celebration of running and beer includes a marketplace expo, hoppy Easter hunt, a reception on Friday and a scenic 6.2-mile loop course to run on Saturday. Apr 14-15. $70 and up. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St, Sebastopol. ipa10k.com. Napa Valley Arts in April A month of events aims to foster a unique sense of place through locally produced art paired with Napa Valley’s best wine and culinary offerings. Through Apr 30. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa. artscouncilnapavalley.org. Napa Valley Writer’s Conference Featured presenter Dana Gioia leads an evening of readings and discussion of the role of poetry in our communities. Apr 15, 6:30pm. $20. Napa Valley College, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500. PAWS for Domestic Peace Walk Center for Domestic Peace leads a walk to raise awareness about the correlation between domestic violence and animal abuse. Apr 15, 10am. Free. Blackie’s Pasture, Tiburon Boulevard, Tiburon. Release Your Returns Join a protest with Indivisible Sonoma County to call on Donald Trump to release all of his tax returns from the past 12 years. Apr 15, 3pm. Free. Santa Rosa Post Office, 730 Second St, Santa Rosa. Second Fridays Art Walk Anchored by Art Works Downtown galleries and artist studios, the art walk links venues throughout downtown San Rafael with receptions and entertainment. Second Fri of every month, 5pm. Art Works Downtown, 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119. World Languages Fair Presentations, music, dances, children’s games and more showcases SRJC’s myriad language offerings. Apr 18. Free. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 800.564.SRJC.


Field Trips

Bird Walk in Bodega Bay Search the harbor, adjacent seas and woodlands for birds, including Doran County Park. Led by Madrone Audubon Society. Wed, Apr 19, 8:30am. Bodega Bay Harbor, East Shore Rd, Bodega Bay. madroneaudubon.org. Birding at Jenner Headlands Explore the coastal preserve with a local avian expert. RSVP required. Apr 15, 10am. Jenner Headlands, Highway 1, Jenner. landpaths.org. Hike into Spring See full blooming wildflowers in an intermediate naturalist-led hike. Apr 15, 10am. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216. Pug Sundays A gathering of pugs, pug owners and pug lovers. Third Sun of every month, 9am. Mill Valley Dog Park, Bayfront Park, Mill Valley. The Sounds & Feel of Spring Docent-led saunter lets you experience all the signs of the coming of spring. Registration required. Apr 17, 9am. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. landpaths.org. Tracking Patterns on a Landscape Observe animal behavior by tracking in a non-invasive way to research and conserve wildlife. Apr 15, 9am. $20. Bodega Dunes Campground, 3095 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. stewardscr.org. Trail Opening Celebration Hike the newly finished Cabin Trail, enjoy drinks and snacks and participate in some light trail-building stewardship if you wish. Apr 15, 10am. Riddell Preserve, 550 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. landpaths.org.

Film Cinema & Psyche Watch and discuss eight masterful movies with folklore and fairy-tale motifs. Mon, 2pm. Through Apr 24. $165. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 240 Channing Way, San Rafael. cinemaandpsyche.com. Deconstructing the Beatles: Rubber Soul Music expert Scott Freiman continues his in-depth exploration of the Beatles in this filmed lecture. Wed, Apr 19, 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222. ELM Movie Night Enriching Lives through Music program in Larkspur hosts a screening of “Landfill Harmonic,” which follows the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura. Apr 17, 6:30pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111. Fly Fishing Film Tour 2017

Normal Is Over Award-winning documentary chronicles the way humans have inadvertently imperiled our planet. Screening is followed by Q&A with filmmaker Renée Scheltema. Apr 12, 7pm. $18. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Petaluma Film Alliance Spring Cinema Series Featuring recent award-winning favorites and top Oscar contenders as well as classic and local films, with pre-screening lectures and post-film discussions. Wed through May 17. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 415.392.5225. Purple Rain Prince’s masterpiece screens as part of the Rio’s “Third Saturdays” cult and classic film series. Apr 15, 7:30pm. $8. Rio Theater, 20396 Bohemian Hwy, Monte Rio. 707.865.0913. Salud Award-winning 2006 film goes inside Cuba’s medical system and their cooperative work in over 60 countries. Apr 13, 7pm. By donation. Peace & Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8902. Sustainable Screening of the documentary about America’s food system is followed by a lively discussion. Apr 19, 6:30pm. Free. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.785.8177. Tiburon International Film Festival The United Nations of film fests returns with selections from 27 countries as well as a Marin filmmakers program. Apr 14-21. Playhouse Theater, 40 Main St, Tiburon. tiburonfilmfestival.com. White Like Me Documentary about race-based white entitlement programs of the 20th century screens with writer Tim Wise on hand for a VIP reception and Q&A and benefits two Marin nonprofits addressing racial inequality. Apr 17, 7pm. $20-$60. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Food & Drink Backyard Fermentation Workshop Get the basics of making fermented salsa, fruits and cocktails. Apr 15, 9am. The Fairfax Backyard Farmer, 135 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.342.5092. Brewmaster’s Dinner Four-course meal is paired with four beer selections from Cooperage Brewing Company. Apr 15, 6pm. $60. Local Barrel, 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433. Chai & Chocolate Mugs of chai and organic chocolates pairs with live Indian music. Apr 16, 3pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Chinese Black Teas Tasting

