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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Setting a Standard Those animal-rights protesters exposed some horrific animal abuse at our local farms, as evidenced by the video they released (“Cage Match,” Oct. 24). I wish the Sonoma County Farm Bureau and the sheriff’s department were more interested in stopping this illegal animal cruelty than covering up for them. The video clearly exposes the claims of Whole Foods as buying only from “humane” farms and wanting

transparency as a shameless marketing ploy. Sonoma County could be setting the standard for animal welfare! Thank you to the protesters for making us aware.

DOUG MOELLER

Santa Rosa

Unrest in the Forest Besides destroying thousands of homes, many thousands of trees were

THIS MODERN WORLD

lost in last year’s fires. Sadly, when burned lands were cleared, there were live trees cut down needlessly due to a combination of expediency, greed and carelessness. Now that PG&E is facing scrutiny for responsibility for the fires, many remaining trees are again under threat. PG&E and its contractors are engaged in a program of extreme vegetation removal. They claim that they must cut 12 feet or more away from power lines and poles for the sake of public safety. This is excessive;

By Tom Tomorrow

their regulations call for a fourfoot safety area, not 12 feet. By cutting a huge swath of trees and vegetation, they claim they will not need to cut again for 10 years. They end up cutting trees that are very old and healthy, and which are not adding to the danger of forest fires. Near my home, I see many large oak trees that have been marked with “to-be-cut” ribbons on them. Those trees are located on sparsely wooded land and pose no fire risk. Also, I have been told that numerous large trees, some that were over a hundred years old, have been cut down by PG&E or its agents in error. The tree companies are being paid in a manner that encourages overcutting— the more they cut, the more money they make. Those evaluating what to cut are not arborists, and the treecutting companies are from all over the country, which means that those doing this work lack an ecological, professional or local connection to what is being done. Trees are the lungs of the earth, and their presence contributes to human emotional health. Trees are already under assault by drought, insects, fires, climate change, disease, vineyard conversion and development. Must PG&E also destroy trees needlessly to add to this carnage? “They’ll grow back” is the retort to questioning the cutting. But the trees may not grow back, and if they do, it may happen when many of us are long gone. Of course tree and vegetation management is needed for fire protection, but it needs to be done conscientiously. Please contact PG&E and your local government representatives and ask that vegetation removal be done with care and discretion. It is not necessary to destroy the village in order to save it.

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Game of Chicken Activists are not terrorists BY JONAH RASKIN

A

nimal rights activists are protesting on Northern California ranches. Sometimes they go beyond their First Amendment rights and break the law.”

That message was delivered loudly and clearly to nearly 100 people who attended a workshop at Shone Farm in Santa Rosa last week. Called “Beyond the Fence Line” (see “Cage Match,” Oct. 24), the event on Oct. 29 was sponsored by the Sonoma County Farm Bureau. By the end of the afternoon, it was pretty obvious—to some attendees, anyway—that there is anti-activist collusion underway between the Farm Bureau, its friends and allies in the county, and local law enforcement. Many regional ranchers clearly think that animal-rights activists are a menace to them and to society. The Farm Bureau agrees. The ranchers and the bureau may be well-meaning, but the fiery language used to describe animal-rights activists is likely to widen the divide rather than help residents interested in this issue to come to a common understanding. For her part, Tawny Tesconi, executive director at the Farm Bureau of Sonoma County, condemned recent protests at local chicken farms as “domestic terrorism.” Brian Sobel, from Sobel Communications, echoed her cry as he too lambasted “domestic terrorists.” Sobel didn’t mean pipebomber Cesar Sayoc. And he didn’t mean Robert Bowers, who shot and killed 11 people at a Pittsburgh synagogue over the weekend. Understandably, farmers don’t want protesters to disrupt their livelihood. But it doesn’t help to demonize animal-rights activists as “terrorists.” Nor did it help matters when Troye Shaffer, from the Sonoma County District Attorney’s office, stood at the podium and called the demonstrators “ne’er-do-wells,” a prejudicial statement if ever there was one—especially given the mass arrest of dozens protesters and the fact that, as of last week, the district attorney was still sorting out the charges. The animal-rights activist group called DxE has made shoppers and eaters aware of factory farming and the inhumane conditions in which animals are raised and slaughtered. Mike Weber of Weber Farms encouraged everyone “to run clean operations.” Indeed, more time and money should be spent on running clean operations than on fences, gates, surveillance, arrests and prosecutions, which will only exacerbate an Us vs. Them mentality that already exists—and that shouldn’t. The Farm Bureau and law enforcement officials ought to be accountable to all of us, not to special interests with deep pockets and the ear of local law enforcement. And please, no more inflammatory language. Jonah Raskin is a frequent contributor to the ‘Bohemian.’ Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

SHADOWY PASTS Anderson & Associates names four Sonoma County and five Napa County clergyman in sex-abuse charges.

