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Bohemian

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847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288 News & Features Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 206

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Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal. NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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THE LAWMAN Sheriff-elect Mark Essick and the fate of the IOLERO, p10.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

New New Deal In the last two years, we’ve watched wildfires sweep through our state and devastate communities. The smoke alone has become a national health issue. We must acknowledge the relationship between these massive fires and climate change. For our health and our safety, Californians must demand legislation, at all levels of government, that eliminates our structurally engrained dependence on fossil fuels and carbon emissions.

Fortunately, an opportunity has presented itself at the national level via Representative-elect Alexandria OcasioCortez. The purpose of this letter is to spur readers to learn about her Green New Deal proposal and contact elected officials to demand change. I support Rep. Ocasio-Cortez’s resolution to create a House Select Committee for a Green New Deal in Congress because its scope matches the urgency of the task at hand. United Nations climate scientists tell us we have just 12 years

THIS MODERN WORLD

to move our country off fossil fuels, to avoid catastrophic climate disaster. We need a Green New Deal to create millions of green jobs, move our country off fossil fuels, and protect working people of all backgrounds. Climate change impacts every part of our lives, and we should demand that our representatives support each other to deliver solutions that recognize it.

BUDDY BURCH

Santa Rosa

By Tom Tomorrow

Face It: We’re Screwed The current state of our country presents a challenging opportunity to integrate an autocratic president and a democratic citizenry. No problem for dictatorship countries where dissidence is forbidden; dissidents are imprisoned, tortured and/or murdered, and the only recourse “the people” have is to violently rebel. No problem for truly democratic countries where dissidence is allowed and dissenters are able to voice their dissatisfaction and disagreement in peaceful protest marches and demonstrations. In our current autocratic democracy, the president “deals” with opponents through fear-inducing and fearbased sanctions, tariffs, border walls, firings, censure, criticism, judgment, blame, threats, untruths and unilateral decisions and behaviors that only create a false “oneness” through separatist and exclusionary onesidedness—rather than achieve a true unifying relationship between parties. Yet we, “the American people,” may have some hope of unitedness through real legislative representation, governmental checks and balances, and a nonpartisan investigation of the presidency. That all may mitigate the rising and deplorable occurrences of civil rights violations, hate crimes, gun violence and mass murders.

RAYMOND BART VESPE

Santa Rosa

Dept. of Corrections In last week’s news story, “Paradise Glossed,” we errantly reported that PG&E had been found liable for the 2017 Tubbs fire. PG&E has been found liable for 11 of the 16 wildfires fires that broke out in California in late 2017, but no determination has yet been made as to the cause of the Tubbs fire. We regret the error.


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I

n our Marin-based sister publication this week, the Pacific Sun (Pacificsun.com), there’s a playful story that’s based off of Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom’s ongoing indecisiveness when it comes to telling the world where he and his family will be living when he takes office next month.

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Will it be Sacramento or Kentfield? The consensus speculation among media types around the state is that Newsom and his family are staying put: He has a really nice house in tony Kentfield in Marin County, and four children under the age of 10 to think about. I came up with a few thoughts about why Newsom ought to stay put in Marin, some more goofy than others, but one serious reason has to do with Newsom’s history of being an out-front champion for hopeless ideas that suddenly become the law of the land, or at least part of the land—i.e., gay marriage and cannabis legalization, both of which Newsom has been a flatout national leader in advancing. And lots of reporters have been asking of Newsom since election day: Hey, what’s the next Big Idea? Here’s one: Why doesn’t Newsom break ranks with Gov. Jerry Brown’s equivocating death-penalty posture and declare his opposition to capital punishment in California—and intention to end it? The state under Brown (who opposes the death penalty in principle) has fumbled around the grotesque ethics of cooking up a single-drug protocol that doesn’t fly in the face of constitutional bans on cruel and unusual punishment. It has wasted millions of dollars on a failed execution protocol that has left more than seven-hundred people on death row, with no sign that anyone’s going to be executed anytime soon. Suicide and old age will kill you before the state does. Two of the condemned died last week, as the Los Angeles Times reported—and as it added its voice to the clamor for an end to capital punishment in California (the paper called on Newsom and Brown to work together in Brown’s last days to abolish the death penalty). For Newsom, the notorious San Quentin State Prison is practically right down the street from Kentfield. He has a chance to go big out the gate, with or without buy-in from the departing Brown. Barack Obama made headlines—and history—as the first U.S. president to visit a federal prison while he was in office. So when was the last time a sitting California governor visited death row? As far as I can tell, the answer is never.

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Dining PLATTER OF THE GODS Omigod, we’ve died and gone to Tokyo.

Miso Challenge Sebastopol’s Sushi Koshō delivers on Tsukiji-worthy bites BY THOMAS BRODERICK

O

ctober 2018 was a sad month for sushi fans around the globe. Tsukiji Market in Tokyo—source of the world’s freshest fish— closed after 83 years of continuous operation. Tsukiji was so famous that, no matter where you were in the world, if you ever paid more than $8 for a single piece of sushi, you knew exactly where the fish came from.

On an unseasonably cold, rainy morning in the summer of 2014, I navigated Tsukiji’s narrow alleys full of styrofoam crates, wholesaler stalls and frantic fishmongers who blared their horns as they sped by at breakneck speed on electric carts carrying the day’s catch. Using the map a friendly police officer had handed me at the market’s entrance, I found rows upon rows of sushi restaurants near the harbor. After waiting in line at one establishment for over

an hour, I took a seat at the sushi bar and ordered raw salmon over rice. That deceptively simple dish had a flavor I’ve been chasing ever since. So when Sushi Koshō in Sebastopol opened last month, I wondered if chef Jake Rand’s menu would be worthy of Tsukiji. Also, could the restaurant compete against Hana and other popular Sonoma County Japanese restaurants? Sushi Koshō’s initial reviews looked promising, and I made a lunch reservation.

Walking into the restaurant on a quiet afternoon, I recognized that the restaurant’s designer had blended modern fine-dining with touches that suggested northern Japan: dark hardwoods that evoke a feeling of warmth even in the coldest Japanese winters. As I took a seat, chef Rand was preparing a sashimi plate while sous chefs chopped radishes, eggplant and other vegetables for the donburi rice bowls. I ordered the sushi lunch ($26) and a glass of Minakata Junmai Ginjo sake ($9). The sake—its taste evoking hints of blueberry and banana—arrived in a wine glass. A bit untraditional, but it paired well with the miso soup. For those unfamiliar with Japanese restaurants, you can learn everything you need to know by trying the miso soup. In my experience, if the miso is good, everything else should be, too. And let me tell you, the miso soup at Sushi Koshō is excellent. The balance of onions, mushrooms and miso paste makes for a satisfying broth, something that should only become more delectable as the temperature drops in Sonoma County over the next few weeks. I ordered another sake to go with a lunch that featured seven pieces of nigiri and six tuna rolls. Sushi Koshō uses red-wine vinegar to flavor its sushi rice, chef Rand explained, which lent it a color that suggested brown rice, though there was no discernible difference in taste. The meal, regardless, was excellent. Each piece of fish melted on my tongue, the rolls’ nori crunched, and the flavors indeed brought back memories of Japan. My only critique: the rice could have been a tad warmer. As is the case at most Sonoma County sushi outposts, the price point is on the high side and renders Sushi Koshō a place best reserved for special occasions (especially for a freelancer on a budget). Yet the price is just right when it comes to satisfying that sushi craving and experiencing a bit of Tsukiji in Sebastopol. Sushi Koshō, 6750 McKinley Ave., Sebastopol. 707.827.6373.