Explore a variety of complex teas. Apr 15, 2pm. By donation. Many Rivers Books & Tea, 130 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871. Easter Brunch at John Ash Menu of tried-and-true classics and twists on old favorites. Apr 16, 10am. John Ash & Co, Vintners Inn, 4350 Barnes Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.7687. Easter Brunch at Rocker Oysterfeller’s Enjoy a special menu, breakfast cocktails and Bloody Mary bar and an egg hunt. Reservations encouraged. Apr 16, 10am. Rocker Oysterfeller’s, 14415 Hwy 1, Valley Ford. 707.876.1983. Easter Brunch at Spoonbar Three-course brunch is topped off with a dessert bar. Apr 16, 11am. $15-$39. Spoonbar, 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222. Easter Sunday Dining at Left Bank Brasserie Serving seasonal brunch items until 3pm, plus reduced regular lunch and dinner menu items. Apr 16. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331. Heirloom Tomato Plant Sale Get a start on your growing season. Apr 15, 9am. Cavanagh Center, 426 Eighth St, Petaluma. Lambert Bridge Chef’s Table Series Seasonally themed menu of locally grown ingredients prepared by Shari Sarabi of Baci Cafe and Wine Bar is paired with Lambert Bridge wines. Apr 14-15. $125. Lambert Bridge Winery, 4085 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.431.9600.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

Join Us for a Special Evening

Thu

Foster Apr 13 Ruthie Multi Blues Awards Winner 8:00

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

Fri

Apr 14

“West Marinicana”

LoWatters

High lonesome twang to Lowdown dirty roots 8:00 / No Cover

Lee Presson

& The Nails Apr 15 Sat

er Su ppClub

“1940’s Supper Club” His Birthday Party! 8:30

JOIN US FOR OUR A NNUAL

Easter Sunday Buffet

A PR 16, 10AM–4PM Reservations Advised 7:45 Swing Dance Lessons Stompy Jones 8:00 Sat Meet Merle’s Kids Apr 22 Fri

Apr 21

The Haggards

From Buck Owens to Led Zeppelin! 8:30

Sat

in the Henhouse Apr 29 Foxes It Don’t Mean a Thang Sun

If It Ain’t Got That Twang 7:30

Apr 30

The Jones Gang

High Octane Americana 5:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

St Supery Chef’s Table Tasting Cheese-centric four-course culinary experience includes wine pairings with several cheeses from Bay Area creameries. Apr 16, 11:30am. $125. St. Supéry Estate Vineyards & Winery, 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507. Wed 4 ⁄12 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22

A Tale of Two Cheesemakers Guided cheese-tasting features Marin French Cheese and Laura Chenel. Apr 15, 2pm. $40. St. Supéry Estate Vineyards & Winery, 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers

Tips for a Cure Rebels for a Cause host a bar night that raises funds for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. Apr 14, 5pm. Spancky’s Bar, 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

with Jerry Garcia), Terry Haggerty (Sons of Champlin) & Kevin Hayes (Roy Rogers)

Trione Food + Wine Dinner Series Three-course dinner is paired with new and library wines. Apr 14-15, 6pm. $100. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.8100. Winemaker Dinner with Kastania Vineyard Five-course dinner features pinot noirs from Sonoma Coast winery. Apr 14, 6pm. $80. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

For Kids

Shelby, Texas

with

Thu 4 ⁄13 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22

HTK Trio feat Howard Wales (Hooteroll Fri 4 ⁄14 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $22–$24

Wild Child

A Live Re-­Creation of a 1960s Doors Concert Sat 4 ⁄15 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$32

Wonder Bread 5

Thu 4 ⁄20 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $12–$15

Soul Ska 420 Celebration with

The Rudicals

Fri 4 ⁄25 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$18

Ghost Note

feat Robert Searight & Nate Werth of Snarky Puppy

Sat 4 ⁄22 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $12–$15

The Main Squeeze with

Hibbity Dibbity

Sun 4 ⁄23 • Doors 6:30pm ⁄ $12–$15

Disney’s Choo-Choo Soul with Genevieve Apr 15, 12pm. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

»20

Rainy Eyes feat Irena Eide, Salt Suns, Ismay & Jeff Manson Band

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

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Bat Potluck & Hike Late afternoon and evening walk explores bats and other nighttime critters, with a potluck dinner and optional campout. Registration required. Apr 15, 4:30pm. Bohemia Ecological Preserve, 8759 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. landpaths.org.

