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SERVING MARIN COUNTY

PACIFICSUN.COM

YEAR 56, NO.48 NOV 28-DEC 4, 2018

Mr. Newsom’s Neighborhoods

WILL YOU GOVERNATE FROM KENTFIELD OR SACRAMENTO, SIR? P6

Dingus Found! P8 ‘Pemberley’ Sequel P14 At Home at Guesthouse P15


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Marin County,

don’t dump it, recycle it! This event made possible by:

RECYCLE YOUR MATTRESS FOR FREE AT THE COLLECTION EVENT BELOW. Saturday, December 1st

10AM — 4PM Pickleweed Community Center 50 Canal St. San Rafael, CA 94901

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Letters Trivia Heroes & Zeroes/Upfront Sundial Music Film Stage Dining Nugget Calendar Classifieds Notices Astrology/Advice

MARIN GARDENS

Publisher Rosemary Olson x315

Marin’s Premier Medical Cannabis Delivery Since 2012 State & Locally Licensed

EDITORIAL News and Features Editor Tom Gogola x316 Movie Page Editor Matt Stafford Arts Editor Charlie Swanson Managing Editor Gary Brandt

NEW PATIENTS RECEIVE 25% OFF! Senior & Vets discounts too!

FREE DELIVERY

CONTRIBUTORS Amy Alkon, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Harry Duke, Tanya Henry, Howard Rachelson, Jonah Raskin, Nikki Silverstein

Check out our menu at:

maringardens.org

INTERNS Aiyana Moya, Alex T. Randolph ADVERTISING Account Managers Danielle McCoy x311 Marianne Misz x336 LEGALS/DIGITAL/EDIT/SALES SUPPORT Candace Simmons x306 legals@pacificsun.com ART AND PRODUCTION Design Director Kara Brown Art Director Tabi Zarrinnaal Production Operations Manager Sean George Graphic Designers Jimmy Arceneaux, Kathy Manlapaz, Jackie Mujica CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano ON THE COVER Design by Tabi Zarrinnaal PACIFIC SUN (USPS 454-630) Published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc. Distributed free at more than 500 locations throughout Marin County. Adjudicated a newspaper of General Circulation. First class mailed delivery in Marin available by subscriptions (per year): Marin County $75; out-of-county $90, via credit card, cash or check. No person may, without the permission of the Pacific Sun, take more than one copy of each Pacific Sun weekly issue. Entire contents of this publication Copyright ©Metrosa, Inc., ISSN; 0048-2641. All rights reserved. Unsolicited manuscripts must be submitted with a stamped self-addressed envelope.

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1020 B Street San Rafael, CA 94901 Phone: 415.485.6700 Fax: 415.485.6226 E-Mail: letters@pacificsun.com


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BE FEARLESS BE INTELLIGENT BE KIND BUT ABOVE ALL... BE ENTERTAINING

Letters Road Rage Redux

Well, I could not have said it better than Russ Young did (Letters, Nov. 14). I live in Novato, and I drive a lot up to Petaluma and over to Sonoma each week, and I make every effort to obey the speed limits and rules of the road. However, what this seems to do is aggravate many of the other drivers out there. I seem to be always dealing with tailgaters, and they always look at me as they pass on the right like, “What is your problem, stupid?” I guess I am, but it has become a real problem for me. Where is the highway patrol these days? Think of the money it would bring in for them! I don’t have a good suggestion as to how to monitor this problem and survive, and I’m not sure if Russ’ idea is the answer. Anyone got a good thought? Trent Anderson Novato

New New Deal

LA BELLE FIFI • 121 TOWN CENTER • CORTE MADERA, CA 94925 415.758.7158

A magical way to begin the holiday season!

Dec. 1st & 2nd • 1:00 & 5:00pm Meet & greet costumed characters after matinees!

Marin Veterans Memorial Auditorium

Tickets.MarinCenter.org 415.473.6800

In the last two years, we’ve watched wildfires sweep through our state and devastate communities. The smoke alone has become a national health issue. We must acknowledge the relationship between these massive fires and climate change. For our health and our safety, Californians must demand legislation, at all levels of government, that eliminates our structurally engrained dependence on fossil fuels and carbon emissions. Fortunately, an opportunity has presented itself at the national level via Representative-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The purpose of this letter is to spur readers to learn about her Green New Deal proposal and contact elected officials to demand change. I support Rep. Ocasio-Cortez’s resolution to create a House Select Committee for a Green New Deal in Congress because its scope matches the urgency of the task at hand. United Nations climate scientists tell us we have just 12 years to move our country off fossil fuels, to avoid catastrophic climate disaster. We need a Green New Deal to create millions of green jobs, move our country off fossil fuels, and protect

working people of all backgrounds. Climate change impacts every part of our lives, and we should demand that our representatives support each other to deliver solutions that recognize it. Buddy Burch Santa Rosa

Face It:We’re Screwed

The current state of our country presents a challenging opportunity to integrate an autocratic president and a democratic citizenry. No problem for dictatorship countries where dissidence is forbidden; dissidents are imprisoned, tortured and/or murdered, and the only recourse “the people” have is to violently rebel. No problem for truly democratic countries where dissidence is allowed and dissenters are able to voice their dissatisfaction and disagreement in peaceful protest marches and demonstrations. In our current autocratic democracy, the president “deals” with opponents through fear-inducing and fear-based sanctions, tariffs, border walls, firings, censure, criticism, judgment, blame, threats, untruths and unilateral decisions and behaviors that only create a false “oneness” through separatist and exclusionary onesidedness—rather than achieve a true unifying relationship between parties. Yet we, “the American people,” may have some hope of unitedness through real legislative representation, governmental checks and balances, and a nonpartisan investigation of the presidency. That all may mitigate the rising and deplorable occurrences of civil rights violations, hate crimes, gun violence and mass murders. Raymond Bart Vespe Santa Rosa

Dept.of Corrections

In last week’s news story, “Paradise Glossed,” we errantly reported that PG&E had been found liable for the 2017 Tubbs fire. PG&E has been found liable for 11 of the 16 wildfires fires that broke out in California in late 2017, but no determination has yet been made as to the cause of the Tubbs fire. We regret the error.


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By Howard Rachelson

Degree

6

M.A. Film Studies Grow and explore. Study and appreciate film on a new level. Intensive study in film making practices, and overviews of key concepts and film theorists. Info Session Sunday, December 2

1

8

What company has the most employees in Silicon Valley?

3:30 - 4:15 p.m. (before The Beaches of Agnès) Ives Hall 101, SSU

$5 parking pass required in SSU general lots

2 America’s first

underground railway system, or subway, began operating around 1897 in what city?

sonoma.education/film

beth.warner@sonoma.edu 707.664.3977

3

Can you name four human body parts or body functions found on typewriter keyboards?

Award Winning

4

Of the European countries with the longest life expectancies, about 83 years, two of them have names beginning with the same letter. What are they?

5

Singers Miley Cyrus, Neil Young and Robin Thicke, and the actor Gerard Butler are lately members of what unfortunate group?

6a.

Family Owned & Operated

Perhaps 500 million years old and sacred to indigenous Australians, this massive sandstone monolith is known by what aboriginal and what English name?

b. Its closest large town, 450 kilometers away, has what female name? 7 When it’s noon in Dallas, Texas, what time is it in El Paso, Texas? 8 What animal, star of P.T. Barnum’s Greatest Show on Earth in the 1880s, was

named after an African word for elephant?

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What European politician, in a 1946 speech, coined the term “Iron Curtain”?

10 What NBA basketball team is named after the state bird of Louisiana? BONUS QUESTION: What university, founded by a Scottish-American industrialist and philanthropist, is America’s only school to offer a major in bagpipe studies? Want more team trivia for your next party, fundraiser or special event? Contact Howard Rachelson at howard1@triviacafe.com. Have a great question? Send it in with your name and hometown, and if we use it, we’ll give you credit!

Answers on page

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Trivia Café


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Heroes &Zeroes By Nikki Silverstein

An adult doe ended up with her face stuck in a coffee can in Mill Valley. As she crashed into fences and parked cars, she dented the can, which caused it to fit more tightly around her face. Neighbors attempted to help, but couldn’t corral her. Enter Southern Marin Fire District. “There is no such thing as a routine call. SMFD responded to what started out as a possible vehicle accident and resulted in a deer with its head stuck in a can,” the department posted on Facebook. Animal services officer Erica Lilly of Marin Humane joined the crew and used a control pole (a long rod with a cable loop at the end to put around the animal’s neck) to restrict the doe’s movement while firefighters removed the can. Unfortunately, before the animal ran off, she kicked Lilly and bruised her hand. Ouch! We hope that heals quickly. Thanks to the neighbors, the Southern Marin Fire District and Marin Humane for helping to free the deer.

Got a Hero or a Zero? Please send submissions to nikki_silverstein@yahoo.com. Toss roses, hurl stones with more Heroes and Zeroes at pacificsun.com.

Kristin Lam

I stepped in dog poop today. Frankly, I’m surprised I don’t step in it every day. It’s all over. Parks, beaches, next to sidewalks. Once a couple of people don’t clean up after their dogs in a particular spot, others start to leave their pooches’ poops in the same area, like it’s a contagious behavior. My poop, or rather the poop on the bottom of my sneakers, came from a trail where you’ll find enough feces to fertilize a baseball field. The biggest offenders walk dogs for a living and frequent the trails where their charges can run free. Though Marin County allows six dogs per walker, three on-leash and three off, scofflaws exceed the limits. I’m barely able to keep track of my one crazy pup while he bounds about off-leash, so how can someone monitor the movements of several dogs? If the dog walkers won’t pick up the waste willingly, then c’mon, Marin: cut down the number of dogs or force all six to remain leashed.

Upfront ‘See, if I move to Sacramento, I’ll have to put a cover on the swimming pool to keep those darn Marin kids from crashing my yard.’