Wine Train Spotting Lay down some tracks to Trade Brewing BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

f I hadn’t lost the longhair look last year, I’d have got even more of a kick out of one of Trade Brewing’s few items of wall decor—that old sign that says, “Hippies use side door.”

I did, in fact, find my way to the side door from one of the backstreets of old Napa. It’s just one block off from new Napa. Good thing, too, because I might have seen the closed sign and moved on if I’d parked by the front on busy First Street. Trade Brewing recently marked its first

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year open, but it’s new to me. I must have driven by a dozen times since then and missed it entirely. Sunk below street grade, wedged in a corner by the railroad tracks, Trade occupies a humble little dwelling that formerly housed a dry cleaner, and sat vacant, I’m told by the bartender, who waves me in cheerily to peruse the beer board while she sets up tables for the afternoon crowd. The crowd is mostly locals, I’m also told, plus tourists on their way to the Oxbow Market, but none of them crowd in for the hour that I’m there. They’re missing out. Trade suds are crisp and on-style. Hatchet IPA is fruity, floral, blonde and dry; Pile Driver double IPA whispers, rather than rasps, about caramel malts and balanced hops; Ten Penny American brown ale is roasty enough with coffee aromas to almost wake me out of this beery reverie. A window-rattling toot from the Napa Valley Wine Train finishes that job. There’s a rich, dry Irish–style stout called Eighty Acre, and a saison-style semi-sour, I believe called What the Funk, that has a boozy vibe despite being aged in Sauvignon Blanc barrels—all contract-brewed at Mare Island Brewing Co. Should the low-key concept work out, a true brew pub at another location may be considered by the owners, who also run the popular Jax Diner down the street. Pints are $6.47, and a sample of five, five-ounce pours is a reasonable $12, presented on a heavy wooden tray. As of press time, Trade appears to be one of the few roasted shishito-free zones available to North Bay brew fans, so hurry up and grab some Goldfish crackers for free, or order a fairly straightforward (needs more sauerkraut, if there was sauerkraut) but fairly tasty New Yorker ($12), a Reuben-style panini served with a side of potato chips. There’s artisan charcuterie and cheese, and, yes, green salads, too—you know, hippie food.


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Law & Auditor Sheriff-elect Mark Essick takes a wait-and-see approach to future of oversight office BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he uncertain fate of a Sonoma County policyaccountability office will be a part of the discussion at the Board of Supervisors meeting on Dec. 4.

There, Jerry Threet, the current director of the Independent Office of Law Enforcement Review and Outreach (IOLERO), will present his fiscal year 2017–18 annual report to the supervisors—as well as proposed new language that would modify the existing ordinance and enhance the

IOLERO’s working interactions with the sheriff’s office. The IOLERO was created in the aftermath of the fatal 2013 shooting of teenager Andy Lopez by the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO). Now, just three years into its rollout, the IOLERO is under fire from an SCSO that would just as soon eliminate the office altogether. Threet is leaving his $160,000 post at the end of the year, citing health concerns. His annual report, released in September, was met with stiff pushback from the SCSO, which called for the elimination of the IOLERO in a

public response to Threet’s report. The SCSO has called for the IOLERO to be replaced by an oncontract auditor who would not be a part of the county bureaucracy and could, say criminal-justice activists who contacted the Bohemian, signal a watered-down version of police accountability. The IOLERO was created as a county office to provide for a rolling review of police investigations into claims of officer misconduct. The office is also empowered to field complaints from Sonoma County citizens, to audit investigations that spring from complaints made

to the SCSO, and to provide a measure of community outreach via a citizen-led community advisory council. Threet notes at several junctures in his report that trust and cooperation between the IOLERO and SCSO started to break down in the aftermath of the devastating 2017 wildfires, which occurred as the election battle for a new sheriff was getting rolling. Sheriff-elect Mark Essick takes office next month. The two-person IOLERO office has a nearly $500,000 annual budget and, in its latest report, spent some time reporting, for example, on the investigation into a controversial “yard-counseling” incident at the Sonoma County Main Adult Detention Facility. The videotaped yardcounseling interactions between corrections officers and inmates ended up costing Sonoma County $1.7 in settlement fees that sprang from a class-action lawsuit against the county and sheriff’s office. When the settlement was announced earlier this year, Sheriff Rob Giordano announced that the agency had ended the practice of yard-counseling disruptive inmates. Essick said in a recent interview with the Bohemian that the yardcounseling ban would remain under his leadership. Less clear is how he plans to address the chasm of trust that’s apparently sprung up between the IOLERO and SCSO. Giordano will represent the SCSO at the Tuesday meeting before the supervisors, four of five of whom have already voted, in closed session, in favor of replacing Threet next year with a new IOLERO top lawyer. David Rabbitt is the lone supervisor on record opposed to the IOLERO’s continuation. Giordano is also leaving his post at the end of this year, after having been named interim sheriff following the resignation of Steve Freitas. The timing, and the alacrity of the SCSO’s response to Threet’s second annual report, comes as Essick is poised to take over the top-cop job in Sonoma County in January. ) 12


