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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | FEBRUARY 20-26, 2019 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 40.42

Aluminum Canvas

North Bay breweries offer eye-popping artwork to drink from p10

CALIFORNIA’S ENERGY FUTURE P6 OSCAR PREDICTIONS P16


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Bohemian 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

News & Features Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 206

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Managing Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 250

Contributors

Michael Barnes, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Julie Cart, Harry Duke, James Knight, Charlene Peters, Tom Tomorrow

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Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano

Cover illustration by Josh Staples. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal. NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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SLIPPERY SLOPE Richard von Busack worries that a win for ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ will open the rock-biopic floodgate, p16.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Ramble On Rambling on (“Cleanup Crew,” Feb. 13). Lost my attention so many times I needed a cup of Bad Ass to get through this one.

BILL FUITEN Forestville

Dear Ms. Ravitch An open letter to District Attorney Jill Ravitch:

Myself and many others have been trying to contact you for some time with no response. I have recently been made aware of criminal animal cruelty taking place in multiple farms across this county. The video footage and photographs I have seen from these farms are truly disturbing, including baby chicks who are so sick and injured they cannot stand to reach food and water, hens who are trapped in wire cages for their entire lives, and birds who are cannibalizing each other due to stress and confinement. In addition to being morally appalling, these conditions violate

THIS MODERN WORLD

the basic animal-welfare provisions set out in California Penal Code 597. It is my understanding that the Sonoma County District Attorney’s Office takes issues of animal abuse very seriously. For this reason, I am very surprised and concerned that your office has decided to pursue charges against the whistleblowers who have uncovered this abuse and who attempted to help these animals, instead of the farms engaged in this criminal activity. From speaking to the individuals who are now facing felony charges in this case, I learned that they contacted you,

By Tom Tomorrow

the Sheriff’s Office and Animal Control multiple times asking you to investigate the situation prior to the actions that led to their arrests. Unfortunately, nothing was done to help these animals. This is not what I have come to expect from elected officials in Sonoma County. I am interested in hearing your perspective on this case and how we can make Sonoma County a place where animals are treated with respect. Would you be willing to sit down with me and several other concerned individuals to have a conversation about these issues? Sonoma County has a long history of protecting the abused and disenfranchised. We can do better than this.

DOUG MOELLER

Santa Rosa

Your Utility Dollars at Work The trouble call had come in; it was for a gas odor. I was with “B” on a job with PG&E in the hills above Novato. We had arrived early, did our set up (flags, cones) and waited. The on-the-job time was set for 8am. Sometime later (9am-ish), PG&E rolls onto the site with a large utility vehicle and a trailer carrying a backhoe. The PG&E guy gets out and gives our set up the once-over. “OK,” he says. He confers with his two associates, reviews the work order and then goes and gets coffee. PG&E drills the first hole for the gas sniffer: “F––k!” More discussion among the work crew. The second, third, fourth and fifth holes are drilled and with the same result; the expletive gets louder and more harsh. Finally, a resident in the corner house comes out. She approaches me and asks if she should call someone, because she thinks there will be a medical emergency soon. I tell her to go ahead. This is the PG&E I know.

GARY SCIFORD

Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


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A new report published by Jobs with Justice, “The State of Working Sonoma County 2018,” documents that: • Nearly one in three Sonoma County residents live in families receiving annual incomes of less than 200 percent of the federal poverty line, or about $50,200 for a family of four. • One in five county residents live in working-poor families earning less than 200 percent of the federal poverty line with at least one member reporting income from work. • Women, Latinos and other people of color experience the highest rates of poverty and disproportionately comprise the working poor. • A living or self-sufficiency wage for Sonoma County in 2017 was $23 an hour, but more than one-half of the new jobs created since 2014 pay less than a livable wage. • Nearly one in two Sonoma County renter households are rentburdened and pay more than 30 percent of their gross monthly income for rent; one quarter are severely rent-burdened and pay more than 50 percent for rent. • Between 2000 and 2016, median rents increased by 25 percent in the county while median renter incomes rose by only 9 percent. North Bay Jobs with Justice and the Alliance for a Just Recovery have proposed several policy initiatives to address structural inequality and the housing crisis including $15 citywide minimum wage by 2020 (phasing in three years faster than the state $15 minimum) to lift the wage floor; rent control and just cause eviction and other protections for tenants; and raising the real estate transfer tax on homes selling for more than $1.5 million to fund affordable housing. To download the report please go to northbayjobswithjustice.org

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Paper THE

THAT WAS THEN A modernized California power grid could make wildfires sparked by power lines a thing of the past.

Powered Up

California moves to upgrade aging grid system to meet voracious demand for the juice BY JULIE CART | CalMatters

A

n unusual experiment began a few years ago in suburban Irvine, when rows of homes, inhabited by UC Irvine faculty and staff, afforded a high-tech peephole from which to observe how humans interact with electricity. The houses were outfitted with

tools for use with the advanced electricity system glowing on California’s horizon, prepping residents for a near future when things worth having will carry the prefix “smart”—as in smart appliances installed in smart homes attached to the smart power grid. The complex system that powers the world’s fifth-largest economy is at a turning point. Utility executives, policymakers and regulators are peering into a

future where California has shed fossil fuels and is fully buzzing with electricity. Before the state completes its shift to a modern, safe, sustainable energy grid, it has to decide precisely how that should be accomplished. Among the key issues: • The grid is aging, large pieces of it having been installed to serve a state with a few million people, not today’s 40 million. Some of the system’s vulnerabilities—even its lethality—have been laid bare

by wildfires, when power was interrupted by flying tree limbs and communities were devastated by blazes sparked by broken equipment. • The 100-year-old system in which power flows one way, from mega-utilities to their millions of customers, is coming apart. Power now runs into and out of the grid from multiple sources, all the time. • By law, the state must obtain all of its power by 2045 from clean sources, including sun and wind, which are cheaper than ever but unpredictable and difficult to fully harness. For example, more solar power may be generated in the middle of the day than the grid demands. That abundance presents a technology problem: how to store excess energy until needed. • The “internet of things”— devices that connect us to each other and the grid—offers convenience but also requires users to relinquish some degree of privacy. Such modernization requires a better understanding of what we need from the grid, and what the grid requires from us. Enter demonstration projects like the five-year experiment at UC Irvine—sponsored by the university, the Southern California Edison power company and the federal Department of Energy—sort of a realtime Truman Show in which homeowners were the subjects. Their households received smart appliances, LED lighting, water heaters, insulation, air conditioning, solar panels and batteries, even electric cars and charging stations. The trade-off for residents was that their every decision was remotely monitored: which lights were flicked on and when; which families used air conditioning or hot water more than others; which wall sockets residents used. Gene Tsudik, a UC Irvine professor and one of the participants, is a computer scientist specializing in privacy and security. His professional antennae were fired up when teams of installers left behind


uncertainty but won’t impact the rates of local CCA participants, say officials at the local utilities. In a recent interview, as PG&E was about to file for bankruptcy protection, MCE chairman and chief executive Dawn Weisz told the Bohemian that “we partner with PG&E and are certainly monitoring the situation, and beyond that we don’t anticipate there being any impacts to our customers,” as she noted that the utility was sitting on about $50 million in reserves intended to absorb any rate fluctuations— while also serving to bolster the utilities’ credit rating. Sonoma Clean Power is carrying about $40 million in reserves, says SCP spokesperson Kate Kelly. These local power hubs must report their activities to the state Energy Commission and the Public Utilities Commission, in much the way legacy utilities do. The companies are not currently subject to all of the same rules that govern the big utilities across a web of complex issues, including compliance with California’s clean-energy goals, but the state is in the process of formalizing additional regulations. California’s grid operator and its cadre of electrical engineers are concerned that runaway innovation could outstrip oversight and create precisely what the grid, even the modern grid, can’t abide: imbalance. “Changes are happening rapidly and we’re trying to keep up with that,” says Mark Rothleder, a vice president at the California Independent System Operator, which manages the state’s grid. “There will be new players, new resources, new opportunities,” he says. “We have to be open to innovation and we have to ensure our technology that manages the grid can enable those resources. We have to pay attention.” Source: CalMatters. CalMatters is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media venture explaining California policies and politics. This article was prepared in partnership with the ‘Sacramento Bee.’ Tom Gogola contributed reporting.