Should I Stay . . . . . . or should I go (to Sacramento)? The Gav-Gov’s ongoing moment of indecision By Tom Gogola

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o where are Gavin Newsom, his wife and four young children going to live when he becomes governor next month? Turns out it’s kind of a question in need of an answer, just a short month before he assumes office. Word from his transition team after the long Thanksgiving weekend? Newsom is still not sure where his head will hit the pillow once he’s sworn in. Several stories about Newsom’s eventual neighborhood choice popped up in state papers in the immediate aftermath of his crushing

defeat of Republican John Cox. Most reports intimated that he’d likely stay in Marin with the family, given that he’s got a cool house and four kids under the age of 10. Earlier in November, Newsom told reporters he hadn’t yet wrapped his mind around whether to move or not. He and his family live in a 1,800-squarefoot Kentfield home, purchased for $2.2 million in 2011, that’s pretty swanky by outside appearances. There’s an in-ground pool and views of Mt. Tamalpais, to go along with what looks to be a lush, green lawn.

Friends and associates of Newsom interviewed for the where-will-helive round of stories pretty much all concluded that he’d likely stay in Marin. So that’s what I figured, too, when I asked about it before the Thanksgiving break took hold. Newsom’s press office in Sacramento off-loaded the inquiry to Nathan Click on the transition team. Click forwarded the Sacramento Bee quote Newsom gave after the election and said that’s still the operating posture being taken by the governor-elect, barely a month before he »8


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Newsom «6 assumes office in a state with the fifth largest economy in the world. The question of whether Newsom would move to the governor’s mansion in Sacramento became less moot after Jerry Brown and his wife moved there in 2015, following a taxpayer-funded upgrade of the hoary governor’s pad. Stories about Brown and Newsom inevitably mentioned that Jerry Brown was the first California governor to occupy the Sacramento mansion since his father Pat Brown lived there in the 1960s. So there’s a recent precedent, set by Brown. Still, here are a few good reasons for Newsom to stay put and turn the Kentfield compound into a Marin governor’s mansion: The Guesthouse. Why would you move to the veritable food-desert of Sacramento when a swank new restaurant just opened down the street that’s perfectly well-suited for meetings with Pacific Sun reporters (see Dining, p15)?

Sing to Us, Dingus! Well, we don’t know whether Newsom will remain in Marin, but we do know of one grateful Marin County resident happy to be home in the county. Dingus has been found! “Bring us Dingus” was the cry heard from Bolinas for the last seven months, ever since the twoyear-old dog went missing in April. Unbelievably, the pit bull and German shepherd mix made his way home on Thanksgiving Day, after an incredible, thousand-mile journey. The story begins with his disappearance in April, which baffled Bolinas residents. A surveillance video from Smiley’s Saloon caught the last known-images of 65-pound Dingus walking on Wharf Road around 8pm that night. Then he was gone. Dingus resided happily in one of the most dog-friendly places in America—dog-friendly, that is, until one disappeared without a trace. Since then, the West Marin townsfolk have grown more wary and protective. The pup’s people, Azi Lynman and his mother, Katie Weber, began one of the biggest dog hunts in Marin. They distributed hundreds of flyers in the North Bay, East Bay and San Francisco; placed dozens of ads online; and launched #bringDingushome on social media. False sightings were abundant, with Lynman and Weber traveling around the state to check them out. The

San Quentin’s death row. The prison is right down the street and Newsom could use the Marin Mansion as bully pulpit to push for an end to the death penalty, if he’s so inclined. Jerry Brown squared up personal objections to capital punishment with the facts: It’s the law of the Cali-land; there are nearly 800 inmates on death row; and serious questions around cruel-andunusual constitutional standards regarding the execution protocol have stymied the state’s pro-death posture. If Newsom’s looking for a Big Issue to latch on to early in his term—on the order of gay marriage, legal pot or gun control, issues which put him in the national spotlight—ending the death penalty in California seems like a pretty good one. Cannabis. Newsom led the way to legalization with his Blue Ribbon Commission on cannabis legalization, which set out the parameters of the legal-weed regime

heartbreak after each disappointment was almost unbearable. On Thanksgiving eve, Lynman, 24, received yet another call that Dingus had been found, this time in San Diego. “I believe I might have your lost dog,” the message said. Lynman phoned back and spoke with Tanner Kuljian, 21, a University of San Diego football player. He sounded certain he had Dingus. The two young men video-chatted, and when Kuljian showed him the pooch, Lynman saw the telltale mole on his face. It was Dingus, indeed. Soon, Lynman, Weber, her daughter and Dingus’ dog sitter were making the 525-mile drive to Kuljian’s home in San Diego. How did Dingus get so far away? Where did Kuljian find him? There were so many questions to be answered, and plenty of time to ponder them on the 13-hour trip in the pelting rain and heavy holiday traffic. At 1:15am on Thanksgiving morning, the eager foursome arrived at Kuljian’s door for the long-awaited reunion with Dingus. A video post on the Dingus Khan Facebook page shows him prancing joyfully and jumping from person to person as he greets his family. What led up to this moment, seven months after Dingus vanished from Bolinas? Kuljian filled us in: “I was at a friend’s party and someone I’d never met before was there with a

now afoot in the state. Curiously, Marin County has kind of lagged behind the region when it comes to a full-on embrace of the economic opportunities extant under Proposition 64. A pro-legalization governor operating in the cool mists of Marin could lend a helping hand to easing the way for legal pot-shops to open in the county. Or not. Pool party at the Newsoms’! In our dank reverie, the media’s invited, the shindig is clothing-optional, the spread is delicious and locally drawn, and the pot-delivery services in the county are showing up in droves in the driveway. Oh, don’t tell me those drivers don’t know where Newsom lives. Anybody who thought it was a good idea to marry Kim Guilfoyle (Newsom’s ex-wife, who is now dating Donald Trump Jr.)—well, jeez, he must have been high at the time or something. Don’t leave us, Gav-Gov! We’re just starting to get to know you! Y

dog. He said he got him from a dogfighting place, but that didn’t seem right, because the dog was goofy and friendly.” As the man with the canine continued to talk, he admitted that the tale about the fighting dog was untrue. Actually, Dingus walked up to him while he hiked in Bolinas last April. Since he was sans collar, the man took him. (Dingus is microchipped, and any animal shelter or vet could pull up Lynman’s current contact information.) “The guy showed us a newspaper article [“Where’s Dingus?,” Pacific Sun, Sept. 5] and a Facebook page about a lost dog,” Kuljian said. “He was superdrunk.” Kuljian read the story and online posts. Clearly, the inebriated fellow knew the pup’s people wanted him home desperately, but he never contacted them. “I thought, ‘Wow, this isn’t your dog,’” Kuljian said. “It was fucked-up.” That was all the impetus he needed. “My friend and I snatched Dingus and ducked out of the party,” Kuljian recalls. The thief was too drunk to notice. The college student called Lynman the next morning, and the tearful reunion soon followed. The family’s first stop once back in Bolinas was Smiley’s. Applause rang out from the 30 or so customers inside the bar as they called out, “Dingus, Dingus!” That night, Lynman and Weber feasted on Thanksgiving dinner and had a few extra reasons to be grateful. —Nikki Silverstein


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Sundial

THE WEEK’S EVENTS: A SELECTIVE GUIDE

MILL VALLEY

Game of Life

Local author Owen Prell has written for both stage and screen, and he’s best known for his documentary film, Finding Nico, about his quest to track down his godfather. Now Prell masters the art of writing a novel with his critically acclaimed debut book, Chance to Break. The novel uses an unending game of tennis to tell the darkly comic story of a man whose life has unraveled in the wake of the 2008 subprime mortgage fiasco. Prell reads from the novel, with discussion, on Friday, Nov. 30, at the Depot Bookstore and Cafe, 87 Throckmorton Ave., Mill Valley. 7pm. Free. 415.383.2665.

NOVATO

Musical Relief As the Camp fire in Paradise set new standards for awfulness, North Bay communities sent emergency help and are now about to ramp up the fundraising efforts. This weekend, local music promoter KC Turner hosts a massive, 10-hour charity event at HopMonk Tavern in Novato. The daylong Camp Fire Benefit Concert features legendary guitarist Alejandro Escovedo flying in from Texas, and also boasts sets from local stars like Greg Loiacono of the Mother Hips, Lester Chambers, Megan Slankard, Matt Jaffe and many others on Sunday, Dec. 2, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. Noon to 10pm. $50 and up. kcturnerpresents.com.

MILL VALLEY

Thriving Hive If you haven’t yet checked out Mill Valley’s collaborative and creative co-working space for women, the Hivery, this weekend is the perfect opportunity to see an array of local vendors and learn more about the inspiring community at the Hivery Holiday Market. This annual showcase includes talented artists, makers, entrepreneurs and crafts people who create art, jewelry, cosmetics and other cool stuff in a fun, sparkly atmosphere on Sunday, Dec. 2, at the Hivery, 38 Miller Ave. #20, Mill Valley. 11am to 3pm. Free admission. 415.569.7760.

SAN RAFAEL

Community Cinema The life story of Ghazwan Alsharif is so unbelievable that it has to be true. An Iraqi refugee and former translator for the U.S. military, Alsharif was wrongfully accused of being a double agent, tortured by the military that employed him and ostracized from family and country before he was able to rebuild his life in the Bay Area while coming out as an openly gay activist. Follow this amazing journey in the new documentary, ‘From Baghdad to the Bay,’ screening with director Erin Palmquist in a Q&A on Monday, Dec. 3, at the Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St., San Rafael. Noon. Free. 415.454.1222. —Charlie Swanson

Pop and punk stars Har Mar Superstar and Sabrina Ellis have the time of their lives performing songs from ‘Dirty Dancing’ on Wednesday, Dec. 5, at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley. See Concerts, p17.


at the

OSHER MARIN JCC

Giant Holiday Balkan Brass Extravaganza

INSPECTOR GADJE

Big Music, Big Party, Big Fun + Dancing

Dec 9 5 pm Beautiful, Ethereal Vocal Winter Celebration

KITKA: WINTERSONGS Songs of Eastern European Women

Ne

e

Laura Partain

Mary Gauthier gives fresh meaning to the phrase ‘Support our troops’ with her new collaborative album.

ar w Ye ’s Ev

Dec 31 The 9th Annual Other Café 9 pm NEW YEAR’S EVE Stand-Up Comedy Showcase

ever a year If there was d laughing... to leave behin

this is it!

