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YEAR 55, NO. 2 JANUARY 11-17, 2017

Health & Wellness: HOLISTIC ISSUE

Natural Remedy

SERVING MARIN COUNTY

PACIFICSUN.COM

TALKING HOLISTIC HEALTH WITH MARIN’S ALCHEMY & GATHERING THYME P8

Dodd’s Bill P6 Theater Outlook P13 Vote for Best of Marin 2017 at PacificSun.com


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02 Enhance your career, study abroad or learn new skills with one of the leading continuing-education providers in the North Bay and beyond.

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Clara Ning (Beijing, China), majoring in Music Performance, practices violin with Professor and Music Department Chair Dr. Brian S. Wilson inside the 1,400-seat Joan and Sanford I. Weill Hall at Sonoma State University’s Green Music Center.

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Publisher Rosemary Olson x315 EDITORIAL Editor Molly Oleson x316

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Movie Page Editor Matt Stafford Copy Editor Lily O’Brien CONTRIBUTORS Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Charles Brousse, Tom Gogola, Tanya Henry, Howard Rachelson, Nikki Silverstein, Charlie Swanson, Flora Tsapovsky, Richard von Busack

ADVERTISING Advertising Account Managers Danielle McCoy x311, Marianne Misz x336

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Letters

Classified and Legal Advertising x331 legals@pacificsun.com

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Trivia/Hero & Zero

ART AND PRODUCTION Design Director Kara Brown

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Upfront

Art Director Tabi Zarrinnaal

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Feature

Production Operations Manager Sean George

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Food & Drink

Graphic Designers Jimmy Arceneaux Lorin Baeta Chelsea Dederick

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Theater

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Music/Film

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Movies

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Sundial

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Classifieds

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Astrology/Advice

ADMINISTRATION Accounting and Operations Manager Cecily Josse x331 CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano PACIFIC SUN (USPS 454-630) Published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc. Distributed free at more than 500 locations throughout Marin County. Adjudicated a newspaper of General Circulation. First class mailed delivery in Marin available by subscriptions (per year): Marin County $75; out-of-county $90, via credit card, cash or check. No person may, without the permission of the Pacific Sun, take more than one copy of each Pacific Sun weekly issue. Entire contents of this publication Copyright ©Metrosa, Inc., ISSN; 0048-2641. All rights reserved. Unsolicited manuscripts must be submitted with a stamped self-addressed envelope. ON THE COVER Design by Tabi Zarrinnaal | Photo courtesy of Gathering Thyme

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1200 Fifth Ave., Suite 200 San Rafael, CA 94901 Phone: 415.485.6700 Fax: 415.485.6266 E-Mail: letters@pacificsun.com

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This week, a letter-writer describes a sad new reality involving Trump and Twitter.

Laugh Out Loud The sense of humor [‘Funny bone,’ Dec. 28]. Let humor fast-track you to healthier, happier living. —Max Elliot Anderson, via pacificsun.com

New Reality

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The next president of the United States is an exemplar of a new maxim, which can quite comfortably be mentioned in all sincerity: If you can’t take the heat (from the media), sit down and tweet. It’s weak and it’s sad. But it’s also the new reality. This new era can easily be referred to as: “Curiouser and curiouser.” —Dennis Kostecki

United We Stand As well as ushering in confusion and fear, 2017 also presents new possibilities. Twenty-three percent of

registered voters are progressive people of color, 28 percent are progressive whites. Together, this is 51 percent of voters: The new majority. (Source: ‘Brown is the New White,’ by S. Phillips). The changing demographics offer an opportunity to create diverse coalitions and make common cause, for the good of all. Interested? On Monday, January 16, the annual honoring of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Marin City takes place. This year it is entitled “Stand Strong, Be United, Move Forward.” The wider community is invited to march at 9am [beginning at St. Andrew Presbyterian Church in Sausalito] and to the program beginning at 10:30am at the Manzanita Center. This is an opportunity to support and connect with people of like mind and heart. “I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear. —Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. —Pamela Dake


1 What city was capital of the Spanish territory of California for most of the 75 years before California became a U.S. state, in 1850?

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2 What is the hardest natural substance known to occur on Earth? 3 What three city locations are mentioned in the open-

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ing lyrics of the song, “I Left My Heart in San Francisco”?

4 The Eiffel Tower, at 984 feet, was the tallest structure in the world from 1889 until 1929, when surpassed in height by what skyscraper in New York, at 1,046 feet? 5 What three rhyming words, spelled with the same

repeating vowel, describe a national capital, a tropical fruit and a great rock guitarist?

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Vo t

By Howard Rachelson

Be e fo r S st

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6a. Author, activist, humanitarian, professor and

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Holocaust survivor, he died in Manhattan this past July 2 at the age of 87.

b. He’s famous for what book with a one-word title, describing his horrifying experiences as a 15-year-old boy at the hands of the Nazis?

Moving Your Home Or Business? Trust The Experts!

7 Lawmakers from what state in 2016 got hot and bothered by these rooms? What laws did they pass?

2014

8 What 26-year-old woman was the world’s highest paid actress in 2016 (as well as 2015)?

9 Can you name the recently fired general manager and head coach of the struggling San Francisco 49ers? Who fired them?

10 Which continental U.S. state extends farthest east? Farthest north? Farthest south? Farthest west?

Vote For Us Now!

BONUS QUESTION: He’s won a Tony Award, the Pulitzer Prize, a Grammy Award, was nominated for a Golden Globe, hosted Saturday Night Live, rapped on talk shows, wrote a best-selling book, composed songs for a hit movie (Moana) and was named Associated Press Entertainer of the Year for 2016. Give his three-word name.

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▼ Snarky name-calling, secret alliances and the use of private email accounts to conduct official government business. No, we’re not describing the recent presidential election. This is about how top dogs in the National Park Service (NPS) mishandled the public process that will soon result in severely restricting dog walking in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), cutting access by a whopping 90 percent. Documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) by Marin County Dog Owners Group and other local organizations expose a bias by the NPS to limit dogs in the GGNRA and highlight the underhanded methods used to influence the outcome of the dog management plan. To publicize the inequity of the process, the dog and recreation advocate

Answers on page

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For your next party, fundraiser or company event, have a Trivia Café team contest hosted by Howard Rachelson, featuring great questions, music and visuals. Contact Howard at howard1@triviacafe.com, and visit triviacafe.com for the web’s most interesting questions!

DEPENDABILITY

groups launched WoofieLeaks, a website that posts incriminating emails and planning documents, including an email from a GGRNA wildlife ecologist urging staff to leave out pertinent data that doesn’t jibe with the agency’s views on virtually eliminating dog walking in the GGNRA. Other gems include a senior GGNRA official directing staff to destroy damning emails and providing talking points to groups opposed to dog walking and helping them write op-ed pieces. “The deliberate destruction of public records, failing recollections, and the use of private emails by agency personnel reveal a fatally flawed, fundamentally unfair, and unlawful decision-making process,” said Chris Carr, the attorney handling the FOIA requests on behalf of local dog and recreation groups. We think the NPS and the GGNRA are in the doghouse now. That’s ruff.

Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeros at ›› pacificsun.com

I can help you with divorce and related issues: Conservatorship, guardianship and much more. Call today for a FREE initial assessment of your situation.Legaldoc-prep provides service at your direction and does not provide legal advice.

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Upfront After suffering from identity theft, Sen. Bill Dodd took on banking-reform legislation and arbitration language in consumer-lending contracts.

Fine Print

Napa Sen. Bill Dodd steps between consumers and lenders By Tom Gogola

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apa’s Bill Dodd says that when he introduced his first bill (SB 33) as a freshly minted state senator early this past month, bankers and businessmen approached him in Sacramento and wondered, what the heck is this former Republican up to? Dodd is also a former business owner who sat on the board of the Napa Community Bank. He says his bill sprang from the recent controversy at Wells Fargo—and from his own experience as a victim

of identity theft. He’s aiming squarely at so-called forced arbitration clauses in contracts that bar consumers from suing lenders in court when there are charges of fraud or identity theft. The Wells Fargo scandal involved employees at the California-based bank who were caught opening some 2 million bank accounts for existing Wells Fargo customers without their knowledge or consent, and then passing along millions of dollars in fees and charges to the unwitting customers. When customers got wise to the scam, they sued, but Wells Fargo successfully

argued that the controversy should be settled through arbitration and not the courts. This “forced arbitration” clause is a standard part of lending contracts designed to protect lenders against expensive lawsuits played out in the courts. The clause is just the sort of fineprint exercise in bank favoritism that has been scrubbed by multiple Obama-era consumer-protection reforms that pushed back against fees and hidden charges in contracts—where, as is often the case, says Dodd, “people don’t know what they are signing.”

His bill dovetails with other work he has done on identity theft and consumer-fraud issues while serving as an assemblyman, and also with federal-level efforts to reform the arbitration-clause backstop for banks and lenders through the besieged Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). Last October, the CFPB announced its intention to scrub forced-arbitration language from lending contracts. “I am not a fan of the clauses,” Dodd says. “In the end, they favor whoever is contracting out for the arbitrator, for obvious reasons.


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I am going to work on a bill that will make an arbitration system that is more fair. And if there’s a solution to arbitration that was equally fair to business and the consumer, I’m all in.

—Bill Dodd My bill essentially says that if a bank or financial institution [has] either defrauded or perpetuated consumer fraud on a customer … the bank would lose the ability to automatically go to the arbitration clause, and the employee or victim could have their claim heard in a court of law.” Wells Fargo argued that because the defrauded customers had legitimate accounts with the bank, the arbitration clause in the customers’ contracts kicked in when charges of fraud emerged. Dodd says that a Wells Fargo whistleblower discovered the scam but “that person lost in arbitration.” Dodd says that members of the banking industry have approached him and said, “We can’t believe you are doing this,” as they highlight court costs associated with out-of-contract lawsuits. Dodd’s identity-theft case ended favorably for him and for the bank that had let it happen, but the arbiter, he says, dropped all court and legal fees associated with the case. Now, he says, when he’s approached by bankers, “I say to them, have you ever seen a time when you or your employee has committed fraud on customers or employees?” Their answer is typically no, to which Dodd responds that they then shouldn’t object to a bill that would adjudicate fraud in court instead of through arbitration. “I am going to work on a bill that will make an arbitration system that is more fair,” says Dodd, “and if there’s a solution to arbitration that was equally fair to business and the consumer, I’m all in.” Until then, he says, he’s putting the emphasis on protecting consumers instead of the banks’ bottom line. “I really do believe that the arbitration system favors the employers, favors the companies,” he says. Dodd’s bill comes amid intense discussion over the fate of the CFPB,

an agency spearheaded by progressive firebrand Sen. Elizabeth Warren. A similar attempt to enact Dodd’s proposed arbitration language at the CFPB has met strong opposition from Republicans, many of whom are hellbent on destroying the agency. In a recent interview with the Pacific Sun, Kevin Stein, deputy director of the consumer-rights nonprofit the California Reinvestment Coalition, said potential rollbacks at the CFPB were a “major concern, and an area where we will fight to protect the agency and the rules and access it gives to consumers to complain about unfair practices.” Dodd says he’s not totally conversant in all the efforts undertaken at the CFPB, but he’s generally a fan of consumer protections, even as he echoes concerns that the agency’s purportedly big-foot approach to regulating big banks and lenders has also put the screws to community lenders. Senate Bill 33 is the first and only bill that Dodd has introduced in his capacity as chair of the state’s Senate Banking and Financial Institutions Committee. The bill has gotten the support of state consumer-rights groups such as the Consumer Federation of California. Dodd says he’s eager to work as a champion for consumer protections that are fair to consumers and lenders alike. “This is my first foray into this area,” he says, as he highlights that the arbitration-reform issue has been editorialized in newspapers ranging from The Boston Herald to The New York Times, and that California Rep. Brad Sherman recently co-sponsored a similar bill in Washington. But Dodd says he didn’t sponsor the bill to get the positive press or to align with the CFPB. “I’m doing this on my own,” he says.Y

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Courtesy of Gathering Thyme

San Rafael’s Gathering Thyme, an inviting wellness shrine, is devoted to matching remedies to customers.