With locations ranging from Bolivia to Saskatchewan, various short films feature fresh stories and some of the best fishing footage ever. Apr 13, 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.


PACI FI C SUN | A P R I L 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 7 | PA CI FI CS U N. COM

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Film

Lamott. $25. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440. Aqus Cafe Apr 13, 7pm, Get Lit, with featured authors and an open mic. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060. Book Passage Apr 12, 7pm, “A Fine Mess” with TR Reid. Apr 15, 4pm, “The Shadow Land” with Elizabeth Kostova. Apr 18, 7pm, “Wherever You Go, There They Are” with Annabelle Gurwitch. Apr 19, 7pm, “Prince Charles” with Sally Bedell Smith. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. Healdsburg Library Apr 13, 4pm, “Be What You Are” with Todd Parr. 139 Piper St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3772.

The 16th annual Tiburon International Film Festival, running April 14-21 at the Tiburon Playhouse, gives viewers a chance to enjoy the art of filmmakers from a wide range of cultures. Pictured here is a shot from René Frelle Petersen’s ‘Hundeliv,’ a Danish film with English subtitles.

Easter Egg Hunt & Family Day Hunt for eggs in the sculpture garden and enjoy decorating activities in the museum. Apr 15, 1:30pm. $7 per child. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500. Low Tides Critter Hunt Kids can spend Easter searching the tidepools for colorful critters along with traditional egg hunt, games and giveaways. Apr 16, 8:30am. $10 per family. Campbell Cove Beach, Westshore Rd, Bodega Bay. stewardscr.org. Robin Hood Presented by Traveling Lantern Theatre Company. Apr 15, 11am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004. Sebastopol Kiwanis Community Easter Egg Hunt Bring your basket and find treats and colored eggs specially prepared by Culinary Boot Camp at Analy High School. Apr 15, 10am. Free. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol.

Lectures Alzheimer’s: Art & Creativity A look at different approaches to introducing art to Alzheimer’s patients. Apr 15, 10:30am. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael. 415.473.6058. Brush Heaven Learn about the history of brushes, and the types of hairs and shapes for all forms of painting. Apr 15, 1pm. Free. Napa Valley Art Supplies, 3250 California Blvd, Napa. 707.224.2775. The Cornerstones of Well-Being Explore how to improve and sustain your overall health and frame of mind. Apr 15,

1pm. POST Wellness by Design Yoga Studio, 224A Weller St, Petaluma. 707.762.7678. Energy Assistance Program Bring a copy of your PG&E bills and get help lowering utility bills. Apr 19, 3pm. Free. Whistlestop, 930 Tamalpais Ave, San Rafael. 415.456.9062. The Journal as Source of Prose, Poetry & Performance Free write using prompts and sensory details to capture a moment, then expand those passages to publication-worthy works. Wed, 6:30pm. Through May 17. $95. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato. marincommunityed.com. Love & Marriage in Today’s Liberal Jewish Community Dinner and conversation with Rabbi George Gittleman on his work with intermarried couples. RSVP requested. Apr 14, 6:15pm. $18. Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.5519. Sewing Machine Workshop Learn how to use the center’s vintage Swiss Elna sewing machine and sew your heart out. Apr 19, 1pm. Free. Whistlestop, 930 Tamalpais Ave, San Rafael. 415.456.9062. Wildlife & Habitat Connectivity Explore the concepts of habitat connectivity and learn what you can do to be a good neighbor to local wildlife. Apr 12, 7pm. First Presbyterian Church of San Rafael, 1510 Fifth St, San Rafael.

Readings Angelico Hall Apr 13, 7pm, “The Tsar of Love & Techno” with Anthony Marra, a One Book One Marin event. Free. Apr 17, 7pm, “Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy” with Anne

Napa Bookmine Apr 15, 6pm, “Trixi Pudong & the Greater World” and “Said the Fly” with Audrey Mei and Laurie Taylor. Apr 19, 4:30pm, Storytime & Sing Along with Savannah Austin. Apr 19, 6:30pm, “Riverine” and “Willy Loman’s Reckless Daughter” with Angela Palm and Elizabeth Powell. 964 Pearl St, Napa. 707.733.3199. 19 Broadway Club Apr 18, 8pm, Floricanto with Casa Manana, a night of poetry and music. Free. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Apr 13, 7pm, “In This Grave Hour” with Jacqueline Winspear. Apr 18, 4pm, “Escargot” with Dashka Slater. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563. Point Reyes Books Apr 14, 7pm, Sixteen Rivers Press reading with Gillian Wegener and Erin Rodoni. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1542. Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Apr 15, 7pm, “A Book of American Martyrs” with Joyce Carol Oates. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938. Sausalito Woman’s Club Apr 19, 6:30pm, Sausalito Woman’s Club Poetry Evening, guest appearances by local SLAM poets. 120 Central Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.2700. The Sitting Room Third Wednesday of every month, 2pm, Sitting Room book club. 2025 Curtis Dr, Penngrove. 707.778.3972. St. Supéry Estate Vineyards & Winery Apr 15, 1pm, “New Wine Lover’s Companion” and “The Cheese Lover’s Companion” with Ron Herbst. Free. 8440 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.963.4507.