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IOLERO ( 10 The response reads, in part, “Generally, the Sheriff’s Office believes there is a fundamental flaw in the design of the current IOLERO office. At its core, the perceived success of IOLERO depends, at least in part, on the perceived failure or shortcomings of the Sheriff’s Office. The IOLERO Director dedicated a large portion of the report on his perceived, personal and political, issues with the Sheriff’s Office and the audit process.” The SCSO says in its response to Threet that it fully supports an audit of its policing practices, but that the supervisors ought to do away with the IOLERO and hire outside auditors on a rolling, non-permanent, contract basis that’s pegged to specific investigations. To Threet and criminal-justice reformers, that’s just another way of saying that the police-accountability protocols in Sonoma County would be watered down under the contract-auditor model. The sheriff’s office doesn’t see it that way: “The Sheriff’s Office feels a more productive model to accomplish this is to hire a truly neutral, independent, and unbiased auditor for a specific, limited period of time. If there is no expectation of employment beyond a specific period of time, there is no pressure or inherent need to justify IOLERO. This would greatly reduce the chances of either intentional or unintentional bias developing in the auditor. It would also afford the Sheriff’s Office the opportunity to get input from a variety of perspectives outside of the county. The Sheriff’s Office looks forward to continuing to work with the Board of Supervisors to fine tune the auditor model.” Threet says the SCSO’s call to eliminate the IOLERO and replace it with a contracted auditor was news to him when he read the report. “It’s the first I heard of it, in [Giordano’s] response.” Essick says that despite taking the reins as elected sheriff in a

month, “we still have a sitting sheriff and [Giordano] is the one who is going to be answering, speaking for the SCSO on the report.” In a phone call with the Bohemian, Essick declined to offer a view on the future of the IOLERO. Giordano’s still his boss, he says. “I could say something that would undermine him. We’re really close to me taking over, but his name is still on the front door. I don’t want to do something to jeopardize the relationship with him.” No doubt he’s in a bit of a sensitive spot. The unpopular sheriff who was in charge when the IOLERO was created is no longer with the department—and the popular sheriff who is pushing to shut down the IOLERO will be leaving in a month. Meanwhile, a federal civil lawsuit around the Lopez shooting by an SCSO deputy who remains on the force drags on. Essick was publically and initially opposed to the creation of the IOLERO as it was being discussed after the Lopez shooting, but expressed support for the office through the course of a robust campaign season that saw the first contested sheriff’s race in the county in nearly three decades. Word from Giordano, who endorsed Essick, is that it’s premature to discuss what he’ll be saying to the supervisors on Dec. 4. He encouraged the public and media to attend. Police-reform activists will likely turn out in force. Essick says he’s taking a wait-and-see approach before weighing in on Threet’s proposed changes to the IOLERO ordinance—which generally call for enhanced access to the police agency. The ordinance isn’t on the agenda and isn’t coming up for a vote this week. “If and when the board decides to take up that discussion and talk about [the ordinance modifications], I’m sure there will be plenty of robust public discussion on it then, and when I get a chance to see what they’re really looking at,” Essick says, “I’d be happy to weigh in—but that could be weeks or a couple months away.”


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Crush CULTURE

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The week’s events: a selective guide

NOBODY PUTS BABY IN A CORNER Pop and punk stars Har Mar Superstar and Sabrina Ellis have the time of their lives performing songs from ‘Dirty Dancing’ on Wednesday, Dec. 5, at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley. See Concerts, p18.

Crafts & Community An eclectic gathering of artists, makers, entrepreneurs and crafters are gearing up for the second annual St. Helena Winter Market, happening all weekend at Native Sons Hall and featuring everything you need to get decked out for this holiday season. Over 25 vendors share their wares, from ceramics and jewelry to handmade stationary. Kids can make ornaments and adults can pick up silver-tipped Christmas Trees from Nimbus Arts. Friday’s market opening event benefits the Native Sons Hall preservation project. Friday to Sunday, 1313 Spring St., St. Helena. Friday, 6pm to 9pm. $10. Saturday–Sunday, 10am to 6pm. Free admission. sthelenawintermarket.com.

SONOMA

Holiday Spirits Once you’ve spent the day holiday shopping at Sonoma’s Cornerstone artisan marketplace, the Meadowcroft Wines tasting room offers a way to wind down with its annual Holiday Wine Cocktail Series. In collaboration with Prohibition Spirits, Meadowcroft features a new wine cocktail each Saturday in December, such as Ugly Sweater (bourbon and Zinfandel with orange slice and cherries), Orange You Jolly, Mulled Merry Mistletoe and more. Sample a complimentary festive wine cocktail with each classic wine tasting on Saturday, Dec. 1, at Meadowcroft tasting room, 23574 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. 10am to 5pm. No reservations or appointment needed. 707.934.4090.

HEALDSBURG

Holiday Tree Harvest One of the most iconic images from Peanuts is Charlie Brown’s tiny tree from the 1965 animated television special, A Charlie Brown Christmas. Representing holiday cheer triumphing over commercialism, the small sapling with a big heart has inspired this weekend’s Great Charlie Brown Christmas Tree Hunt at Riddell Preserve. You’re invited to harvest a Douglas fir tree that, while not manicured like trees from a Christmas tree farm, will still fill your home with spirits bright. The hunt also helps the preserve’s fire-reduction efforts. Saws, gloves and cider will be available Sunday, Dec. 2, 550 Westside Road, Healdsburg. 11am to 3pm. Free; weather permitting. landpaths.org.

N O VAT O

Musical Relief As the Camp fire in Paradise set new standards for awfulness, North Bay communities sent emergency help, and are now about to ramp up the fundraising efforts. This weekend, local music promoter KC Turner hosts a massive, 10-hour charity event at HopMonk Tavern in Novato. The daylong Camp Fire Benefit Concert features legendary guitarist Alejandro Escovedo flying in from Texas, and also boasts sets from local stars like Greg Loiacono of the Mother Hips, Lester Chambers, Megan Slankard, Matt Jaffe and many others on Sunday, Dec. 2, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. Noon to 10pm. $50 and up. kcturnerpresents.com.

—Charlie Swanson


Stage

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I’M BAAAAAACK! It’s not really

Christmas until it gets twisted.

Merry Twistmas David Templeton warps the boards, as in the old days BY HARRY DUKE

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nce upon a time, way back in the summer of 2003, Bohemian contributor David Templeton and producer Dan Zastrow were having a conversation about a strange Christmas story that David had written.

“You know what would be cool?” David said. “Maybe someday finding some interesting people to gather onstage and read a bunch of twisted Christmas stories, and maybe do it as a benefit.” And Dan said, “You know, we really can do that.” And David said, “Really?” And Dan said, “Really!” And in December of that year, the first ever Twisted Christmas Live! was unveiled. Performers such as musician Charlie Musselwhite, bluesman Roy Rogers, comedian Johnny Steele, radio’s Steve Jaxon, actress Diane Amos (best known as the Pine-Sol