Vibrant Health Conversation with a clinical herbalist

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ocated on a busy corner in downtown San Rafael, Gathering Thyme has been a local wellness shrine for almost a decade. With a nutritionist, herbalist, chiropractor and holistic psychotherapist on

staff, the clinic and store, owned by clinical herbalist Cheryl Fromholzer, is a welcoming introduction to what may seem like a daunting, complex world of herbs, seeds and unfamiliar terms. Since opening at the very visible location,

By Flora Tsapovsky Fromholzer, who has confident yet reserved energy, has been championing the herbal scene in Marin with classes, events, seasonal offerings and above all— plenty of patience. “Our customers tend to come in two flavors,” Fromholzer says.

“Those who are educated in herbal and nutritional supplements and know exactly what it is they want, and those who have a health concern and are looking for advice.” And for those who put ‘getting healthier’ on their 2017 bucket list, who could be a better fit to lead the unaware and the curious into the world of herbal medicine?


F.T.: Why ‘Western Herbalism?’ What sets it apart?

Courtesy of Gathering Thyme

Women at Gathering Thyme prepare medicine made from nature.

Flora Tsapovsky: Why is herbal medicine important today?

Cheryl Fromholzer: “Herbal medicine is a journey in self-care which is a very different paradigm than our current medical model of healthcare. It was not that long ago when every family had an elder, usually grandma, who understood how to use herbs growing in the garden, and even everyday foods, to help with common ailments. These “folk” remedies included things like drinking cabbage juice for stomach ulcers, or applying raw grated potatoes on the skin for drawing out infection. In many cultures this tradition of using plants for medicine is still very much alive, but has largely been forgotten in American culture with the advent of “modern” medicine. Now, we look to someone outside the family, who may or may not have our long-term best interests at heart, to help us with our ills.

With rising healthcare costs and astronomical pharmaceutical drug prices, many people are coming back to the traditional ways of health and healing, and for good reason—with a little knowledge and training, herbal medicine can be very effective both as a preventive measure, as well as to help with many modern-day physical, mental and emotional ailments.”

F.T: What would you advise a brand-new customer in terms of getting to know the field?

C.F.: “If you are unfamiliar with herbal medicine and would like to get to know the field, start by getting a good book on the topic. I highly recommend Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide by Rosemary Gladstar.This book is a practical primer on herbal medicine and includes everything from growing to using herbs in your everyday life. Another excellent

C.F.: “Western herbalism draws from herbal traditions of Europe and the Americas, and emphasizes the study and use of herbs used in these traditions in the treatment and prevention of illness. For me, the most important aspect of being a Western Herbalist is the sense of wholeness it brings, of connectedness, of belonging. I think it’s important that we learn to use the plants that are native to our bioregion, as well as those wonderful wild ‘weeds’ that pop up in the cracks of our sidewalks and lawns.”

F.T: What is the ‘starter kit’ for getting familiar with herbal products and the right approach to gathering it? C.F.: “I would recommend for every household to develop an herbal first-aid kit for common complaints. It really depends on the makeup of your household and what kinds of issues arise most frequently. For households with children, I would recommend an ointment for bumps, bruises, burns, scrapes and rashes, peppermint or chamomile tea for tummy upsets and perhaps garlic/mullein oil for ear infections. In addition, the general health issues we are asked to help with the most are insomnia, stress, reproductive health issues and digestive complaints. We sell a wide variety of remedies in those categories and it all boils down to matching a remedy to a person.”

F.T.: What are some of your bestselling products and why?

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F.T.: Are you aware of health trends and 'buzz' products? What’s your relationship with them?

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way to get introduced to herbal medicine is by taking classes. I am offering a free workshop at the Mill Valley Library next Saturday the 14th from 11am-12:30pm on “Congestion and Sinus Relief using Herbal Medicine.” In addition, Gathering Thyme offers many short- and long-term classes on herbal medicine, nutrition, natural cosmetics and aromatherapy. A word of caution—while the internet can be a great vehicle for disseminating information, not all of it is credible. There are a lot of marketing websites, as well as sites that will tell you that ‘herbs don’t work’ or ‘herbs are dangerous.’ Avoid all of them and go straight to the source—sites written by practicing professional herbalists who know first-hand the safety and efficacy of herbs. Learningherbs.com is a great place for beginners to learn about Western Herbalism.”

C.F.: Among our bestsellers are herbal honeys, a delicious way to incorporate herbs into your diet, and elderberry syrup. This is a traditional remedy for colds and flus. Studies have shown that taking elderberry can be helpful as preventive medicine during cold and flu season, protecting your cells from viral penetration, and if you do get sick, illness tends to be shorter lived and less intense.”

C.F.: “While we are always analyzing the latest health trends, and will bring in new products that are of value to our customers, we steer far away from many of the trendy, ‘buzz’ products, as we find that they just don’t hold up to the claims made. We are passionate about the sustainability of ethically sourced products and refuse to carry some things that may be linked to the destruction of our rainforests or the demise of the herb itself through overharvesting in the wild. Our goal is always helping our customers achieve vibrant health. While many would like to believe it, there is no ‘magic bullet.’ Achieving your health goals doesn’t come in a bottle but requires a multi-faceted approach including diet and lifestyle changes. We can help on all fronts.”

F.T.: Are there ‘must-have’ herbs or spices for everyday well-being?

C.F.: “There is no ‘must-have’ herb or spice that would be beneficial for everyday well-being for every person. Many people indeed come into the shop asking for ‘the sleep herb’ or ‘the stress herb’—but herbal medicine is best applied when you dig a little deeper and can best match a remedy to the person. We take the time to ask questions to get a better idea of what may be the most beneficial for our customers. Herbs have energetic qualities, as do people. By ‘energetics,’ we mean herbs can be warming or cooling, drying or moistening to differing degrees. We look at balancing the constitution of a person with the energetics of herbs we dispense.”Y Gathering Thyme, 1447 Fourth Street, Suite B, San Rafael; 415/524-8693; gatheringthyme.com.


VOTE

ISSUE DATE: APRIL 26

Vote Now!

JAN 4 -FEB 28 ISSUE DATE: APRIL 26

Courtesy of Alchemy

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JAN 4 -FEB 28

VOTING: NOW-FEB 28

2017

ISSUE: APRIL 26

pacificsun.com

www.pacificsun.com

Alchemy, a salon and clinic, fills a hole in the wellness market.

Well Within

Alchemy helps clients feel their best

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lchemy, slivered between two restaurants (San Rafael Joe’s and Fenix) on San Rafael’s Fourth Street, is easy to miss when you walk by—but a closer look reveals big windows, hints of ‘chic’ and a beautiful sign. Open since June of 2016, Alchemy is the baby of Devon Foley Keane, Dr. Edmond Zingaro and Karen Cohen, a registered nurse. Foley Keane was born in San Anselmo and has a background in design and the apparel industry. “I moved back from Australia and teamed up with my partners to create this unique concept,” she says. “I saw a hole in the wellness market AD SIZE and thought it could be done in a more connected way, that was more encompassing in all areas that actually make us feel well.” The salon and clinic offers a myriad of beauty and cosmetic services, from waxing to Botox to peels, and prides itself on a holistic approach. “We have taken the traditional ‘medical spa’ and combined it with the elements that spoke to us personally,” Foley Keane says. “We wanted to target the whole person, to address the issues we seem to all have in common … to offer an all-encompassing spread of treatments that truly serve the aspect that wellness plays in our lives, from the inside and out.” Alchemy’s popular B12 push infusions are geared to inject the skin with the vitamin, bi-weekly or

1/4s

monthly. “B12 serves the body in so many amazing ways,” gushes Foley Keane. “It boosts the immune system, nourishes, detoxifies and rejuvenates, as well as targeting specific goals like facilitating weight loss, increased energy, improved focus.” Other beloved treatments are broadband light photofacials. “Our clients are active Californians with a love of the outdoors, but are also concerned with sun damage and proactively preventing precancerous lesions from growing,” says Foley Keane. “We ask each client that comes through our door what specifically concerns them about how they’re feeling, how they are aging, what they see when they look in the mirror every morning,” Foley Keane continues. “We ask about the client’s desires—are they after immediate results-driven treatments that are measurable in the moment? Are they after a longterm plan for prevention in aging? Are they fatigued? Sun damaged? Are they interested in a postpartum mommy makeover? Do they simply want their mustache gone? Maybe they are just tired of shaving their backs? Sometimes it’s the little things that make a huge difference.” It’s hard to disagree with that.Y —F.T.

2017

www.pacificsun.c

Alchemy, 925B Fourth Street, San Rafael; 415/295-7953; alchemymarin.com.


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• Global company based in San Rafael, CA • Medical Consulting • One on One Patient Care • Worldwide Ambassadors • Public Education

• CME/CE educational seminars Physicians, Nurses and Pharmacists • Educating Local, State, National and International Governments and Medical Institutions


CLASSES START

January 21

YOU

BELONG HERE

Courtesy of Más Masa

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Más Masa specializes in Chilean-influenced dishes made with corn.

FOOD & DRINK

New Era

Get healthy with ancient grains at Más Masa By Tanya Henry

The REAL Mental Health Initiative at Congregation Rodef Sholom is proud to present our second annual speaker series:

REAL Conversations about Mental Health and Mental Illness Thursday, January 19 7:00-9:00pm How I Went From Wanting to Die to Loving Life: A Resilience Journey with Leah Harris

Leah Harris’ journey has taken her from a suicidal and hopeless young woman to an empowered advocate living a meaningful life. Her talk will explore the legacy of intergenerational trauma, mental illness, and addiction in her Jewish family and how she has broken the cycle of silence and shame.

at Congregation Rodef Sholom 170 North San Pedro Road San Rafael, CA

NEXT IN THE REAL SPEAKER SERIES:

Free and open to the public; RSVP to MHI@rodefsholom.org or 415.479.3441

Thursday, February 16 Even in Marin: Addiction and Recovery in Families with David Sheff and Nic Sheff

Thursday, March 23 My Son Who Has Bipolar Disorder is My Hero: Ending the Stigma of Mental Illness with Liza Long

For information: www.rodefsholom.org/our-community/mental-health-initiative The REAL Mental Health Initiative at Rodef Sholom is supported by the Laszlo N. Tauber Family Foundation

T

ransparency is one of those buzzwords that has suffered from massive overuse in recent times, but it might be the single best word to describe Fairfax’s newest addition to the dining scene. Más Masa opened at the end of November on Bolinas Road, and chef/owner Patrick Sheehy hopes that his fast casual concept will bring back corn—in a good way. Sheehy describes the ancient grain as the most fascinating food in the world both for its botany and its history. The Manhattan Beach native spent almost two years in Chile, where along with teaching English and surfing, he discovered his love for South American cuisine. It was also in Chile—more specifically, in the surfing lineup— where he met Will Eoff, who would become one of four partners to open the cheery and welcoming restaurant. White enamel plateware with blue or red trim adds to the casual, clean look and feel of the space. Red cushions top metal chairs, and plenty of windows infuse a 48-seat room with light. A corn grinder (used for making housemade tortillas from special nonGMO corn) sits right at the door, and an open kitchen allows customers a full view of their meal preparation. “I grew up with a burrito in one hand, and a surfboard or skateboard in the other,” says Sheehy, a Fairfax resident who appears genuinely excited to bring what he calls his “fun, healthy”

restaurant to Marin. Not only did Sheehy take a deep dive into Chilean cuisine, he is also a recent graduate from the Culinary Institute of America in St. Helena, and did a stint with Thomas Keller’s Bouchon in Yountville. Más Masa’s very manageable menu offers up a couple of salads, six entrée options and a few sides and desserts. As expected, corn is a central ingredient in almost every item—from hominy in a shaved kale salad, to a corn-based drink to a purple corn panna cotta dessert. Will Eoff, the face of the front of the house, couldn’t be more engaging, and generously offers sample tastes of housemade specialties. Two Al Pastor tacos of purple corn tortillas filled with succulent pork cooked in a guajillo adobo and roasted pineapple offered a satisfying medley of balanced flavors. Ceviche tacos of rockfish served with a crisp, bright salad and soupy beans topped with Cotija cheese needed more spice and backbone. Likewise, the winter squash tacos were brimming with warm, hearty squash, but were thin in the way of flavor. With its all-things-corn concept, uber-friendly owners, enticing outdoor patio and a carefully curated list of interesting beer and wine—including a Fieldwork Brewing Co. IPA and pinot grigio from Monterey’s coveted Santa Lucia Highlands—I have no doubt that Más Mas will hit its stride sooner rather than later.Y