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clicking, ticking, blinking monitors that provided his family’s interface with the grid. “I was very well aware that even simple devices that transmit wirelessly can triangulate the movement of people in the house,” says Tsudik. One takeaway for Scott Samuelsen, director of UCI’s Advanced Power and Energy Program, which ran the project, is that while the adoption of smart-home devices is growing fast, regulations and consumer protections that should accompany them are not keeping pace. “The market is out of control with respect to regulation [of devices],” Samuelsen says. “We are in a free-for-all.” Some aspects of grid modernization are indeed under way. Regulators have ordered power companies to make their equipment safer, particularly to withstand—and not cause— wildfires. Much of the equipment we can now see will either be buried safely underground or armored heavily to protect it from the elements. But other aspects—policies, regulations, new business models—could require another decade to resolve. Some policymakers envision a centrally managed Western grid serving everyone from the Rocky Mountains to the Pacific, not ruled over by California alone. Others see more and more micro-grids forming, ranging from a family with solar panels to hospitals, malls and small counties taking care of their own electricity needs. The rise of smaller, local alternatives to the big utilities, such as Marin Clean Energy and Sonoma Clean Power, is known as community choice aggregation (CCA); the movement sparked in the Bay Area and has spread across the state. Small aggregators now have 2.5 million customer accounts. Marin Clean Energy (MCE) and Sonoma Clean Power (SCP) have both brought new customers to their utilities, and amassed significant reserves in recent years in order to offset any potential rate hikes. The PG&E bankruptcy has led to some


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 20 -26, 20 19 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Dining OH LA LA Lucky Napa County’s got an oasis of Continental Europe in Yountville.

Soup’s On!

You can try, but you won’t be able to resist Bistro Jeanty’s signature tomato soup BY CHARLENE PETERS

L

ocated in the heart of Napa Valley, Yountville offers a cozy, walkable atmosphere. Its streets are lined with luxury hotels and famed neighborhood restaurants such as chef Thomas Keller’s French Laundry and celebrity chef Michael Chiarello’s Bottega, to name a few.

But one of the most approachable eateries within the 1.5-square miles of Yountville is a longtime favorite of locals and visitors alike, Bistro Jeanty. Phillipe Jeanty arrived in Yountville in 1977 from Epernay, in the Champagne region of France, with the sole purpose of opening a restaurant on the property of Domaine Chandon winery. He left the winery restaurant and opened Bistro

Jeanty in 1998; his vision was to create a menu that speaks to comfort food and incorporates French cuisine. In fact, one of the menu’s mainstays is an elegant presentation of tomato soup with a puffed pastry cover. Oh la la. On a busy Saturday during lunchtime, I call to see about a last-minute reservation. The host at Bistro Jeanty proves accommodating, and five minutes following my phone call, we

arrive, are seated and begin to peruse the menu and specials presented on a chalkboard at our table. A glass of Cabernet Sauvignon is ordered for my friend, while I decide to stick with sparkling water. We both agree the cheese plate would be nice, so we order one with my favorite French cheese, an Époisses de Bourgogne, known for its rind soaked in brandy ($12.50). The cheese plate comes with slices of pear and candied walnuts. The cheese, as well as the pear slices, should have been served room temperature, but instead are chilled and difficult to spread on the large crackers that come with the plate. We have an easier time spreading the cheese on slices of baguette—if only the bread basket had arrived before we devoured most of the cheese! It’s time to decide on our lunch course, but I knew all along I’d order a bowl of tomato soup ($13). What I hadn’t planned to order? The beet salad with marché greens topped with citrus vinaigrette ($13.50), a combination I deemed the perfect lunch on a rainy winter’s day. My dining companion has the vegetarian bourguignon special ($23) on her radar, made with portabella mushrooms instead of beef, which, to her delight, is scrumptious. But she also adds an order of tomato soup after mine arrives. As my companion now knows, among the list of menu selections at Bistro Jeanty that cater to foodies, the signature tomato soup is irresistible, especially once one has seen the piping hot steam rise from the bowl and let the puffed pastry soak in the soup before scooping up the saturation in all its tomato goodness. My friend doesn’t regret ordering the soup, of course, and takes home the remainder of her main course. I eat every last bunch of marché and piece of yellow beet—and leave no trace of tomato soup or puffed pastry behind. Bistro Jeanty, 6510 Washington St., Yountville. 707.944.01034. bistrojeanty.com.


Street Value Eighth Street Wineries throw a block party BY JAMES KNIGHT

A

fter an epic journey, Enkidu has returned to the wilderness— returned to the comparative wilderness of the Eighth Street warehouse district south of the town of Sonoma, that is. Winemaker and founder Phillip Staehle named Enkidu Wines after a semi-domesticated demigod who plays a supporting role in the Epic of Gilgamesh, the original bromance of ancient Babylonia. While the tasting room has been somewhat peripatetic (English majors will be quick to note that’s not, like, a sad thing) over the past decade or so, popping up around Sonoma Valley, production has always been sensibly situated in

Eighth Street Wineries Annual Open House, Saturday, Feb. 23, noon-4pm. Tickets, $45 advance; $50 door; $10 designated driver. $10 raffle tickets benefit La Luz Center in Sonoma. eighthstreetwineries.com.

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this wine-soaked industrial park. And to the classics majors: no, Enkidu’s recent retreat from pricey real estate on the Sonoma Plaza is not the sad part of the story, like its namesake’s exile to the underworld: Enkidu is participating in the Eighth Street Wineries Association’s annual tasting this Saturday, Feb. 23, with neighbors MacLaren, Obsidian, Stone Edge Farm, Talisman, Tin Barn, Ty Caton and William Knuttel, some of which are only open to the public for special events. Enkidu’s signature wine is a Rhône-styled red blend of Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre called Humbaba (after a beast that attempted to guard the cedar forest from Enkidu and his buddy Gilgamesh, who sometimes behaved badly), and it’s often sold out, but the new 2017 Humbaba ($28) premieres at the tasting, along with newly released 2016 Bedrock Vineyard Zinfandel ($38). The 2017 Sonoma County Sauvignon Blanc ($22), though no longer sourced from Kick Ranch, maintains a tropical yet lean and zesty style. You want Cab, try the 2016 High Mayacamas Cabernet Sauvignon ($35). From all highelevation vineyards, this savory, balanced wine from the new school of old-school California Cab sports enough of a juicy cassis core to win over a Cab-jaded palate, too. There’ll be a special event discount on top of these already fair prices, and that’s not to mention Enkidu’s “E” label wines, which won’t be poured on Saturday, but offer Sonoma County Pinot and old vine Zin for $25. The event works like this: choose which winery you want to check in to (note that Enkidu is across the street from the other wineries), then taste all the wines you want, paired with small bites at each winery, from their chef or local catering favorites like Girl & the Fig—at $45 for lunch and a weekend’s worth of winetasting, a pretty civilized value.


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Drinkable Art North Bay breweries are putting the ‘can’ back in ‘canvas’ BY MICHAEL BARNES

U

sed to be that what’s on the inside is what counted, but in a rapidly changing craft-beer landscape overflowing with a variety of hoppy concoctions, it now seems that what’s on the outside is what matters most. Store shelves are no longer a place to merely display product; they’ve become de-facto art installations, and the products are no longer merely alcoholic beverages; they’ve become works of art. For modern-day microbrew artists, the canvas of choice: a can.