Laughs, fun, friends cocktails

MARINJCC.ORG/ARTS

MUSIC

Life Saver Mary Gauthier lends a voice to wounded veterans on ‘Rifles & Rosary Beads’By Charlie Swanson

F

olk sensation Mary Gauthier is in the business of telling stories. Usually, they’re her own, and for over 20 years, Gauthier has turned her struggles with childhood abandonment, drugs and other issues into somber and introspective songs that regularly brings audiences to tears. Now Gauthier is using her gifts to tell a different set of stories. Her 2018 album, Rifles & Rosary Beads, was co-written with U.S. military veterans and their families as part of SongwritingWith:Soldiers, a nonprofit program that facilitates retreats where professional songwriters and wounded veterans collaborate to create music. “We bear witness and turn their stories into songs,” says Gauthier of

SongwritingWith:Soldiers, which she has been active in for over four years. “I reached a place where I realized these are really good songs, I think I should make a record,” she says. “I got the blessing of the organization to put these songs out in the world.” Each of the 11 songs on Rifles & Rosary Beads delivers a gut-punch of emotion. Opening track “Soldiering On” juxtaposes a soldier’s mental state on the battlefield with once he’s returned home. “Bullet Holes in the Sky” uses images of color guards and tiny American flags waving in parades to expose a soldier’s loneliness in a society that cannot relate to his wartime service. “A lot of our veterans feel invisible now; they feel unseen and they feel removed,” Gauthier says.“We call it the civilian-military divide. These songs help

bridge that. It gets civilians into a place of empathy with what our veterans and their families are going through.” About 22 veterans commit suicide every day in the United States. Gauthier hopes to shine a light on their struggles and help them heal. “When you’ve been traumatized, as so many of our soldiers have been, what happened to you, there’s no words for,” she says. “But this is where music can pick up the thread. I can play the melody and see the tears and know the melody is reflecting how they feel, and then you use metaphor to access what’s inside of them. The song becomes a reflection of their soul, and they suddenly don’t feel so alone. Somebody sees them, somebody understands.” Mary Gauthier performs Thursday, Dec. 6, at Freight & Salvage, 2020 Addison St., Berkeley. 8pm. $22–$26. 510.644.2020.

Wed 11⁄28 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–20 • All Ages

Luz of Y La Bamba with

Sea Of Bees

Thu 11⁄29 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–18 • All Ages

All Things Hank

A Tribute to Hank Williams & Family feat Barry Sless, Darren Nelson,

Danny Uzi, Bryan Kehoe & many more Fri 11⁄30 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–32 • All Ages

Featuring Saint Croix reggae legend Vaughn Benjamin with his full band

Akae Beka (formerly Midnite) with special guest Spiritual + Dubtonic Kru Sun 12⁄2 • Doors 10am ⁄ $17–19 • All Ages feat Irena Eide of Rainy Eyes Little Folkies Family Band Holiday Concert Wed 12⁄5 • 10:30pm ⁄ $2850–3350 • 21+ (((folkYEAH!))) Presents

Har Mar Superstar and Sabrina Ellis do the songs of Dirty Dancing Introducing Heart Bones 3rd Show Added Due To Popular Demand! Thu 12⁄6 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $32–42 • All Ages Sat 12⁄8 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $32–42 • 21+ Sun 12⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $32–42 • All Ages

Golden Gate Wingmen

feat

John Kadlecik, Jeff Chimenti, Reed Mathis & Jay Lane

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

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DEC 1 7:30 pm

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12 RICH, ADVENTUREPACKED AND INSPIRING FILMS! 7TH ANNUAL ADVENTURE DOCUMENTARY FILM FESTIVAL

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Come and be Inspired! “Setting the stage for important conversations about the world we live in.”

SPECIAL GUESTS • FILMMAKERS • ARTISTS • ACTIVISTS Featuring documentaries on environmental issues, epic adventures, eye-opening politics and humanitarian causes.

PASSES AND SPONSORSHIPS GO ON SALE NOV 6 TICKETS ON SALE NOV 15: $18 GENERAL; $15 for students attending Kidz Kino UNITING OUR COMMUNITY THROUGH THE POWER OF THE ARTS

142 THROCKMORTON • MILL VALLEY 415.383.9600 • throckmortontheatre.org

Timothée Chalamet needs hugs not drugs in ‘Beautiful Boy.’

FILM

Needle in the Hay Affluence abounds in drama based on pair of 2008 addiction memoirs By Richard von Busack

S

hot in West Marin and based on a pair of fatherand-son memoirs, Beautiful Boy concerns the tragedy of addiction from two angles. Young Nic Sheff (Timothée Chalamet of Call Me by Your Name) is readying for college when he tailspins into hard partying. His concerned father, David (Steve Carell), gets Nic into rehab fast, but it’s already too late; the first half of the film commences with Nic graduating to needles. The youth tries the good old geographical cure, by going down to L.A. to live with his mother (Amy Ryan), but returns and vanishes into the Haight, and later, the Tenderloin, in San Francisco. When a catastrophe befalls somebody else, it’s natural to look for causes and to ask, “What did these people do that I would have

had the sense to avoid?” There are three potential factors here. The Sheffs live in one of those rustic $3 million homes off Sir Francis Drake Boulevard—fancier than the place where Jackson Maine danced with his demons in A Star Is Born. This leads us to a snap judgment of addiction because of “affluenza.” And Carell’s David is humane as all get out; maybe Nic’s call of the wild is an escape from David’s moist, buddying parenting. The movie also suggests that rock music was a factor. Nic worships the band Nirvana, and the framed trophies of David’s writing career include Playboy interviews with John Lennon and Yoko Ono. But all of this is too simple to describe or diagnose Nic’s addiction. The second half of the film decays into a series of broken trusts and relapses. On the plus side, Maura

Tierney, as David’s wife, displays the kind of strong yet unobtrusive acting that should have made Jessica Hecht more famous. The ever-rising Chalamet has everything needed to play Nic—he’s devious as well as beautiful, as the addiction makes him lie and steal. Vistas of the Point Reyes cliffs mirror the existential plummet an addict faces, just as they were supposed to do. Yet the eclectic soundtrack (everything from hippie band Pavlov’s Dog to Polish composer Henryk Górecki) adds to the movie’s formlessness rather than defining it. Beautiful Boy’s sentimental heart is revealed in the soundtrack’s choice to play Perry Como shooting a tranquilizer dart into Fiddler on the Roof’s “Sunrise, Sunset.” ‘Beautiful Boy’ is playing at select theaters in the North Bay.


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EVERY WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC NIGHT WITH DENNIS HANEDA EVERY TUESDAY TRIVIA NIGHT WITH JOSH WINDMILLER THU 11/29 $10 7PM DOORS / 7:30PM SHOW ALL AGES

MARIN SCHOOL OF THE ARTS ROCK BANDS

SUN 12/2 $50+ 12PM DOORS / 110PM SHOW ALL AGES

CAMP FIRE BENEFIT CONCERT

THE SAM CHASE, MEGAN SLANKARD, JOSH BROUGH (OF POOR MAN’S WHISKEY) WED 12/5 $1825 7PM DOORS / 8PM SHOW

21+

TONY LUCCA THE CONTENDERS

(JAY NASH & JOSH DAY) SEATED SHOW

FRI 12/7 $1520 7PM DOORS / 8PM SHOW

21+

SAT 12/8 $2530 8PM DOORS / 9PM SHOW

21+

KEVIN RUSSELL AND SOME DANGEROUS FRIENDS ILLEAGLES

(EAGLES TRIBUTE)

WED 12/12 $1520 7PM DOORS / 8PM SHOW

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FRI 12/14 $1520 8PM DOORS / 9PM SHOW

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THE BLACK LILLIES

DIEGO’S UMBRELLA + THE CROOKED STUFF

Book your next event with us. Up to 150ppl. Email elisabeth@hopmonk.com

HOPMONK.COM | 415 892 6200

Outdoor Dining Sat & Sun Brunch 11–3

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week

Din ner & A Show

20th Anniversary Weekend!

OU T ! Anniversary Show S OL D Fri Nov 30 Paul Thorn Band Sat Bishop’s Big Fun Trio Dec 1 Elvin Just added Angela Strehli Band Sun Dance Dec 2 HowellDevine Party! Sat Dec 8 Danny Click’s Birthday Party with The Hell Yeahs! 8:30 Fri City Blues Dec 14 Sweet Dance Lessons! 8:00 Sat 15 The Last Call Troubadours

Thu

Nov 29

Dec

Beach Boys + Rock n’ Roll Originals 8:30

Gospel Christmas Eve Weekend

Sun

Gospel Sunday Night Dinner Show

Mon

Gospel Christmas Eve Dinner Show

Dec 23 Sons of the Soul Revivers 7:00 Dec 24 Sons of the Soul Revivers 7:00

Year End Beatle Fest!

Sat Dec 29 & Sun Dec 30 8:00

The Sun Kings

The Beatles Never Sounded So Good! Mon

15th Annual New Year’s Eve Party!

Dec 31 The Zydeco Flames Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Kevin Berne

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Melissa Ortiz and Madeline Rouverol tell the story of the other Bennet sisters in new ‘Pemberley’ installment.

STAGE

Forever New Marin Theatre Company gathers the family in sequel to sequel to ‘Pride and Prejudice’ By Harry Duke

I

n 2016, the Marin Theatre Company participated in the “rolling” world premiere of Lauren Gunderson and Margot Melcon’s Miss Bennet: Christmas at Pemberley. The “continuation” of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice was born, according to Gunderson, of the playwrights’ desire “to write something fun, grand, female-driven and hopeful, but with that wonderful wit and complication of a good family holiday gathering. The world of Jane Austen felt perfect for this.” This year brings a sequel to the sequel of sorts with The Wickhams: Christmas at Pemberley, running in its world premiere through Dec. 9. Was a sequel always in the plan? “We had no idea about a second play when we started Miss Bennet’,” says Gunderson, “but as we worked on the story, and in their world, we realized that Pemberley was full of other people and other stories to tell.”