THEATER

Stage Outlook Theater companies reveal plans for 2017 By Charles Brousse

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fter a couple of quiet weeks to relax, decompress with relatives and friends and maybe lift a glass or two of Aunt Ellie’s famous eggnog, it’s time to direct attention to the 2016/2017 season’s second half. In anticipation, here are some nonperformance related news items from my multi-company theater beat. Insiders say that artistic director Jasson Minadakis and his Marin Theatre Company (MTC) cohorts are still exchanging high-fives over their good fortune in snagging Lauren Gunderson for a three-year playwriting residency. According to

Theatre Communications Group (TCG), which gathers such arcane statistics, Ms. Gunderson was tied for sixth place among the most frequently produced American playwrights at TCG member theaters across the country during the 2015-2016 season. MTC will lay claim to much of her time in various capacities until 2019; her first project, Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley, recently closed after an extended, sold-out run. MTC is also welcoming the arrival of Keri Kellerman as managing director, replacing Michael Barker, who left last April to take a similar position at Connecticut’s venerable Westport Country Playhouse. Kellerman is a

seasoned pro, with years of experience not only in the administrative and fundraising sectors, but in the nurturing of new work as well. Sounds like a perfect fit. According to Ross Valley Players’ (RVP) Business Manager Alex Ross, people who work at the Marin Art and Garden Center’s (MAGC) beloved Barn Theatre are really jazzed about the prospect of installing new seating and risers in their rustic home, which is one of America’s longest continuously operating community theaters. Already, more than $100,000 of the estimated $135,000-$140,000 cost is in hand. When accomplished, this will be a boon to theatergoers who have had

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Photo courtesy of MTC

‘Native Son,’ based on the novel by Richard Wright, will open January 19 at Marin Theatre Company.

to put up with uncomfortable chairs and restricted sightlines. In addition, the company has been able to extend its lease with MAGC to the end of 2018 while the latter’s board of directors engages in strategic planning. One hopes that this will lead to a happy outcome for both parties. The San Rafael office of the Mountain Play Association is beginning to gear up for this year’s production of Beauty and the Beast, which opens May 21. Although last year’s West Side Story, which was hit by a Sunday rainout, didn’t do as well as expected, Executive Director Sara Pearson anticipates a better result this time around. Ms. Pearson also reports that the recent gala that showcased many of the best performers from previous Mountain Plays raised about $105,000 in donations and pledges. Another fundraiser, the first of its kind in the organization’s history, will offer a concert version of the musical Hair on Saturday, June 10 (one day only) to mark the 50th anniversary of its debut at New York’s Public Theater. In other news, the Mountain Play board is embarking on a revision of the organization’s strategic plan that may result in substantial changes. Stay tuned. Over at Marin Shakespeare Company (MSC), escrow may be closing as you read this for the purchase of a building at the east end of Fourth Street in San Rafael, to serve as company headquarters and as a venue for classes, storage and all kinds of year-round activities. The project will probably be two years in the making and will require a capital campaign to augment the large donations that are already being used for improvements at their Forest Meadows summer performance space. Any plans for MSC to become a year-round production company in addition to the summer shows? Speaking to Managing Director Lesley Currier by phone, I can visualize her smiling enigmatically as she replies that it’s too early to say. According to the company website, plans for AlterTheater’s announced production of Bondage, by Star Finch—including whether it will be presented at American Conservatory Theater’s Costume Shop space after its run at an unnamed storefront on San Rafael’s Fourth Street—have not yet been finalized. That’s it, except that MSC’s Currier would like it to be known that longtime Marin theater activist Ann Brebner, age 93 and ailing, could use financial support for her 24-hour home care. If you’re so inclined, visit gofundme.com/annbrebner.Y


Courtesy of Manik Khan

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Manik Khan says that spirituality is at the heart of Indian music.

MUSIC

Divine Sounds

In ‘A Monster Calls,’ a young, bullied boy must tell an enormous creature one true tale.

Ali Akbar College of Music turns 50

Green Man

F

Deep feelings emerge in ‘A Monster Calls’ By Richard von Busack

By Lily O’Brien

rom the outside, the Ali Akbar College of Music, in San Rafael’s West End, looks like an ordinary house. But for the many students, teachers and extended family who gather inside, it is a beloved hub of Hindustani Indian classical music. Celebrating 50 years this year, the college will be presenting its first concert of 2017 on Saturday, January 14. One of the performers, Manik Khan, 31, is the youngest son of the late Ustad Ali Akbar Khan, one of the world’s most renowned sarode players, and founder of the school. Although Manik was only 23 years old when his father passed away in 2009, he enjoyed a deep and rewarding relationship with him. At age 13, Manik began studying sarode with his father, and at 14, he started joining his father on stage on the tanpura, a stringed “drone” instrument. “My father told me that it takes 20 years to please yourself, 30 years to please the box office, 40 years to please your teacher and then a lifetime or beyond to please the higher powers,” Manik says. Growing up, Manik was also exposed to the rock and psychedelic music of the ’60s, thanks to his “hippie” mother, Mary. Khan introduced him to Indian and jazz fusion, but Manik says that his father joked that it could be “Con-fusion

music,” unless it was played really well. After earning a degree in Cultural Anthropology from San Francisco State University, Manik became involved full-time with the Ali Akbar College of Music, where he does the bookkeeping, teaches, studies and performs. His mother, a tabla player, is the director, and his brother, Alam, a sarode teacher and performer, manages the office. Acclaimed master percussionist Pandit Swapan Chaudhuri also helps run the school. The college attracts around 80 to 100 students from all over the world each semester. The upcoming concert will feature Hindustani classical vocalist Gaayatri Kaundinya, accompanied by Rajvinder Singh on tabla and Manjeev Singh on the dilruba, in the first half. The second half will feature Manik on sarode, along with Nilan Chaudhuri on tabla. Currently, Manik is deeply involved in the study of sarode and Indian classical music, but feels that he has a lifetime of learning ahead of him. “The better that I can get, the more I improve, and the more that I am able to teach, the more justice I can do to our family and the music as a whole,” he says.Y Ali Akbar College of Music, 215 West End Ave., San Rafael; 415/454-6372; aacm.org.

FILM

L

ike the fairy-tale creature that he is, the title character in A Monster Calls brings a challenge. In accordance with the Law of Three, he will tell three stories. You, in return, must tell him one true tale. Seeing him emerge from a massive yew tree, unfolding into a gnarled figure of some 20 feet in height, one thinks of the line from the old folk song “The Silkie”: “And a grumly guest I’m sure was he.” Towering, ancient and solitary, he’s like the warrior Ents in The Lord of the Rings or a more frightening and better-spoken Groot. The rumbling voice belongs to Liam Neeson, pitched down an octave or two, and all the fiercer for it. The animation in the three stories this monster tells is as gorgeous as Kubo and the Two Strings—forests and villages unfold like paper blossoms, or spiral out into the multi-colored fractals of wet-onwet watercolors. J.A. Bayona (The Orphanage, The Impossible) centers his touching film on the emotions of the monster’s companion. Conor (Lewis MacDougall), an English schoolboy, has a mother who is slowly dying, and he’s pitilessly

bullied at school. The mother is Rogue One’s Felicity Jones, in perhaps her best performance. Most likely, Conor’s future home will be with his loveless grandmother (Sigourney Weaver, using a self-conscious British accent she probably could have done without). Conor hopes to be spared a life with this cold woman, when his father arrives from his current home in the USA. But the man is useless. Dad’s idea of consolation begins and ends with his repeating the old English expression, “Worse things happen at sea.” It seems that Patrick Ness’ source novel would be most mind-blowing to a younger reader, with the revelation that a story that starts with witches and handsome princes may finish in a different way than the Grimm Brothers wrote it down. However, A Monster Calls retrieves its essential keenness in its finish, in the story Conor must tell and yet cannot bring himself to say. This hard-edged fantasy reveals honest, unsentimental feelings … the sort of feelings many will recall from the ordeal of tending doomed lovers or parents, after some monstrous disease called upon them.Y


By Matthew Stafford

Fri. January 13 - Thu. January 19 • The Curious World of Hieronymus Bosch (1:27) Vivid look at the 15th century artist and how his fantastical paintings are more popular than ever. • The C Word (1:34) Eye-opening documentary about cancer and the many alternative options at hand for preventing it; Morgan Freeman narrates. • The Eagle Huntress (1:27) Eyefilling documentary about a 13-year-old Mongolian girl and her quest to become her family’s first female eagle hunter in 12 generations. • Fences (2:19) August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play stars Denzel Washington as a father struggling to raise his family in racially explosive 1950s Pittsburgh. • Hidden Figures (2:07) True story of the three African-American women who were the brains behind John Glenn’s launch into orbit in the early ’60s. • Khaidi No 150 (2:22) Chiranjeevi and Kajal Aggarwal star in V.V. Vinayak’s latest Telugu action flick. • La La Land (2:08) Bold, brilliant Hollywood musical circles around the bittersweet romance between a struggling jazz musician and an aspiring actress; Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling star. • Lion (2:09) Two-hour commercial for Google Earth in which an Indian orphan searches the globe for home and family. • Live by Night (2:09) The Dennis Lehane novel hits the big screen with Ben Affleck as a police chief ’s son who spirals into a life of crime; Affleck writes and directs, too. • Loving (2:03) True story of Mildred and Richard Loving, the courageous interracial couple who faced harassment and worse in the American South of the 1950s. • Manchester by the Sea (2:15) Poignant, bittersweet tale of a Boston janitor who returns to his seaside hometown to raise his newly orphaned nephew; Casey Affleck stars. • Moana (1:43) Disney musical about a Polynesian girl’s epic ocean voyage across the wide Pacific; songs by LinManuel Miranda. • A Monster Calls (1:48) A lonesome child finds friendship and spiritual guidance from a wise old monster (Liam Neeson). • Monster Trucks (1:45) An edgy teen seeks new horizons with a handmade truck and a new pal: A primordial critter with equally itchy feet. • Moonlight (1:50) Tender, bittersweet drama about a young gay black man’s struggle to define himself and embrace his sexuality. • Neruda (1:47) Fanciful biopic finds the great Chilean poet on the run from a tireless flatfoot during the anti-communist hysteria of the 1940s. • Passengers (1:56) When the hibernating passengers on a spaceship to another planet wake up 90 years into their 120-year journey, it’s up to Jennifer Lawrence to change the spark plugs.

• Patriot’s Day (2:10) Docudrama about the Boston Marathon bombing stars Mark Wahlberg, Kevin Bacon and John Goodman as three cops racing to track down the bombers before they strike again. • Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2:13) Disney and Lucasfilm cook up a standalone Star Wars flick about a scheme to swipe the plans to the Death Star; Mads Mikkelsen stars. • Seasons (1:37) Dazzling cinematic essay focuses on our planet’s wildlife and how it’s evolved from the ice age to today; Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud (Winged Migration) direct. • Sherlock Season 4 Finale (1:45) Catch TV sleuths Holmes and Watson on the big screen, solving all manner of mysterious mayhem; Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman star, respectively. • Silence (2:41) Intense Scorsese historical epic about the torments of the flesh two wandering missionaries endure in 16th century Japan. • Sing (1:48) Animated musical about a koala impresario’s all-star singing competition features vocals from Reese Witherspoon, Seth MacFarlane and Scarlett Johansson. • Singin’ in the Rain (2:00) Classic musical comedy about Hollywood’s terrifying transition to talking pictures stars Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds and the awesomely acrobatic Donald O’Connor. • Spotlight (2:08) True story about the Boston Globe’s tenacious investigation into a decades-long Catholic Church cover-up; Mark Ruffalo, Michael Keaton and John Slattery star. • Stage Russia: Anna Karenina (2:45) Modern-dance version of Tolstoy’s landmark novel about a St. Petersburg aristocrat and her crumbling social milieu. • Sundance Short Film Tour (1:35) Eight short subjects from last year’s fest make up a cinematic smorgasbord of comedies, cartoons, documentaries and dramas from around the globe. • Tampopo (1:55) Newly restored Japanese cult comedy classic about (among other things) a modern urban cowboy, the proprietress of a noodle shop and a foodobsessed gangster. • Things to Come (1:43) Isabelle Huppert stars as a philosophy professor whose crumbling personal life liberates her to explore the next chapter of her existence. • Underworld: Blood Wars (1:31) Kate Beckinsale is back as a saucy vampire trying to broker peace between hirsute werewolves and her own bloodsucking brethren. • Why Him? (1:51) Overprotective dad Bryan Cranston is understandably appalled when he meets his daughter’s boyfriend, doofus tech zillionaire James Franco.