Chicken Nuggets The artist handling the graphic design work for HenHouse Brewing Company is the “oneman art department” of Josh Staples, who worked with the

owners at a warehouse facility prior to the brewery’s taproom opening in 2016. Unlike other local breweries, HenHouse has a particularly noticeable mascot taking center stage on its cans: the hen. “Animal logos are iconic,”

says Staples, “and people can relate to that and the love of nature.” HenHouse’s founding members hold a strong connection to chickens, hailing from Petaluma. Staples grew up on a farm and chose a “Petalumastyle hen” as inspiration for the HenHouse mascot. “I had a few renditions of the hen, and it went from being ornate to a little more realistic,” he says. “I tried using a wood-cut print at first, then combined hand-drawn elements. You can’t have a brand called HenHouse and not have a hen. We want people to know it’s a

HenHouse beer when they see it.” HenHouse’s recognizable lineup of beers catapulted the brewery into something of a ruler of the roost for the North Bay craft-beer scene. The brewery developed a hardcore following of hop-heads, eagerly anticipating releases of their “conspiracy theory” line of India pale ales, like the Chemtrails IPA, throughout the year. As the brewery’s tap list has expanded, so have the designs. The hen has found herself standing atop a mound of cash outside a bank vault for the Inside Job IPA, directing airplanes as an


Flying the Coop

While there aren’t binders full of hand-drawn designs at Cooperage Brewing Company, the taproom features an eclectic array of artwork from local artists on its walls to accompany the eclectic spectrum of suds on tap. The hop-forward hub serves up its flavorful style in spades with a frequently rotating list of IPAs. Owner and head brewer Tyler Smith estimates that Cooperage has brewed 140 different beers

in just three-and-a-half years, deviating from the brewery’s initial intentions to focus on barrel-aged, sour beers. Bay Area-themed ales such as Steph Curty and McCurty Cove, to name a few, are reaching cultlike status among a dedicated fan base of North Bay beer buffs. Cooperage recently unveiled its inaugural beers to go in the can: fan-favorite Kegslayer IPA and the Smeltron 3030 DIPA. Local designer and HenHenouse brewery shift supervisor Nicky London-Sorgman was tapped for the designs. “We can literally go anywhere with these cans because of their crazy beer names,” London-Sorgman says. “Sometimes I have to ask what the names of the beers mean so I get the inside joke.” The Kegslayer IPA design of a heavy metal heroine, slaying her way through a mound of Cooperage kegs with a sword, was created as a surprise tribute to one of the brewery's original tasting rooms members, Rachael Ingram. The design, created by an artist who designs for Cellarmaker Brewing in San Francisco, was initially intended for T-shirts; however, the beer and corresponding shirt’s popularity made it an easy choice to can. With the existing image in place, London-Sorgman provided the final touches, adding a few more destroyed kegs and a postapocalyptic wasteland to the backdrop. For the Smeltron 3030 can, a riff off Oakland-based rapper Del the Funky Homosapien’s collaboration with S.F.-born

producer Dan the Automator, London-Sorgman decided to take a giant leap in the future by visiting the past. “I knew I wanted to do a space scene, so I dove into the world of imagery with Deltron. They have a ’50s noir, futuristic-space thing going on, and that’s what I used as a reference. Then I came up with the idea of having hops as aliens attacking people, like Mars Attacks meets The Simpsons aliens,” he says. The resulting image is a whimsically wonderful, pulp-art space odyssey— which could also serve as tasting notes to describe a few of Cooperage’s beers. “Tyler [Cooperage owner and head brewer] is the easiest client I've worked with; he's so laid back and chill. I have so much freedom with him. He’s willing to make a constant variety of beers, and it’s translated into the product and the art,” LondonSorgman says. “We talked about keeping the cans standardized and simplistic, but I told them we shouldn’t because they have such unique beer names.”

Brotherly Love

Another Sonoma County standout garnering well-deserved attention for its inspired beer names is Windsor’s Barrel Brothers Brewing. The brewery is a family affair, founded by brothers-in-law and a father-in-law in 2015. The brewery started canning in June 2016, and now produces some of the most inventive labeling and flavors on the market. Barrel

Brothers works with a friend in Phoenix to create all of its labels, although brewmaster Wesley Deal admits that his brother-inlaw, Daniel, deserves more credit than he does in visualizing and developing the design process. “Craft beer is like skateboarding was—a little alternative that pushes the boundaries as far as you can get away with,” Deal says. Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but not so much in the corporate world; Barrel Brothers received multiple cease and desist notices for a few of its designs. The brewery’s take on a 40-ounce malt liquor bottle reimagined as a WD-40 can, and its tongue-in-cheek usage of a certain basketball team’s logo raised a few eyebrows. “The WD-40 concept came together over a couple of beers and throwing stupid names out there. We ended up going with my initials,” Deal says. “The beer is hand-labeled, hand-wrapped, and we even put the red straws on there by hand,” Deal continues. “Because of how hands-on it was, we weren’t planning to produce a high amount of it, but we had people flying in from around the country to add it to their 40 collections. I didn’t know people had 40 collections. “Eventually, we had to stop producing it. WD-40 sent us a funny cease and desist letter. We also got a letter from the NBA on our Taking My Talents to New England Hazy IPA label.” One Hazy IPA label that’s safe for now is State Sponsored Juicing. Deal says several concepts came together when creating the design. “The Russian Olympic ban due to juicing was a current event [at the time] that many people were aware of,” he says. “The beer itself has the duality of being a juicy IPA, but also one that’s on PEDs because it’s so intense. The hazy IPA style is also exploding in a way that the style itself is practically ‘statesponsored.’” The brewmaster’s favorite design thus far is their take on a Pilsner-style beer, aptly named, Dad Pants. Deal points ) 12

11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 20 -26, 2019 | BOH E MI A N.COM

air traffic controller on the Denver Airport IPA, and going where no chicken has gone before, standing on the lunar surface in the Hollow Moon IPA. “As a kid who grew up interested in conspiracies, it’s fun to play with them in my art now,” Staples says. “But it’s also tricky because you want to make it light and relatable, and when putting the hen in there, I try to make her safe. “In the beginning,” he adds, “she was stoic and always on her own, but when we started putting her in outer space and driving tractors, I wanted to make sure she still looked dignified.” Staples’ favorite design outside of the conspiracy theory line is a brut IPA called Joy Delivery System. The design is a fantasia of frightful fun, featuring a hopjuggling, unicycle-riding beer can, a giant clown face, hot-air balloons and, of course, rainbows. The Joy Delivery System artwork serves as a delightful tapestry of amusement, conveying the euphoric sensation one might feel after imbibing the brut IPA. “It’s really colorful and wacky, and reminded me of an ’80s cartoon puzzle. We actually ended up releasing a jigsaw puzzle based off that label,” he says. Although Staples and HenHouse continue to push the look of their cans to new frontiers, Staples prefers to rely upon an old-school aesthetic. “The creativity and the hand-drawn elements are most important to me,” he says. “I still draw on paper. We have several binders full of hand-drawn designs at the brewery.”


Drinkable Art ( 11

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12

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to the label’s vintage jean-theme, complete with a braided belt looping across the top of the can as playing on the notion that the Pilsner style has “traditionally been your dad’s beer.” The design is equal parts simplicity and boldness, a proper representation of the liquids commonly found inside the brewery’s cans. But the modern craft-beer world sure isn’t your dad’s frothy pint from yesteryear. “Beer is around 5,000 years old, but how it’s being sold now is so new and changing so fast. Social media is accelerating that. Beer buyers started ordering our beer through social media because of how many posts are popping up of our beers.” This developing trend in the beer market prompted Barrel Brothers to alter its approach when whipping up new brews. “We started with how the beer would taste, then we’d think about how the label would look. Now we start with the label first,” Deal says. “Everyone wants to try a new beer. They almost don’t want to drink the same beer twice anymore. Consumers want something they can say they found first.” Although the brewery benefits from a strong social media presence through creative labeling, coupled with a consumer base’s seemingly unquenchable thirst for more, Deal acknowledges the importance of the product itself. “You have to make a good beer, first and foremost, to stay in the business,” he says. “The modern craft-beer consumer can taste the difference between good and bad, fresh and not fresh.”

Simplicity Sells Despite the staggering number of craft breweries reappropriating, reimagining and remixing the way beer is brewed and viewed, there remains a small contingent of microbreweries opting for a “less is more,” scaled-down approach. Santa Rosa’s Moonlight Brewing is renowned for crafting

classic beer styles for over 20 years, and Fogbelt Brewing Company has developed a unique, albeit understated, look behind its brand of brews since opening in 2013. Fogbelt’s theme of a treelined setting under a dense layer of fog is the staple imagery for many of its flagship beers, the majority of which happen to be named after coastal redwood trees found only in the fog belt. The brewery rarely strays away from this region-centric marketing, a concept that took root from the beginning, says Fogbelt’s principal graphic designer Paul Hawley.