Melcon agrees. “The lovely thing about Pride and Prejudice,” she says, “is that there are five sisters. Lizzy and Jane already had their story pretty well told, but that leaves three sisters ready for their stories to extend past the end of the novel.” This time it’s sister Lydia’s turn. “As the title betrays, we’re going to focus on Lydia Wickham and her complicated marriage,” says Gunderson, “but we'll also meet two new characters that are servants at Pemberley.” The servants? “The introduction of the world of the below-stairs staff of Pemberley gives us a balance to the merriment of upstairs at the holidays,” says Melcon. “It is still filled with generosity and holiday cheer, but happy endings look different upstairs than they do downstairs.” The introduction of some of the downstairs characters is one of the things that attracted director Megan Sandberg-Zakian to the project. “The chance to be part of the development of a new Christmas classic with these

two amazing women was too good to pass up,” says Sandberg-Zakian. “I was also intrigued by the fact that the playwrights said they wanted to address the two things that had always bugged them about Pride and Prejudice—that Lydia ends up with Wickham, and that we never hear the stories of the servants.” What about the challenges of following up a success? “It’s definitely challenging to make the characters recognizable but still fresh and interesting,” says Sandberg-Zakian. “Luckily, in the immortal words of Jane Austen herself, ‘people themselves alter so much that there is something new to be observed in them forever’—which makes for good drama.” ‘The Wickhams: Christmas at Pemberley’ runs Tuesday–Sunday through Dec. 16 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $25–$60. 415.388.5208. marintheatre.org.


DINING

Guesthouse Attendant A new culinary outpost just opened in Newsom’s nabe—won’t you join us for apps, governor-elect? By Tanya Henry

T

o many locals, Picco tops the list for best restaurant in Marin. Under the talented eye of Real Restaurants Group’s chef Bruce Hill, Picco delivers exquisite food, professional service and well-made cocktails. It’s one of the few North Bay establishments that provides the high-caliber dining experience most frequently encountered on the other side of the Golden Gate Bridge. So when Jared Rogers, who

spent over a decade as executive chef at Picco, decided to open his own place in Kentfield, expectations were high. Rogers, a former San Francisco Chronicle Rising Star Chef, left Larkspur and Picco for the American South in 2016, and ran a tapas restaurant in Charleston. He also did a stint at Brass Rabbit in Healdsburg before heading back to Marin, where he opened the Guesthouse in October. Marinites

are lucky to have Rogers back incounty. The Guesthouse space, most recently occupied by Ambrosia and, before that, the long-running Pacific Cafe, has been utterly transformed. The once casual open space is now all grown up with various gradations of gray painted walls punctuated by blue accents, floral wallpaper and tan banquettes that give the place a sophisticated, be-on-your-best-behavior vibe. The

Guesthouse, 850 College Ave., Kentfield. 415.419.5101.

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Stephanie Amberg

Tell Kentfield’s Gavin Newsom that we’ve reserved a table in his name, and he better show up!

kitchen is open, and the 110-seat dining area shares space with a long concrete-topped bar that makes for a sometimes noisy experience. There is a reason Rogers gets the attention he does—not to mention that his food is a perfect fit for Marin. His food is refined without being fussy, and his handle on ingredients and knowledge of how they do and don’t work together is beyond impressive. A recent crudo of the day made for elevated bites of fresh fish prepared with spicy jalapeno, watermelon and avocado. An inspired roasted-squash bisque prepared with tahini and yogurt was sublime with crunchy everythingspice, cilantro and hints of citrus. A black truffle agnolotti pasta was a triumph of the fall season, with earthy, rich flavors and a creamy ricotta filling. Grilled kurobuta pork chop featured a spiced apple compote; amid a medley of roasted Brussels sprouts and potatoes were some red radishes. The simplicity of a roasted radish that tasted much like a turnip or a rutabaga was surprising and tasty, and something I had never encountered on a restaurant menu. Wine and spirits are taken just as seriously as the food at Guesthouse. Roger’s partner, Dustin Sullivan (he’s also a Real Restaurants alum), heads up the beverage program and has created a wine list that offers unusual wines, such as a Markus Huber rosé from the Traisental region in Austria. Instead of focusing only on the Sonoma and Napa California wine regions— Santa Barbara, Lodi and the North Coast are also featured. Cocktails play it safe with classics like a properly made martini, rye Manhattan and a house oldfashioned. That said, a dry mezcal negroni with a grapefruit twist and a sunburn cocktail with blanco tequila, cucumber and cayenne showed some creative license. While the space can get noisy and the décor feels a bit too formal and out of sync with the chef ’s joyful and inventive food, there is no question this newcomer is a welcome addition to Marin’s restaurant landscape. It’s just a matter of time before all of the restaurant’s elements come together for this culinary wizard.


ATTENTION:

MARIN COUNTY PROPERTY OWNERS Monday, December 10, 2018 is the final day to pay the 2018-2019 first installment of property taxes without penalty. Property taxes are due now and property owners are encouraged to pay early to avoid late penalties. WAYS TO PAY: • Postmark by Monday, December 10, 2018 • Deliver to Tax Collector by 5:00 p.m., Monday, December 10, 2018 • Pay online or by phone by 11:59 p.m. on Monday, December 10, 2018 Property owners who have not received a tax bill, especially those who recently purchased real estate, should contact the Tax Collector’s office. Non-receipt of a tax bill does not excuse a property owner from paying taxes by the December 10, 2018 deadline. MARIN COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR Civic Center-Room 202 P.O. Box 4220 San Rafael, CA 94913-4220 Regular Office Hours: 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday Extended Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m., Monday, December 10, 2018 • Pay online with Assessor Parcel Number: marincounty.org/taxbillonline • Pay by phone with Tax Bill Number: 1-800-985-7277 • There is no service fee when paying with an e-check • There is a credit/debit card service fee of 2.35% percent with a minimum fee of $1.49 • The service fee for credit/debit card transactions is not retained by the County, they are paid to the service provider Property Tax Postponement for Senior Citizens, Blind, or Disabled Persons The State Controller’s Office (SCO) will accept new PTP Applications until February 10, 2019. Late applications are accepted! To be eligible for PTP, you must: • Be at least 62, or blind, or have a disability; • Own and occupy the home as your primary place of residence; • Have a total household income of $35,500 or less; and • Have at least 40% equity in the property. Go to the SCO website at sco.ca.gov/ardtax_prop_tax_postponement.html for more information. If you have any questions, call 1-800-952-5661 or email postponement@sco.ca.gov For more information regarding property tax bills and payments, please visit marincounty.org/taxes, or call the Tax Collector at (415) 473-6133.

PACIFICSUN.COM

YEAR 56, NO.16

APRIL 25-MAY 1, 2018

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SERVING MARIN COUNTY

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Celebrate Our 55th Anniversary! Thank you for partnering with us for all these years! Anniversary Issue: December 19 Reserve by December 12

sales@pacificsun.com | 415.485.6700

NUGGET

High Tides . . . And green grass forever By Jonah Raskin

H

ere’s a question for budding chemists in the land of milk and marijuana: What do you get when you mix water and THC extracted from weed? Answer? You get cannabis-infused water, of course. Carbonate the water and now you’ve got a cannabis spritzer. A cannabis cocktail. A bud-based bevie. Now there’s a local company, Occidental Power, creating THCinfused water that will be on shelves in the New Year. The company uses Russian River tap water that’s filtered before the cannabis is added. Then comes the fizz. Next year, the folks at Occidental Power plan to buy from local growers, but right now, they’re using their own organic cannabis that they grow outdoors. Only the choicest flowers go into the cocktail. The extracted psychoactive component is added to the water and becomes Mountjoy Sparking Water, which will be available in local dispensaries starting in January 2019, in a childproof, 16-ounce plastic bottle. The beverage will come in several flavors, including blackberry, lemon, lime, peach and natural—which offers a mix of herbs from the Sonoma County Herb Exchange in Sebastopol.

Occidental Power won’t say exactly what herbs go into the mix. The company doesn’t want to give away its secret formula. Alex Mountjoy is a familiar face in Occidental in Sonoma County. He’ll soon be famous all over town for his cocktail. “For a long time, I wanted a cannabis beverage,” he says. “I developed it as much for myself as for the market. “I know this might sound clichéd, but our cannabis beverage is a thinking person’s tool that helps balance your life,” he adds. “It certainly balances my life. It’s good for cooking, sleeping and working; it increases productivity.” Mountjoy and his wife and business partner, Jenny, are no strangers to manufacturing and marketing. For years, they sold clocks, mirrors and picture frames all over the United States. Their factories were located in the East Bay. In addition to the cannabis cocktail, they have a body-care line. Right now none of those products contain cannabis product, but they will in the near future. They also offer bottles of Mountjoy Sparking Water infused with CBD. Sip the CBD product to help with anxiety and without any psychoactive effects. It’s shipped around the country and also available in local supermarkets. Y


Film

Concerts

Clubs & Venues

MARIN

MARIN

Hanukkah Celebration with Inspector Gadje San Francisco–based Balkan Brass Band leads a holiday extravaganza that marks the Jewish Festival of Lights. Dec 1, 7pm. $10-$35. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Book Passage Nov 29, holiday concert with Novato Youth String Ensemble and the Sinaloa Middle School Jazz Choir. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Har Mar Superstar and Sabrina Ellis Minneapolis pop star and Texas punkrocker team up under the name Heart Bones to perform songs from “Dirty Dancing.” Dec 5, 10pm. $28-$38. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850. Michelle Schmitt Bay Area songwriter performs her tenth annual holiday benefit concert and releases her new album, “St Mary.” Nov 29, 8pm. $100. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

SONOMA Out of the Fire Benefit Concert & Silent Auction Sonoma County songwriters Sarah Baker, Volker Strif ler, Levi Lloyd and others perform to raise funds for musicians affected by the wildfire. Dec 2, 1pm. $10$30. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260. Santa Rosa Symphony Regional symphony with a national reputation presents “Viva Italia”with guest conductor Jayce Ogren. Times vary. Dec 1-3. $24 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040. Whitey Morgan Working-class country rocker from Flint, Michigan, plays a rough-and-tumble brand of honky-tonk. Dec 2, 8pm. $25; VIP $75. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