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Lark: Wed 6:15

The Eagle Huntress (Not Rated) Fences (PG-13)

Rafael: Fri 4, 6; Sat-Mon 2, 4, 6; Tue-Thu 6 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:50, 4, 7:10, 10:20 Rowland: Fri-Wed 12:20, 3:35, 6:55, 10:05 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12, 3:35, 6:40, 9:50; Sun-Wed 12, 3:35, 6:40 • Hidden Figures (PG) Larkspur Landing: Fri, Tue-Wed 7, 9:55; Sat-Mon 1, 4, 7, 9:55 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:30, 1:10, 2:30, 4:05, 5:30, 7:05, 8:30, 10 Playhouse: Fri 4, 7, 9:45; Sat 1, 4, 7, 9:45; Sun 1, 4, 7; Tue-Wed 4, 7 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:10, 1:05, 4:20, 7:20, 10:25 Northgate: Fri-Wed 8:35 • Khaidi #150 (Not Rated) La La Land (PG-13) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:10, 3:15, 6:35, 9:35; Sun-Wed 12:10, 3:15, 6:35 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:15, 11:30, 1:10, 2:45, 4:05, 5:50, 7:30, 9, 10:30; Sun, Wed 10:15, 11, 1:10, 4:05, 7:30; Mon 10:15, 11:30, 1:10, 2:45, 4:05, 7:30; Tue 10:15, 11:30, 1:10, 2:45, 4:05, 5:50, 7:30 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10, 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 10:10 Lion (PG-13) Playhouse: Fri 3:45, 6:35, 9:25; Sat 12:45, 3:45, 6:35, 9:25; Sun 12:45, 3:45, 6:35; Tue-Wed 3:45, 6:35 Regency: Fri-Sat 10:20, 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:25; Sun-Wed 10:20, 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 Northgate: Fri-Wed 1:35, 4:40, 7:40, 10:35 Rowland: Fri-Wed • Live by Night (R) 10:30, 1:40, 4:50, 7:50 Loving (PG-13) Rafael: Fri-Wed 5 Manchester by the Sea (R) Regency: Fri-Sat 12:40, 3:50, 7, 10:15; Sun-Tue 12:40, 3:50, 7; Wed 12:40, 3:50 Moana (PG) Northgate: Fri-Wed 11, 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:40 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:35, 2:20 • A Monster Calls (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:05, 2:35, 7:35; 3D showtimes at 5:05, 10:05 • Monster Trucks (PG) Moonlight (R) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:20, 3:50, 6:50, 9:30; Sun-Wed 12:20, 3:50, 6:50 Regency: Fri-Sat 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:40, 10:40; Sun-Wed 11:15, 1:55, 4:35, 7:40 Rafael: Fri, Tue-Thu 5:30, 8; Sat-Mon 3, 5:30, 8 • Neruda (R) Passengers (PG-13) Northgate: Fri-Wed 11, 1:45, 7:30; 3D showtimes at 4:45, 10:15 Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:40, 3:45, 6:45, 9:50; Sun-Wed 12:40, 3:45, 6:45 • Patriot’s Day (R) Larkspur Landing: Fri, Tue-Wed 6:45, 9:45; Sat-Mon 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 9:45 Northgate: Fri-Wed 1:15, 4:15, 7:20, 10:30 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:15, 1:25, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:55; Sun-Wed 1:10, 4:05, 7 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Tue-Wed 6:30, 9:30; Sat-Mon 12, 3:15, 6:30, 9:30 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:40, 3:50, 6:55, 10:05 Rowland: Fri-Wed 12:30, 3:45, 7, 10:15 Seasons (PG) Rafael: Fri-Mon 2:30 Regency: Mon, Wed 7 • Sherlock Season 4 Finale (PG) Regency: Fri-Sat 11:40, 3:20, 7:10, 10:05; Sun-Wed 11:40, 3:20, • Silence (R) 7:10 Sing (PG) Fairfax: Fri-Sat 12:30, 3:40, 6:40, 9:25; Sun-Wed 12:30, 3:40, 6:40 Larkspur Landing: Fri, Tue-Wed 7:15, 9:50; Sat-Mon 11:45, 2:30, 5:15, 8 Northgate: Fri-Wed 11:15, 12:30, 2, 3:15, 4:35, 5:55, 7:15, 9:50 Playhouse: Fri 3:30, 6:45, 9:35; Sat 12:30, 3:30, 6:45, 9:35; Sun 12:30, 3:30, 6:45; Tue-Wed 3:30, 6:45 Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:40, 1:30, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30 Regency: Sun, Wed 2, 7 • Singin’ in the Rain (PG) Rafael: Thu 7 (producer Blye Pagon Faust in person; a benefit for • Spotlight (R) Sunny Hills Services) • Stage Russia: Anna Karenina (Not Rated) Lark: Thu 7:30 • Sundance Short Film Tour (Not Rated) Rafael: Fri-Mon 1 Tampopo (Not Rated) Rafael: 8:15 daily Things to Come (Not Rated) Rafael: Fri-Wed 7:30 Northgate: Fri-Wed 12:25, 3, 7:45; 3D showtimes at 5:20, 10:10 • Underworld: Blood Wars (R) Rowland: Fri-Wed 10:20, 3, 7:40, 10; 3D showtimes at 12:40, 5:20 Why Him? (R) Northgate: Fri-Wed 5, 7:50, 10:30 The late, great Debbie Reynolds in ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’ playing Sunday and Wednesday at the Regency.

Showtimes can change after we go to press. Please call theater to confirm. CinéArts at Marin 101 Caledonia St., Sausalito, 331-0255 CinéArts at Sequoia 25 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley, 388-4862 Cinema 41 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera, 924-6505 Fairfax 9 Broadway, Fairfax, 453-5444 Lark 549 Magnolia Ave., Larkspur, 924-5111 Larkspur Landing 500 Larkspur Landing Cir., Larkspur, 461-4849 Northgate 7000 Northgate Dr., San Rafael, 800-326-3264 Playhouse 40 Main St., Tiburon, 435-1234 Rafael Film Center 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael, 454-1222 Regency 80 Smith Ranch Rd., Terra Linda, 479-5050 Rowland 44 Rowland Way, Novato, 800-326-3264

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Movies

• New Movies This Week • The Curious World of Hieronymus Bosch (Not Rated) Lark: Sat 7 • The C Word (Not Rated)


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Sundial Concerts MARIN The Coffis Brothers & the Mountain Men Brotherly band from Santa Cruz rocks a classic sound with ease. Jan 15, 6pm. Free. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.3850. Katie Skene Los Angeles-based 23-year old blues guitarist, singer and songwriter teams with jam veterans Barry Sless, Pete Sears, John Molo and Rob Barraco. Jan 14, 8pm. $18-$20. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael, 415.524.2773.

SONOMA Marching Church Experimental Danish alternativerock outfit plays the North Bay with Canadian electronic musician Bernardino Femminielli, San Francisco rockers CCR Headcleaner and local punks Service. Jan 16, 7pm. $12. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.528.3009. Unified Highway Reggae-pop duo is made of Rebelution vocalist/guitarist Eric Rachmany and former Zion I DJ and producer Amp Live. Jan 12, 8:30pm. $17. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.765.2121.

NAPA Karrin Allyson Grammy-nominated jazz singer offers four nights of performances, both solo and with a trio, that feature songs from her canon of acclaimed albums. Jan 12-15, 6:30 and 9pm. $35 and up. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.603.1258.

Clubs & Venues MARIN Ali Akbar College of Music Jan 14, Manik Khan and Gaayatri Kaundinya. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael, 415.454.6372. The Belrose Second Wednesday of every month, Ragtime

jam. Thurs, open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael, 415.454.6422.

Ian McArdle. Jan 18, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito, 415.331.9355.

Benissimo Ristorante & Bar Thurs, Fri, live music. 18 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera, 415.927.2316.

Panama Hotel Restaurant Jan 11, Lady D & the Tramps. Jan 12, Wanda Stafford. Jan 17, Swing Fever. Jan 18, Marianna August. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael, 415.457.3993.

Fenix Jan 11, pro blues jam with Dallis Craft. Jan 12, Deep Blue Jam. Jan 13, Eric Wiley Band. Jan 14, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Jan 15, 11:30am, Sunday Brunch with Joan Getz. Jan 17, the Rhythm Rangers. Jan 18, pro blues jam. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.813.5600. George’s Nightclub Jan 13, Al Smith Band and the Swerve. Jan 14, DJ Marroquin. Jan 17, hip-hop open mic. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.226.0262. Grazie Restaurant Jan 14, Kurt Huget and Peter Penhallow. 823 Grant Ave, Novato, 415.897.5181. HopMonk Novato Jan 11, open mic night with Liquid Television. Jan 13, A License to Chill. Jan 14, Year Sure Whatever and Staring At Stars. Jan 18, open mic night with the Struts. 224 Vintage Way, Novato, 415.892.6200.

Peri’s Silver Dollar Jan 11, the New Sneakers. Jan 12, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Jan 13, Sabbath Lives. Jan 14, Achilles Wheel. Jan 15, Grateful Sundays. Jan 16, Billy D’s open mic. Jan 17, the Good Guys. Jan 18, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax, 415.459.9910. Rancho Nicasio Jan 13, the Rivertown Trio. Jan 14, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Jan 15, 4pm, Wendy DeWitt’s piano party. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio, 415.662.2219. Rickey’s Jan 13, Blue News. Jan 14, Doc Kraft Band. Jan 15, Chime Travelers. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato, 415.883.9477.

INCAVO Wine Tasting & Collective Tues, 7pm, Open Mic Night with Simon Costa. 1099 Fourth St, Ste F, San Rafael, 415.259.4939.

Sausalito Seahorse Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Jan 12, Marin Jazz Trio. Jan 13, Cole Tate Band. Jan 14, Rolando Morales and Carlos Reyes. Jan 15, 5pm, Mazacote. Jan 17, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito, 415.331.2899.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Jan 11, Tom Finch Trio. Jan 18, Skillet Licorice. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax, 415.485.1005.

Servino Ristorante Jan 14, Dominic Quin-Harkin. 9 Main St, Tiburon, 415.435.2676.

Marin Country Mart Jan 13, 5:30pm, Friday Night Jazz with Robby Elfman Trio. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon Jan 12, Acoustically Speaking. Jan 13, Cave Clove. Jan 14, Urban Grass. Jan 16, Epicenter Soundsystem reggaae. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas, 415.868.1311.