Roster of Abuse Law firm names names in widening Catholic Church sex-abuse scandal BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he law firm Jeff Anderson & Associates released a report last week that identified 26 Catholic clergymen in Marin, Napa and Sonoma counties with sexual-abuse histories.

The firm’s findings come as the California Attorney General Xavier Becerra has pledged to investigate childhood sexual-abuse charges in the Bay Area and the alleged cover-up by the Catholic Church. A review of the firm’s thumbnail sketches of the 200-plus accused

clergymen from the Bay Area may give insight into what the Boston Globe and the film Spotlight highlighted—that for decades, the Catholic Church dealt with its pedophilia problems by apparently shuffling sex-abusing clergy from one diocese to another. And it indicates that numerous California Catholic clergy sex abusers may have gotten away with their crimes due to a 2003 Supreme Court ruling that rejected a California attempt to retroactively eliminate statutes of limitations for certain sex crimes, including those perpetrated against minors. Here are the clergy members of

the Roman Catholic church who at one time or another were assigned to schools and churches in Marin, Napa or Sonoma counties, and who are alleged to have committed sexual assault against children, according to Anderson & Associates:

Marin County • Msgr. Peter Gomez Armstrong, according to the law firm’s report, has been accused of sexually abusing at least one child. He worked at St. Vincent’s School for Boys in San Rafael between 1975 and 1979, and died in 2009. • Fr. James W. Aylward was subject

to a civil suit alleging sexual abuse against a minor, which the law firm reports was settled by the Archdiocese of San Francisco. After assignments to San Francisco, Millbrae, San Mateo, Washington, D.C., and Pacifica, Aylward arrived at St. Sylvester’s in San Rafael in 1990 and stayed on for five years. He was then sent to Burlingame for a few years and then to Our Lady of Mt. Carmel in Mill Valley from 1998 to 2000. His whereabouts are currently unknown, says the law firm report. • Fr. Arthur Manuel Cunha was assigned to Our Lady of Loretto in Novato and served there between 1984 and 1986. He was absent on sick leave in 1986–87. From 1987 to 1989, his whereabouts were unknown, according to the law firm. He was absent on leave again from 1989 to 1991, and his whereabouts have been unknown since then. The law firm reports that Cunha was “arrested in 1986, pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 60 days in jail and four months of counseling in connection with sexually abusing two boys.” He’s been named in multiple civil lawsuits. • Fr. Sidney J. Custodio was assigned to St. Raphael’s Church in San Rafael in 1955; sex-crime allegations against him were lodged while he worked at St. Gregory in San Mateo County. According to the law firm, his whereabouts have been unknown since 1975. • Fr. Pearse P. Donovan was assigned to Marin Catholic High School in San Rafael from 1953 to 1955, and allegations of sexual abuse against him were levied when he later worked at St. Clement in Hayward. He’s been named in at least one civil lawsuit, reports Anderson & Associates. He died in 1986. • Msgr. Charles J. Durkin is reported to have retired in 2002, “a month after the San Francisco District Attorney’s Office requested 75 years worth of church records related to abuse allegations,” reports Anderson. He worked at St. Sebastian’s in San Rafael in 1962, and lived at the Nazareth House in San Rafael after he retired in 2003. He died in 2006 and was the subject of an accusation of sexual assault that occurred while he was at the Star of the Sea in San Francisco,


sexual abuse, but again, the statute of limitations had run out.

• Fr. Arthur Harrison was charged with criminally abusing a 10-yearold when he was assigned to Our Lady of Loretto in Novato, in 1960. The case was dismissed because of the statute of limitation, but the Diocese of San Jose lists Harrison as a clergy-member “with credible allegations of sexual abuse of children,” according to the law firm report. He died in 2006.

• Fr. Guy Anthony Mrunig spent his career as a clergyman at St. Sebastian’s in Kenfield-Greenbrae from 1971 to 1973; at Marin Catholic High School in Kentfield from 1972 to 1978; and at the Serra Club of Marin County from 1973 to 1977. The report says that multiple survivors have come forward alleging sexual abuse while he was at Marin Catholic in Kentfield. He reportedly left the priesthood to marry a former student from the high school and his whereabouts since 1979 are unknown, says the law firm.