NAPA Squirrel Nut Zippers Holiday Caravan Experimental jazz-swing band’s second annual holiday tour features classic holiday songs and the group’s biggest hits. Nov 30-Dec 1, 7 and 9pm. $39-$89. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300. Symphony Napa Valley Soprano Marnie Breckenridge returns to Napa Valley with “Christmas at the Symphony,” featuring holiday favorites. Dec 2, 3pm. $30-$65. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900. Ultrafaux & Hot Club of Baltimore Napa Valley Jazz Society presents the dynamic gypsy jazz group. Dec 2, 4pm. $25$45. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

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Calendar

Church of Saint Raphael Dec 1-2, Holiday Choral Concert by Candlelight with Marin Symphony. 1104 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. 415.479.8100. College of Marin James Dunn Theatre Dec 2, 3 and 7pm, Marin Symphony Youth Programs Winter Concert. 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9385. Fenix Nov 30, Greg Ballad. Dec 1, Nzuri Soul. Dec 2, Greg Johnson & Glass Brick Boulevard farewell performance. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600. George’s Nightclub Nov 30, Nef the Pharaoh. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262. HopMonk Novato Dec 2, 12pm, Campfire benefit with Alejandro Escovedo and friends. Dec 5, Tony Lucca and the Contenders. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200. Iron Springs Pub & Brewery Nov 28, Hopsauce. Dec 5, Cubed. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005. L’Appart Resto Nov 29, Two Smooth Band. 636 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.256.9884. Marin Center Showcase Theatre Nov 28, “An Unforgettable Nat King Cole Christmas” with Evan Tyrone Martin. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800. Marin Country Mart Nov 30, 5:30pm, Friday Night Jazz with Jeff Derby. Dec 2, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with Claudia Russel. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700. 19 Broadway Nightclub Nov 29, Mot & the Ship of Fools. Nov 30, SunHunter. Dec 1, Euro Night Fest with Sonamo. Dec 2, Elvis Johnson’s Fairfax Blues Jam. Dec 4, Blues Champions. Dec 5, Damon LeGall Band. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091. No Name Bar Nov 28, Marty Atkinson and Katy Boyd. Nov 29, No Room for Zeus. Nov 30, Michael Aragon Quartet. Dec 3, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392. Osteria Divino Nov 28, Ken Cook Duo. Nov 29, Passion Habanera. Nov 30, Barrio Manouche. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355. Panama Hotel Restaurant Nov 28, Lorin Rowan. Nov 29, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Seventh annual Throckmorton Theatre Mountainfilm Festival opens Nov. 30 in Mill Valley and features inspiring, adventure-packed flicks.

Papermill Creek Saloon Nov 30, Awesome Hotcakes. Dec 1, Just Friends. Dec 2, 6pm, the LoWatters. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235. Peri’s Silver Dollar Nov 28, Chris James & the Showdowns. Nov 29, Dr Mojo. Nov 30, Columba Livia. Dec 1, Sam Vega. Dec 2, Matt Bolton. Dec 4, James Lawless. Dec 5, Michael Brown and friends. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910. Rancho Nicasio Nov 30, the Paul Thorn Band. Dec 1, Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun Trio. Dec 2, 4pm, HowellDevine. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219. Sausalito Cruising Club Mon, Joe Tate & Blue Monday Band jam session. 300 Napa St, Sausalito. 415.332.9922. Sausalito Presbyterian Church Dec 2, 5pm, Christmas choral concert with Sausalito Presbyterian Church choral

ensemble. 112 Bulkley Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.3790. Sausalito Seahorse Nov 29, Mindy Canter and Jules Broussard. Nov 30, Reed Fromer Band. Dec 2, 4pm, Julio Bravo & Orquestra Salsabor. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899. Smiley’s Schooner Saloon Nov 30, JB Barton and friends. Dec 1, Hibbity Dibbity. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311. St Vincent’s Chapel Nov 30-Dec 2, “Holidays in Harmony” with Novato Music Association Chorus. 1 St Vincent’s Dr, San Rafael. novatomusicassociation-chorus.org. Station House Cafe Dec 2, 5pm, Paul Knight and friends. 11180 State Route 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1515. Sweetwater Music Hall Nov 28, Luz Elena Mendoza with

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Sea of Bees. Nov 29, Hank Williams tribute with Barry Sles and others. Nov 30, Akae Beka. Dec 1-2, Ryan Bingham. Sold-out. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850. Terrapin Crossroads Nov 28, Colonel & the Mermaids. Nov 29, Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band. Nov 30, Nicki Bluhm with the Coffis Brothers. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773. Throckmorton Theatre Nov 28, 12pm, the Curium Trio. Dec 5, 12pm, Quartet San Francisco. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

SONOMA 2 Tread Brewing Company Nov 30, Velvet Chamber. 1018 Santa Rosa Plaza, Santa Rosa. 707.327.2822. A’Roma Roasters Nov 30, Organix. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765. Aqus Cafe Nov 30, the Tonewoods. Dec 1, Not Yetis. Dec 2, 2pm, Two Smooth. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060. Arlene Francis Center Nov 30, Benefit For National Suicide Prevention Lifeline with Kristy Q and DeathGlam. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009. Barley & Hops Tavern Nov 30, House of Mary. Dec 1, Aly Rose Trio. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037. The Big Easy Nov 28, Wednesday Night Big Band. Nov 29, Don Forbes and the Reckless. Nov 30, Trouble in the Wind and Mike Saliani Band. Dec 4, jazz jam with Joe Kelner. Dec 5, Rockville Roadkill Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163. Bluewater Bistro Nov 29, 5pm, Ricky Ray. 21301 Heron Dr, Bodega Bay. 707.875.3513. Church of the Incarnation Dec 2, 4pm, “An English Holiday” with North Bay Sinfonietta. 550 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2604. Elephant in the Room Nov 30, Aly Rose Trio. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. elephantintheroompub.com. Flamingo Lounge Nov 30, the Igniters. Dec 1, B-4 Dawn. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530. Glaser Center Nov 30-Dec 1, tribute to Leonard Bernstein with Santa Rosa Symphonic Chorus. Dec 2, 3pm, “Festive, Family, Fun” with Healdsburg Chorus. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381. Green Music Center Schroeder Hall Nov 29, Isle of Klezbos. Dec 1, Rock Collegium. Dec 4-5, Opera and Music Theatre Scenes: The Mariachi Story. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery Dec 5, Chris Robinson Brotherhood. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277. HopMonk Sebastopol Nov 29, Dragon Smoke. Dec 4, Mary Gauthier. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. Hotel Healdsburg Dec 1, 6:30pm, Berkeley Choro Ensemble. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800. Hudson Street Wineries Nov 30, 5:30pm, the Musers. 428 Hudson St, Healdsburg. 707.433.2364. Lagunitas Tap Room Nov 28, Roem Baur. Nov 29, JL Stiles. Nov 30, the 14ers. Dec 1, the Rusty String Express. Dec 2, Elima. Dec 5, JimBo Trout. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts Dec 3, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy’s Wild and Swingin’ Holiday Party. Dec 4, LeAnn Rimes: You and Me and Christmas Tour. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600. Main Street Bistro Nov 29, Willie Perez. Nov 30, Valtierra Latin Orchestra. Dec 1, Yancie Taylor. Dec 2, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501. Murphy’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Nov 30, Peace of G. Dec 1, Jesse Lee Kincaid. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall Nov 28, Los Lonely Boys. Nov 30, the Travelin McCourys and David Grisman. Dec 1, Petty Theft. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048. Newman Auditorium Dec 5, SRJC Jazz Combos Fall Concert. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372. Occidental Center for the Arts Nov 30-Dec 1, 8pm and , Dec 2, 3pm, Occidental Community Choir Winter Concert. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Robert Earl Keen. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill Nov 30, Road Eleven. Dec 1, Moonalice. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044. Rock Star University House of Rock Dec 1, Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers with Destroyer. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Veterans Memorial Park Dec 1, 2pm, “TubaChristmas” with Tubas At Large. 850 Main St, Napa. napacitynights.com.

St John’s Episcopal Church Nov 30, “The Ceremony of Carols” with the North Bay Singers. 40 Fifth St, Petaluma. The Star Dec 1, music mixer with MC Radio Active and Dove Mosis. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.6390. Starling Bar Nov 30, John Paul Hodge. Dec 1, Oakland Crush. 19380 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.938.7442. Twin Oaks Roadhouse Dec 1, Stone Cold Mollie. Dec 3, the Blues Defenders pro jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Blue Note Napa Nov 28, DJ Williams & Shots Fired. Nov 29, Beat-Lele: ukulele tribute to the Beatles. Dec 2, the Duo Quartet. Dec 5, Eki Shola and Michael Fortunato. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts Nov 30-Dec 28, “Art of the Spirit: Return to Light,” group show is juried by Julie Zener. Reception, Dec 4 at 5:30pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue Dec 2, 2pm, Rob Watson and friends with Vernon Black. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Galleries

Ca’ Momi Osteria Nov 30, Full Chizel. Dec 1, Nate Lopez. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664. Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Dec 1, Jon Shannon Williams. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922. Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Nov 29, Salty Dawgs. Nov 30, Woodstock Gypsy. Dec 1, Highwater Blues. Dec 2, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Paul Mahder Gallery Dec 2, 7pm, parlor jazz series with Helen Sung. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

Jarvis Conservatory Dec 1, It’s a Grand Night for Singers. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Redwood Cafe Nov 29, Dylan Black Project. Nov 30, Maria Muldaur & Her Red Hot Bluesiana Band. Dec 1, Timothy O’Neil Band. Dec 2, 4pm, Gyspy Kisses.

Bubble Street Gallery Dec 2, “Bubble Street Gallery Holiday Celebration,” see new works in this annual show. Reception, Dec 2 at 4pm. 565 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.339.0506.

NAPA

JaM Cellars Nov 29, Shelby, Texas. 1460 First St, Napa. 707.265.7577.

Red Brick Nov 30, Jami Jamison. Dec 1, Best of Red Brick Open Mic. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Book Passage Dec 2-1, “Tom Killion Art Show,” Marin artist displays his latest spectacular landscape prints. Reception, Dec 2 at 5pm. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. Daily, 9am to 9pm. 415.927.0960.