‘It’s almost an arms race to outdo one another with the hippest and coolest label art.’ “The theme comes from our personal affinity with the area,” he says. “Besides, what’s better than hiking in the redwoods and enjoying a nice IPA afterward?” Hawley comes from a wine background, designing labels and serving as general manager for his family’s winery, Hawley Winery in Healdsburg. “I wanted a label that looked somewhat high-end and got away from the loud and cartoony stuff,” he says. “At Fogbelt, we want the label to show that we take the beer seriously and that we aren’t going to make fun of what’s inside.” What’s inside is a refreshing elixir as crisp and cool as any coastal morning fog. For Hawley, the challenge is developing fresh ideas for the label art but keeping it consistent with the brand. “If we suddenly released a label that had android-


A ‘Can-Do’ Attitude As Sonoma County’s craft-beer landscape continues to evolve and recreate itself with ever-changing brands and styles, one thing appears unanimous among those in the North Bay craft-beer scene: cans and the art wrapped around them aren’t going away anytime soon. The 16-ounce, four-pack of cans has established itself as the standard format of packaging for

most in the industry. “Breweries have to buy in bulk, so more breweries are going to cans, and it’s easier now to go with labels,” Barrel Brothers’ Deal says. “Printing companies are now offering more product options for labels.” Cooperage’s Smith believes the need to stand out and further enhance brand recognition will only increase in the immediate future. However, he feels this approach mainly applies to breweries looking to dominate certain retail spaces. “When it comes to over-the-top designs, do you need it? No. If it’s for the grocery store, it should stand out,” he says. “But the brewers who’d rather sell their beer at taprooms and bottle shops are more about the freedom of expression.” It’s this freedom of expression that London-Sorgman feels separates the craft-beer can from the corporate behemoths. “Labels help put a face to the personality of the brewers who make the beer,” he says. “The people at Cooperage like to have fun, and it shows in their designs.” As much as London-Sorgman appreciates the creativity and independence found in the art of the craft-beer world, he also understands how such a bold style of branding can leave a bad taste in some consumers’ mouths. “People could look at the labels and say we’re trying too hard— ‘Just be a beer, be a silver can.’ And that’s totally OK. I get that,” he says. “But if you don’t like the labeling, you don't have to buy it. If I can get someone who doesn't drink beer to stop and look at the can, then I’ve done my job.” Fogbelt’s Hawley likens the art of the can to a cultural touchstone of the past. “The craft-beer can is like the record album; it’s an opportunity to show the world the culture and personality of your company,” he says. HenHouse’s Staples, who says the most he’s spent on a single beer was $20, primarily because of the artwork, shares in Hawley’s sentiments. “It’s like any art form,” he says. “There’s going to be something different that will appeal to everyone.”

13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 20 -26, 2019 | BOH E MI A N.COM

armadillos, people might be like, ‘What the hell is going on at Fogbelt?’” he says. Android-armadillos notwithstanding, Fogbelt has branched out on occasion with imagery outside of the forest. Fogbelt’s Wet Hop series of cans featuring a head full of hops is a label Hawley designed based on a Soviet, anti-alcohol propaganda poster. Hawley removed the original illustration’s inclusion of hawks inside an empty mind in favor of hops. “I think reappropriating images is more out of necessity. We don't have a huge staff of graphic designers. We have to work with what we’ve got,” he says. However, Hawley doesn’t consider himself a graphic designer, “just a guy who taught himself Adobe and likes to tinker around.” Hawleys says that Fogbelt plans on expanding its portfolio of label art by recruiting local artists to design original labels in the future. An original design of note for Fogbelt from a packaging standpoint is its recently released Godwood Triple IPA. The label of the 12-ounce can displays a giant redwood ascending up the side, and when one Godwood can is stacked atop another, it displays the full-sized image of the tree. “I was just playing around with the format and seeing how I could turn it into more of a canvas,” Hawley says. “We’ve seen the one-upmanship of hopping rates, ABV, and other ingredients, and now what’s left is the packaging— it’s almost an arms race to outdo one another with the hippest and coolest label art.”


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 20 -26, 20 19 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Crush CULTURE

THE WEEK’S EVENTS: A SELECTIVE GUIDE SONOMA

Inspiring Preview

Next month, the Sonoma International Film Festival returns for its 22nd year of showcasing renowned cinema, cuisine and wines. This week, SIFF fans can get an early introduction to the festivities with a screening of the uplifting documentary ‘Bethany Hamilton: Unstoppable,’ about the surfer who overcame a shark attack. The film’s directors will be in attendance for a discussion after the screening, and SIFF is offering a pre-screening wine reception and a chance to join the filmmakers for a limited-seating dinner. Thursday, Feb. 21, at Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St. E., Sonoma. Dinner at 5:30pm; doors at 6:30pm. $20; dinner included, $95. sonomafilmfest.org.

S A N TA R O S A

Local Color

Every year since 1992, tattooing’s biggest stars have gathered for the annual Santa Rosa Tattoos & Blues event. That streak was almost broken last year, until Santa Rosa natives Daniel Dorsett of Dorsett Speed Shop and Daat Kraus of Santa Rosa Tattoo stepped in to save the show, which returns this weekend for its 28th year. Get inked and view work from nationally recognized body artists, enjoy the Saturday afternoon classic car show and rock out to bands like the Aces and Plan 9. Friday to Sunday, Feb. 22–24, at the Flamingo Conference Resort & Spa Hotel, 2777 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. santarosatattoosandblues.com.

C O TAT I

Legends of Love

Last fall, North Bay audiences had a chance to see local music icon Holly Near in a new light when the feature-length documentary Holly Near: Singing for Our Lives premiered at the Mill Valley Film Festival. Near is offering another new musical endeavor when she returns to the stage for a new performance, “Our Love Is Here to Stay,” in which she departs from her original material to present an evening of popular love songs, standards and show tunes. Performing alongside musical friends like Jan Martinelli, Near shows some love on Friday, Feb. 22, at Ner Shalom, 85 La Plaza, Cotati. 7pm. $30–$40. 707.664.8622.

ST HELENA

Pop Out

Ryan Pfluger

Metal artist David Buckingham often travels to the middle of nowhere to find his art supplies, scouring remote desert towns for scrap metal that he revives into bright and bold pop-art with an attitude. His new solo exhibit, ‘Nobody Likes a Smartass,’ shows off his latest batch of welded, rainbow-colored assemblage pieces that scream out slogans like “Born to Be Wild” with an energy that leaps off the wall. The exhibit opens with a reception featuring the artist and Markham Vineyards wines on hand Saturday, Feb. 23, at Caldwell Snyder Gallery, 1328 Main St., St. Helena. 4pm. Free. 707.200.5050.

—Charlie Swanson

REMEMBER TO ROCK Indie-rock star Sharon Van Etten plays off her new album, ‘Remind Me Tomorrow,’ at Gun Bun Winery in Sonoma on Monday, Feb. 25. See Clubs & Venues, p19.


Kurt Gonsalves

PLAID HANDS The four members of heaven-bound band the Plaids perform one last show in ‘Forever Plaid.’

To Die For

Jukebox musical featuring hits of the ’50s plays in Napa BY HARRY DUKE

M

usical zombies rise from the dead to sing an evening of 1950s pop standards. Let me try that again. On Feb. 4, 1964, the Plaids, an eastern Pennsylvania-based vocal quartet, were headed for a major gig at the Fusel-Lounge at the Harrisburg Airport Hilton when their cherry-red Mercury was broadsided by a bus full of Catholic schoolgirls. The girls, who escaped unscathed, were on their way to see the Beatles on The Ed Sullivan Show. The Plaids went on to that Great Performance Hall in the Sky—or at least the green room of the Great Performance Hall in the Sky. Rather than spend an eternity waiting to “go on,” they make

‘Forever Plaid’ plays through March 3 at the Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. Thursday, 7pm; Friday–Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $30–$40. 707.266.6305. luckypennynapa.com.

15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 20 -26, 2019 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Stage

their way back to earth to give the concert that never was. That is the plot upon which Stuart Ross and James Raitt hang 24 musical standards in their very popular jukebox musical Forever Plaid, running through March 3 at Napa’s Lucky Penny Community Arts Center. Frankie (F. James Raasch), Sparky (Scottie Woodard), Jinx (Michael Scott Wells) and Smudge (David Murphy) were high school friends who dreamed of musical glory. Following the path created by ’50s versions of what we now refer to as “boy bands” (the Four Lads, the Crew-Cuts, etc.), they formed the Plaids and specialized in four-part harmonies. And that’s what you’ll hear over the Michael Ross-directed show’s one hour and 45-minute running time. “Three Coins in the Fountain,” “Sixteen Tons,” “Chain Gang” and “Love Is a Many Splendored Thing” are just some of the 20-plus songs performed by the crisply costumed gents (courtesy Barbara McFadden) with matching choreography by Woodard. Music is nicely performed by a trio consisting of music director Craig Burdette (keyboards), Quentin Cohen (drums) and Alan Parks (bass). The guys are good, with each one getting a solo shot to go along with the group work. Their stock characters (the shy one, the funny one, etc.) banter with each other between numbers and amusingly engage with the audience. The comedic numbers are particularly well done, with the show’s highlight being a three-minute recreation of The Ed Sullivan Show, though it helps to have some familiarity with that show. The same can be said for the music. Yes, it’s a trip down memory lane, but if toe-tapping, handsqueezing and perpetual grinning are any indications, Forever Plaid hits all the right notes with an audience willing to make the trip. Rating (out of 5):

#chooseSSU

Sonoma State Business Degree, now at College of Marin Ready to complete your degree? Learn how a Business Administration degree can work for you. Join us during a live streaming info session—find out more about the program and ask your questions. Info Session - Live Web Stream (Online) Wednesday, February 27 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. RSVP Today!

sonoma.education/rsvp Questions? Contact Amy Unger 707.664.2601 ungera@sonoma.edu


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 20 -26, 20 19 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Film

HOW HARD CAN IT BE? Handing out little gold statues seems to get more

and more difficult every year for the Academy Awards.