• Msgr. John. P. Heaney served from 1971 to 1974 at Marin Catholic High School in Kentfield, and again at St. Rita’s in Fairfax from 1974 1979, according to the firm. Allegations against Heaney arose while he was the SFPD chaplain between 1976 and 2002, and he was criminally charged, in 2002, with multiple felony counts of child abuse that were dropped because the statute of limitations had run out. He died in 2010. • The Rev. Gregory G. Ingels got his start as a clergyman at Marin Catholic High School in Kentfield in 1970 and was also assigned to St. Isabella’s church in San Rafael in 1982. “Multiple survivors have come forward alleging sexual abuse” by Ingels from 1972 to 1977, reports the Anderson law firm, while he was at the Kentfied school. He too was criminally charged with child sexual abuse, but the charges were dropped owing to the 2003 Supreme Court ruling. His whereabouts since 2011 are unknown, says the law firm. • Fr. Daniel T. Keohane was assigned to St. Anthony of Padua, in Novato, from 2006 to 2009; a sexual-abuse allegation was made against him for activities he allegedly committed while he was at the Church of the in San Francisco in the 1970s. The San Francisco diocese deemed the allegations credible, as it recommended further investigation. He took a leave of absence in 2015 and his whereabouts since then are unknown, reports the law firm. • Fr. Jerome Leach served at St. Patrick’s Church in Larkspur from 1980 to 1983 and the Anderson report notes that he was alleged to have committed sex crimes there and at All Souls in San Francisco. In 2002, he was arrested and charged with child

• Msgr. John O’Connor was placed on leave by the Archdiocese of San Francisco in 2002 “after it received an allegation of improper contact with a boy occurring more than thirty years ago,” the law firm reports. During his career, he was mostly assigned to churches in San Francisco, but was at St. Isabella’s in San Rafael between 1964 and 1971. He was “absent on leave” between 2005 and his death in 2013. • Fr. Miles O’Brien Riley was assigned to St Raphael’s in San Rafael from 1964 to 1968 and also worked as a chaplain at San Quentin State Prison during that time. He was accused of sexually abusing a girl when she was 16, and the Anderson & Associates document notes that the Archdiocese of San Francisco permitted Riley to retire quietly in 2003. • Fr. John Schwartz was ordained in 1981 and, after assignments in Oregon, wound up at St. Anselm’s in Ross in 2004–06. No further information is provided by the Anderson report on allegations against Schwartz, whose whereabouts since 2012 are unknown, says the law firm. • Fr. Kevin F. Tripp was ordained in 1968 and spent much of his career in Massachusetts, where, in 2002 the district attorney in Fall River released a list of priests under investigation for sexual abuse, and Tripp was on the list, according to the law firm. The Massachusetts district attorney’s finding alleged that there were two persons who had been victimized by Tripp. The law firm determined that as of 2003, and according to a San

Francisco Faith newsletter, Tripp was the executive director of the Marin Interfaith Council in San Rafael. • Fr. Milton T. Walsh’s first clergy assignment was at Our Lady of Loretto in Novato before heading to Rome to get his doctorate in 1982. He reportedly returned to Novato on a break from his studies, “where he allegedly sexually abused a boy whose family he had grown close with during his time working at Our Lady of Loretto,” reads the law firm report; he was at Loretto between 1978 and 1980. Walsh was arrested for the sexual assault in 2002 after being caught in a Novato police-department telephone sting where he admitted to the sexual abuse of a minor—but the charges were dropped. Yes, the statute of limitations case, again. His whereabouts since 2015? Unknown, says the law firm.

Napa County

• Fr. Edward F. Beutner was ordained in 1965 and spent the next quarter century moving from assignments in Wisconsin to California, including a one-year special assignment at Mont La Salle in Napa. No further information is provided from Anderson & Associates on his alleged misdeeds. He died in 2008. • Fr. Don D. Flickinger was charged by the San Jose Diocese with having engaged in sexual activity with minors in the years 2002, 2005 and 2006. The cases were all settled, and a 2011 lawsuit against Flickinger alleged that he had a history of sexual misconduct spanning 40 years. He spent two years, 1981 to 1983, at Napa’s Mont La Salle Novitiate. • Fr. Francis J. Ford was ordained in 1951 and died in 1985. He served as Chaplain at Napa State Hospital from 1974 to 1976. No further information on Ford was provided in the Anderson law firm report. • Br. John Moriarty worked at the St. Helena Christian Brothers’ Retreat House, in Napa County, from 1974 to 1978 and is alleged to have committed sexual abuse against children in 1975–76. He is believed to have passed in 2013, but his whereabouts since 1993 are unknown, says the law firm. • Fr. Francis Verngren was the

subject of a 2003 civil lawsuit file by a man who says the priest sexually abused him from 1966 to 1979, when Verngren was principal at St. Mary’s College High School in Berkeley. He was also affiliated with the St. Mary’s College High School in Napa between 1964 and 1984, and died in 2003.