Emery Lipinski Studios Dec 1-2, 11am-5pm,“Steve Emery & Kathleen Lipinski Open Studio,” the artists open their home for their 40th annual exhibit of paintings and prints. Reception, Dec 1 at 11am. 38 San Francisco Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.453.3648.

Palooza Gastropub Nov 29, Greg Lamboy. 8910 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.833.4000.

The Phoenix Theater Dec 1, Cyborg Octopus with Sepulchre and Wroht. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Art Openings

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater Dec 1, 4pm, VOENA: Voices of Angels... Sunset by Candlelight. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900. River Terrace Inn Nov 30, Karen Shook. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000. Silo’s Nov 30, Papa Joe & the New Deal. Dec 1, Caravanserai. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833. Uptown Theatre Nov 30, Jonny Lang. Dec 1, Lyle Lovett and

Art Works Downtown Through Dec 22, “Art Works Downtown Members’ Exhibit,” showing in the Underground, Founders and Donors’ Gallery. Reception, Nov 9 at 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119. Bay Model Visitor Center Through Jan 26, “The Sausalito Renaissance,” exhibit tells the story of the birth of midcentury modern art in Sausalito. Reception, Nov 20. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871. Bolinas Museum Through Dec 20, “Cosmic Wonders,” photography exhibit looks at the moon, the stars and the space between. Reception, Sept 22 at 2pm. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330. Book Passage Through Nov 30, “Tom Killion Residency,” acclaimed Marin artist returns to Book Passage’s gallery for a year-long exhibition of his original prints and handcrafted books. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. Daily, 9am to 9pm. 415.927.0960. Gallery Route One Through Dec 23, “Confronting Borders,” photographer Peg Hunter captures community and common ground, with painters Johanna Baruch and Igor Sazevich also exhibiting. Reception, Nov 17 at 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.


Events Marin Community Foundation Through Feb 1, “Marin Open Studios 25th Anniversary Exhibition,” featuring several local artists from the popular annual studio tour event. Reception, Oct 4 at 5:30pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5. 415.464.2500. Marin Society of Artists Through Dec 1, “Realism to Abstraction,” exhibit features diverse richness of talent, knowledge and experience. Reception, Nov 9 at 5pm. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561. MarinMOCA Through Dec 23, “Memory & Perception,” an exhibit that reveals how artists interpret the world around and within them. Reception, Nov 17 at 4:30pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137. Osher Marin JCC Through Jan 1, “Sh’ma: Stories in Silk,” hand-dyed silk artworks by Catherine Stern are inspired by the Torah. Reception, Oct 7 at 2pm. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000. Robert Allen Fine Art Through Nov 30,“Works on Paper,” group show features prints, drawings and mixedmedia works. Reception, Oct 4 at 4pm. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800. Throckmorton Theatre Through Dec 2,“November Art Show with Caroline Dahl & Ben Parker,”the contemporary embroidery artist and sculptor exhibit their new works. Reception, Nov 6 at 5pm. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Comedy Eliot Chang The Laugh Cellar co-hosts a standup show featuring the refreshingly positive comedian. Dec 1, 7pm. $20. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Dance Marin Holiday Spectacular Get in the spirit of the season with a reimagined presentation of PAAM’s original production, “A Scarf in Union Square.” Dec 1, 7pm; Dec 2, 2pm. $22. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.499.6800. Stapleton Ballet’s Nutcracker Now in its 30th year, this production features inspired dancing, exquisite costumes and lavish sets. Dec 1-2. 1 and 5pm. $26-$39. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.473.6800.

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Madrigal Family Winery Through Dec 11, “El Día de los Muertos,” art exhibit features installation of Mexican artwork from regional Mexican artists and celebrated Bay Area Latin artists. Reception, Nov 1 at 6pm. 819 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.729.9549.

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Events Dance Palace Artisan Craft & Holiday Market Annual fair is filled with the sights, sounds and scents of the winter holidays. Nov 30Dec 2. Free. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075. Festival of Lights Marin’s biggest Hanukkah party includes festive foods, glow-in-the-dark dancing, live music, artisan crafts and kids activities Dec 2, 11:30am. Free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000. The Hivery Holiday Market Talented local makers, artists and craftspeople offer unique products, art pieces, jewelry, cosmetics and more. Dec 2, 11am. The Hivery, 38 Miller Ave #20, Mill Valley. 415.569.7760. ICB Winter Open Studios See more than 100 artists’ studios and work in this seasonal tradition. Nov 30-Dec 2, 11am. The ICB Art Studios, 480 Gate Five Road, Sausalito. icb-artists.com. Landmarks Holiday Art & Craft Sale Popular holiday sale is packed with art and crafts from local artists and hot cider. Dec 1, 10am. Free admission. Tiburon Art & Garden Center, 841 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. Latkes & Lights Celebration includes Menorah lighting with traditional blessings, colorful dreidels, steaming hot latkes and hot chocolate and live Klezmer music from Klezmer Soul. Dec 4, 5pm. Free. Bon Air Center, 302 Bon Air Center, Greenbrae. bonair.com. Marin Center’s Pop-Up Holiday Boutique Shop for locally produced original arts and crafts. Nov 29-Dec 7, 11am. Free. Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6400. Mill Valley Holiday Craft Fair Over 55 artists sell their fine handmade arts and crafts. Dec 1, 10am. Free. Mill Valley Community Center, 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley. 415.383.1370. Mill Valley Winterfest Partake in a day of snow slides, arts and crafts, live music, family activities and Santa’s arrival in a fire truck. Dec 2, 11am. Free. Depot Plaza, Throckmorton and Miller, Mill Valley. 415.388.9700. Muir Beach Holiday Arts Fair Enjoy the scenery while browsing work from over 40 local artists with crafts for kids and holiday ornaments. Dec 1-2, 10am. Free. Muir Beach Community Center, 19 Seascape Dr, Muir Beach. 415.388.8319. San Jose Middle School Art & Tech Day Students from San Jose share their art, writing, music, and technology projects. Dec 1, 11am. Novato Copperfield’s Books, 999 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.763.3052.

North Bay silversmith Alison Morse sells her traditional jewelry alongside several other artisans at the annual Muir Beach Holiday Arts Fair.

Sausalito Woman’s Club Holiday Open House Event features food and drinks, caroling, kids’ craft room and Santa. Dec 2. Sausalito Woman’s Club, 120 Central Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.2700.

Film Albatross Powerful look at the giant bird steps outside the norms of environmental documentary films. Pre-registration required. Nov 29, 7pm. donations welcome. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277. Cinema & Psyche Study, watch and discuss three early Hollywood films from Ernst Lubitsch. Dec 3, 2pm. $70. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 240 Channing Way, San Rafael. cinemaandpsyche.com. From Baghdad to the Bay New doc on Ghazwan Alsharif, Iraqi refugee now living in San Francisco as openly gay activist, screens with filmmaker discussion.

Dec 3, 12pm. Free. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222. Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra Musicians accompany the classic Harold Lloyd silent comedy “Speedy.” Dec 2, 4:15pm. $15-$20. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222. Petaluma Cinema Series Director Jim Sheridan’s 2002 drama “In America” screens with lecture and discussion. Dec 5, 6pm. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, SRJC Petaluma Campus, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. petalumafilmalliance.org. The Push Grant Korgan attempts to become the first spinal cord-injured athlete to reach the South Pole in this documentary, presented by SIFF with wine reception. Dec 4, 6pm. $20. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626. Throckmorton Mountainfilm Festival Adventure-packed films are shown along with special guest speakers, parties and conversations. Nov 30-Dec 2. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

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Food & Drink

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Off the Grid Food Trucks Eat your way through the largest gathering of mobile food trucks in Marin, listen to live music and take in great views. Sun, 11am. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700. Sausalito Gingerbread House Tour & Competition Stroll the shops around Sausalito and view elaborate, festively decorated gingerbread houses galore. Dec 1-30. Downtown Sausalito, Caledonia Street, Sausalito.

Lectures Books & Gifts for All A team of booksellers present and recommend new books for all the readers on your holiday shopping list. Nov 30, 10am. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Readings J. Patrick Costello, Registered Representative, Securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Adviser. Cambridge and Green River Financial Services are unaffiliated. Investing involves risk. Depending on the different types of investments there may be varying degrees of risk. Socially responsible investing does not guarantee any amount of success.

Book Passage Nov 30, 4:30pm, Nutcracker Story Time with Marin Ballet. Dec 2, 1pm,“Building Blocks for the New Retirement” with Joan Tabb. Dec 2, 4pm,“Brave Healing” with Laura Di Franco. Dec 3, 7pm,“The Dakota Winters” with Tom Barbash, in conversation with Dave Eggers. Dec 3, 7pm, Literary Salon with Left Coast Writers. Dec 5, 7pm,“Mistral” with Rachel Cobb. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960. Depot Bookstore & Cafe Nov 30, 7pm, “Chance to Break” with Owen Prell. 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley 415.383.2665.

Theater Annie Broadway classic about everyone’s favorite orphan is a family favorite holiday musical. Through Dec 16. $22-$35. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185. Every Brilliant Thing Left Edge Theatre presents the poignant and humorous story of a young boy who lists everything worth living for. Through Dec 9. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600. The House of Yes Skeletons come out of the closet for a family full of secrets during an eventful Thanksgiving dinner. Through Dec 16. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177. A John Waters Christmas Legendary filmmaker, author and raconteur spreads Yuletide profanity and perverted piety with his critically acclaimed oneman show. Nov 30, 9pm. $52. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Le Cirque de Bohème Old-style circus troupe presents a new show, “Yesterday,” with an amazing cast of characters. Through Dec 16. $27-$55. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. cirquedeboheme.com. Napa Valley College Theater Performance Performed in repertory, these pieces live in dialogue with di Rosa’s current exhibit, “Be Not Still: Living in Uncertain Times.” Dec 1, 12:30pm. $10. di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991. Nuncrackers the Musical Holiday show is filled with “Nunsense” humor and beloved caroles. Through Dec 9. $20-$30. College of Marin Studio Theatre, 835 College Avenue, Kentfield. 415.485.9555. The Odd Couple Ross Valley Players put on one of Neil Simon’s finest comedies. Through Dec 16. $15-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555. Scrooge In Love After “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge’s life takes a turn for the romantic in a new musical. Nov 30-Dec 16. $20-$40. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305. Shrek the Musical Santa Rosa Junior College theater arts department presents the play based on the Oscar-winning film. Through Dec 2. Maria Carrillo High School, 6975 Montecito Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307. Spin Off Imaginists’ alternate universe finds the average American family navigating new episodes of wackiness, weekly. Nov 30-Jan 26. $5-$20. The Imaginists, 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554. The Tailor of Gloucester Delightful family musical, based on the famed Beatrix Potter story, is a holiday treat for all ages. Through Dec 16. $16-$34. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400. Transcendence’s Broadway Holiday Spectacular New holiday celebration for all ages features performers from Broadway. Nov 30-Dec 2. $39 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600. The Wickhams: Christmas at Pemberley New holiday classic that revisits Jane Austen’s world from “Pride & Prejudice” makes its world premiere. Through Dec 9. $10-$52. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The PACIFIC SUN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian.com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date. Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.