story that inspired Alfred Hitchcock’s film gets a North Bay premiere. Through Apr 23. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177. Bondage Award-winning playwright Star Finch’s surreal ghost story follows a mixed-race girl who dares to chart her own path to womanhood on an island plantation. Through Apr 16. $25. AlterTheater Performance Space, 200 Tamal Plaza, Corte Madera. 415.454.2787. Company A single man weighs the pros and cons of married life in a series of hilarious musical vignettes. Through Apr 16. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498. The Diary of Anne Frank The gripping new adaptation of the book creates a contemporary, impassioned story of the lives of people persecuted under Nazi rule. Through Apr 23. $10-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145. The Odd Couple Neil Simon’s Tony-winning comedy pits a clean-freak and a slob who share an apartment with hilarious results. Through Apr 23. $9-$25. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920. Sing Me a Murder See and sing in the newest dinner show from Get a Clue Productions, a fully functioning karaoke bar with deadly competition. Reservations required. Fri, Apr 14, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. The Sunshine Boys Neil Simon’s hilarious love letter to vaudeville is presented by Marin Onstage. Through Apr 15. $12-$24. The Belrose, 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6422. Vincent Sightglass Theater present a one-nightonly performance of the play based on the memoirs of Vincent Van Gogh and written by Leonard Nimoy. Apr 15, 5pm. $25 and up. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. sightglasstheater.org. Way Out West San Rafael playwright Joel Eis adapts Nickolai Gogol’s classic farce “The Inspector General,” and resets it in 1848 San Francisco. Through Apr 23. $15-$20. Ross Valley Players, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Greenbrae. 415.456.9555.

Studio 333 Apr 13, 7pm, Why There Are Words, various authors read on the theme “Only the Lonely.” $10. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.8272. Whistlestop Apr 18, 1pm, Russian Poetry Day. Free. 930 Tamalpais Ave, San Rafael. 415.456.9062. Yo el Rey Roasting Third Tuesday of every month, poetry night. 1217 Washington, Calistoga. 707.942.1180.

Theater The Birds The gripping theatrical version of the short

Have an event for the Sundial? Email information to calendar@ pacificsun.com at least two weeks prior to desired publication.


Seminars&Workshops To include your seminar or workshop, call 415.485.6700.

RELATIONSHIP CHALLENGES? Tired of endless relationship or marital challenges? Or single and sick of spending weekends and holidays alone? Join coed Intimacy Group, Single’s Group or Women’s Group to explore what’s blocking you from fulfillment in your relationships and life. Weekly, ongoing groups or 9-week groups on Mon, Tues, or Thurs evenings. Space limited. Also INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY & COUPLES sessions. Central San Rafael. Possible financial assistance (health/flex savings accounts or insurance). Call (415) 453-8117 or reneeowen@ sbcglobal.net for more information. Renée Owen, LMFT#35255. www. therapists.psychologytoday.com/183422 Equine Partners for Empowerment - May 7 - 1:00pm - 5:00pm - Are many of your days spent on auto-pilot, missing connections with others? Do your feelings match your actions so you are living an authentic, balanced life? Are you looking to take a more active, leadership role in your own life? Join us for this exciting and brand new workshop to discover your own innate ability to bring the social intelligence of the horse into your daily life. These empowering activities do not require horsemanship skills as all activities will be held from the ground. Group & individual exercises will provide for powerful growth & learning. For more information, contact Judy Weston-Thompson MFT 23268, CEIP-MH - Equine Insight; equineinsight@aol.com, 415-457-3800

Community Spanish Language Learning Center In Downtown San Rafael www.spanishindowntown sanrafael.com

Mind&Body HYPNOTHERAPY Thea Donnelly, M.A. Hypnosis, Counseling, All Issues. 25 yrs. experience. 415-459-0449. Gina Vance, CCHT Move Forward Quickly Overcome & Resolve MindBodyJourneys.com 415-275-4221

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Handy•Tech•Man Instruction, problemsolving: Apple, PC, iPad, iPhone, printers, TV, electronics. Serving Marin since 2013

Home Services CLEANING SERVICES All Marin House Cleaning Licensed, Bonded, Insured. Will do Windows. O’felia 415-717-7157