Awards Plight

The Oscars shuffle controversies leading up to Hollywood’s biggest night BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

t was a brilliantly idiotic decision on the part of the Academy to edit the technical awards out of the Oscars broadcast, and the board of directors had to backtrack once the film industry set up a righteous squawk about the snub. This drastic move toward a more streamlined Oscar night began years ago, when off-screen award lunches were held to honor the engineers. Inevitably, lifetime award winners were left as mere B-roll, screwed out of their rightful place on the stage at the Kodak Theater.

The board of directors sawed through the “boring” parts in an effort to make the Oscar show more like the Golden Globes’ “everybody wins” participation trophy ceremony. I watch no Globes, golden or otherwise, no Grammys either. I will have no other trophy shows before me except the longest-running, cruelest of them all, wherein old scores are settled, where deserving people get completely stiffed as mediocrities are exalted. Forecasting the awards is like The Casting Game: you want, you settle for, you get (as in, “You wanted Bernie, you settled for Hillary, you got Orange Thanos”). Best Actress I’d prefer Melissa McCarthy for Can You Ever Forgive Me? but I literally don’t get a vote.

I’d settle for Lady Gaga, who did a credible job animating a semi-dead warhorse. But half a dozen times Glenn Close has gone home with the special dishonor of the Oscar loser— shame! humiliation! defeat!—and this year she was nominated for The Wife, in which she played, get this, a passed-over award winner. Best Supporting Actress Always the most fascinating category, with a range of character actresses in age and personality. Regina King richly deserves it for If Beale Street Could Talk. Marina de Tavira is a real long shot, but the maternal opaqueness she brought to Roma—that quality that makes you go crazy trying to figure out your mother—is worth celebrating. Rachel Weisz has been in a number of much better movies than The Favourite, and we should

remember them if or when she wins. Best Actor Willem Dafoe was brilliant in At Eternity’s Gate, completely overcoming that calloused patch over the heart that long-time film watchers get about Vincent van Gogh. One would settle for Christian Bale’s transformation into the snarling Dick Cheney in the equally snarling Vice. There must be Academy members wondering if giving the Oscar to Bale would embarrass Cheney, seeing as nothing has been able to embarrass him previously. But they’ll probably give it to Viggo Mortensen for that bad popular movie where he plumped up and went full guido. Best Supporting Actor Richard E. Grant in Can You Ever Forgive Me?, not a breakthrough, but a role that epitomizes his screen efforts as a rotter. If Sam Rockwell wins, so be it. The best part of Vice was that shot of Rockwell, as President Bush, studying a piece of fried chicken as if it were a chess problem. Probably it’ll be Sam Elliott for being Sam Elliott in A Star Is Born, per critic James Rocchi’s Borgnine Rule: Whenever handicapping Oscars, just ask yourself, “Who would Ernest Borgnine vote for?” seeing as the Academy skews toward the AARP (and Elliott was on the cover of the AARP magazine). Best Picture Win or not, Roma was the best picture of 2018. A Star Is Born is a serious contender, a tale of rehab hinging on the fiction that there is exactly one person controlling the music industry, and if you don’t please him, it’s curtains. If the mendacious Green Book is the winner, it’s neither better nor worse than any other based-on-atrue-story buddy movie. Anything but Bohemian Rhapsody, because if we follow the chain that leads from this to the biopics of Elton John and Bowie, we’re going to end up seeing Jared Leto dressed up as Jobriath, Adam Driver as Adam of Adam and the Ants, Paul Dano as both Ron and Russell Mael, and “so we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” The Academy Awards ceremony will be broadcast on Sunday, Feb. 24, at 5pm on ABC.


17

2018

Lo Coco’s C u c i n a R u s t ic a

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Music

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FRIDAY

PRIDE & JOY

SATURDAY

TAINTED LOVE

FEB 22

SOUL ⁄FUNK • DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

BEST OF THE 80'S LIVE MAR 2 THE COVERS⁄ TRIBUTE • DOORS 8PM • 21+ SUNDAY

MAR 3

SHOOK TWINS

WITH RAINBOW GIRLS FOLK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

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MAR 15 SATURDAY

MAR 16

BIG SOUND Eki Shola opened last year’s NPR Tiny Desk Contest

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SOUL • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

KITCHEN DWELLERS WITH GOODNIGHT, TX

BLUEGRASS • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

3⁄16 Kitchen Dwellers w/ Goodnight, TX, 3⁄21 The Sam Chase & The Untraditional with The Soft White Sixties, 3⁄23 Steve Poltz w/ special guest Daniel Rodriguez (of Elephant Revival), 3⁄24 Stephen Marley (Acoustic) w/ Mystic Marley, 3⁄29 Mustache Harbor, 4⁄4 The King Street Giants, w/ The Crux, Alison Harris, 4⁄5 Low Cut Connie, 4⁄19 The Purples Ones - Insatiable Tribute to Prince

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FRIDAY, MARCH 1 • 7PM • $10

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LOS BLUE NOTES

FRIDAY, MARCH 8 • 7PM • $5

FRENCH OAK GYPSY BAND SATURDAY, MARCH 9 • 7PM • $5

THE ACROSONICS

SUNDAY, MARCH 10 • 12PM

JOHN KALLEEN GROUP FRIDAY, MARCH 15 • 7PM • $5

JUNK PARLOR

SATURDAY, MARCH 16 • 7PM • $5

FOXES IN THE HENHOUSE

HAPPY HOUR: MON—FRI, 4PM—6PM BRUNCH: SAT, SUN 11AM—2PM

Mon—Thu: 11:30am—9pm, Fri—Sat: 11:30am—12am Food served til 11pm; Fri, Sat & Karaoke Wed til 10

707.559.5133 101 2ND ST #190, PETALUMA

FOR RESERVATIONS:

COMING SOON! MARCH 27 Across the Great Divide 50th Anniversary of The Band: Dustbowl Revival & Hot Club of Cowtown

707.546.3600 | yourLBC.org

New Beginnings

Eki Shola dreams of possibilities on new album BY CHARLIE SWANSON

S

anta Rosa solo artist Eki Shola has always used her music as a conduit for love and healing. Working on her keyboard, and backed by digital effects, the two-time Norbay Award winner for electronica crafts jazzy, ambient tones with ethereal melodies that often carry dreamlike messages of hope and a sense of gratitude for life.

In the aftermath of the Tubbs fire that destroyed Shola’s home, she turned to music, and this week debuts a new album, Possible, with a concert on Feb. 22 at the dhyana Center in Sebastopol. “Everything burned,” says Shola. Even the contents inside her fireproof safe were incinerated. She decided to forego trying to recreate her recorded songs and instead used donated instruments and a new laptop to track down and rework old samples and bits of music she found in her emails and online correspondents going back more than a decade. “My motto is ‘Work with what you have,’” she says. “I got these snippets and played with them, sampled them and built out entirely different songs from them.”