lady in commercials) and dozens of others would regale local audiences over the years with the most twisted Christmas tales imaginable while supporting local food banks. Audiences, at first confused by musicians not playing music and comedians not telling jokes, soon took to the format and it became a sold-out event for years. After their 2012 “End of the World Show,” Templeton and Zastrow decided to commit their time and energy to other projects, so the final curtain was drawn on Twisted Christmas Live! and Sonoma County Christmases were never the same again. But like the Grinch returning presents to the Whos in Whoville, Templeton is bringing Twisted Christmas Live! back to the area, this time as a benefit for the Spreckels Theatre Company’s Performing Arts and Youth Theater Programs. Some of the old crew will return, like comedians Will and Debi Durst and the Reduced Shakespeare Company’s Reed Martin. Newcomers include goth comedian Oliver Graves (America’s Got Talent) and veteran film, television and stage actor Charles Siebert, who spent two years playing Scrooge in 6th Street Playhouse’s Christmas Carol. Audiences will see these and other performers presenting seven weird, funny, off-the-wall Christmas stories, including a rhyming version of Die Hard, a reading of “The Night Before Christmas” done as a bingo game, an original ghost story by Healdsburg’s Irène Hodes, plus a satirical musical tribute to the music of Disney’s Frozen, some outrageous short films by local filmmaker John Harden and an appearance by the North Bay Zombie Caroling Choir. Templeton hopes people who want something a little different in their holiday entertainment will still come out. “It’s pretty much for everybody,” he says, “who likes to laugh and gasp and go, ‘Oooooh, I really wasn’t expecting that!’” David Templeton’s ‘Twisted Christmas Live!’ will be performed Sunday, Dec. 9, at 7pm at Spreckels Performing Arts Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. $30–$35. 707.588.3400. spreckelsonline.com.


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holiday picks A T Y O U R H O M E T O W N B O O K S T O R E

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SEBASTOPOL • PETALUMA • SANTA ROSA HEALDSBURG • NAPA • CALISTOGA SAN RAFAEL • NOVATO • LARKSPUR

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Wed 11⁄28 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–20 • All Ages

Luz of Y La Bamba with

Sea Of Bees

Thu 11⁄29 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–18 • All Ages

All Things Hank

A Tribute to Hank Williams & Family feat Barry Sless, Darren Nelson,

Danny Uzi, Bryan Kehoe & many more Fri 11⁄30 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–32 • All Ages

Featuring Saint Croix reggae legend Vaughn Benjamin with his full band

Akae Beka (formerly Midnite) with special guest Spiritual + Dubtonic Kru Sun 12⁄2 • Doors 10am ⁄ $17–19 • All Ages feat Irena Eide of Rainy Eyes Little Folkies Family Band Holiday Concert Wed 12⁄5 • 10:30pm ⁄ $2850–3350 • 21+ (((folkYEAH!))) Presents

Har Mar Superstar and Sabrina Ellis do the songs of Dirty Dancing Introducing Heart Bones

Outdoor Dining Sat & Sun Brunch 11–3

feat

John Kadlecik, Jeff Chimenti, Reed Mathis & Jay Lane

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

WEDNESDAY

NOV 28 FRIDAY

NOV 30 SATURDAY

DEC 1 SUNDAY

DEC 2 FRIDAY

DEC 7

PETTY THEFT

COVERS⁄ TRIBUTE • DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

WHITEY MORGAN WITH ALEX WILLIAMS

COUNTRY • DOORS 7PM • 21+

ANDRE NICKATINA WITH D-LO & J.LATELY

HIP-HOP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

DEC 8

THE GRAIN WITH THE KING STREET GIANTS & THE BIG FIT

SUNDAY

THE SLACKERS WITH THE

SATURDAY

DEC 9 SATURDAY

DEC 15

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

Dec Sun

Gospel Sunday Night Dinner Show

Mon

Gospel Christmas Eve Dinner Show

Dec 23 Sons of the Soul Revivers 7:00 Dec 24 Sons of the Soul Revivers 7:00

Year End Beatle Fest!

Sat Dec 29 & Sun Dec 30 8:00

The Sun Kings

The Beatles Never Sounded So Good! Mon

15th Annual New Year’s Eve Party!

Dec 31 The Zydeco Flames

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

NOV 30 - DEC 2

Transcendence’s Broadway Holiday Spectacular DECEMBER 5

So You Think You Can Dance Live! DECEMBER 7

Posada Navideña

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Life Saver

Mary Gauthier lends a voice to wounded veterans

POOR MAN'S WHISKEY AMERICANA • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

MUSIC THAT HEALS Mary Gauthier gives fresh meaning to the phrase ‘Support our troops.’

Reservations Advised

AGGROLITES & VIERNES 13

12⁄21 Blind Boys of Alabama Christmas Show, 12⁄22 The Soul Section w ⁄ DJ Rise, 12⁄28 The English Beat, 12⁄29 Howlin Rain w ⁄ Whiskerman, 12⁄31 NYE 2019 with Tommy Castro and the Painkillers, 1⁄10 Man Man, 1⁄11 Shwayze, 1⁄12 Foreverland - The Electrifying Tribute To Michael Jackson, 1⁄17 Corb Lund, 1⁄18 Paul Thorn w/ Alice Drinks the Kool-Aid, 1⁄20 Tim Flannery & the Lunatic Fringe

Mary Gauthier performs Tuesday, Dec. 4, at HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $20. 707.829.7300.

Beach Boys + Rock n’ Roll Originals 8:30

Gospel Christmas Eve Weekend

Rodney Strong Vineyards Dance Series

SKA • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

Now Gauthier is using her songwriting gifts to tell a different set of stories. Her 2018 album, Rifles & Rosary Beads, was co-

OU T ! Anniversary Show S OL D Fri Nov 30 Paul Thorn Band Sat Bishop’s Big Fun Trio Dec 1 Elvin Just added Angela Strehli Band Sun Dance Dec 2 HowellDevine Party! Sat Dec 8 Danny Click’s Birthday Party with The Hell Yeahs! 8:30 Fri City Blues Dec 14 Sweet Dance Lessons! 8:00 Sat 15 The Last Call Troubadours

Nov 29

ROCK • DOORS 8PM • 21+

FOLK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

olk sensation Mary Gauthier is in the business of telling stories. Usually, they are her own, and for over 20 years, Gauthier has plumbed the depths of her soul with introspective and somber tunes about her struggles with childhood abandonment, drugs and other issues, sung with a forlorn Southern accent that regularly brings audiences to tears.

20th Anniversary Weekend!

WITH BANG DATA

& SPECIAL GUEST DAVID GRISMAN

Music

Thu

LOS LONELY BOYS THE TRAVELIN MCCOURYS

written with U.S. military veterans and their families as part of SongwritingWith:Soldiers, a nonprofit program that facilitates retreats where professional songwriters and wounded veterans collaborate to create music. “We bear witness and turn their stories into songs,” says Gauthier of SongwritingWith:Soldiers, which she has been active in for over four years. “I reached a place where I realized these are really good songs, I think I should make a record,” she says. “I got the blessing of the organization to put these songs out in the world.” Each of the 11 songs on Rifles & Rosary Beads delivers a gutpunch of emotion. Opening track “Soldiering On” juxtaposes a soldier’s mental state in battle and then later at home. “Bullet Holes in the Sky” uses images of color guards and tiny American flags waving in parades to expose a soldier’s loneliness in a society that cannot relate to his wartime service. “A lot of our veterans feel invisible now; they feel unseen and they feel removed,” Gauthier says. “We call it the civilianmilitary divide. These songs help bridge that. It gets civilians into a place of empathy with what our veterans and their families are going through.” About 22 veterans commit suicide every day in the United States. Gauthier hopes to shine a light on their struggles and help them heal. “When you’ve been traumatized, as so many of our soldiers have been, what happened to you, there’s no words for,” she says. “But this is where music can come in and pick up the thread. I can play the melody and see the tears and know the melody is reflecting how they feel, and then you use metaphor to access what’s inside of them. The song becomes a reflection of their soul, and they suddenly don’t feel so alone. Somebody sees them, somebody understands.”