FURNITURE REPAIR/REFINISH FURNITURE DOCTOR Ph/Fax: 415-383-2697

GARDENING/LANDSCAPING GARDEN MAINTENANCE OSCAR - 415-505-3606

Seminars & Workshops

Real Estate HOMES/CONDOS FOR SALE AFFORDABLE MARIN? I can show you 50 homes under $500,000. Call Cindy @ 415-902-2729. Christine Champion, Broker. ENGLISH HOUSESITTER Will love your pets, pamper your plants, ease your mind, while you’re out of town. Rates negotiable. References available upon request. Pls Call Jill @ 415-927-1454

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141810. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: KEVIN’S SOBER COACHING, 199 POSADA DEL SOL, NOVATO, CA 94949: KEVIN SCHILTZ, 199 POSADA DEL SOL APT.13, NOVATO, CA 94949. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on MAR 16, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 22, Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141784. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: OSORIO’S CARS FOR SALE, 3241 KERNER BLVD, SUITE #20, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: CIPRIANO OSORIO, 2209 POTRERO AVE, RICHMOND, CA 94804. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on MAR 14, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 22, Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017141743. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 1) ALDRICH FRANKLIN CONSULTING, 2) ENCOMPASS CONSULTING, 42 RIDGE ROAD, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960: CYNTHIA ALDRICH FRANKLIN, 42 RIDGE ROAD, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the ficti-

tious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 08, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 22, Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141767. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 1) FIVE STARS YACHT OF SAUSALITO, 2) LIQUID EVENTS 3) BAY AREA LIQUID EVENTS, 85 LIBERTY SHIP WAY #C04, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: BAY EXCURSIONS LLC, 1001 BRIDGEWAY#125, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant is renewing filing with changes and is transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on Mar 10, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 22, Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141769. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: SAUSALITO BIKE RETURN, 24 IRON SPRINGS, FAIRFAX, CA 94930: SAUSALITO BIKE RETURN LLC, 1001 BRIDGEWAY #125, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 10, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 22, Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141804. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: I BUY HOUSES, 68 MITCHELL BLVD #100, SAN

RAFAEL, CA 94903: ANDREW KAUFMAN, 37 SUNSET WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 15, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 22, Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141828. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: THUMBJIVE, 25 THOMAS DR #10, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: 1) JOSEPH ELLIOTT, 25 THOMAS DR #10, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941 2) DANIEL RAYNAUD, 10208 AMELIA CT, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 3) FABRICE ARMISEN, 861 MILTON STREET, OAKLAND, CA 94607. The business is being conducted by A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on MAR 20, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141829. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 1) 689 CELLARS 2) KILLER DROP 3) SUBMISSION, 135 THIRD STREET, SUITE 100, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: 689 CELLARS, LP, 135 THIRD STREET, SUITE 100, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED PARTNERSHIP. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on MAR 20, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

Trivia answers «5 1 Marin Academy, in San Rafael 2 A Royal Flush; 10 through the

7 Breaking Bad (BR and BA; the main character was a chemistry teacher)

3 Toledo 4 Bubba Gump Shrimp Co. (in-

8 Condoleezza Rice 9 Iceland 10 Flute, oboe, clarinet and

ace of the same suit

spired by the movie Forrest Gump)

5a. Mark b. Lira c. Drachma d. Pound (the Irish punt) 6 Atari

bassoon. Thanks for the question to Stanton Klose from Terra Linda. BONUS ANSWER: The War of 1812. Cronk was born in 1800 and joined U.S. forces to fight the British at age 14.

21 PA CI FI C S U N | A P R I L 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 7 | PA CI FI CSUN.CO M

TO PLACE AN AD: Call our Classifieds and Legals Sales Department at 415.485.6700.Text ads must be placed by Friday, 5pm to make it into the Wednesday print edition.


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22

PublicNotices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017141842. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: FARM HOUSE LOCAL, 25 WARD STREET, LARKSPUR, CA 94939: CUSTOM CHEF, LLC, 25 WARD STREET, LARKSPUR, CA 94939. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 21, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141793. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: NOURISHING LIFE CENTER, 8 MANOR ROAD, FAIRFAX, CA 94930: MARIE GIPSON, 8 MANOR ROAD, FAIRFAX, CA 94930. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on Mar 14, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141852. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 1) HOW WOMEN LEAD, 2) HOW WOMEN INVEST 3) HOW WOMEN GIVE, 1 ADRIAN TERRACE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: BAY AREA WOMEN LEADER NETWORK, 1 ADRIAN TERRACE, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 22, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2017141808. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: 007 TRANSPORTATION, 46B VARDA LANDING RD, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: 007 TRANSPORTATION LLC, 46B VARDA LANDING RD, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 15, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141736. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: FORWARD AND UP, 65 MILLARD ROAD, LARKSPUR, CA 94939: 1) DAVID P LIEBENDORFER, 65 MILLARD ROAD, LARKSPUR, CA