Sonoma County

• Br./Fr. Donald W. Eagleson’s abuse charges stem from a 1971 incident while he was a Brother of the Holy Cross and allegedly sexually abused a youth. He was assigned to St. Vincent de Paul in Petaluma between 1986 and 1987. In 2002, he was assigned to Sacred Heart Church in Eureka, where another abuse allegation arose regarding his 1971 activities. He was at Nazareth House in San Rafael in 2004 when, the law firm reports, he died. • Fr. J. Patrick Foley was identified last month, by the San Diego diocese he served in for decades, as a likely candidate to have committed sexual abuse against minors. After a 1991 leave of absence from the San Diego diocese, he arrived at Christian Brothers High School in Sacramento for a few years before landing in the Santa Rosa diocese, according to the law firm. He was suspended in 2010 and his whereabouts since 2015 have been unknown, reports the law firm. • Br. Joseph (Jesse) GutierrezCervantes was hired as a contract psychologist at Hanna Boys Center in Sonoma in 1984 and was fired two years later “after sexual misconduct allegations surfaced” that Gutierrez had sexually abused boys during therapy sessions. According to the Anderson report, his current whereabouts, clerical status and whether he has access to children are unknown. • Fr. Austin Peter Keegan “has been accused of sexually abusing at least 80 children and has been named in at least one civil lawsuit. Keegan’s abuses are alleged to have started in the 1960s when he worked for the Archdiocese of San Francisco and the Diocese of Santa Rosa, where he served from 1977 to 1979. He was at St. Eugene’s Cathedral in Santa Rosa from 1980 to 1981, but the law firm reports his whereabouts have been unknown since then.

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where he served from 1956 to 1961, and again from 1996 to 2003.


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Dining HEY, THAT’S THE SANTA ROSA LOCATION! RRBC Windsor is so new that pictures of it haven’t even developed yet.

Kitchen Kinks Russian River Brewing Company Windsor is a worthy work in progress BY THOMAS BRODERICK

H

oly crap, this place is huge!

This was my first thought as I got out of my car at a recent visit to Russian River Brewing Company’s new, second location in Windsor. I arrived at 1:30pm, just in time for a late lunch at the brewpub. Only five days after the grand opening on Oct. 11, I knew that a few amenities—

especially the planned guided tours of the brewery and the tasting room—were still a few weeks off. I did a double-take upon entering the brewpub. The décor took me back to my years living in Tennessee—a rustic-farmhouse aesthetic that reminded me of so many similar upscale Nashville restaurants. It was surprising to discover it in the middle of Sonoma County.

Nearly 150 people had already made the discovery and were dining in the indoor restaurant, the outdoor bar and in the comfortable leather chairs that surround the indoor fire pit. I order a Supplication and took a seat at the crowded indoor bar so I could better overhear what others thought of the longanticipated arrival of the RRBC’s Windsor outpost. I am a total Fourth Street Santa

Rosa RRBC brewpub loyalist— and as such, the Windsor menu made me feel like a stranger in a strange land: squash soup, steak and, alas, avocado toast. The pork schnitzel sandwich and the fries looked good. I put in an order and finished off the beer. A few minutes later, the food arrived, alongside a fresh Pliny. The meal left something to be desired, and here’s hoping RRBC Windsor works out the openingweek kinks. The fries were hot, but also soggy. The schnitzel was cooked to perfection, but came on a sesame seed bun (pretzel is traditional). To my right, a patron who just paid $22 for a steak lamented to the bartender that he’d erred in ordering it. “Too dry.” I also witnessed a poor avocado toast buried under a mountain of mixed greens. When I visited, the brewery was still waiting on Comcast to install the cable for the TVs flanking the bar areas (it has since been installed), and the minibrewery had yet to arrive. Now set to open next spring, the minibrewery is a glass viewing area that will eventually allow visitors to watch brewers experiment with flavors that may or may not become permanent fixtures on the Windsor menu. Minor gripes aside, the Windsor location allowed me to do something I’ve never done before: open a cooler and grab a six-pack of Pliny to go. There appear to be thousands of icecold beers for sale in the gift shop. The days of Pliny scarcity are over— at least for those of us living in the North Bay. Hallelujah! Give owners Vinnie and Natalie Cilurzo space and time to work out the bugs, and RRBC Windsor should become a mainstay of the tourist circuit and a nice hangout spot for locals—especially during the rainy season, when the weather will compel people to curl up by the indoor fire with their favorite brew. I’m looking forward to my second visit, on a day like that. Russian River Brewing Company, 700 Mitchell Lane, Windsor. 707.545.2337. Facility tours are scheduled to start Nov. 15.


Wine Dark Brew The grape haunts the brews of the season BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

hese are sour times. Dark times. Good times for dark and sour beer.