Din n er & A Show

3rd Show Added Due To Popular Demand! Thu 12⁄6 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $32–42 • All Ages Sat 12⁄8 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $32–42 • 21+ Sun 12⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $32–42 • All Ages

Golden Gate Wingmen

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week

Laura Partain

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12th Annual

DECEMBER 11

Tony Bennett

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

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LEVI LLOYD AND FRIENDS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6 • 6PM

SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | MARCH 21-27, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.46

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ELAINE LUCIA AND FRIENDS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 • 7PM

AWESOME CAKES

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8 • 7PM

THE SIDEMEN

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 13 • 6PM

PETER WELKER SEXTET

FEATURING DEBORAH WINTERS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14 • 7PM

MISS MOONSHINE

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15 • 7PM

DIRTY RED BARN

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6 • 6PM

CHUCK SHER AND THE RED BRICK ALL STARS HAPPY HOUR: MON—FRI, 4PM—6PM BRUNCH: SAT, SUN 11AM—2PM

Mon—Thu: 11:30am—9pm, Fri—Sat: 11:30am—12am Food served til 11pm; Fri, Sat & Karaoke Wed til 10

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBE R 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 11/30–12/6

Sebastiani Theatre Presents

Honorable

Green Book – CC & AD 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30

PG13

Concerts

Border – R 10:30-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30 Can You Ever Forgive Me?

SONOMA COUNTY

– CC & AD R 10:45-1:15-6:15, Tues 12/4: 1:15-6:15

Out of the Fire Benefit Concert & Silent Auction

Boy Erased – CC & AD R 12:45-6:00 Maria By Callas – CC & AD PG 10:15-3:15-8:30

Free Solo – CC PG13 10:40-1:00-3:45-6:30-8:45, Tues 12/4: 10:40-6:30-8:45

Presented By

Silvermoon Theatre

The Old Man & the Gun – CC & AD PG13 4:00-8:40

The King & I: Live From the London Palladium – Tues 12/4: 1:00pm 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

December 14,15 & 16

The Snow Maiden Presented By Sonoma Conservatory December 8 & 9

Wings Of Desire Closed Caption and Audio Description available for all films

Ralph Breaks the Internet Bohemian Rhapsody • Boy Erased Can You Ever Forgive Me? Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

Calendar

December 21

Traveling Spectacular With Oddjob Ensemble December 22

www.SebastianiTheatre.com

Sonoma County songwriters Sarah Baker, Volker Strifler, Levi Lloyd and others perform to raise funds for musicians affected by the wildfire. Dec 2, 1pm. $10-$30. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Santa Rosa Symphony Regional symphony with a national reputation presents “Viva Italia”with guest conductor Jayce Ogren. Times vary. Dec 1-3. $24 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Whitey Morgan

Working-class country rocker from Flint, Michigan, plays a rough-and-tumble brand of honky-tonk. Dec 2, 8pm. $25; VIP $75. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

MARIN COUNTY ® BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, November 30 – Thu, December 6

DINE-IN CINEMA Bruschetta • Paninis • Soups • Salads • Appetizers Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance Foreign Language Film!Stone In Years!” – Box Office “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 RR DV (1:15(12:30) 4:15)THE 7:15 9:55 PG-13 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:20 9:15 9:45CC Fri:Award 1:15 at 12:00 (12:30) 2:40begins 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Noms BestRActor! Academy 8 Great Beers on Tap +Award Wine byNominee the Glass and Bottle

GREEN BOOK

2 Academy Award Noms Including Best Actor!

MARIA BY CALLAS

“A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” –DV LA (12:20) 2:45 5:10 9:45 R Times LA VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (1:40 4:30) 7:00 PG CC (12:45) 3:45 6:45 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET OF KELLS Sat: 10:30am Added Show! 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This Believable (1:15) 9:40 RCC One ofOne This Year’s Best!” – RNewsday 9:15 Week7:10 Only! DV If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

SUSPIRIA (2018)

ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including PRODIGAL SONS (1:00) 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:40 R Best Picture, Actor & Best (1:20 3:50)Best 6:40 9:00 PGDirector! CC DV (2:20) 9:10 NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu

RALPH BREAKS THE INTERNET MILK

MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES(1:10) OF GRINDELWALD WAITRESS 4:30 7:30 NR

THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

(1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R CC 5(1:00 Academy Award Noms Including Picture! 4:00) 7:00 9:50 PG-13 DV “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

FROST/NIXON

(12:507:20 3:50) 9:30 R WIDOWS (2:15) R 6:50 GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Mysterious, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine DR REVOLuTIONARY SEUSS’ THE GRINCH ROAD

“Deliciously unsettling!” – RLAPG Times (12:45 2:45 4:45) 6:45 8:45 CC DV PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50

THE presents GHOST Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of CAN YOU EVER ME? (2:15) 7:15FORGIVE PG-13 (1:15) 4:15 7:00 9:30 R

PuRE: A BOuLDERING Fri-Mon: (12:00 4:35) 6:50 FLICK R CC DV Michael Moore’s FebWed: 26th at 7:15 Thu: (4:35) THE Thu, MOST DANGEROuS Tue: (12:00 4:35) (4:00)

SICKO MOVIES IN MORNING MAN INTHE AMERICA Starts Fri, June 29th!