After writing more than 60 songs, she decided to release a trilogy of records she calls Pieces, beginning with Possible. “There was a flow amongst the three albums,” she says. Possible represents Shola’s raw in-themoment emotions in the months after the fires. The planned second record, Drift, is a meditation on loss and memory that layers together ambient effects and vocals. “That’s where my music evolved to,” she says. “Creating a cocoon that is melodic and soft and comforting.” The final record, Essential, finds Shola taking stock post-fire and asking, “Now what?” For the upcoming Possible album-release event, Shola hosts a family-friendly party featuring Michael Fortunato on horns, live visual artist Dirt E Bill, Forestville electronic artist Lenkadu, and members of California HOPE on hand for counseling outreach. “This community has been amazing in terms of support post-fires,” says Shola. “This is my little way of saying thank you to everybody.” Eki Shola performs on Friday, Feb. 22, at dhyana Center, 186 Main St., Ste. 240, Sebastopol. 7:30pm. Free; all ages. ekishola.com.


Concerts SONOMA Eki Shola Sonoma County electronica artist releases her new album with a concert featuring live visuals by Dirt E Bill and more. Feb 22, 7:30pm. Free. dhyana Center, 186 N Main St, Sebastopol. 800.796.6863.

Salute to Mark Dennis Director of Sonoma rockand-roll chorus Vox Populi is honored with performances from Plan B, Rubber Soul and others. Feb 22, 7:30pm. $20. Sonoma Valley Woman’s Club, 574 First St East, Sonoma. 707.373.0700.

Soulfly Intense metal band out of Arizona returns to rock the North Bay with support from acts Unearth and Incite. Feb 25, 6:30pm. $25-$27. The Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

MARIN Chris Robinson Brotherhood Bearded band of merry rootsrockers returns to Terrapin for two nights. Feb 23-24. $35. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Bobby Rush Legendary R&B, soul, funk and blues artist performs a solo seated show with opener HowellDevine. Feb 21, 8pm. $30-$35. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Somos el Son Peruvian-born vocalist and percussionist Braulio Barrera and his Latin band heat up the “Winter Nights” concert series. Feb 23, 8pm. $25-$35. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

NAPA Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Stars of ‘90s swing revival have spent 25 years blending jazz, swing and dixieland

Andy Romley

with infectious energy and spirit. Feb 23, 8pm. $35-$55. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Myron Mckinley Trio Powerhouse group of journeymen musicians celebrates the music of Earth, Wind & Fire. Feb 27, 6:30 and 8:30pm. $15-$35. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Clubs & Venues

THE VOODOO THAT THEY DO Big Bad Voodoo Daddy throw a party celebrating 25 years

of swing at the Uptown in Napa. See Concerts, this page.

SONOMA Congregation Ner Shalom Feb 22, 7pm, Holly Near: Our Love is Here to Stay. 85 La Plaza, Cotati. 707.664.8622.

Coyote Sonoma Feb 22, Buck Thrifty. 44F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.385.9133.

Crooked Goat Brewing Feb 23, 3pm, Sean Carscadden. Feb 24, 3pm, Acoustic Soul. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Elephant in the Room Feb 21, Marshall House Project. Feb 22, Folk Revival. Feb 23, Midtown Social. Feb 24, Awesome Hotcakes. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. elephantintheroompub.com.

Fern Bar Feb 21, jazz night with Michael Price & Co. Feb 22, Shapeshifters. Feb 23, DJ Timoteo Gigante. Feb 24, the Easy Leaves. Feb 25, Woodlander and friends. 6780 Depot St, Suite 120, Sebastopol. 707.861.9603.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall Feb 23, 2pm, Carol Menke faculty and friends recital. Feb 24, Veronica Swift with the Benny Green Trio. Sold-out. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall Feb 22, Wild Up. Feb 23, the Chieftains. Sold-out. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery Feb 25, Sharon Van Etten. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

HopMonk Sebastopol Feb 22, Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra. Feb 23, the Big Fit. Feb 25, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Jacques. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Occidental Center for the Arts Feb 23, Steve Gillette and Cindy Mangsen. Feb 23, 11am, Joyful Noise Gospel Choir. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Raven Theater Feb 21, Habib Koité & Bassekou Kouyate. 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Red Brick

Feb 22, Erica Sunshine Lee. Feb 23, Everything Turned to Color. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Feb 22, Miss Moonshine. Feb 23, Redwood Highway Ramblers. Feb 24, 12pm, Dorian Mode. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Redwood Cafe

HopMonk Sonoma

Feb 20, Fox and Bones. Feb 21, Double Denim Beats Before Bed. Feb 22, Sara Petite. Feb 23, Amber Snider Band. Feb 24, Radio Keys. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Feb 21, Marin All Stars. Feb 22, Midtown Social. Feb 23, Wendy DeWitt with Kirk Harwood. Feb 24, Irish jam session. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Feb 21, THUGZ. Feb 23, Petty Rocks. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Feb 22, 10am, “A Trip Down Memory Lane” sing-a-long. Feb 24, 3pm, Carlton Senior Living Symphony Pops. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Murphy’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Feb 22, Jesse Lee Kincaid. Feb 23, Savannah Blu. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall Feb 22, Pride & Joy. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Stout Brothers Irish Pub Feb 20, Miss Moonshine. Feb 27, Awesome Hotcakes. 527 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.636.0240.

MARIN Fenix Feb 21, Soul Power. Feb 22, the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. Feb 23, James Henry Hands on Fire. Feb 24, 6:30pm, Kyle Alden and friends. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Feb 22, Jerry’s Middle Finger. Feb 24, 11:30am, the Music of the Grateful Dead for Kids. Feb 27-28, Martin Barre Band. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Feb 20, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Feb 21, Dead Funk Summit featuring Melvin Seals. Feb 22, San Geronimo and Cosmic Twang. Feb 26, Koolerator. Feb 27, Waxahatchee. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA Andaz Napa

Feb 20, John Vicino. Feb 23, Michelle Lambert. Feb 27, Rose Winters. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Blue Note Napa

Feb 20, Mark Allen Felton. Feb 21, tribute to Bob Marley with Sol Horizon. Feb 22-23, Larry Carlton Quartet. Feb 24, Makana. Feb 26, Sweet Burgundy. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Art Openings SONOMA Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Feb 22-Mar 31, “Not Just Landscapes,” show celebrates artwork reflecting scenery in any style, from cityscapes

to nature views. Reception, Feb 22 at 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

NAPA Caldwell Snyder Gallery Feb 23-Mar 23, “Nobody Likes a Smartass,” artist David Buckingham shows off his latest batch of colorful metal assemblage works. Reception, Feb 23 at 4pm. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 707.200.5050.

Comedy Coyote Sonoma Comedy NIght Laugh it up with local comedians James Rowan and Steve Ausburne. Feb 23, 8pm. $15. Coyote Sonoma, 44F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.385.9133.

Derek Sheen Gifted storyteller, actor and writer regularly tours with Patton Oswalt, Brian Posehn and Janeane Garofalo. Feb 21, 7pm. $20-$25. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Magic 8 Comedy Night Features headlining standup Franco Tevini. Feb 24, 8pm. Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Villain-Tines Day Spectacular Local improv comedy troupe the Gentlemen Bastards hosts a revue featuring )

20

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 20 -26, 2019 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Calendar

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20 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 20 -26, 20 19 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Treat Yourself

complimentary brow wax with appointment

Calendar ( 19 performer Jamie DeWolf and comedians Kala Keller and Sue Alfieri. Feb 23, 7:30pm. $20. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Dance Afro-Fusion 2019

Third annual cultural dance event features special guests and an empowering message. $25-$65. Feb 23, noon. Tone, 545 Ross St, Santa Rosa 707.526.3100.

Events Broadway Bash Effective anti-aging products by GM Collin

Mary Lia Skin Care

Esthetic Services in the Coastal Redwoods

707.486.8057 maryliaskincare.com

Slay all Day

Benefit party for Cinnabar Theater’s Young Rep program includes cocktails, auctions and exciting performances. Feb 23, 6pm. $75. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, cinnabartheater.org.

Chinese New Year Celebration

Annual event includes buffet, entertainment and cultural demonstrations. Feb 23, 5pm. $10-$25. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Rebuild Green Expo

Meet the pros in a showcase for all aspects of how to build homes that are healthy for people and the planet. Feb 22. Free. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. rebuildgreenexpo.com.

The Spirit of Us

Full Service Salon

Ayurvedic Indian Head Massage • relief from tension headaches, & sinusitis • improves mobility in neck & shoulders

Margery Smith

Specializing in: • On & Off Site Weddings • Hair • Eyelash Extensions

CMT# 62066

707.536.1797 margerysmith.massagetherapy.com

707.978.2399 NEW ADDRESS:

4745 Old Redwood Hwy Santa Rosa, next to Starbucks

Legacy Showcases presents an enriching and educational production of African American musical history. Feb 23, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Art Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Tattoos & Blues Festival

Live art meets live music in this long standing celebration. Feb 22-24. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Field Trips Edible Plants Walk Open your senses as well

as your curiosity to the abundance of plantlore in Sonoma County. Feb 23, 9:30am. $10; kids are free. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.5712.