19 Broadway Club Jan 12, Bernal Beat. Jan 13, 5:30pm, Neck & Neck. Jan 13, 9pm, the Happys with Friends on Fire. Jan 14, 5:30pm, the Restless Sons. Jan 14, 9pm, San Francisco Airship. Jan 15, 4pm, Erika Alstrom with Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Jan 15, 8pm, the Rivertown Trio. Jan 16, open mic. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax, 415.459.1091. No Name Bar Jan 12, Harmonic Law. Jan 13, Michael Aragon Quartet. Jan 14, KC Filson Band. Jan 15, Migrant Pickers and friends. Jan 16, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Jan 17, open mic. Jan 18, Jimi James Band. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito, 415.332.1392. Osteria Divino Jan 11, Lilan Kane. Jan 12, Passion Habanera. Jan 13, Gabrielle Cavassa. Jan 14, Walter Earl Trio. Jan 15, J Kevin Durkin. Jan 17,

Spitfire Lounge Second Thursday of every month, DJ Romestallion. Second Friday of every month, DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael, 415.454.5551. Sweetwater Music Hall Jan 12, the Overcommitments. Jan 13, Mykal Rose and Reggae Angels. Jan 14, 12pm, Shark Alley Hobos and friends tribute to Mikie Lee Prasad. Jan 14, 9pm, Wonderbread 5. Jan 16, open mic with Austin DeLone. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.3850. Taste of Rome Jan 13, the 7th Sons. 1000 Bridgeway, Sausalito, 415.332.7660. Terrapin Crossroads Jan 11, Mark Karan and friends. Jan 12, Cosmic Thursdays with Ross James. Jan 13, Murder Ballads with Greg Loiacono

CALENDAR and friends. Jan 13, Tim Bluhm and Jason Crosby. Jan 14, Greg Loiacono and friends. Jan 15, 3pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh & the Camp Terrapin Band. Jan 15, 7:30pm, Midnight North. Jan 16, Grateful Monday with Stu Allen and friends. Jan 17, CMac & the Casual Coalition. Jan 18, the Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael, 415.524.2773. Travis Marina Jan 14, Hot Rod Jukebox. Fort Baker, Sausalito.

SONOMA Aqus Cafe Jan 12, Gaia String Band. Jan 13, the Sticky Notes. Jan 14, Two of Us. Jan 15, 2pm, Gary Vogensen’s Sunday Ramble. Jan 18, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060. The Big Easy Jan 11, the Wednesday Night Big Band. Jan 12, Ptown Playaz. Jan 13, the Gentlemen Soldiers and Timothy O’Neil Band. Jan 14, the doRian Mode. Jan 15, 4Minus Trio. Jan 17, Rhythm Drivers. Jan 18, For Pete’s Sake. 128 American Alley, Petaluma, 707.776.4631. Coffee Catz Tues, 12pm, Jerry Green’s Peaceful Piano Hour. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.6600. Corkscrew Wine Bar Jan 13, Hots & Tots aka Toby Tyler and Pete Hale. Jan 17, North Bay Jazz Guitar Collective. 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.789.0505. Flamingo Lounge Jan 13, Sugar Rush. Jan 14, Carlos Xavier & His Salsa Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.8530. HopMonk Sebastopol Tues, open mic night. Jan 13, Lagos Roots Afrobeat Ensemble and Loralax. Jan 14, Steve Gatz Blues Band. Jan 16, Monday Night Edutainment with Relic Secure. Jan 18, Songwriters in the Round. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.7300. HopMonk Sonoma Jan 13, David Thom & Vintage Grass. Jan 14, Aki Kumar. 691 Broadway, Sonoma, 707.935.9100. Lagunitas Tap Room Jan 11, Hot Grubb. Jan 12, Grover Anderson. Jan 13, the Rhythm Drivers. Jan 14, Tally Up. Jan 15, the Shots. Jan 18, Jason Bodlovich. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma, 707.778.8776.


Luther Burbank Center for the Arts Jan 16, Miranda Sings. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT LIVE

8 PM

Phoenix Theater Jan 14, Screw 32 with the Wynona Riders and Monsula. 201 Washington St, Petaluma, 707.762.3565.

NAPA Blue Note Napa Jan 11, 6:30 and 9pm, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Jan 18-19, 6:30 and 9pm, Amendola vs Blades with Scott Amendola and Wil Blades. 1030 Main St, Napa, 707.603.1258. Silo’s Jan 11, David Kelleher. Wed, 5pm, Mike Greensill’s evening jazz. Jan 12, Delphi Freeman Trio. Jan 13, the Ray Charles Project. Jan 14, Total Recall 90s. Jan 18, Craig Corona. 530 Main St, Napa, 707.251.5833.

Art Opening MARIN Bay Model Visitor Center Jan 11-Feb 25, “Fixed Landscapes,” sculptor Brian Andrews works with wood, employing traditional techniques to explore contemporary cultural issues. Reception, Jan 21 at 1pm. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

MarinMOCA Jan 14-Feb 19, “Hidden,” juried exhibition featuring the artists of MarinMOCA explores the concept of concealed or disguised imagery. Reception, Jan 14 at 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137. Osher Marin JCC Jan 13-Mar 10, “Traces of Sepharad,” etchings by New York-based artist Marc Shanker are based on Judeo-Spanish proverbs and densely layered with meaning and cultural connections. Reception, Jan 26 at 6:30pm. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

SONOMA Area Arts Gallery Jan 16-18, “Beatles Cartoon Pop Art Show,” animator Ron Campbell, director of the 1960’s Saturday Morning Beatles Cartoon series and the film “Yellow Submarine,” appears, exhibits and talks cartoons. Reception, Jan 16 at 5pm. 105 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.541.6521. Riverfront Art Gallery Jan 11-Mar 5, “Photoshopped or Not?”

Grammy Award-winning Jamaican political reggae artist Mykal Rose performs at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley on January 13.

Courtesy of Mykal Rose Management

Marin Society of Artists Jan 12-Feb 4, “Roadside Attractions,” a showing of unique 2D and 3D works. Reception, Jan 22 at 2pm. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Din n er & A Show

Jan 13 The Rivertown Trio Fri

featuring Julie Bernard

Sat

Jan 14 Sun

Riverfront Gallery co-owner and photographer Lance Kuehne shows new work that concentrates on magnificent and vibrant local landscapes. Reception, Jan 14 at 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art Jan 14-Apr 2, “Eye of the Beholder & Graphic Knowledge,” dual exhibits feature the sculpture and early prints of post-war artist Nathan Oliveira and the prints of Karl Kasten. Reception, Jan 14 at 6pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA. Steele Lane Community Center Jan 11-Feb 2, “Santa Rosa Photographic Society Members’ Show,” featuring photographs in a wide variety of styles and subjects. Reception, Jan 18 at 4pm. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

Continuing This Week Art MARIN

Jan 15

Fabulous Harmonies 8:00 / No Cover Dance Party!

Buck Nickels and Loose Change

Soulful, Original, Country 8:30 Boogie Woogie Queen

Wendy DeWitt’s Piano Party with

Kathey Tejcka 4:00 / No Cover e

Sugar Rush 8:00 Daanrcty! P Sat Jan 21 Freddy Clarke International Dance Party! Fri

Jan 20

8:00 / No Cover

ARTrageous Gallery Ongoing, inaugural exhibit featuring Roberta Ahrens, Harriet Burge and others. 857 Grant Ave, Novato. Tues-Sat, 11 to 6, Sun, 11 to 4, Thurs, 11 to 8. 415.897.8444. Baobab Gallery Ongoing, Shona sculptures, watercolors, jewelry, baskets, handmade paper items and handmade fabrics. 556 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 415.924.8007. Dance Palace Ongoing, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

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Mystic Theatre Jan 13, Led Zepagain. Jan 14, Saved by the 90s. Jan 16, Protoje. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.765.2121.

Music


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Depot Bookstore & Cafe Ongoing, 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2665. Desta Art & Tea Gallery Through Jan 15, “Reality, Memory & Fiction,” exhibit of paintings by Stephen Namara features people, objects and landscapes seen as snapshots of his life. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6 415.524.8932. Gallery O Ongoing, still lifes and abstract landscapes by Tim Schaible, and glasswork by Colleen Cotten. Highway 1 and Dillon Beach Road, Tomales. Thurs-Sun, noon to 5, and by appointment. 707.878.2898. Gallery Route One Through Jan 22, “Tell Tales,” Madeline Nieto Hope’s repurposed art shows in the Center Gallery, while “The Inverness Almanac: Collective Retrospective” shows in the project space and Isis Hockenos’“She Said She Said” shows in the annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347. Garzoli Gallery Ongoing, work from contemporary artist Laurie Curran and recent gallery acquisitions on view. 930 B St, San Rafael. 415.459.4321. Liberty Ship Gallery Ongoing, artist cooperative gallery with works by Eulah Capron, Katheryn Holt, Barbara Jackson, Darcy J Sears and Scott Gordon Woodhouse. 10 Liberty Ship Way, Bay 2, Ste 210, Sausalito. Sat, 11 to 5; also by appointment. 415.289.0705. Margaret Muldoon’s Artistic Furniture Ongoing, hand-painted furniture, plus “UnStill Photography” by Alan Babbitt. 411 San Anselmo Ave, Fairfax.

Marin History Museum Wednesdays-Saturdays, “Faces of Marin History,” special exhibit features rarely seen original portraits, photos and stories of Marin County’s founders and notable residents past and present. Ongoing, “Treasures from the Vault,” local artifacts; also, “Ranching and Rockin’ at Olompali” features history of State Park; also, “Growing the Future: Farming Families of Marin.” Boyd Gate House, 1125 B St, San Rafael. Tues-Fri, plus second and third Sat monthly, 11 to 4. 415.454.8538. Marty Knapp Photo Gallery Through Jan 16, “The Night Sky,” Knapp shows new photographs of the starry skies above the Point Reyes coast and the deserts of Southern California. 11245 Shoreline Hwy, Point Reyes Station. Fri-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.663.8670. MINE Art Gallery Ongoing, 1820 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. Museum of the American Indian Ongoing, “Jewelry of California and the Southwest.” 2200 Novato Blvd, Novato. Tues-Fri, 10 to 3; Sat-Sun, 12 to 4. 415.897.4064.

Art

Pine Street Museum Ongoing, Opening exhibit features interactive display of scrolls, ceramics and special barcodes to explain them. 124 Pine St, San Anselmo. 415.485.0484. Robert Allen Fine Art Through Jan 27, “Abstract Works on Canvas,” group exhibition features Beatrice Findlay, Jeffrey Long, Michael Moon, Richard Saba and Geoffrey Williams. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800. Robert Beck Fine Art Ongoing, California landscape painters including Maynard Dixon. 222 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. Wed-Sun, noon to 5:30. 415.456.7898. Rustic Bakery Through Jan 31, “California Colors,” plein air oil paintings by Laura Culver boast vibrant colors and light. 2017 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larksput. 415.461.9900. San Geronimo Valley Community Center Ongoing, 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888. Studio 333 Ongoing, 45 local artists on display. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Sat, 11-5. 415.331.8272. Throckmorton Theatre Through Jan 31, Mary Black & Millicent Tomkins,” the two artists share wall pace and present their latest abstract encaustics and magical realism works of art. Ongoing, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. Tomales Gallery Ongoing, paintings by Jonnie Baldwin, Denise Champion, Timothy David Dixon, Clark Mitchell and others. 3985 TomalesPetaluma Rd, Tomales. Fri-Sun, 12:30 to 5; also by appointment. 707.878.2680. Wilderness Collections Gallery Ongoing, photographs by Rodney Lough Jr. 8 Princess St, Sausalito. Daily, 10 to 6. 866.432.9453.

Comedy Keith Lowell Jensen The standup engages with his new funny and emotional show, “Not for Rehire.” Jan 13, 8pm. $18-$25. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600. Mort Sahl Sahl takes the stage every week to deliver his legendary, take-no-prisoners wit. Thurs, 7pm. $20. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600. Mark Pitta & Charles Fleischer A comedic one-two punch of laughs is in the works. Jan 14, 8pm. $36 and up.

The ‘Traces of Sepharad’ exhibit at the Osher Marin JCC in San Rafael, featuring etchings by New York artist Marc Shanker, opens on January 13.

Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600. Trivia & Standup Night Trivia contest is followed by a headlining standup set from popular comedian Will Durst. Jan 17, 8pm. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax, 415.459.1091. Tuesday Night Live Featuring comedians at the top of their game, both rising stars and names known worldwide. Tues, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Coast Swing and Lindy Hop with instructor Jasmine Worrell. Four-week sessions begin the first of every month 167 Tunstead Ave, San Anselmo 415.459.8966. The Belrose Sundays, 4pm, Argentine Dance. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael, 415.454.6422. Club 101 Wednesdays, 8:20pm, salsa dancing with lessons. 815 W Francisco Blvd, San Rafael, 415.460.0101.

Dance

Dance Palace Wednesdays, 6pm, Women’s Collaborative Dance. $5-$15 per month. Sundays, 10am, Ecstatic Dance Point Reyes, explore different rhythms with no experience necessary. 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1075.