94939 2) OLAF K GOLUBJATNIKOV, 65 MILLARD ROAD, LARKSPUR, CA 94939. The business is being conducted by A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on Mar 7, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141867. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: MOXIE ROAD PRODUCTIONS, 6 TARTAN RD, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: WORD ROADS, LLC, 6 TARTAN RD, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 24, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141901. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: BLISS EVENTS BAY AREA, 305 SAN ANSELMO AVE # 301, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960: LAURA M SUSKI, 28 TAPPAN ROAD, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on MAR 29, 2017. (Publication Dates: Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19, Apr 26 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141859. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: MYOHO SERVICES, 439 SHERWOOD DRIVE #310, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: KEN AINSWORTH, 439 SHERWOOD DRIVE # 310, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on MAR 23, 2017. (Publication Dates: Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19, Apr 26 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017141855. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: BLACK COD LIVES MATTER, 103 GREENBRAE BOARDWALK, GREENBRAE, CA 94904: HOGAN ANTHONY KANIA, 103 GREENBRAE BOARDWALK, GREENBRAE, CA 94904. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin

County on Mar 22, 2017. (Publication Dates: Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19, Apr 26 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141848. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: TRANSQUEST FOR MIRACLES, 200 NAPA ST, SAUSALITO, CA 94965: RICHARD DREAM WEAVER, 20O NAPA ST, SAUSALITO, CA 94965. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 22, 2017. (Publication Dates: Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19, Apr 26 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141785. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: FLM MANGEMENT, 408 PUTNAM ST, ANTIOCH, CA 94509: WENDY L. GUSSLER, 408 PUTNAM ST, ANTIOCH, CA 94509. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Mar 14, 2017. (Publication Dates: Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19, Apr 26 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141926. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: ANN DICKSON ENTERPRISES, 109 WIMBLEDON WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: ANN DICKSON, 109 WIMBLEDON WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Apr 03, 2017. (Publication Dates: Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19, Apr 26 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141920. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business:ADVANSOS, 649 CARLSTON AVENUE, OAKLAND, CA 94610: LEDNA HORNE, 649 CARLSTON AVENUE, OAKLAND, CA 94610. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on March 31, 2017. (Publication Dates: April 12, April 19, April 26, May 3 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141938. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: ANGEL DOODLE KIDS, 2 OAK TREE LANE, FAIRFAX,

CA 94930: DIEANNA LYNN JONES, 2 OAK TREE LANE, FAIRFAX, CA 94930. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on April 4, 2017. (Publication Dates: April 12, April 19, April 26, May 3 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017-141928. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: LOTUS CHAAT & SPICE, 1561 4TH STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: RAJ RANI LLC, 704 4TH STREET, SAN RAFAEL CA 94901. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registration expired more than 40 days ago and is renewing under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein.. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on April 3, 2017. (Publication Dates: April 12, April 19, April 26, May 3 of 2017)

OTHER NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME:SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1701095. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner HOLLY GREENWOOD filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: EVELYN ROSE REYES to EVELYN ROSE GREENWOOD. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 05/23/2017 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT C, ROOM C, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: MAR 23, 2017. (Publication Dates: Mar 29, Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LORRAINE S. BOYER AKA LORRAINE SHIRLEY BOYER AKA LORRAINE BOYER; Case No. PR-1701163 filed on Mar 28, 2017. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will

or estate, or both, of LORRAINE S. BOYER AKA LORRAINE SHIRLEY BOYER AKA LORRAINE BOYER.A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed in the Superior Court of California, County of MARIN by SUZANNE S. BOYER. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SUZANNE S. BOYER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action). The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: MAY 8, 2017 at 9:00 am. In Dept. J, Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94913. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under Section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California Statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: DAVID A. BROWN, ESQ. TILLEM McNICHOL & BROWN, 846 BROADWAY, SONOMA, CA 95476. Telephone: 707-996-4505, FAX: 707-996-2460. (Publication Dates: Apr 05, Apr 12, Apr 19 of 2017)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MARJORIE NOBLES WRIGHT, AKA MARJORIE N. WRIGHT; Case

No. PR-1700550 filed on MARCH 28, 2017. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MARJORIE NOBLES WRIGHT. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed in the Superior Court of California, County of Marin by K. DIXON WRIGHT. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that K. DIXON WRIGHT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action). The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: May 8, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept. J, Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94901. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under Section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law.YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: KATHLEEN S. WRIGHT, PO BOX 1339, SANTA CLARA, CA 95052. Telephone: 408.499.2159. Publication Dates: APRIL 12, APRIL 19, APRIL 26 of 2017.