TO PLACE AN AD: email legals@pacificsun.com or fax: 415.485.6226. No walk-ins

please. All submissions must include a phone number and email. Ad deadline is Thursday, noon to be included in the following Wednesday print edition.

Seminars&Workshops To include your seminar or workshop, call 415.485.6700

SINGLE & DISSATISFIED? Tired of spending weekends and holidays alone? Join with other single men and women to explore what’s blocking you from fulfillment in your relationships. Nine-week Single’s Group, OR weekly, ongoing, coed Intimacy Groups or Women’s Group, all starting the week of December 3rd. Groups meet on Mon, Tues, & Thurs evenings. Space limited. Also, Individual and Couples sessions. Central San Rafael. For more information, call Renee Owen, LMFT #35255 at 415-453-8117 HIGHLY EFFECTIVE & AFFORDABLE THERAPY. SELF-CARE THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS: AUTHENTIC RELATIONSHIP GROUP. 9 week groups forming now, downtown San Rafael, 2 Tuesdays a month/ December through January, Stanford Trained therapist, Ilene Wolf, LMFT for 25 years, 5 Secrets of loving Relationships. Practical tools to experience more joy & turn your life into a success story. “I have seen 100s of individuals, couples, families and groups, you can feel better. Call- for a free 20 minute interview to make sure this group fulfills your goals. 415.420.3619 • www.ilenewolf.com

Mind&Body HYPNOTHERAPY Thea Donnelly, M.A. Hypnosis, Counseling, All Issues. 25 yrs. experience. 415-459-0449.

Home Services CLEANING SERVICES FURNITURE DOCTOR Ph/Fax: 415-383-2697

Real Estate HOMES/CONDOS FOR SALE AFFORDABLE MARIN? I can show you 60 homes under $600,000. Call Cindy Halvorson 415-902-2729, BRE #01219375. Christine Champion, BRE# 00829362.

GARDENING/LANDSCAPING GARDEN MAINTENANCE OSCAR 415-505-3606

ENGLISH PETSITTER Exp., reliable and long-term Marin resident will love your animals & pamper your plants.

Call or Text: Jill 415-927-1454

Seminars & Workshops CALL TODAY TO ADVERTISE

415.485.6700

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2018-145670. The following individual(s) are doing business: MARIN SPEECH WORKS, 131 CAMINO ALTO SUITE E-3, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: RENEE TIMARCO MS, CCC, SLP, 820 LOVELL AVE, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on OCTOBER 30, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 2018-145581. The following individual(s) are doing business: ARIGATOU JAPANESE FOOD TO GO, 2046 FOURTH ST, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: TAKUJI ISIZAKI, 118 BAYO VISTA WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901, HISAKO ISHIZAKI, 118 BAYO VISTA WAY, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by A GENERAL PARTNERSHIP. Registrant will begin transacting busi-

ness under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on OCTOBER 16, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 145650. The following individual(s) are doing business: KLA ENTERPRISE, 72 BAHAMA REEF, NOVATO, CA 94949: KELLEIGH LYNN ALDRIDGE, 72 BAHAMA REEF, NOVATO, CA 94949. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on OCTOBER 26, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 145680. The following individual(s) are doing business: THACKREY & CO., 240 OVERLOOK ROAD, BOLINAS, CA 94924: SEAN THACKREY, 240 OVERLOOK ROAD, BOLINAS, CA 94924. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL.

Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on NOVEMBER 2, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT— File No: 145691. The following individual(s) are doing business: CALEX CONSTRUCTION, 28 PHILLIPS DR., APT. 31, SAUSALITIO, CA 94965: SERGEY NOSACH, 28 PHILLIPS DR., APT. 31, SAUSALITIO, CA 94965. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on NOVEMBER 5, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT—File No: 145701. The following individual(s) are doing business: THE POWDER ROOM BRIDGET EDWARDS, 546 MAGNOLIA AVE, LARKSPUR, CA 94939: BRIDGET EDWARDS,

Trivia answers «5 1

Apple, with about 25,000 employees

2 Boston 3 Colon (:), eye (I), pee (P),

period (.) . . . others?

4 Switzerland and Spain 5 People who lost homes in the

recent California fires

6

Uluru, Ayers Rock; its closest town is Alice Springs. (Thanks to Mick Griffin from Mill Valley for the question.)

7

11am; Dallas is in the central time zone, while the west Texas town of El Paso is in the mountain time zone.

8 Jumbo 9 Winston Churchill 10 The New Orleans Pelicans

BONUS ANSWER: Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh, Penn., founded by Andrew Carnegie. The bagpipe program started two decades ago. (Thanks to Michael Vogel from Mill Valley for the question.)

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PublicNotices 14838 ECHO RIDGE DR NC, NEVADA CITY, CA 95959. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on NOVEMBER 7, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT窶認ile No: 145698. The following individual(s) are doing business: CHAPMAN LAW GROUP, A.P.C., 950 NORTHGATE DR., STE 307, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903: CHAPMAN LAW GROUP, A.P.C, 950 NORTHGATE DR., STE 307, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94903. This business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on NOVEMBER 6, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 7, 14, 21, 28 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT窶認ile No: 145745. The following individual(s) are doing business: MOLLY MAID OF MARIN + W. CONTRA COSTA COUNTIES, 3095 KERNER BLVD, STE K, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901: BATCH ENTERPRISES, INC, 3095 KERNER BLVD, STE K, SAN RAFAEL, CA 94901. This business is being conducted by A CORPORATION. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on NOVEMBER 16, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 21, 28, December 5, 12 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT窶認ile No: 2018145721. The following individual(s) are doing business: IVANA VANOVA BOOKKEEPING & CONSULTING, 100 TIBURON BLVD., SUITE 220, MILL VALLEY, CA 94941: IVANA VANOVA,

124 HILL PATH, CORTE MADERA, CA 94925. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on NOVEMBER 13, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 28, and December 5, 12, 19 of 2018) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT窶認ile No: 2018145752. The following individual(s) are doing business: ONSITE ASSETS, 30 ASH AVENUE, CORTE MADERA, CA 94925: LAURENCE MACKLER, 30 ASH AVENUE, CORTE MADERA, CA 94925. This business is being conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL. Registrant will begin transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed herein. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Marin County on NOVEMBER 16, 2018. (Publication Dates: November 28, and December 5, 12, 19 of 2018) OTHER NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: CIV 1803890 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF MARIN TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS 1. Petitioner (name of each): MARY ANN GRILLER, has filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: MARY ANN GRILLER to Proposed Name: MARY ANN SCIALLO GRILLER 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. if no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without

a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING a. Date: 1/4/2019, Time: 9:00am, Dept: B. The address of the court is same as noted above; 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. 3.a. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the Pacific Sun, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin. DATED: OCT 30, 2018 Roy O. Chernus Judge of the Superior Court JAMES M. KIM Court Executive Officer MARIN COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT By E. CHAIS, Deputy (November 14, 21, 28 and December 5 of 2018) ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: CIV 1803837 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF MARIN TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS 1. Petitioner (name of each): Carolyn Elizabeth Peyser, has filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name: Carolyn Elizabeth Peyser to Proposed Name: Saskia Anand Abheeti 2. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. if no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING a. Date: 12/13/2018, Time: 9:00am, Dept: B, Room: . The address of the court is same as noted above; 3501 Civic Center Drive, San Rafael, CA 94903. 3.a. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the Pacific Sun, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in the county of Marin.

DATED: OCT 25, 2018 PAUL M. HAAKENSON Judge of the Superior Court James M Kim Court Executive Officer MARIN COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT By E. Chais, Deputy (November 14, 21, 28 and December 5 of 2018) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RANDALL GREGORY TOM also known as RANDALL G. TOM NO.: PR 1800372 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: RANDALL GREGORY TOM also known as RANDALL G. TOM A Petition for~Probate~has been filed by: WALTER TOM in the Superior Court of California, County of Marin. The Petition for~Probate~requests that: WALTER TOM be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: 12/17/2018, Time: 9:00AM, Dept.: J, Room: Address of court: 3501 Civic Center Drive, PO Box 4988, San Rafael, CA 94913-4988. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court

within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California~Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California~Probate~Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in~Probate~Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: ROBERT I. SIMON, 45 BELDEN PLACE, 2ND FLOOR SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94104 (415) 434-3608 FILED: NOV 6, 2018 James M. Kim Court Executive Officer MARIN COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT By: E. CHAIS (November 14, 21, 28 2018) NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN THOMAS FRIGAARD CASE NO.: PR 1804190 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: John Frigaard, John, T. Frigaard, John Thomas Frigaard A Petition for~Probate~has been filed by: Ellen Goldstein in the Superior Court of California, County of Marin. The Petition for~Probate~requests that: Ellen Goldstein be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless

they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: 12/31/2018, Time: 9:00AM, Dept.: J, Address of court: 3501 Civic Center Drive, PO Box 4988, San Rafael, CA 94913-4988. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California~Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California~Probate~Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in~Probate~Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Peter J. Bassing, 700 Larkspur Landing Circle, Ste. 199, Larkspur, CA 94939-1754 (415) 2589987 FILED: NOV 20, 2018 James M. Kim Court Executive Officer MARIN COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT By: E. CHAIS (November 28, December 5, 12 2018)