Alma del Tango Studio Ongoing, Swing Dance Classes, Learn East

Marin Rod and Gun Club Jan 18, 7pm, Tam Twirlers, 12-week square

Courtesy of Osher Marin JCC

Marin Community Foundation Through Jan 13, “Om Prakash: Intuitive Nature,” renowned Indian artist’s abstract paintings display. Ongoing, Through Jan 3, “Collective Actions” featuring artists from Artisans, Bolinas and Stinson Open Studios and Gallery Route One, among others. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Through Jan 26, “Annual Members’ Show,” O’Hanlon Gallery presents their members’ show with a special auxiliary show at the Mill Valley Community Center. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.


dancing session, no partner required. $96. 2675 Francisco Blvd E, San Rafael.

Sausalito Seahorse Sundays, 4pm, Salsa class. Free. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito 415.331.2899. Sol Studios Fairfax Thursdays, 10:45am, Flamenco Dance Class, bring a shawl and join in the barefoot class. $9. 12 School St #12e, Fairfax 415.785.4861.

Marin Singles Convention Annual gathering includes a keynote talk and fun dance party for singles. Jan 14, 7:30pm. $15-$20. The Club at Harbor Point, 475 E Strawberry Dr, Mill Valley.

Events

Martin Luther King Jr Birthday Celebration Annual community event features a panel discussion, performance by positive hip-hop artist Jacqueline Lawrence and other activities based on King’s messages of love and peace. Jan 15, 6:30pm. Free. SRHS Performing Arts Auditorium, 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Back to the Future Luncheon at Whistlestop Join Whistlestop in celebration of a historic Cubs win with a grand slam 80s inspired lunch in the Jackson Café at Whistlestop,11:30am-1:50pm,Thursday, January 19. Free entertainment provided by Bread & Roses Presents from 12-1pm. Advance ticket purchase by Thursday, January 12 (may sell out), or call the front office at 415.456.9062 to reserve your spot. Fee: $8 members/$10 non-members. Bay Area World Guitar Show International show features new, used, vintage and rare guitars. Attendees may bring in items to sell or trade. Jan 14-15. $20. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.499.6800. Color Me Calm Adult Coloring Group A relaxing and brain-stimulating group for adults, with supplies provided. Second Thurs of every month, 6pm and Third Tues of every month, 2pm. San Rafael Library, 1100 E St, San Rafael, 415.485.3323. Community Meditation Practice Sitting and walking meditation with free instruction. Followed by tea and snacks. Sun, 9:30am. Free. Santa Rosa Shambhala Meditation Center, 855 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.4907. CranioSacral System Screening Explore whether you or your child could benefit from CranioSacral therapy to treat migraines, headaches, chronic neck and back pain and other body pain and tension. Wed, Jan 11, 10am and Wed, Jan 18, 10am. Free. Breathing Retraining Center, 12 Mitchell Blvd, San Rafael. The Draped Figure Draw or paint from live models in a variety of costumes and settings. Tues, 10am. $15. MarinMOCA, 500 Palm Dr, Novato, 415.506.0137. Harlem Globetrotters The world-famous basketball ambassadors of good will play two exhibition games in Santa Rosa on the heels of setting nine Guinness World Records. Wed, Jan 11 and Wed, Jan 18. $32 and up. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 866.777.8932. Heroes in Heels A memorable evening of socializing, a silent auction, raffle and entertainment raises awareness of human trafficking. Jan 14, 7pm. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Meditation Class Experience meditation in a form that is natural and easy to follow. Second Sat of every month, 10:30am. $15. Healing for People, 7 Mt Lassen Dr, San Rafael, 415.380.8600. Monday Painting Group An open space to paint with fellow artists. Space is limited. Mon-noon. $10. MarinMOCA, 500 Palm Dr, Novato, 415.506.0137. Mother’s Kirtan Second Thurs of every month. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael, 415.457.4191. The Peking Acrobats China’s most gifted tumblers, contortionists, jugglers, cyclists and gymnasts perform a family-friendly show with live musical accompaniment. Jan 17, 6:30pm. $16-$21. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600. Radiant Presence With Peter Brown. Every other Tues. Open Secret, 923 C St, San Rafael, 415.457.4191. Second Fridays Art Walk Anchored by Art Works Downtown galleries and artist studios, the art walk links venues throughout downtown San Rafael with receptions and entertainment. Second Fri of every month, 5pm. Art Works Downtown, 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.451.8119. Toastmaster’s Open House Group invites the public to join them in unlocking communication skills. Express yourself, find your voice and shape your words. Thurs-noon. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael, 415.485.3438.

Society. Wed, Jan 18, 8:30am. Bodega Bay Harbor, East Shore Rd, Bodega Bay, madroneaudubon.org. Coho Salmon Creek Walk Tour Explore the Lagunitas Creek watershed and learn about the ecology of the endangered native population of coho salmon. Sat, Jan 14, 12:30pm. $35. Samuel P Taylor State Park, Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Lagunitas, catie@tirn.net. Sanctuary Bird Walk Led by experienced staff of volunteers. Second Thurs of every month, 10am. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon, richardsonbay.audubon.org.

19 Wed 1/11 •Doors 6pm • FREE Cafe open for Coffee, Lunch, & Dinner FREE Dinner Show with

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The Overcommitments Kiddo! Benefit

Fri 1/13 • Doors 8pm • $30 ADV / $32 DOS

Reggae Royalty Mykal Rose with Reggae Angels

Film

Sat 1/14 • Doors 11:30am • FREE

Shark Alley Hobos & Friends

Circus Rosaire Tiburon Film Society hosts a screening of the documentary about a traditional family circus nine generations in the making. Jan 12, 6:30pm. Free. BelvedereTiburon Library, 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon, 415.789.2665. IZ: The Man & His Music Documentary about the Hawaiian star gets a screening followed by discussion with Hawaiian culture scholar Constance Hale. Jan 18, 6:30pm. Free. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur, 415.785.8177. Painting Bolinas O’Hanlon Center kicks off its Art Film Fridays series with a colorful documentary about the late eccentric Bolinas artist Peter Lee Brownlee. Jan 13, 7pm. $5. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.4331. This Changes Everything Sustainable Fairfax screens the imaginative film that weaves personal stories around the theme of the vast challenge of climate change. Jan 13, 7pm. $10. Fairfax Women’s Center, 46 Park Rd, Fairfax.

Food & Drink Corte Madera Farmers’ Market Wed-noon. 100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera, 415.382.7846. Friday Night Live Enjoy delicious themed buffet dinners with live music on hand. Fri. $7-$14. San Geronimo Golf Course, 5800 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo, 415.488.4030.

Field Trips

Girl’s Night Out Happy hour lasts all night long, even for the guys. Thurs. Bootlegger’s Lodge, 367 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax, 415.450.7186.

Afternoon Community Service Participate in center restoration projects. Third Wed of every month. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon, 415.388.2524.

Indian Valley Farm Stand Organic farm and garden produce stand where you bring your own bag. Sat, 10am. College of Marin, Indian Valley Campus, 1800 Ignacio Blvd, Novato, 415.454.4554.

Bird Walk in Bodega Bay Search the harbor, adjacent seas and woodlands for birds, including Doran County Park. Led by Madrone Audubon

Marin Country Mart Farmers’ Market Sat, 9am. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur, 415.461.5715.

»20

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The Coffis Brothers

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Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone Thu 1/19 • Doors 7pm • $17 ADV / $20 DOS

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Mill Valley Community Center Mondays, 6pm, Swing Dance Lessons. 925.267.2200. 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley.

Intro to E-Book Self-Publishing Let Jim Azvedo, marketing director at Smashwords, teach you the ins and outs of independent publishing. Presented by Bay Area Independent Publishers Association (BAIPA). Jan. 14, 11am-12:15pm; afternoon workshop,1-3pm, $40. Meeting begins 9am. $20/non-members. The Key Room, 1385 Hamilton Pkwy, Novato, baipa.org


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Comedy

Jan 17, 7pm. Aqus Cafe, 189 H St, Petaluma, 707.778.6060. Divorce Workshops for Women Workshop is designed to help women in any part of the process of divorce. Second Sat of every month, 9:30am. Interfaith Counseling Center, 15 Austin Ave, San Anselmo, 415.256.9701. E-Book Help Get one-on-one help in downloading library e-books to the Kindle, iPad and other devices. Call ahead to reserve a session. Thurs, 10am. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, 415.473.6058. Grow by Integrating the Secrets of Meditation Learn how meditation helps balance stress. Jan 17, 6:30pm. 415.328.6514. Sir Francis Drake High School, 1327 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. The Marin Referral Network Join other professionals and entrepreneurs to share success stories and challenges, and brainstorm how to grow your businesses through referrals and leads. Thurs, 8am. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 240 Channing Way, San Rafael, 949.680.6153.

Grab some greats laughs, times two, when Mark Pitta and Charles Fleischer tear it up on January 14 at the Throckmorton Theatre in Mill Valley.

Marinwood Farmers’ Market Sat, 9am. Marinwood Plaza, Marinwood Avenue and Miller Creek Road, San Rafael, 415.999.5635. Mill Valley Farmers’ Market Fri, 9:30am. CVS parking lot, 759 E Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley, 415.382.7846.

Belvedere-Tiburon Library Mon at 10:30am and 11am, songs and fingerplays for kids under two. Wed at 11am, toddler storytime; at 4pm, readalong program for ages seven and up. Mon. Belvedere-Tiburon Library, 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon, 415.789.2665.

Sunday San Rafael Farmers’ Market Sun, 8am. Marin Farmers’ Market, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, 415.472.6100.

Corte Madera Library Preschool storytime. Wed, 11am. Corte Madera Library, 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera, 707.924.6444.

Sunday Supper New weekly dinner series and etiquette class celebrates classic French cuisine that reflects the season. Sun, 4pm. $30-$45. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.3331.

Fairfax Library Tues at Sat at 11am, storytime for ages three and up. Tues-Sat, 11am. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax, 415.453.8092.

Thursday San Rafael Farmers’ Market Thurs, 8am. Marin County Civic Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.472.6100.

Lectures

Winter WINEland Wine Road’s annual event lets you meet winemakers and taste limited productions at over 100 wineries. All wineries are offering sales and some will offer food pairings. Jan 14-15, 11am. $45-$60. Wine Road wineries, various locations, Healdsburg, wineroad.com.

ACT Prep Workshop provides an overview to all English segments of the ACT, including grammar, reading comprehension and the newly-revised essays. Jan 14, 3:30pm. Fairfax Library, 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax, 415.453.8092.

For Kids Bay Area Discovery Museum Ongoing, “Animal Secrets.” Hands-on art, science and theater camps, art studio, tot spot and lookout cove adventure area. Wed-Thurs at 10am and 11am, music with Miss Kitty. $5$6. Fri at 11am, aquarium feeding. Ongoing. Admission, $8-$10. Bay Area Discovery Museum, Fort Baker, 557 McReynolds Rd., Sausalito., 415.339.3900.

Bike Skills Class & Beginner’s Ride Workshops for beginning cyclists and those who want to hone their skills is followed by ride on trails around town. Registration required. Fri-noon. Sebastopol Bike Center, 6731 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.829.2688. CityZen Evening of sitting meditation, tea and dharma talk. All are welcome. Mon, 7pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.568.5381. Climate Change Lecture Series

Novato Garden Club Meeting Potluck luncheon for prospective club members includes hands on workshop, “ Making a terrarium.” Reservations required. Jan 11, 11am. Margaret Todd Senior Center, 1560 Hill Rd, Novato, 415.897.9822. Peace Corps Orientation Recruiter Barbara Smith offers an informative chat about short and long-term service opportunities with the Peace Corps. Jan 18, 12pm. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, 415.473.6058. Pet Portrait Workshop Barbara Lawrence leads a painting workshop. Sat, 2pm through Jan 28. $60/$190 all classes. Riley Street Art Supply, 1138 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.457.2787. Pilgrimage: Camino de Santiago Joe and Marisa Jennings discuss how best to prepare for, experience and return from a secular, or spiritual journey to Santiago de Compostela. Jan 13, 12pm. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, 415.473.6058. Pruning Basics Presented by Marin master gardener Gary Bartl. Jan 13, 2pm. San Rafael Library, 1100 E St, San Rafael, 415.485.3323. Spanish Conversation Club Spanish language facilitators Carol Costa and Joe Cillo host a mix of beginning and intermediate conversational Spanish. Mon, 1pm. San Rafael Library, 1100 E St, San Rafael, 415.485.3323.