Film Academy Awards Night at Rialto

Food for Thought benefit features the Oscars on the big screen with prizes and plenty of local color on hand. Feb 24, 4pm. $30. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Bethany Hamilton: Unstoppable

Documentary on the sharkattack survivor who became a professional surfer screens as a preview of 2019’s Sonoma International Film Festival, with wine reception and filmmaker Q&A. Feb 21, 6:30pm. $20 and up. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Crows of the Desert: A Hero’s Journey through the Armenian Genocide Marta Houske’s film is presented by the Alliance for the Study of the Holocaust and Genocide. Feb 26, 4pm. Free. Warren Auditorium, Ives Hall, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.235.5582.

Joni 75: A Birthday Celebration

Live concert film features several stars of music honoring Joni Mitchell on the occasion of her 75th birthday. Feb 27, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Memoir of War

Haunting adaptation of author Marguerite Duras’ autobiographical novel recounts her struggles in 1944 Nazi-occupied France. Feb 22, 7pm. $5 donation. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Oscar Night Fundraiser

Dress as your favorite actors or characters and see the Oscars on the big screen with beer, wine, appetizers and

more. Feb 24, 3:30pm. $35. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Petaluma Cinema Series

Academy Award-nominated remake of “A Star Is Born,” screens with lecture and discussion. Feb 27, 6pm. $6/$45 series pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, SRJC Petaluma Campus, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. petalumafilmalliance.org.

Red Carpet Evening Gala

Alexander Valley Film Society brings Hollywood glamour to Sonoma County an evening of film, fashion, food and fun. Feb 24, 4pm. $225. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. avfilmsociety.org.

Food & Drink Annual Crab Dinner at Gary Farrell Winery Enjoy the local specialty in the winery barrel room, featuring four courses paired with limited-release wines. Feb 23, 6pm. $200. Gary Farrell Winery, 10701 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.473.2909.

Cabernet Season Food & Wine Pairing Indulge in critically acclaimed Cabernet Sauvignon wines paired with bites from chef Alex Lovick in intimate setting. Space is limited, reservations recommended, Wed, 1:30pm. $165. Inglenook Winery, 1991 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.968.1161.

Cabernet Season Wine Tastings Complimentary winetasting featuring select wineries and winemakers from the Napa Valley. Fri, 11am. through Mar 15. Free. Napa Valley Welcome Center, 600 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5895.

Culinary Boot Camp

Five-day, hands-on course gives you a command of classic culinary methods and techniques. Feb 25. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Eighth Street Wineries Annual Open House Stroll through the cellars of


Various Healdsburg and Geyserville restaurants donate portion of food and beverage sales to support Healdsburg Jazz Educational Fund, with afterparty at Costeaux Bakery. Feb 20. Costeaux French Bakery, 417 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. healdsburgjazzfestival.org.

Napa Craft Beer & Spirits Festival

Meet and mingle with local brewers and taste from over 75 craft selections, with chefs pairing bites to brews and music. Feb 23, 2pm. $25-$99. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Premiere Napa Valley Barrel tasting and live auction is a winemaker and wine owner’s dream. Feb 23. CIA at Greystone, 2555 Main St, St Helena. premierenapavalley.com.

Winemaker Dinner with Sonoma-Cutrer WInery

Dinner pairs local cuisine with local wine. Feb 24, 5:30pm. $125. Prelude at Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

Theater

Lectures

After Miss Julie

Charles Blow

New York Times columnist discusses social and political issues as part of the H. Andrea Neves & Barton Evans Social Justice Lecture Series. Feb 26, 7:30pm. $15. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

The Soul of Illness

Discover how to address the root causes of illness and learn to return to a state of long-lasting joyous and healthy living. Feb 22, 7pm. $10-$20. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

Toot & Whistle: Ward Kimball’s Trains

Learn about Disney animator Ward Kimball and his incredible railroad hobby in a multimedia presentation. Feb 23, 2pm. Free with admission. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

Readings Center for Spiritual Living

For Kids

Feb 22, 7pm, “Mind to Matter” with Dawson Church. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.4543.

African American Folk Tales with Kirk Waller

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

For children ages five and up. Feb 23, 11am. Free. Sebastopol Library, 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Fairytale Ball

Whimsical event for children ages 4-12 and their adult chaperone includes dancing, crafts and more. Advance tickets required. Feb 23, 5pm. $35 per pair, additional guests are $10. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Fishing in the City & Fishing Derby

Saturday morning clinic and Sunday morning fishing is fun for kids 5-15 and their adult. Feb 23-24. Howarth Park, 630

Feb 22, 4pm, “Ten Rules of the Birthday Wish” with Tom Lichtenheld. Feb 22, 7pm, “This Messy Magnificent Life: A Field Guide” with Geneen Roth. Feb 23, 7pm, “The Eulogist” with Terry Gamble. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Readers’ Books

Feb 23, 3pm, “King Solomon’s Table” with Joan Nathan. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Feb 22, 7pm, “Seven Practices of a Mindful Leader” with Marc Lesser. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

August Strindberg’s 1888 play about sex and class is adapted to an English country house on the eve of Labour’s historic landslide in 1945. Through Mar 3. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Farce of Habit

Valley Players present the absurdly funny romp about a gaggle of nuns invading a quiet fishing lodge. Through Feb 23. $20. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Forever Plaid

Jukebox musical features some of the greatest hits of the 1950s. Through Mar 3. $30-$40. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Lightwire Theater

Beloved story of “The Ugly Duckling” plays out on stage through a cutting-edge blend of puppetry, technology and dance. Feb 24, 2pm. $18-$25. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Million Dollar Quartet

Hit Broadway musical tells the story of when Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley came together in a jam session in 1956. Feb 22-Mar 17. $38-$48, $35 for ages under 30. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Spy Who Killed Me

Get a Clue Productions hosts an interactive and humorous murder-mystery dinner theater experience. Sat, Feb 23, 7pm. $68 (includes meal). Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. getaclueproductions.com.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian.com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Fireside Dining Sat & Sun Brunch 11–3

Din n er & A Show

Cathy Lemons and Phil Berkowitz & Band Feb 22 The Lucky Losers Fri

Classic R&B and Blues 7:00 ⁄ No Cover

Stompy Jones featuring Dance Feb 23 Annette Moreno Party! Sat

8:00

“West Americana” Feb 24 LoWatters Sun

The Jones Gang’s Mar 9 12-Piece Band Recreates Sat

“Mad Dogs and Englishmen” 8:00

Marin All Stars

Mar 16 Dan Durkin, Michael Blakeman, Rancho Marty Fuetch and Vernon Black ebut! D

8:00

St. Patrick’s Day Party Mar 17 Irish Specials, Green Beer! Sun

San Geronimo

Thu 2⁄21 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $30–35 • All Ages Grammy Winning Blues Legend Bobby Rush (solo seated show)

+ HowellDevine

Fri 2⁄22 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $12–15 • All Ages Performing and celebrating the music and magic of the Jerry Garcia Band

Jerry's Middle Finger

Wed 2⁄27 & Thu 2⁄28 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $35–40• All Ages

High Lonesome Twang to Lowdown Roots 4:00 ⁄ No Cover

Sat

21

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week

6:00

Tommy Castro & The Painkillers

Weekend

Mar 22 & Mar 23

Fri Night Only! Special Guest Ron Thompson Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Jethro Tull's Martin Barre Band with Special Guest Matt Jaffe Fri 3⁄1 & Sat 3⁄2 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $42–47 • 21+

GATORATORS

feat Dave Malone (The Radiators), Camile Baudoin (The Radiators), Reggie Scanlan (The Radiators), Mitch Stein (CRYPTICAL) & Eric Bolivar (Anders Osborne) + Special Guests Sun 3⁄3 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $19–22 • All Ages

Deadgrass

A String Band Adventure Through Jerry Garcia's Musical World Thu 3⁄7 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–30 • All Ages

Greg Loiacono (The Mother Hips, Green

Leaf Rustlers) with special guests Scott Hirsch (Hiss Golden Messenger) & Jamie Drake (seated show)

Fri 3⁄8 & Sat 3⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $50–60 • 21+ Jorma Kaukonen (solo) www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

LICENSED CANNABIS COMPANY SEEKING QUALIFIED INVESTORS

Cannabis manufacturing and distribution company seeking a few qualified investors to finance the buildout of a 6000 sf facility in Santa Rosa. FXL, Inc. is a purpose-driven science-based cannabis company founded by an industry professional and Ph.D. medicinal chemist to bring novel products to market in the fastest growing industry in America.