By Amy Alkon

Q:

I’m a recovering addict, five years sober. My ex-boyfriend was a “normie” (12-step slang for someone who hasn’t had addiction issues), and there were definitely things he just didn’t get. Do I need to date another recovering addict to feel understood? I’ve done that before, and I really don’t like it. It’s like living in a recovery bubble 24/7.—Sober

A:

A person who doesn’t have a history of addiction can understand the need to take the edge off. They’ll even admit to doing it themselves—with a cup of chamomile tea. Though “normies” tend to view addicts as lazy, an addict’s shame sometimes comes out of typically impressive qualities—like creativity and industriousness—being applied to getting loaded. Take author and former comedian Amy Dresner. In her addiction memoir, My Fair Junkie, she writes about suffering a grand mal seizure while shooting cocaine. Realizing that she could’ve cracked her head open, she had an epiphany—not to stop shooting coke, but to strap on a bike helmet before doing it. As shocking as this would be to most normie men, there are those who could still be a good partner to someone in recovery—if they’re willing to put some work into empathizing. However, it turns out there are different kinds of empathy. In short, “I feel ya” empathy is different from “I understand you” empathy. “I feel ya” is dumb empathy, the kind that just pops up automatically. Researchers call this auto-empathy “affective empathy,” because “affect” is researcher-speak for the observable expression of emotion. Affective empathy involves “emotional contagion,” in which you “catch” and then automatically experience somebody’s emotion to some degree. “I understand you” empathy, on the other hand, is “cognitive empathy,” a psychological skill that psychologists call “perspective-taking.” It involves a conscious mental effort to put yourself in another person’s shoes—to understand another’s point of view, motivations and/or emotions. Research by business school professor Cynthia Wang and her colleagues finds that an ability for perspective-taking correlates with reduced prejudice and stronger social bonds. This suggests that a man who engages in it might be more likely to see you as, well . . . rehabulous—sober and fabulous—a person who overcame her addiction issues instead of a bunch of addiction issues with a person attached. Finally, because you’ve probably done serious soul-searching and character correction in getting and staying sober, a man who’s a good match for you is one who’s taken some hard looks at himself and worked to remodel where necessary. Ideally, he’ll help you feel comfortable opening up to him by being open about his own current and former shortcomings. (Try not to laugh when he reveals deeply shameful lapses—like once stresseating five cookies at a party.)

Q:

In a documentary on Lady Gaga, she talked about how whenever she reached a new pinnacle of success, her boyfriend or fiancé left her. It happened three times. My most recent boyfriend couldn’t handle it when I started to become successful. Are my options to be successful and alone or unsuccessful and loved? How do I find someone who won’t feel threatened?—Disturbed

A:

Wave hello to “precarious manhood,” a term coined by psychologists Jennifer Bosson and Joseph Vandello for how a man’s social status must be continually earned and “can be lost relatively easily” through public failures and the exposure of his shortcomings. We rack up our social standing in comparison with others. So, not surprisingly, Bosson and Vandello write that “feelings of masculinity can be undone” by “being outperformed by a woman.” The reality is, the world is not our dating oyster. (Atheists have to take a pass on the hot churchgoers. The teetotalers go poorly with the “social crack smokers.”) Accept that success narrows your options, and concentrate on meeting men in places the honchos (or at least the highly successful ones) hang out. (Price points—like costly admission to a charity event—are one way to weed out many of those of middling achievement.) Narrowing the field this way should make you less likely to hear dismaying parting words from a man—those that basically translate to “I have mad respect for your success. My penis, unfortunately, has some ambivalence.“ Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon at 171 Pier Ave. #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or email adviceamy@aol.com. @amyalkon on Twitter. Weekly radio show, blogtalkradio.com/amyalkon

Astrology

For the week of November 28

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Every year the bird

known as the Arctic tern experiences two summers and enjoys more daylight than any other animal. That’s because it regularly makes a long-distance journey from the Arctic to the Antarctic and back again. Let’s designate this hardy traveler as your inspirational creature for the next 10 months. May it help animate you to experiment with brave jaunts that broaden and deepen your views of the world. I don’t necessarily mean you should literally do the equivalent of circumnavigating the planet. Your expansive adventures might take place mostly in inner realms or closer to home.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20) When the

American Civil War began in 1861, the United States fractured. Four years later, the union was technically restored when the Northern states defeated the Southern states. At that time, African-American slavery became illegal everywhere for the first time since the country’s birth decades earlier. But there was a catch. The Southern states soon enacted laws that mandated racial segregation and ensured that African Americans continued to suffer systematic disadvantages. Is there a comparable issue in your personal life? Did you at sometime in the past try to fix an untenable situation only to have it sneak back in a less severe but still debilitating form? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to finish the reforms; to enforce a thorough and permanent correction.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Does an elusive giant creature with a long neck inhabit the waters of Loch Ness in northern Scotland? Alleged sightings have been reported since 1933. Most scientists dismiss the possibility that “Nessie” actually exists, but there are photos, films and videos that provide tantalizing evidence. A government-funded Scottish organization has prepared contingency plans just in case the beast does make an unambiguous appearance. In that spirit, and in accordance with astrological omens, I recommend that you prepare yourself for the arrival in your life of intriguing anomalies and piquant mysteries. Like Nessie, they’re nothing to worry about, but you’ll be better able to deal gracefully with them if you’re not totally taken by surprise. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Does moss really “eat” rocks, as Cancerian author Elizabeth Gilbert attests in her novel The Signature of All Things? Marine chemist Martin Johnson says yes. Moss really does break down and release elements in solid stone. Gilbert adds, “Given enough time, a colony of moss can turn a cliff into gravel, and turn that gravel into topsoil.” Furthermore, this hardy plant can grow virtually everywhere: in the tropics and frozen wastes, on tree bark and roofing slate, on sloth fur and snail shells. I propose that we make moss your personal symbol of power for now, Cancerian. Be as indomitable, resourceful and resilient as moss. LEO (July 23–August 22) Let’s shout out a big

“THANKS!” and “HALLELUJAH!” to the enzymes in our bodies. These catalytic proteins do an amazing job of converting the food we eat into available energy. Without them, our cells would take forever to turn any particular meal into the power we need to walk, talk and think. I bring this marvel to your attention, Leo, because now is a favorable time to look for and locate metaphorical equivalents of enzymes: influences and resources that will aid and expedite your ability to live the life you want to live.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) “Every dreamer knows that it is entirely possible to be homesick for a place you’ve never been to, perhaps more homesick than for familiar ground,” writes author Judith Thurman. I’m guessing you will experience this feeling in the coming weeks. What does it mean if you do? It may be your deep psyche’s way of nudging you to find an energizing new sanctuary. Or perhaps it means you should search for fresh ways to feel peaceful and well-grounded. Maybe it’s a prod to push you outside your existing comfort zone so you can expand your comfort zone. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Venice,

By Rob Brezsny

Italy, consists of 118 small islands that rise from a shallow lagoon. A network of 443 bridges keeps them all connected. But Venice isn’t the world champion of bridges. The American city of Pittsburgh, Penn., holds that title, with 446. I nominate these two places to be your inspirational symbols in the coming weeks. It’s time for you build new metaphorical bridges and take good care of your existing metaphorical bridges.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) To aid

and support your navigation through this pragmatic phase of your astrological cycle, I have gathered counsel from three productive pragmatists. First is author Helen Keller. She said she wanted to accomplish great and noble things, but her “chief duty” was “to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.” Second, author George Orwell believed that “to see what is in front of one’s nose” requires never-ending diligence. Finally, author Pearl S. Buck testified that she didn’t wait around until she was in the right mood before beginning her work. Instead, she invoked her willpower to summon the necessary motivation.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

Blackjack is a card game popular in gambling casinos. In the eternal struggle to improve the odds of winning big money, some blackjack players work in teams. One teammate secretly counts the cards as they’re dealt and assesses what cards are likely to come up next. Another teammate gets subtle signals from his card-counting buddy and makes the bets. A casino in Windsor, Ontario, pressed charges against one blackjack team, complaining that this tactic was deceptive and dishonest. But the court decided in the team’s favor, ruling that the players weren’t cheating but simply using smart strategy. In the spirit of these blackjack teams, Sagittarius, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you to better your odds in a “game” of your choice by using strategy that is as good as cheating but isn’t actually cheating.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) What has become of the metaphorical seeds you planted around your last birthday? Have your intentions flourished? Have your dreams blossomed? Have your talents matured? Have your innocent questions evolved into more penetrating questions? Be honest and kind as you answer these inquiries. Be thoughtful and big-hearted as you take inventory of your ability to follow through on your promises to yourself. If people are quizzical about how much attention you’re giving yourself during this time of taking stock, inform them that your astrologer has told you that December is Love Yourself Better Month. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) If you want to play the drinking game called Possum, you and your friends climb up into a tree with a case of beer and start drinking. As time goes by, people get so hammered they fall out of the tree. The winner is the last one left in the tree. I hope you won’t engage in this form of recreation anytime soon—nor in any other activity that even vaguely resembles it. The coming weeks should be a time of calling on favors, claiming your rewards, collecting your blessings and graduating to the next level. I trust your policy will be: no trivial pursuits, no wasted efforts, no silly stunts. PISCES (February 19–March 20) In his song

“Happy Talk,” Academy Award-winning lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II offered this advice: “You gotta have a dream. If you don’t have a dream, how you gonna have a dream come true?” Where do you stand in this regard, Pisces? Do you in fact have a vivid, clearly defined dream? And have you developed a strategy for making that dream come true? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to home in on what you really want and hone your scheme for manifesting it. (P.S.: Keep in mind Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s idea: “A goal without a plan is just a wish.”)

Go to realastrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.800.350.7700.

23 PA CI FI C S U N | NOVEM B ER 2 8 - D ECEM B ER 4, 2018 | PACI FI CSUN.CO M

Advice Goddess

FREE WILL


Pacific Sun 1848  

November 28-December 4, 2018

Pacific Sun 1848  

November 28-December 4, 2018