Readings Book Passage Jan 11, 7pm, “How to Talk So Little Kids Will Listen” with Julie King. Jan 11, 7pm, “Swing Time” with Zadie Smith. $30. Jan 12, 7pm, “A Really Good Day” with Ayelet Waldman. Jan 13, 7pm, “The Lost City of the Monkey God” with Douglas Preston. Jan 14, 4pm, Mock Caldecott, get a jump on the annual

literary awards with wine and discussion. Reservations required. $20. Jan 17, 7pm, “The Art of Community” with Charles Vogl. Jan 18, 7pm, “The Art of Play” with Joan Staford. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera, 415.927.0960. Dr Insomnia’s Coffee & Teas Second Wednesday of every month, 7pm, “Poetry Farm” with local writers, bring your own poetry to read. 800 Grant Ave, Novato 415.897.9500. Studio 333 Second Thursday of every month, 7pm, Why There Are Words, literary series hosts authors reading on the theme of “Lucky Seven & One to Grow On” to celebrate the group’s seventh anniversary. $10. 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito 415.331.8272. The Western Gate Teahouse Fridays, 6pm, Candlelight poetry and tea session with Scott Traffas. 7282 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Lagunitas 415.785.8309.

Theater Becoming Dr. Ruth Humorous and life-affirming one-woman play starring Ann Woodhead tells the story of Dr Ruth, America’s most famous sex therapist. Through Jan 22. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.823.0177. Emilie Ross Valley Players welcomes Lauren Gunderson, a playwright in residence at Marin Theatre Company, to bring 18th century noblewoman Emilie du Châtelet to life in a night of theater you won’t soon forget. Jan 13-Feb 5. $10 and up. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555. Feisty Old Jew San Francisco playwright and performer Charlie Varon presents his hit one-man show. Jan 13-15. $50. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa, 707.266.6305. Murder at Joe’s Speakeasy Get a Clue Productions presents an interactive murder-mystery dinner theater show set in the Roaring Twenties. Fri, Jan 13, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions.com. Red Hot Mama The acclaimed one-woman musical biography of entertainment legend Sophie Tucker comes alive with the sights and sounds of Broadway, vaudeville and Las Vegas nightclubs. Through Jan 29. $25-$40. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920. Stage Kiss The charming and funny play about two actors with an amorous history cast as romantic leads in a 1930s melodrama makes its North Bay premiere. Jan 13-Feb 5. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 West Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.


Seminars&Workshops To include your seminar or workshop, call 415/485-6700.

SINGLES WANTED! Single & Dissatisfied? Tired of spending holidays and weekends alone? Join with other singles to explore what’s blocking you from fulfillment in your relationships. Stimulating, growthful & fun. Nine-week coed Single’s Group starts week of Jan 16 (advance sign-up required). Space limited. Also, starting week of 1/16: ongoing, coed (emotional) INTIMACY GROUPS (partnered or single), WOMEN’S GROUP and INDIVIDUAL, FAMILY & COUPLES THERAPY. Central San Rafael. Possible financial assistance (health/flex savings accounts or insurance). Call (415) 453-8117 for more information. Renée Owen, LMFT#35255. https://therapists.psychologytoday.com/1834

Mini-Memoir Workshop

Feb 1-Mar 15, 2017. Turn any sliver of your life into a short piece of personal non-fiction writing– a mini-memoir. Led by veteran journalist/writing coach Mary Ann Hogan. Weds 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. @Tam High (Through the Tam Union H.S. Community Ed Program. Community Ed fees apply.) Register now at:Marinlearn.com or call 415-945-3730 RELATIONSHIP ISSUES, DIFFICULT TRANSITIONS, LOSS, TRAUMA, CHALLENGES, CHANGE, HEALING, GROWTH. Groups are often a preferred therapy option. Openings/waiting lists are available in each of the following safe, successful groups: 1)GENERAL GROUP FOR WOMEN AND MEN; 2) MOTHERLESS DAUGHTERS GROUP for women who have lost their mothers through death, illness, narcissism, separation, estrangement; 3) LOSS & GRIEF GROUP, death of a loved one or significant loss; 4) WOMEN OLDER & WISER (WOW! 55+); 5) FORMER MEMBERS OF HIGH DEMAND GROUPS OR CULTS, “spiritual,” “political,” “philosophical,”etc. Contact Colleen Russell, LMFT (MFC29249), Certified Group Facilitator, 25 years experience with individuals, couples, families, groups: 415-785-3513; crussellmft@earthlink.net; www.colleenrussellmft.com. Kentfield and West Marin Offices.

Catch the Buzz! Facebook.com/PacificSunNews

Community Spanish Language Learning Center In Downtown San Rafael www.spanishindowntown sanrafael.com

Mind&Body HYPNOTHERAPY Thea Donnelly, M.A. Hypnosis, Counseling, All Issues. 25 yrs. experience. 415-459-0449. Gina Vance, CCHT Move Forward Quickly Overcome & Resolve MindBodyJourneys.com 415-275-4221

Home Services CLEANING SERVICES ADVANCED HOUSE CLEANING Licensed. Bonded. Insured. Will do windows. Call Pat 415-310-8784

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Landscape & Gardening Services Yard Work Tree Trimming Maintenance & Hauling Concrete, Brick & Stonework Fencing & Decking Irrigation & Drainage

View Video on YouTube: “Landscaper in Marin County” youtu.be/ukzGo0iLwXg 415-927-3510 GENERAL CONTRACTING www.temple415.com•BBB A+

All Marin House Cleaning Licensed, Bonded, Insured. Will do Windows. O’felia 415-717-7157

FURNITURE REPAIR/REFINISH FURNITURE DOCTOR Ph/Fax: 415-383-2697

Real Estate HOMES/CONDOS FOR SALE AFFORDABLE MARIN? I can show you 50 homes under $500,000. Call Cindy @ 415-902-2729. Christine Champion, Broker.

ENGLISH HOUSESITTER Will love your pets, pamper your plants, ease your mind, while you’re out of town. Rates negotiable. References available upon request. Pls Call Jill @ 415-927-1454

Seminars & Workshops TO INCLUDE YOURS CALL: 415/485-6700

Trivia answers «5 1 Monterey 2 Diamonds 3 Paris, Rome and Manhattan 4 The Chrysler Building 5 Havana, banana and Santana.

8

6a. Elie Wiesel b. Night 7 North Carolina; GOP-led law-

10 East: Maine; north: Minnesota; south: Florida; west: Washington

Thanks for the question to Stanton Klose from Terra Linda.

makers passed the ‘bathroom bill,’ regulating transgender people’s use of public restrooms.

Jennifer Lawrence (about $46 million)

9

General Manager Trent Baalke and Head Coach Chip Kelly were fired by 37-year-old 49ers CEO Jed York, son of Denise DeBartolo York and John York, and nephew of former 49ers owner Eddie DeBartolo, Jr.

BONUS ANSWER: Lin-Manuel Miranda, who also, by the way, wrote and starred in the Broadway sensation, Hamilton

21 PA CI FI C S U N | JA NU A RY 1 1 - 1 7 , 2 0 1 7 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

TO PLACE AN AD: Call our Classifieds and Legals Sales Department at 415/485-6700.Text ads must be placed by Friday, 5pm to make it into the Wednesday print edition.


PACI FI C SUN | JA NU A RY 1 1 - 1 7 , 2 0 1 7 | PA CI FI CS U N. COM

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PublicNotices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141196 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: INTEGRATIVE ATHLETICS, 712 D STREET, SUITE E, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: ZACHARY SCHLEH, 139 ½ LAUREL AVE, SAN ANSELMO, CA 94960. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 13, 2016. (Publication Dates: Dec 21, 28 of 2016 and Jan 04, Jan 11 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 2016-141223 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: PRIM’D MARKETING, 5 SAN PABLO COURT, NOVATO, CA 94949: PRIMD LLC, 5 SAN PABLO COURT, NOVATO, CA 94949. The business is being conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 16, 2016. (Publication Dates: Dec 21, 28 of 2016 and Jan 04, Jan 11 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141093 The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: CHRKOL, 133 TAMAL VISTA DR, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: IVY XY YE, 133 TAMAL VISTA DR, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on Nov 28, 2016. (Publication Dates: Dec 21, 28 of 2016 and Jan 04, Jan 11 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141244. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: SAN ANDREAS SHELLFISH, 4250 DILLON BEACH RD, DILLON BEACH, CA 94929: ROBERT S BRODSKY, 4250 DILLON BEACH RD, DILLON BEACH, CA 94929. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County ClerkRecorder of Marin County on Dec 21, 2016. (Publication Dates: Dec 28 of 2016 and Jan 04, Jan 11, Jan 18 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141250. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: ANGELICA’S BOTIQUE, 76 BELVEDERE STREET, STE C, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: GUADALUPE MORALES, 35 SAN CLEMENTE DRIVE # 103, CORTE MADERA, CA 94925. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 21, 2016. (Publication Dates: Dec 28 of 2016 and Jan 04, Jan 11, Jan 18 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT —File No: 2016-141274. The following individual(s) is (are)

doing business: JOELLY’S FASHION, 957 FRONT STREET, NOVATO, CA 94945: VINICIO GOMEZ, 2651 17TH ST, SAN PABLO, CA 94806. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 27, 2016. (Publication Dates: Jan 04, Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25 of 2017)

J ALLEN , 471 LAS COLINDAS RD, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903 2) EDWARD T ALLEN, 471 LAS COLINDAS RD, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. The business is being conducted by MARRIED COUPLE. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 12, 2016. (Publication Dates: Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT —File No: 2016141218—The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: PINERIDGE APARTMENTS, 396 PINE HILL ROAD, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: WOODMONT CAPITAL- CASA ROJA, LP, 1050 RALSTON AVENUE, BELMONT, CA 94002. The business is being conducted by LIMITED PARTNERSHP. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 16, 2016. (Publication Dates: Jan 04, Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141212. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: POOL HOUSE, 104 CLARK STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: SCOTT MULLINS, 104 CLARK STREET, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant is renewing filing with no changes and is transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 14, 2016. (Publication Dates: Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141270. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: CODY WINCHESTER, 26 ROCK ROAD, KENTFIELD, CA 94904: GARRETT C WINCHESTER, 26 ROCK ROAD, KENTFIELD, CA 94904.The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 27, 2016. (Publication Dates: Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2017141299. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: THE HIVE MARKETING, 7 ROCCA DRIVE, FAIRFAX, CA 94930: THE HIVE DIGITAL MARKETING, INC, 7 ROCCA DRIVE, FAIRFAX, CA 94930. The business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant is renewing with changes under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Jan 3, 2017. (Publication Dates: Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141299. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: THE HOUSE DOULA, 11 CROWN POINT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: JANA S PUTNEY, 11 CROWN POINT, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 19, 2016. (Publication Dates: Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1 of 2017)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016141187. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: SAVE THE HUMANS, 471 LAS COLINDAS RD, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: 1) KELLIE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2016-141217. The following individual(s) is (are) doing business: WOODSIDE REALTY GROUP, 42 NORMAN WAY, TIBURON, CA 94920: CHARLES L. NORMAN, 42 NORMAN WAY, TIBURON, CA 94920. The business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on Dec 15, 2016. (Publication Dates: Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25, Feb 1 of 2017)

OTHER NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHAEL G. MULLIGAN; Case No. PR-1604559 filed on Dec 20, 2016. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of MICHAEL G. MULLIGAN. The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed in the Superior Court of California, County of MARIN. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that BERNADETTE MULLIGAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action). The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: JAN 27, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept. M, Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at

Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, Room # 113, San Rafael, CA, 94903. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative , as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under Section 9052 of the California Probate Code. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY OR PARTY WITHOUT ATTORNEY: JAMES A. ZAKASKY Esq. sbn 256971, LAW OFFICES OF JAMES A. ZAKASKY, 50 OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE, SUITE 605, SANTA ROSA, CA 95404. Telephone: 707-595-1148. FAX: 707-595-1149 (Publication Dates: Dec 28 of 2016 and Jan 04, Jan 11, of 2017)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1604458. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner YANGCHEN LHAMO CHANGBHAR filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: YANGCHEN LHAMO CHANGBHAR to YANGCHEN LHAMO CHANGRA. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 02/08/2017 AT 08:30 AM, DEPT B,

ROOM: B, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: Dec 13, 2016 (Publication Dates: Dec 28 of 2016 and Jan 04, Jan 11, Jan 18 of 2017)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF MARIN. No: CIV 1604623. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner SUMAN filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: SUMAN to SUMAN ROSE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: 02/21/2017 AT 09:00 AM, DEPT L, ROOM: L, Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94913. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin: PACIFIC SUN. Date of filing: Dec 23, 2016 (Publication Dates: Jan 04, Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25 of 2017)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ALICE T.MAY; Case No. PR-1604649 filed on Dec 22, 2016. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of ALICE T.MAY. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed in the Superior Court of California, County of MARIN by MONICA FINNEGAN THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MONICA FINNEGAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests the decedent’s

will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action). The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: JAN 27, 2017 at 9:00 am. in Dept. M, Superior Court of California, Marin County, located at Superior Court of California, County of Marin, 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94901. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under Section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California Statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: MARTHA L. DAETWYLER, 70565; 199 FREMONT ST., 21 ST FLOOR, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94105. Telephone: 415-957-1800. FAX: 415-974-1520 Publication Dates: Jan 11, Jan 18, Jan 25 of 2017)

Publish your Legal Ad • Fictitious Business Name Statement • Abandonment of Business Name Statement • Change of Name • Family Summons • General Summons • Petition to Administer Estate • Withdrawal of Partnership • Trustee Sale For more information call 415/485.6700 ext 331 or email legals@pacificsun.com


By Amy Alkon

Goddess Q:

My girlfriend of six years is breaking up with me. My question is: How do I let our friends and my family know? I’m thinking a mass email telling my side of the story. Then I wouldn’t have to have the same conversation over and over with different people.—Glum

A:

Sending a mass email is a great way to get some piece of information out to everybody—from your best friend to 1.4 million people on Twitter to three random drunk dudes who really shouldn’t be on their phones at their boss’s funeral in Estonia. The ability we have online to dispense a little information to a whole lot of people, immediately, effortlessly, is about the coolest thing ever—and the Frankenstein monster of our time. As I write in Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck, because all the groovy new digital tools are so fun and easy to use, we often “fall back on what’s technically possible” as our behavioral standard. Our chimp-like impulse to just click already derails picky-wicky concerns that we might otherwise have, such as, “Hmm, wonder whether sending that might get me, oh, you know, fired, ostracized and sleeping in a refrigerator box on the corner.” Consider that anything you email can be rapidly shared—and shared and shared and shared. For example, novelist and professor Robert Olen Butler emailed five of his grad students the sad (and rather creepy) details of the demise of his marriage, asking them to “clarify the issues” for other students who wanted to know. The email quickly made the rounds in the literary world and ended up in The New York Times and on Gawker, where they “clarified” that his wife had left him to become one of four women in “Ted Turner’s collection.” But even a less tawdry, less tycoon-filled breakup email may go more viral than one might like. Anthropologist Jerome Barkow, who studies gossip, explains that we evolved to be keenly interested in information that could have some bearing on our ability to survive, mate and navigate socially. As Barkow puts it (and as is borne out by others’ research), gossip about how soundly somebody’s sleeping is unlikely to be as spreadworthy as whom they’re sleeping with. However, our propensity to spread gossip may be both the problem with emailing your news and the solution to getting it out there. Consider going old-school: Ask a few, um, chatty friends to put the word out to your circle, answer any questions people have and let your wishes be known (like if you aren’t ready to talk about it). All in all, you’ll get the job done, but in a much more controlled, contained way— one that reflects this bit of prudence from political writer Olivia Nuzzi: “Dance like no one is watching; email like it may one day be read aloud in a deposition.”

Q:

I’ve been seeing this woman for two months. I really like her. She’s made some mistakes—two bad marriages, some promiscuity, running from debts—but she’s determined to change. My friends think she’s bad news. But our relationship—though mostly sexual so far—has been terrific. Shouldn’t my intuition count more than my friends’ opinions?—Fretting

A:

When you’re deciding how to invest your life savings, you probably don’t say, “I’ll just take a moment to ask my penis.” Well, your intuition is about as reliable a judge of your girlfriend’s character. Intuitions (aka “gut feelings”) are conclusions we leap to—automatically, without the intervention of rational thought. Our mind flashes on this and that from our past experience, and up pops a feeling. The problem is, we’re prone to overconfidence that our intuitions are correct, mistaking strong feelings for informed feelings. Psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Gary Klein find that certain people’s intuitions are somewhat more likely to be trustworthy—those who repeatedly encounter the same situation, like a surgeon who only does appendectomies. Her hunches about a patient’s appendix are more informed because they come out of repeated experience and because she presumably gets corrective feedback when she guesses wrong (though, ideally, not from a monitor making that awful flatlining sound). But Kahneman tells the McKinsey Quarterly, “My general view … would be that you should not take your intuitions at face value.” In fact, you need to go out of your way to look for evidence that your intuitions are wrong. In this case, it will take time and challenges to her character—and your actually wanting to see whether she acts ethically or does what’s easiest. In other words, your hunches can tell you things—things that need a lot of post-hunch verification through applying higher reasoning (which, again, doesn’t simply mean calling upon any organ that’s higher than your knees).Y Worship the goddess—or sacrifice her at the altar at adviceamy@aol.com.

For the week of January 11

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In Norse

mythology, Yggdrasil is a huge holy tree that links all of the nine worlds to each other. Perched on its uppermost branch is an eagle with a hawk sitting on its head. Far below, living near the roots, is a dragon. The hawk and eagle stay in touch with the dragon via Ratatoskr, a talkative squirrel that runs back and forth between the heights and the depths. Alas, Ratatoskr traffics solely in insults. That’s the only kind of message the birds and the dragon ever have for each other. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aries, I suggest that you act like a far more benevolent version of Ratatoskr in the coming weeks. Be a feisty communicator who roams far and wide to spread uplifting gossip and energizing news.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have a

divine mandate to love bigger and stronger and truer than ever before. It’s high time to freely give the gifts you sometimes hold back from those you care for. It’s high time to take full ownership of neglected treasures so that you can share them with your worthy allies. It’s high time to madly cultivate the generosity of spirit that will enable you to more easily receive the blessings that can and should be yours. Be a brave, soft-hearted warrior of love!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I love and respect Tinker Bell, Kermit the Frog, Shrek, Wonder Woman, SpongeBob SquarePants, Snow White, Road Runner and Calvin and Hobbes. They have provided me with much knowledge and inspiration. Given the current astrological omens, I suspect that you, too, can benefit from cultivating your relationships with characters like them. It’s also a favorable time for you to commune with the spirits of Harriet Tubman, Leonardo da Vinci, Marie Curie or any other historical figures who inspire you. I suggest that you have dreamlike conversations with your most interesting ancestors, as well. Are you still in touch with your imaginary friends from childhood? If not, renew acquaintances. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I never wish to

be easily defined,” wrote Cancerian author Franz Kaf ka. “I’d rather float over other people’s minds as something strictly fluid and non-perceivable; more like a transparent, paradoxically iridescent creature rather than an actual person.” Do you ever have that experience? I do. I’m a Crab like you, and I think it’s common among members of our tribe. For me, it feels liberating. It’s a way to escape people’s expectations of me and enjoy the independence of living in my fantasies. But I plan to do it a lot less in 2017, and I advise you to do the same. We should work hard at coming all the way down to earth. We will thrive by floating less and being better grounded; by being less fuzzy and more solid; by not being so inscrutable, but rather more knowable.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here’s my declaration:

“I hereby forgive, completely and permanently, all motorists who have ever irked me with their rude and bad driving. I also forgive, totally and forever, all tech support people who have insulted me, stonewalled me or given me wrong information as I sought help from them on the phone. I furthermore forgive, utterly and finally, all family members and dear friends who have hurt my feelings.” Now would be a fantastic time for you to do what I just did, Leo: Drop grudges, let go of unimportant outrage and issue a blanket amnesty. Start with the easier stuff—the complaints against strangers and acquaintances—and work your way up to the allies you cherish.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There are some authors who both annoy me and intrigue me. Even though I feel allergic to the uncomfortable ideas they espouse, I’m also fascinated by their unique provocations. As I read their words, I’m half-irritated at their grating declarations, and yet greedy for more. I disagree with much of what they say, but feel grudgingly grateful for the novel perspectives they prod me to discover. (Nobel Prize-winner Elias Canetti is one such author.) In accordance with the current astrological rhythms, Virgo, I invite you to seek out similar influences—for your own good!

By Rob Brezsny

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Now would be an excellent time to add new beauty to your home. Are there works of art or buoyant plants or curious symbols that would lift your mood? Would you consider hiring a feng shui consultant to rearrange the furniture and accessories so as to enhance the energetic flow? Can you entice visits from compelling souls whose wisdom and wit would light up the place? Tweak your imagination so it reveals tricks about how to boost your levels of domestic bliss. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 2017, you will

have unprecedented opportunities to reimagine, revise and reinvent the story of your life. You’ll be able to forge new understandings about your co-stars and reinterpret the meanings of crucial plot twists that happened once upon a time. Now check out these insights from author Mark Doty: “The past is not static, or ever truly complete; as we age we see from new positions, shifting angles. A therapist friend of mine likes to use the metaphor of the kind of spiral stair that winds up inside a lighthouse. As one moves up that stair, the core at the center doesn’t change, but one continually sees it from another vantage point; if the past is a core of who we are, then our movement in time always brings us into a new relation to that core.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Tao Te Ching is a poetically philosophical text written by a Chinese sage more than two millennia ago. Numerous authors have translated it into modern languages. I’ve borrowed from their work to craft a horoscope that is precisely suitable for you in the coming weeks. Here’s your high-class fortune cookie oracle: Smooth your edges, untangle your knots, sweeten your openings, balance your extremes, relax your mysteries, soften your glare, forgive your doubts, love your breathing, harmonize your longings and marvel at the sunny dust. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I recently

discovered “Tree of Jesse,” a painting by renowned 20th century artist Marc Chagall. I wanted to get a copy to hang on my wall. But as I scoured the internet, I couldn’t find a single business that sells prints of it. Thankfully, I did locate an artist in Vietnam who said he could paint an exact replica. I ordered it, and was pleased with my new objet d’art. It was virtually identical to Chagall’s original. I suggest that you meditate on taking a metaphorically similar approach, Capricorn. Now is a time when substitutes may work as well as what they replace.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free,” wrote Franz Kaf ka. That fact is worthy of your consideration in the coming weeks, Aquarius. You can avoid all risks by remaining trapped inside the comfort that is protecting you. Or you can take a gamble on escaping, and hope that the new opportunities you attract will compensate you for the sacrifice it entails. I’m not here to tell you what to do. I simply want you to know what the stakes are. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “All pleasures

are in the last analysis imaginary, and whoever has the best imagination enjoys the most pleasure.” So said 19th century German novelist Theodor Fontane, and now I’m passing his observation on to you. Why? Because by my astrological estimates, you Pisceans will have exceptional imaginations in 2017—more fertile, fervent and freedom-loving than ever before. Therefore, your capacity to drum up pleasure will also be at an all-time high. There is a catch, however. Your imagination, like everyone else’s, is sometimes prone to churning out superstitious fears. To take maximum advantage of its bliss-inducing potential, you will have to be firm about steering it in positive directions.Y

Homework: Tell a story about the time Spirit reached down and altered your course in one swoop. Go to RealAstrology.com and click on “Email Rob.”

23 PA CI FI C S U N | JA NU A RY 1 1 - 1 7 , 2 0 1 7 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

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January 11-17, 2017

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