The hazy days of summer IPA are long gone, and the good dead grape is settled down for its long sleep in casks of oak. In the quiet after the commotion of harvest, a feral black cat stalks the vineyard, forever interrupting the frantic errand of some small creature scuttling under fallen leaves, stocking up on seeds as night draws nearer each day. Though the grapes had saved

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Swirl

their sweetest for last, there’s a sourness in the air now, as leftbehind and fallen grapes and apples play host to much smaller creatures’ feast: Lactobacillus, Brettanomyces and other unruly guests make a cruel mockery of the good work of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the sacred yeast of the winemaking and brewing world. But in beer, what’s gone all wrong can be made right, explains Lagunitas Brewing Company’s “head brew-monster” Jeremy Marshall about its limited release, Sonoma Farmhouse Brett stout. “This beer started almost as a mistake,” Marshall says in brewery notes. “Back in 2010, a batch of imperial stout didn’t go exactly as planned, so we put it into some red wine barrels, with a little brett. A couple years later, we took that beer out of barrels and found it had changed into something different and wonderful.” Lagunitas-strong, at an imperial 11.3 percent alcohol by volume (abv), this monster brew is deep and engaging, not hot—a dark harmony of vinous heritage and all those bugs that are bad for wine. But this October limited release is hard to find; get bottles while you can at the brewery’s swag shop for $10. For that wine-dark taste without the sour, try Plow Brewing’s Irons in the Fire porter aged in Pinot Noir barrels, on tap or in a crowler (a growler in a can) to go for $15. The hue of leaves turning red, Fogbelt Brewing’s Methuselah ($18) is brewed with light pilsner malt, but aged with Zinfandel grapes for two years in wine barrels. The tart taste is deepened by a fruity, raisiny undertone, with something of that sour funk of old books nuancing its slightly beery bouquet. Which brings us to Barrel Brothers’ Leather-Bound Books ($18), a dusky brown sour ale aged in Pinot Noir barrels with unspecified dark fruits. Like damp straw and healthy compost, there’s something farm-yardy but fresh and sweet about the LeatherBound, and it’s tarter, with more of a fig than raisin character of the darker Duchesse de Bourgogne, a Belgian sour that it resembles. My spirits are lifted already.


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Kristin Lam

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THE GAVERNATOR Gavin Newsom’s got some big brown shoes to fill.

Voter’s Guide STATEWIDE ELECTIONS

Governor GAVIN NEWSOM Well, duh. Did anyone think we were going to endorse the Republican John Cox for governor? Cox’s campaign in its entirety seems to be predicated on coaxing road rage from voters over last year’s SB 1, and this year’s Proposition 6, which seeks

to repeal it (see below for more). There are, of course, concerns with Newsom. They begin, perhaps petulantly observed on our part, with Newsom’s failure to provide a candidate’s statement to the California state voter’s guide. Whatever his campaign’s reason for withholding a statement, not participating in this most basic of civic activities—helping voters make an informed decision— smacks of a candidate so far ahead in the polls that why bother

even indicating there’s a race at all, competitive or otherwise? Yes, Nate Silver gives Cox a 1 percent chance of defeating Newsom this year, but 1 percent is not zero percent, and we all know how the 1 percent’s been faring under Trump. After 2016, we’re not taking anything for granted, and neither should Newsom. The no-participation posture smacks of the very sense of my-turn entitlement that the Lt. Governor’s detractors tag him

with. That’s a posture that may not serve Newsom well in Sacramento. At least Jerry Brown knew how to throw the impudent yahoos of the California right a bone or two on occasion, if not the frackers.

U.S. Senator KEVIN DE LEON As other wags have observed, Kevin de Leon did not acquit himself in a particularly senatorial manner when he teedoff on longstanding incumbent Sen. Dianne Feinstein during the Brett Kavanaugh hearing, over Feinstein’s admittedly weird handling of Christine BlaseyFord’s letter of complaint against


State Assembly MARC LEVINE

Levine’s opponents have described themselves as the more progressive version of the popular San Rafael state assemblyman, as they often note his support from various big business and corporate interests in Sacramento. Still, we’re going with Levine this time around. This choice reminds us of the old days around election day when alternative weeklies were faced with endorsing a mainstream Democratic candidate for president—and instead lurched forth with self-serving editorial jeremiads about how awesome it would be if Ralph Nader were president. As much as we like Levine challenger Dan Monte and appreciate his persistence and keep-him-honest critique of Levine, the incumbent has proved to be an accessible and decent fellow—and we were impressed with his efforts on behalf of undocumented children during Trump’s zero-tolerance moment of maximum misanthropy earlier this year, and with his bill targeting sexual-harassing lobbyists signed by Gov. Brown at the end of the legislative session. If nothing else, that’s exactly the kind of legislation that can begin

to redeem middle-aged white men from their current national status as a rather fraught, if not downright icky, demographic.