By Amy Alkon

Q:

I love my boyfriend; however, I feel bad that he never buys me presents. He did when we were dating, and he buys himself extravagant stuff. But he got me nothing for my birthday and only some trinkets for Christmas because I made a stink. When I’ve brought up the gifts issue, he’s implied that I’m materialistic. However, what matters to me is not the cost, but that he’s thinking of me. Is my desire for gifts somehow shallow?—Coal Digger

A:

Once again, it’s Christmas. Ooh, ooh, what’s that under the tree?! Once again … it’s the floor. Many men sneer at the importance their ladies place on getting gifts from them, deeming it a sign of female emotional frailty. What these men aren’t taking into account is that the differences that evolved in male and female psychology correspond to differences in male and female physiology. To put this another way, women (disproportionately) are into getting gifts from romantic partners for the same reason men (disproportionately) are into watching strippers. Because, for a woman, sex can lead to pregnancy (and a hungry kid to drag around), female emotions evolved to act as a sort of alarm system, making a woman feel crappy when there are signs that a man’s commitment may be waning. However, a man’s being willing to give gifts suggests a willingness to “invest” (beyond 2.6 minutes of foreplay and a teaspoon of sperm). Accordingly, evolutionary behavioral scientist Gad Saad believes that gift-giving evolved as a “distinctly male courtship strategy.” Though women do give gifts to romantic partners, they tend to wait till they’re in a relationship and then do it to “celebrate” being together. Saad’s research finds that men, on the other hand, “are much more likely to be tactical in their reasons for offering a gift to a romantic partner”—like, in the courtship phase, to get a woman into bed. (Of course, if a woman wants to get a man into bed, she doesn’t need to give him a present to unwrap; she just starts unbuttoning her top.) Explain the science to your boyfriend. You don’t have a character deficiency; you just want him to show his love in the way that works for you. That’s what people who love each other do. Besides, you aren’t demanding, “‘Tiara of the Week!’ or I’m gone!” You’d just like occasional little “thinking of you” prezzies and somewhat bigger ones on Official Girlfriend Holidays (birthdays, anniversaries, etc.). Ultimately, these are not just gifts but messages that making you happy is worth an investment of money and effort—beyond what he’s been putting in to run out and get his wallet wired shut just in time for your birthday.

Q:

My fiancé and I were driving my drunk friend home from a party. He was saying rude things to her, but I knew he was just wasted and didn’t mean them, so I didn’t say anything. I thought my fiancé would also shrug it off, but she was mad and hurt that I didn’t stand up for her. Is it that big a deal? Couldn’t she have stood up for herself ?—Middleman

A:

Yes, there’s actually more to being an ideal partner to a woman than being able to unhook a bra with your teeth. A woman today may be perfectly capable of defending herself—with her big mouth or her big pink handgun. However, she has an emotional operating system pushing her to go for men who show an ability and a willingness to protect her. This comes out of how, over millions of years of evolution, certain ladies’ children were more likely to survive and pass on their mother’s genes. Which children? Those whose mothers chose men who’d do more in an attack than, well, effectively crawl under the car seat and wish that all of the awfulness would stop. Your fiancé probably still feels resentful and maybe even thinks less of you for how you basically showed all the testosterone-driven fortitude of a geranium. Consider what grandpas everywhere call “having character:” Doing the right thing. If, in looking back, you would’ve done things differently, tell your fiancé. Then pledge that going forward, you’ll be that kind of guy—and protecting the person who means the most to you won’t involve pushing your girlfriend toward the grizzly bear so you’ll have more time to make a run for it.Y Worship the goddess—or sacrifice her at the altar at adviceamy@aol.com.

Astrology

For the week of April 12

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Before visiting

Sicily for the first time, American poet Billy Collins learned to speak Italian. In his poem “By a Swimming Pool Outside Siracusa,” he describes how the new language is changing his perspective. If he were thinking in English, he might say that the gin he’s drinking while sitting alone in the evening light “has softened my mood.” But the newly Italianized part of his mind would prefer to say that the gin “has allowed my thoughts to traverse my brain with greater gentleness” and “has extended permission to my mind to feel a friendship with the vast sky.” Your assignment in the coming week, Aries, is to Italianize your view of the world. Infuse your thoughts with expansive lyricism and voluptuous relaxation. If you’re Italian, celebrate and amplify your Italianness.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s closing time. You have finished toiling in the shadow of an old sacred cow. You’ve climaxed your relationship with ill-fitting ideas that you borrowed from mediocre and inappropriate teachers once upon a time. And you can finally give up your quest for a supposed Holy Grail that never actually existed in the first place. It’s time to move on to the next chapter of your life story, Taurus! You have been authorized to graduate from any influence, attachment and attraction that wouldn’t serve your greater good in the future. Does this mean that you’ll soon be ready to embrace more freedom than you have in years? I’m betting on it.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The heaviest butterfly on the planet is the female Queen Victoria’s Birdwing. It tips the scales at two grams. The female Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing is the butterfly with the longest wingspan: More than 12 inches. These two creatures remind me of you these days. Like them, you’re freakishly beautiful. You’re a marvelous and somewhat vertiginous spectacle. The tasks you’re working on are graceful and elegant, yet also big and weighty. Because of your intensity, you may not look flightworthy, but you’re actually quite aerodynamic. In fact, your sorties are dazzling and influential. Though your acrobatic zigzags seem improbable, they’re effective. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Picasso had mixed feelings about his fellow painter Marc Chagall, who was born under the sign of Cancer. “I’m not crazy about his roosters and donkeys and flying violinists, and all the folklore,” Picasso said, referring to the subject matter of Chagall’s compositions. But he also felt that Chagall was one of the only painters “who understands what color really is,” adding, “There’s never been anybody since Renoir who has the feeling for light that Chagall has.” I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will be the recipient of mixed messages like these. Praise and disapproval may come your way. Recognition and neglect. Kudos and apathy. Please don’t dwell on the criticism and downplay the applause. In fact, do the reverse! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Go Tell It on the