To make an appointment: email: John@farmxlab.com or call: John 916.290.3375

WED NIGHT: 5-7p

18” Cheese $13.99! 18” 2 Tops $19.99! Stuffed Shells for $5 Meatballs for $1 ea.

20+ SHOWS PER WEEK VISIT HOPMONK.COM FOR FULL CALENDAR

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California Poppies by the Orange by Carolyn Lord

Jazz on the Menu

Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3425.

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 20 -26, 2019 | BOH E MI A N.COM

some of Sonoma Counties premier local artisan wineries. Feb 23, 12pm. $10-$50. Eighth Street Wineries, 21481 Eighth St E, Sonoma. 707.939.3930.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 20 -26, 20 19 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

JCC Presents Israeli Film Festival 2019

October 9 - November 27 Israeli

Film Festival 2019

March 5 - March 26

And Then She Arrived

The Testament

Fractures

The Amazing Journey

Tues. March 5 1:00 and 7:00 p.m. Tues. March 12 1:00 and 7:00 p.m.

Tues. March 19 1:00 and 7:00 p.m. Tues. March 26 1:00 and 7:00 p.m.

Tickets and Information

WWW.JCCSOCO.ORG or call (707) 528-4222 SCREENINGS: Rialto CinemasÂŽ

6868 McKinley Street, Sebastopol, CA 95472

Do You Like to Write? The Bohemian has immediate openings for news, feature story, arts & culture and dining & lifestyle writers. We are looking for experienced journalists who are equipped to produce thoroughly researched, well-crafted articles on deadline. To apply, please send a short cover letter explaining who you are and why you would be a good fit, as well as a resume and three examples of your published work to submit@bohemian.com.


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PLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

Now Hiring Hair Stylists

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Astrology For the week of February 20

BY ROB BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21–April 19) In December 1915, the California city of San Diego was suffering from a draught. City officials hired a professional “moisture accelerator” named Charles Hatfield, who promised to make it rain. Soon Hatfield was shooting explosions of a secret blend of chemicals into the sky from the top of a tower. The results were quick. A deluge began in early January of 1916 and persisted for weeks. Thirty inches of rain fell, causing floods that damaged the local infrastructure. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned, Aries: When you ask for what you want and need, specify exactly how much you want and need; don’t make an open-ended request that could bring you too much of a good thing.

famous for his own painting and sculpture. The work for which we remember him today is the alterations he made to Michelangelo’s giant fresco The Last Judgment, which spreads across an entire wall in the Sistine Chapel. After Michelangelo died, the Catholic Church hired da Volterra to “fix” the scandalous aspects of the people depicted in the master’s work. He painted clothes and leaves over the originals’ genitalia and derrieres. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose that we make da Volterra your antirole model for the coming weeks. Don’t be like him. Don’t engage in cover-ups, censorship or camouflage. Instead, specialize in the opposite: revelations, unmaskings and expositions.

TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Actors Beau and Jeff Bridges are brothers born to parents who were also actors. When they were growing up, they already had aspirations to follow in their mom and dad’s footsteps. From an early age, they summoned a resourceful approach to attracting an audience. Now and then they would start a pretend fight in a store’s parking lot. When a big enough crowd had gathered to observe their shenanigans, they would suddenly break off from their faux struggle, grab their guitars from their truck and begin playing music. In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll be equally ingenious as you brainstorm about ways to expand your outreach.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

According to Edward Barnard’s book New York City Trees, a quarter of the city is shaded by its 5.2 million trees. In other words, one of the most densely populated, frantically active places on the planet has a rich collection of oxygengenerating greenery. There’s even a virgin forest at the upper tip of Manhattan, as well as five botanical gardens and the 843-acre Central Park. Let’s use all this bounty-amidst-the-bustle as a symbol of what you should strive to foster in the coming weeks: refreshing lushness and grace interspersed throughout your busy, hustling rhythm.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) As a poet myself, I regard good poetry as highly useful. It can nudge us free of our habitual thoughts and provoke us to see the world in ways we’ve never imagined. On the other hand, it’s not useful in the same way that food and water and sleep are. Most people don’t get sick if they are deprived of poetry. But I want to bring your attention to a poem that is serving a very practical purpose in addition to its inspirational function. Simon Armitage’s poem “In Praise of Air” is on display in an outdoor plaza at Sheffield University. The material it’s printed on is designed to literally remove a potent pollutant from the atmosphere. And what does this have to do with you? I suspect that in the coming weeks you will have an extra capacity to generate blessings that are like Armitage’s poem: useful in both practical and inspirational ways. LEO (July 23–August 22) In 1979, psychologist Dorothy Tennov published her book Love and Limerence: The Experience of Being in Love. She defined her newly coined word “limerence” as a state of adoration that may generate intense, euphoric and obsessive feelings for another person. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Leos are most likely to be visited by this disposition throughout 2019. And you’ll be especially prone to it in the coming weeks. Will that be a good thing or a disruptive thing? It all depends on how determined you are to regard it as a blessing, have fun with it and enjoy it regardless of whether or not your feelings are reciprocated. I advise you to enjoy the hell out of it! VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Based in Switzerland, Nestle is the largest food company in the world. Yet it pays just $200 per year to the state of Michigan for the right to suck up 400 million gallons of groundwater, which it bottles and sells at a profit. I nominate this vignette to be your cautionary tale in the coming weeks. How? 1. Make damn sure you are being fairly compensated for your offerings. 2. Don’t allow huge, impersonal forces to exploit your resources. 3. Be tough and discerning, not lax and naïve, as you negotiate deals. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Sixteenthcentury Italian artist Daniele da Volterra wasn’t very

What is the quality of your access to life’s basic necessities? How well do you fulfill your need for good food and drink, effective exercise, deep sleep, thorough relaxation, mental stimulation, soulful intimacy, a sense of meaningfulness, nourishing beauty and rich feelings? I bring these questions to your attention, Scorpio, because the rest of 2019 will be an excellent time for you to fine-tune and expand your relationships with these fundamental blessings. And now is an excellent time to intensify your efforts.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

Michael Jackson’s 1982 song “Beat It” climbed to No. 3 on the record-sales charts in Australia. On the other hand, “Weird Al” Yankovic’s 1984 parody of Jackson’s tune, “Eat It,” reached No. 1 on the same charts. Let’s use this twist as a metaphor that’s a good fit for your life in the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may find that a stand-in or substitute or imitation will be more successful than the original. And that will be auspicious!

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) The Space Needle in Seattle, Wash., is 605 feet high and 138 feet wide—a tall and narrow tower. Near the top is a round restaurant that makes one complete rotation every 47 minutes. Although this part of the structure weighs 125 tons, for many years its motion was propelled by a mere 1.5 horsepower motor. I think you will have a comparable power at your disposal in the coming weeks: an ability to cause major movement with a compact output of energy. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In 1941, the Ford automobile company created a “biological car.” Among its components were “bioplastics” composed of soybeans, hemp, flax, wood pulp and cotton. It weighed a thousand pounds less than a comparable car made of metal. This breakthrough possibility never fully matured, however. It was overshadowed by newly abundant plastics made from petrochemicals. I suspect that you Aquarians are at a phase with a resemblance to the biological car. Your good idea is promising but unripe. I hope you’ll spend the coming weeks devoting practical energy to developing it. (P.S.: There’s a difference between you and your personal equivalent of the biological car: little competition.) PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Cartographers of Old Europe sometimes drew pictures of strange beasts in the uncharted regions of their maps. These were warnings to travelers that such areas might harbor unknown risks, like dangerous animals. One famous map of the Indian Ocean shows an image of a sea monster lurking, as if waiting to prey on sailors traveling through its territory. If I were going to create a map of the frontier you’re now headed for, Pisces, I would fill it with mythic beasts of a more benevolent variety, like magic unicorns, good fairies and wise centaurs.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 20 -26, 2019 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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North Bay Bohemian February 20-26, 2019  

North Bay Bohemian February 20-26, 2019