Secretary of State ALEX PADILLA

Even if the Bohemian were preinclined to support the Democrat Alex Padilla in his race for Secretary of State this year, his opponent, Mark P. Meuser, is worth a shout-out if for no other reason than—wow! Meuser’s entire candidate statement in the state voter’s guide is devoted to one thing and one thing only: scrubbing the voter rolls in California so that there are no dead people, undocumented immigrants or duplicate registrations. “If the rolls remain bloated,” writes Mueser, an attorney with a San Rafael campaign address, “special interests are able to use money and influence to elect bought and paid-for politicians.” Cynical translation: Unless we start throwing as many Democrats off the voter rolls as possible, California Republicans may never emerge from an obscurity of their own extremist, anti-immigrant making. In any other year and under any other federal administration, Meuser’s emphasis on cleaning up the voter rolls might seem reasonable and even necessary. And, hey, it’s part of the Secretary of State’s job to oversee elections. It’s not the Secretary of State’s job, however, to use his power to sway elections. Meuser’s manifesto smacks of the same sort of flagrant voter suppression efforts undertaken by other secretaries of state around the country who are Republican— i.e., Kansas vote suppressor and Trump patsy Kris Kobach—and who have gleefully championed the worst of the worst when it comes to Trump and his autocratic-incompetent bent. The reality-show president has made a lot of noise about how, were it not for all those illegal voters, he would have taken California in 2016, and he’s pledged to ) 12

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the frat-boy judge. Feinstein gets a lot of knocks for her national security hawkishness—she voted in favor of the disastrous 2003 invasion of Iraq—and for being insufficiently confrontational when it comes to the issue of the lunatic in the White House. At last blush, Feinstein’s up by some 10 points in the polls, which indicates that the state’s not as ready to bail out on the senator as its more progressive quadrants would have one believe. But the bottom line is that Feinstein’s been in office way too long, is compromised by her establishment cred and her family millions, and it’s time for a change. Whether de Leon can deliver is a subject for another day, but we’re willing to take the chance.


Vote ( 11

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win the popular vote next time around, after losing it by more than 3 million votes to Hillary Clinton—and that was even after the Russian hookers whizzed onto the scene with advice on how to properly rig an election. We’re opposed to any attempt, however gussied in civic duty, to deny people the right to vote under the guise of potential election “fraud” that’s been demonstrated to be a “total and complete lie” by any reasonable person or researcher who’s done the legwork.

STATEWIDE PROPOSITIONS

Proposition 6 OPPOSE

C’mon, Republicans, give it a rest already. Proposition 6 aims to revoke 2017’s SB 1, which slapped a new gas tax on gallons purchased and with an eye toward dedicating the

annual revenue to fixing the decrepit transportation infrastructure in the state. It’s a totally necessary and reasonable tax on a fossil fuel that ought to be shown the door in any event. But more to the point: back in the old days, elected officials of any party would wear it as badge of honor if their constituents referred to them as, say, Sen. Pothole—it indicated a down-and-dirty embrace of constituents’ most pressing, street-level concerns. Nowadays, any mention of a tax is met with road-raging Republicans hell-bent on driving this nation into the ditch—if only until they rescue it by throwing all the immigrants out of the country.

Proposition 12 SUPPORT

Proposition 12’s kind of a weird one, in that its detractors and supporters, or some of them anyway, are folks you’d expect to be on the same page when it comes to animal-cruelty issues and farming. People for the


DISTRICT RACES

Santa Rosa City Council, 4th District MARY WATTS

We were impressed with all three candidates for Santa Rosa’s newly created District 4 seat, but in the end we believe Mary Watts to be the strongest candidate in the field, given her command of the issues facing many Santa Rosans. Watts, currently a deputy director at the Community Action Partnership, is facing off against the thoughtfully holistic social worker Victoria Fleming and Dorothy Beattie, who comes out of the banking and finance sector. As a renter in the city, Watts is young, smart and tuned in to crucial issues around economic equity, homelessness and mental-health services in the city. She gets our vote.

Santa Rosa City Council, 2nd District

race for the 2nd District, and he has previously served on the city douncil. During a recent candidates’ forum at City Hall, Pierce told attendees that he’d gotten into the race in some measure because nobody else had stepped up to face the incumbent Sawyer. That’s not an especially great reason to vote for someone, but maybe next time around a young person of color will take a run at Sawyer’s seat. Until then, we got no big beef with Sawyer.

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LOCAL MEASURES

Santa Rosa Measure O

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SUPPORT

Santa Rosa had a $37 million reserve in fiscal 2016–17. The reserve has been plundered and is down to a much-dwindled $6 million as of this year. Measure O slaps a temporary, six-year sales tax on residents to fund post-fire rebuilding and other critical city needs, as it would raise an estimated $9 million annually to restore damaged facilities and infrastructure and help prevent future fires, repair potholes, streets and sidewalks, and improve the conditions of local roads. Sounds like a reasonable tax in a season of uncertainty.

Santa Rosa Measure N

SUPPORT (WITH A CAVEAT) Well, this is a tough one. Measure N seeks to raise $124 million through issuing bonds in order to build affordable housing and provide other housing-related boosts to Santa Rosa. We’re in support, but hope that if it passes, the city takes steps to ensure that organized labor isn’t left in the cold when it comes to who is actually going to build all that housing.