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

Starts Fri,Sun June 29th! Fri, Sat, &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets7:10 On Sale at BoxCC Office! (1:30 ELLSBERG 4:20) 9:50 PG-13 DV 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 R 25 CC Years! DV 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 10:20 AM CHANGELING Fri-Mon: (2:10) 9:10 Tue: (2:10) Venessa Redgrave Meryl Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH AND CHONG’S 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED Wed: 9:55 Thu: 10:00 HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, AprR20th 8pm 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th! CC DVAM

BOY ERASED

A STAR IS BORN

Fri-Tue/Thu: (1:10 4:10) 7:05 9:55 Wed: (1:10) 7:05

Hanukkah Celebration with Inspector Gadje San Francisco–based Balkan Brass Band leads a holiday extravaganza that marks the Jewish Festival of Lights. Dec 1, 7pm. $10-$35. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Har Mar Superstar & Sabrina Ellis

band’s second annual holiday tour features classic holiday songs and the group’s biggest hits. Nov 30-Dec 1, 7 and 9pm. $39-$89. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Symphony Napa Valley

Soprano Marnie Breckenridge returns to Napa Valley with “Christmas at the Symphony,” featuring holiday favorites. Dec 2, 3pm. $30-$65. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Ultrafaux & Hot Club of Baltimore

Napa Valley Jazz Society presents the dynamic gypsy jazz group. Dec 2, 4pm. $25$45. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center

Nov 30, Benefit For National Suicide Prevention Lifeline with Kristy Q and DeathGlam. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Glaser Center

Nov 30-Dec 1, tribute to Leonard Bernstein with Santa Rosa Symphonic Chorus. Dec 2, 3pm, “Festive, Family, Fun” with Healdsburg Chorus. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Minneapolis pop star and Texas punk-rocker team up under the name Heart Bones to perform songs from “Dirty Dancing.” Dec 5, 10pm. $28-$38. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Michelle Schmitt

Gundlach Bundschu Winery

Bay Area songwriter performs her tenth annual holiday benefit concert and releases her new album, “St Mary.” Nov 29, 8pm. $100. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Squirrel Nut Zippers Holiday Caravan Experimental jazz-swing

Nov 29, Isle of Klezbos. Dec 1, Rock Collegium. Dec 4-5, Opera and Music Theatre Scenes: The Mariachi Story. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Dec 5, Chris Robinson Brotherhood. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

HopMonk Sebastopol Nov 29, Dragon Smoke. Dec 4, Mary Gauthier. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Nov 28, Roem Baur. Nov 29, JL

Stiles. Nov 30, the 14ers. Dec 1, the Rusty String Express. Dec 2, Elima. Dec 5, JimBo Trout. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Dec 3, Big Bad Voodoo Daddy’s Wild and Swingin’ Holiday Party. Dec 4, LeAnn Rimes: You and Me and Christmas Tour. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Nov 28, Los Lonely Boys. Nov 30, the Travelin McCourys and David Grisman. Dec 1, Petty Theft. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

The Phoenix Theater Dec 1, Cyborg Octopus with Sepulchre and Wroht. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Dec 1, Stone Cold Mollie. Dec 3, the Blues Defenders pro jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

MARIN COUNTY HopMonk Novato

Dec 2, 12pm, Campfire benefit with Alejandro Escovedo and friends. Dec 5, Tony Lucca and the Contenders. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Sweetwater Music Hall Nov 28, Luz Elena Mendoza with Sea of Bees. Nov 29, Hank Williams tribute with Barry Sles and others. Nov 30, Akae Beka. Dec 1-2, Ryan Bingham. Sold-out. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Nov 28, DJ Williams & Shots Fired. Nov 29, Beat-Lele: ukulele tribute to the Beatles. Dec 2, the Duo Quartet. Dec 5, Eki Shola and Michael Fortunato. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center

Dec 1, 4pm, VOENA: Voices of Angels...Sunset by Candlelight. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Uptown Theatre

Nov 30, Jonny Lang. Dec 1, Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123. )

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19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOVEMBE R 28- D EC E M BE R 4, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Calendar ( 18

SONOMA COUNTY CANNABIS DELIVERY www

sparc.co

Veterans Memorial Park

Dec 1, 2pm, “TubaChristmas” with Tubas At Large. 850 Main St, Napa. napacitynights.com.

Comedy Eliot Chang

The Laugh Cellar co-hosts a standup show featuring the refreshingly positive comedian. Dec 1, 7pm. $20. Flamingo Lounge, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Dance So You Think You Can Dance

Live show features the television competition 2018 finalists. Dec 5, 8pm. $55-$69. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Events Bay Area Made Holiday Market

SANTA ROSA

1061 N. DUTTON AVE 707.843.3227 | A-10-17-0000074-TEMP

SEBASTOPOL 6771 SEBASTOPOL AVE 707.823.4206 | A-10-18-0000178-TEMP

Browse and buy holiday gifts from over 40 of the Bay Area’s favorite and emerging craftspeople Dec 1, 11am. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.824.5600.

Bijoux Holiday Open House

Fine arts exhibit and sale includes handcrafted jewelry, ceramics, clothing and more from local artists and designers. Dec 1-2. Free. Bijoux, 583 Harrison St, Sebastopol. 707.326.6874.

Calistoga Holiday Village & Christmas Faire

On Friday evening, stroll downtown Calistoga and indulge in holiday shopping, then spend Saturday finding artisan crafts and holiday activities at the faire. Dec 1-2. Free admission. Napa County Fairgrounds, 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga. visitcalistoga.com.

Calistoga Lighted Tractor Parade

@sparc.co

@sparccannabis

@sparcsf

Calistoga’s ag heritage and the holiday season comes together with vintage tractors, trucks and autos lit up in dazzling displays. Dec 1, 7pm. Free. Downtown Calistoga, Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. visitcalistoga.com.

Chanukah at the River The event features a giant menorah, music, crafts, latkes, doughnuts and more. Dec 2, 4:30pm. Free. Water Street Promenade, 100 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.559.8585.

Guerneville Holiday Extravaganza & Parade of Lights

Celebration opens with Thursday evening Tree Lighting and merchant open house and closes with Saturday evening parade of lights. Nov 29-Dec 1. Free. Downtown Guerneville, Main St, Guerneville. russianriver.com.

Gundlach Bundschu Holiday Bazaar & Toy Drive Bring an unwrapped toy for Sonoma kids in need and enjoy live music, goods for sale, photo booth, food and more. Dec 1, 11am. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Handmade Holiday Crafts Fair

Over 80 local artists sell their gift-ready wares, with live entertainment and holiday goodies. Dec 1-2. $3. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Healdsburg Chanukah Celebration Live music, special guests and latkes highlight this festive evening. Dec 3, 5pm. Oakville Grocery, 124 W Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3200.

Holiday on Florence

Showcase of fine local crafts ranges from weavings and jewelry to cookbooks and paintings. Dec 1-2, 11am. Free admission. The Weaving Studio, 343 Florence Ave, Sebastopol. 707.280.2607.

Holidays in Yountville The town transforms into a winter wonderland with sparkling lights, live entertainment, art shows, shopping, food and wine tours, carriage rides and more. Through Jan 1, 2019. Downtown Yountville, Washington St, Yountville. yountville.com.

Lighting of the Snowmen

Music, dancing, beer and movies mark the annual celebration. Dec 1, 4pm. Free. Cornerstone Sonoma,

23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Mercatino di Natale Christmas Festival

Celebrate holidays Italianstyle with vendors, wine and beer bar, exhibit of Italians in Sonoma County and entertainment. Dec 1, 11am. $5. St Rose Hall, 320 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. 707.591.9696.