Mountain” is the title of an old gospel song, and now it’s the metaphorical theme of your horoscope. I advise you to climb a tall peak—even if it’s just a magic mountain in your imagination—and deliver the spicy monologue that has been marinating within you. It would be great if you could gather a sympathetic audience for your revelations, but that’s not mandatory to achieve the necessary catharsis. You simply need to be gazing at the big picture as you declare your big, ripe truths.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If you were a snake, it would be a fine time to molt your skin. If you were a river, it would be a perfect moment to overflow your banks in a spring flood. If you were an office worker, it would be an excellent phase to trade in your claustrophobic cubicle for a spacious new niche. In other words, Virgo, you’re primed to outgrow at least one of your containers. The boundaries you knew you would have to transgress some day are finally ready to be transgressed.

By Rob Brezsny

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): For more than a century, the Ringsaker Lutheran Church in Buxton, North Dakota hosted rites of passage, including 362 baptisms, 50 marriages and 97 funerals. It closed in 2002, a victim of the area’s shrinking population. I invite you to consider the possibility that this can serve as a useful metaphor for you, Libra. Is there a place that has been a sanctuary for you, but has begun to lose its magic? Is there a traditional power spot from which the power has been ebbing? Has a holy refuge evolved into a mundane hangout? If so, mourn for a while, then go in search of a vibrant replacement. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Most people

throw away lemon rinds, walnut shells and pomegranate skins. But some resourceful types find uses for these apparent wastes. Lemon rind can serve as a deodorizer, cleaner and skin tonic, as well as a zesty ingredient in recipes. Ground-up walnut shells work well in facial scrubs and pet bedding. When made into a powder, pomegranate peels have a variety of applications for skincare. I suggest that you look for metaphorically similar things, Scorpio. You’re typically inclined to dismiss the surfaces, discard the packaging and ignore the outer layers, but I urge you to consider the possibility that right now they may have value.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’re growing too fast, but that’s fine as long as you don’t make people around you feel that they’re moving too slowly. You know too much, but that won’t be a problem as long as you don’t act snooty. And you’re almost too attractive for your own good, but that won’t hurt you as long as you overflow with spontaneous generosity. What I’m trying to convey, Sagittarius, is that your excesses are likely to be more beautiful than chaotic, and more fertile than confusing. And that should provide you with plenty of slack when dealing with cautious folks who are a bit rattled by your lust for life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Until

recently, scientists believed that the number of trees on the planet was around 400 billion. But research published in the journal Nature says that’s wrong. There are actually three trillion trees on Earth—almost eight times more than was previously thought. In a similar way, I suspect that you have also underestimated certain resources that are personally available to you, Capricorn. Now is a good time to correct your undervaluation. Summon the audacity to recognize the potential abundance you have at your disposal. Then make plans to tap into it with a greater sense of purpose.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The poet John Keats identified a quality that he called “negative capability.” He defined it as the power to calmly accept “uncertainties, mysteries and doubts without any irritable reaching after fact and reason.” I would extend the meaning to include three other things not to be irritably reached for: Artificial clarity, premature resolution and simplistic answers. Now is an excellent time to learn more about this fine art, Aquarius. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Are you ready for a riddle that’s more enjoyable than the kind you’re used to? You may be too jaded to embrace this unusual gift. You could assume that it’s another one of the crazymaking cosmic jokes that have sometimes tormented you in the past. I hope that you’ll welcome the riddle in the liberating spirit in which it’s offered. If you do, you’ll be pleasantly surprised as it teases you in ways that you didn’t know you wanted to be teased. You’ll feel a delightful itch or a soothing burn in your secret self, like a funny-bone feeling that titillates your immortal soul.Y Test this hypothesis: The answer to a pressing question will come within 72 hours after you do a ritual in which you ask for clarity. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

23 PA CI FI C S U N | A P R I L 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 7 | PA CI FI CSUN.CO M

Advice Goddess

FREE WILL


Sun1715  

April 12-18, 2017

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