JOHN SAWYER Lee Pierce is an impressive candidate in this two-person

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Ethical Treatment of Animals is opposed to Proposition 12, but we spoke to a member of the animalrights group DxE recently who supports it. So here’s the deal: Current state law under 2008’s animal-welfare oriented Proposition 2 says that chickens, pigs and cows have to be given enough space to turn around fully. There’s no cage-free mandate in California even though Proposition 2 set out to make the state cage-free by 2015. Proposition 12 repeals the earlier measure, revises living-space requirements for hens, cows and pigs—and sets 2022 as the year when all the beasts will be freed from their cages at long last. Supporters in the animal-rights world highlight that enforcement of animal-cruelty laws would be enhanced via a new mandate directed at the California Department of Food and Agriculture (see “Cage Match,” Oct. 24, for more on Proposition 12).

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tung by the surprise defeat of Measure C earlier this year, water-conscious progressives in Napa County have banded together and are running for positions across the county. Measure C set out to provide additional measures of water security in a region where, some say, the “Peak Wine” moment has come and left the county vulnerable when it comes to longterm availability of water for residents. Measure C lost by a hair, and activists vowed to turn on the heat at the voting booth this year. These candidates have also vowed to not take any corporate campaign donations this campaign season, and that’s very Beto of them. They’ve got our nod. Geoff Ellsworth sits on the board of the City Council of St. Helena and is running for mayor this year. He’s been a big proponent of transparency, and campaign materials note that he’s been hard charging to improve water quality and lower water rates for resident via charges on big wineries and hospitality venues so that they’re paying, he says, “a fair price for the city water they use.” Sounds fair to us. Jason Kishineff hopes to join the American Canyon City Council and plans, if elected, to introduce “participatory budgeting” to the city so “the people can decide how to spend their tax dollars.” Now there’s a radical thought we can get behind. He’s also pushing a health-focused agenda this fall, promising to introduce initiatives in support of farmers markets, a pesticide ban and skate parks. Amy Martenson sits on the Napa Valley College Board of Trustees and was an out-front proponent of Measure C. Her campaign materials promise a robust push-back “against proposals that would privatize publicly owned lands and turn over profits to developers and winery owners.” She notes as well that the current makeup of the board of trustees skews to members with ties to the wine industry. Xulio Soriano is running for a seat on the Napa Valley Board of Trustees and lays claim to being “one of the first indigenous candidates to run in Napa County in recent times.” He’s hoping to close the achievement gap in underrepresented groups and was also an out-front supporter of Measure C. Donald Williams’ campaign is pretty cut-and-dry: He’s running for a seat on the Calistoga City Council and pledges to stand for responsible city planning “that respects the town’s small-town character.” Call us convinced.


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Crush Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

Notes from the Trail

In 2007, Napa farmer and writer Jeremy Benson and his sister April hiked 1,200 miles along the coast of California, starting in Crescent City and making their way south to San Diego. Along the way, Benson wrote down his experiences, and now he offers a look back on that momentous trek with his new chapbook based on those hikes, Footslog. Named the poet laureate of Napa County last year, Benson reads from his new collection and shares other stories at a book-release party on Friday, Nov. 7, at Napa Bookmine, 964 Pearl St., Napa. 6pm. Free admission. 707.733.3199.

ST HELENA

Artistic Discovery

Born in India and now living and working in the Bay Area, painter Siddharth Parasnis considers himself a citizen of the world, traveling to exotic locales like Greece and Guatemala and taking inspiration from the bold textures and colors he encounters. His latest exhibition, “Serendipity,” offers an engaging interpretation of the beachfront cityscapes and sun-drenched harbors of those regions with bright, blocky, polygon-like structures that evoke curiosity and playful nostalgia. “Serendipity” opens with a reception on Saturday, Nov. 3, at Caldwell Snyder Gallery, 1328 Main St., St. Helena. 4pm. 707.200.5050.

R O H N E R T PA R K

Classical Folk

The Santa Rosa Symphony has a long history of welcoming acclaimed soloists to perform with the orchestra, though not many like Grammy Award–winning guitarist Sharon Isbin. Acclaimed for her triumphant performances, Isbin has collaborated with jazz greats, Argentinian vocalists and even pop stars like Sting and Katy Perry, fusing several worlds of music together. Recently the subject of a documentary, Sharon Isbin: Troubadour, the guitarist will perform Heitor Villa-Lobos’ Guitar Concerto and other works with the Santa Rosa Symphony on Saturday, Nov. 3, through Monday, Nov. 5, at the Green Music Center’s Weill Hall, 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. Times vary. 707.546.8742.

SEBASTOPOL

Uncharted Territory

—Charlie Swanson

CHAMBER MUSIC CHARMERS Redwood Arts Council hosts the Berlin-based ATOS Trio for a concert featuring an all-Russian program of classical works on Saturday, Oct. 3, at the Occidental Center for the Arts. See Clubs & Venues, p20.