Monte Rio Holiday Wonderland Craft Faire Local crafters sell their handmade holiday gifts with delicious foods and family fun atmosphere. Dec 1-2. Monte Rio Community Center, 20488 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.9956.

Montgomery Village Chanukah Festival

Menorah lighting, dreidels and more mark the Festival of Lights. Dec 2, 4pm. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

The Reindeer Run

Dress in colorful garb and walk or run in this eighth annual event hosted by KHOPE International poverty relief group. Dec 1, 8am. $37-$47. American Canyon Wetlands parking lot, Wetlands Edge road and Eucalyptus drive, American Canyon. khopeinternational.org.

Santa Train

The Wine Train turns into an enchanting holiday experience with hot cocoa, freshly baked cookies, games and sing-alongs. Through Dec 26. $39 and up. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa. 800.427.4124.

Sonoma Plaza Chanukah Celebration Light the menorah with festive foods and live music. Dec 5, 5pm. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.1090.

Field Trips The Great Charlie Brown Christmas Tree Hunt

Find your non-traditional Christmas tree for this holiday season and help with fire reduction work. Pre-registration required. Dec 2, 11am. Riddell Preserve, 550 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. landpaths.org.


Luther Burbank Holiday Open House View Burbank’s historic home and greenhouse, and get fresh-baked cookies and spiced tea. Dec 1-2, 10am. $3. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, 204 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Film From Baghdad to the Bay New doc on Ghazwan Alsharif, Iraqi refugee now living in San Francisco as openly gay activist, screens with filmmaker discussion. Dec 3, 12pm. Free. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra Musicians accompany the classic Harold Lloyd silent comedy “Speedy.” Dec 2, 4:15pm. $15-$20. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

The Push Grant Korgan attempts to become the first spinal cord-injured athlete to reach the South Pole in this documentary, presented by SIFF with wine reception. Dec 4, 6pm. $20. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Food & Drink Holiday Chocolates from Bean to Bar Susan and Jeff Mall of Healdsburg’s Volo Chocolate lead a workshop. Dec 2, 1pm. $95. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Holiday Gifting at Landmark Vineyards Sample wines while browsing gift baskets for the wine lover on your list. Dec 1, 1pm.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Holiday Wine Cocktails

A John Waters Christmas

Get into the holiday spirit(s) with fresh and festive drinks. Sat, Dec 1. Meadowcroft Wines, 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.4090.

Larson Family Winery Holiday Open House Sip samples of wines and taste gourmet foods, with live music and special prices on gifts. Dec 1-2, 11am. Free admission. Larson Family Winery, 23355 Millerick Rd, Sonoma. 707.938.3031.

Robert Mondavi Winery Holiday Tree Lighting & Celebration Eighth annual party includes wine tasting, hot apple cider, Italian cookies, cheese and charcuterie, with carriage rides and carols. Dec 1, 3pm. $25; kids under 12 are free. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 888.766.6328.

Lectures Crash Course: From the Good War to the Forever War Learn many unknown facts that have shaped US history since the Vietnam war. Dec 2, 2pm. $15. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Why Your Genes Aren’t Your Destiny Sutter Health presents a lecture and discussion on the complex interplay between our genes and our environment. Nov 29, 7pm. Free. DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Sonoma Wine Country, 1 Double Tree Dr, Rohnert Park, 707.584.5466.

Theater Annie Broadway classic about everyone’s favorite orphan is a family favorite holiday musical. Through Dec 16. $22$35. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Every Brilliant Thing Left Edge Theatre presents the poignant and humorous story of a young boy who lists everything worth living for. Through Dec 9. $25-$40.

Legendary filmmaker, author and raconteur spreads Yuletide profanity and perverted piety with his critically acclaimed oneman show. Nov 30, 9pm. $52. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Le Cirque de Bohème

Old-style circus troupe presents a new show, “Yesterday,” with an amazing cast of characters. Through Dec 16. $27-$55. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. cirquedeboheme.com.

Nuncrackers the Musical

Holiday show is filled with “Nunsense” humor and beloved caroles. Through Dec 9. $20$30. College of Marin Studio Theatre, 835 College Avenue, Kentfield. 415.485.9555.

Scrooge in Love

After “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge’s life takes a turn for the romantic in a new musical. Nov 30-Dec 16. $20$40. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Transcendence’s Broadway Holiday Spectacular

New holiday celebration for all ages features performers from Broadway. Nov 30-Dec 2. $39 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The Wickhams: Christmas at Pemberley New holiday classic that revisits Jane Austen’s world from “Pride & Prejudice” makes its world premiere. Through Dec 9. $10-$52. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

21

M.A. Film Studies Grow and explore. Study and appreciate film on a new level. Intensive study in film making practices, and overviews of key concepts and film theorists. Info Session Sunday, December 2

3:30 - 4:15 p.m. (before The Beaches of Agnès) Ives Hall 101, SSU

$5 parking pass required in SSU general lots

sonoma.education/film

beth.warner@sonoma.edu 707.664.3977

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Tour along beautiful Mark West Creek is followed by live music, hot cider, wreathmaking and other holiday crafting. Pre-registration required. Dec 1, 12pm. by donation. Rancho Mark West Farm, 7125 St Helena Rd, Santa Rosa. landpaths.org.

Free admission. Landmark Vineyards, 101 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.0216.

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ere’s a question for budding chemists in the land of milk and marijuana: What do you get when you mix water and THC extracted from weed? Answer? You get cannabisinfused water, of course.

Carbonate the water and now you’ve got a cannabis spritzer. A cannabis cocktail. A bud-based bevie. Now there’s a local company, Occidental Power, creating THCinfused water that will be on shelves in the New Year. The company uses Russian River tap water that’s filtered before the cannabis is added. Then comes the fizz. Next year, the folks at Occidental Power plan to buy from local growers, but right now, they’re using their own organic cannabis that they grow outdoors. Only the choicest flowers go into the cocktail. The extracted psychoactive component is added to the water and becomes Mountjoy Sparking Water, which will be available in local dispensaries starting in January 2019, in a childproof, 16-ounce plastic bottle. The beverage will come in several flavors, including blackberry, lemon, lime, peach and natural—which offers a mix of herbs from the Sonoma County Herb Exchange in Sebastopol.

Occidental Power won’t say exactly what herbs go into the mix. The company doesn’t want to give away its secret formula. Alex Mountjoy is a familiar face in Occidental in Sonoma County. He’ll soon be famous all over town for his cocktail. “For a long time, I wanted a cannabis beverage,” he says. “I developed it as much for myself as for the market. “I know this might sound clichéd, but our cannabis beverage is a thinking person’s tool that helps balance your life,” he adds. “It certainly balances my life. It’s good for cooking, sleeping and working; it increases productivity.” Mountjoy and his wife and business partner, Jenny, are no strangers to manufacturing and marketing. For years, they sold clocks, mirrors and picture frames all over the United States. Their factories were located in the East Bay. In addition to the cannabis cocktail, they have a body-care line. Right now none of those products contain cannabis product, but they will in the near future. They also offer bottles of Mountjoy Sparking Water infused with CBD. Sip the CBD product to help with anxiety and without any psychoactive effects. It’s shipped around the country and also available in local supermarkets.


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For the week of November 28

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Every year the bird known as the Arctic tern experiences two summers and enjoys more daylight than any other animal. That’s because it regularly makes a long-distance journey from the Arctic to the Antarctic and back again. Let’s designate this hardy traveler as your inspirational creature for the next 10 months. May it help animate you to experiment with brave jaunts that broaden and deepen your views of the world. I don’t necessarily mean you should literally do the equivalent of circumnavigating the planet. Your expansive adventures might take place mostly in inner realms or closer to home. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

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When the American Civil War began in 1861, the United States fractured. Four years later, the union was technically restored when the Northern states defeated the Southern states. At that time, African-American slavery became illegal everywhere for the first time since the country’s birth decades earlier. But there was a catch. The Southern states soon enacted laws that mandated racial segregation and ensured that African Americans continued to suffer systematic disadvantages. Is there a comparable issue in your personal life? Did you at sometime in the past try to fix an untenable situation only to have it sneak back in a less severe but still debilitating form? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to finish the reforms; to enforce a thorough and permanent correction.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Does an elusive giant creature with a long neck inhabit the waters of Loch Ness in northern Scotland? Alleged sightings have been reported since 1933. Most scientists dismiss the possibility that “Nessie” actually exists, but there are photos, films and videos that provide tantalizing evidence. A government-funded Scottish organization has prepared contingency plans just in case the beast does make an unambiguous appearance. In that spirit, and in accordance with astrological omens, I recommend that you prepare yourself for the arrival in your life of intriguing anomalies and piquant mysteries. Like Nessie, they’re nothing to worry about, but you’ll be better able to deal gracefully with them if you’re not totally taken by surprise. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Does moss really “eat” rocks, as Cancerian author Elizabeth Gilbert attests in her novel The Signature of All Things? Marine chemist Martin Johnson says yes. Moss really does break down and release elements in solid stone. Gilbert adds, “Given enough time, a colony of moss can turn a cliff into gravel, and turn that gravel into topsoil.” Furthermore, this hardy plant can grow virtually everywhere: in the tropics and frozen wastes, on tree bark and roofing slate, on sloth fur and snail shells. I propose that we make moss your personal symbol of power for now, Cancerian. Be as indomitable, resourceful and resilient as moss. LEO (July 23–August 22) Let’s shout out a big “THANKS!” and “HALLELUJAH!” to the enzymes in our bodies. These catalytic proteins do an amazing job of converting the food we eat into available energy. Without them, our cells would take forever to turn any particular meal into the power we need to walk, talk and think. I bring this marvel to your attention, Leo, because now is a favorable time to look for and locate metaphorical equivalents of enzymes: influences and resources that will aid and expedite your ability to live the life you want to live. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) “Every dreamer knows that it is entirely possible to be homesick for a place you’ve never been to, perhaps more homesick than for familiar ground,” writes author Judith Thurman. I’m guessing you will experience this feeling in the coming weeks. What does it mean if you do? It may be your deep psyche’s way of nudging you to find an energizing new sanctuary. Or perhaps it means you should search for fresh ways to feel peaceful and well-grounded. Maybe it’s a prod to push you outside your existing comfort zone so you can expand your comfort zone. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Venice, Italy, consists of 118 small islands that rise from a shallow

BY ROB BREZSNY

lagoon. A network of 443 bridges keeps them all connected. But Venice isn’t the world champion of bridges. The American city of Pittsburgh, Penn., holds that title, with 446. I nominate these two places to be your inspirational symbols in the coming weeks. It’s time for you build new metaphorical bridges and take good care of your existing metaphorical bridges.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) To aid and

support your navigation through this pragmatic phase of your astrological cycle, I have gathered counsel from three productive pragmatists. First is author Helen Keller. She said she wanted to accomplish great and noble things, but her “chief duty” was “to accomplish small tasks as if they were great and noble.” Second, author George Orwell believed that “to see what is in front of one’s nose” requires never-ending diligence. Finally, author Pearl S. Buck testified that she didn’t wait around until she was in the right mood before beginning her work. Instead, she invoked her willpower to summon the necessary motivation.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

Blackjack is a card game popular in gambling casinos. In the eternal struggle to improve the odds of winning big money, some blackjack players work in teams. One teammate secretly counts the cards as they’re dealt and assesses what cards are likely to come up next. Another teammate gets subtle signals from his cardcounting buddy and makes the bets. A casino in Windsor, Ontario, pressed charges against one blackjack team, complaining that this tactic was deceptive and dishonest. But the court decided in the team’s favor, ruling that the players weren’t cheating but simply using smart strategy. In the spirit of these blackjack teams, Sagittarius, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you to better your odds in a “game” of your choice by using strategy that is as good as cheating but isn’t actually cheating.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) What has become of the metaphorical seeds you planted around your last birthday? Have your intentions flourished? Have your dreams blossomed? Have your talents matured? Have your innocent questions evolved into more penetrating questions? Be honest and kind as you answer these inquiries. Be thoughtful and big-hearted as you take inventory of your ability to follow through on your promises to yourself. If people are quizzical about how much attention you’re giving yourself during this time of taking stock, inform them that your astrologer has told you that December is Love Yourself Better Month. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) If you want to play the drinking game called Possum, you and your friends climb up into a tree with a case of beer and start drinking. As time goes by, people get so hammered they fall out of the tree. The winner is the last one left in the tree. I hope you won’t engage in this form of recreation anytime soon—nor in any other activity that even vaguely resembles it. The coming weeks should be a time of calling on favors, claiming your rewards, collecting your blessings and graduating to the next level. I trust your policy will be: no trivial pursuits, no wasted efforts, no silly stunts. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

In his song “Happy Talk,” Academy Award-winning lyricist Oscar Hammerstein II offered this advice: “You gotta have a dream. If you don’t have a dream, how you gonna have a dream come true?” Where do you stand in this regard, Pisces? Do you in fact have a vivid, clearly defined dream? And have you developed a strategy for making that dream come true? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to home in on what you really want and hone your scheme for manifesting it. (P.S.: Keep in mind Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s idea: “A goal without a plan is just a wish.”)

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 28- DECEMBE R 4, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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North Bay Bohemian 1848  

November 28-December 4, 2018

North Bay Bohemian 1848  

November 28-December 4, 2018