Gela Megrelidze

Cannabis has been off-limits to doctors and researchers in the United States for the past 80 years, but recently scientists have discovered its anti-cancer properties, leading some parents to try cannabis oil to treat their children. This dramatic story and its timely relevance are captured in the new documentary ‘Weed the People,’ produced by actress and filmmaker Ricki Lake and directed by acclaimed documentarian Abby Epstein, both of whom participate in a Q&A when Weed the People screens onetime only on Sunday, Nov. 4, at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 2pm. 707.829.3456.


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HAUNTING GROUND Sydney Schwindt plays the spectral Elvira in ‘Blithe Spirit.’

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f you’re wary of attending the latest splatter fest at your local multiplex and seek kinder, gentler Halloween season entertainment, Napa’s Lucky Penny Productions brings you Noël Coward’s Blithe Spirit, directed by Barry Martin and running through Nov. 4. It’s an old-fashioned ghost story laden with Coward’s acerbic wit and charm.

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Author Charles Condomine (Tim Kniffin) is researching the occult world for his next novel. He’s invited a local medium, Madame Arcati (Karen Pinomaki), to conduct a séance in his home. Charles is convinced she’s a charlatan, but Arcati manages to call forth the spectral presence of his late first wife, Elvira (Sydney Schwindt). As Charles is the only one who can see or hear Elvira, his current wife, Ruth (Kirstin Pieschke), thinks he’s going quite mad. Soon convinced of Elvira’s presence, Ruth finds herself in a battle with Elvira over their husband. At first terrified with the situation, Charles actually begins to take some delight in the circumstances and starts to adapt to living with two wives—even if one is dead. Elvira goes about scheming to get Charles to join her on the “other side,” while

Ruth seeks out Madame Arcati to help rid her of the troublesome spirit. That’s easier said than done. Kniffin is solid as the initially flustered but soon rolling-with-thepunches Charles who, after closer examination, is really quite a cad. He’s the perfect vehicle to deliver some classic Coward lines in a classic Coward manner. Schwindt is a lot of fun as the devilish Elvira and gets a major assist from makeup designer Brette Bartolucci. Pinomaki has the showiest role (it won Angela Lansbury her fourth Tony for the 2009 revival) and garners big laughs with her physicality. Festooned in costume designer Barbara McFadden’s colorful accoutrements, Pinomaki earns those laughs by playing the character straight. Her visual outlandishness and other spectral bits are nice counterparts to the dry verbal humor for which Coward is best known and that this cast delivers well. The play creaks a bit, but in a day when stage pyrotechnics can overwhelm a show, it’s nice to be reminded that the words are what really matter. Rating (out of 5): HHHHH ‘Blithe Spirit’ plays through Nov. 4 at the Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. Thursday, 7pm; Friday–Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $23–$33. 707.266.6305.


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REAL-LIFE FAKE Melissa McCarthy stars as a struggling writer who becomes a master forger in the Lee Israel biopic ‘Can You Ever Forgive Me?’

Word Crimes

‘Forgive Me?’ plays forgery for fun and profit BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

G

od bless all the actors who aren’t there because of their looks.

The literally catty tragicomedy Can You Ever Forgive Me? commences nicely with Melissa McCarthy playing Lee Israel, surly, shabby and frumpy at a publisher’s office—meeting a deadline at 3am with the help of a big glass of something on the rocks. She’s fired for drinking on the job, even at that hour. As she leaves, a younger employee mutters, “If I ever get like that, kill me.” Israel snaps back: “If you ask me nicely, I’ll kill you now.” This true-life tale of a drinker with a writing problem is set in 1991. Print hasn’t keeled over quite yet, but Israel, who’d previously published a number of celebrity bios, is having trouble landing an advance. When vet bills for her ancient cat press her, Israel goes to sell a prized possession: a personal note from Katherine Hepburn from the days when the two had collaborated on an autobiography. The money is good enough that Israel falls into a unique field of crime: forging celebrity letters to sell to the local bookstores.

She recruits her seedy drinking buddy, Jack, played by Richard E. Grant in a performance that’s been generating Oscar buzz. His untrustworthy barfly is the kind of man who introduces himself as “Jack Hock: big cock”—dodgy and gay and British and drunk, a mountebank with fingerless Fagin gloves. Jack and Israel’s scam turns out to have consequences, however, and also blights the author’s potential friendship (friendship, or more) with pretty bookstore owner Anna (Dolly Wells), who has writing ambitions of her own. The elegant soundtrack sports jazz crooner Blossom Dearie, the ill-fated country rocker Spade Cooley and a bit of Justin Bond covering Lou Reed’s “Goodnight Ladies” in a deserted cabaret. Ornery and salty as the film is, it has a cool counterpoint of loneliness to it. And it shows how lost even the recent past is—it has the sense of New York when it was New York, when it was gritty and bad, and seemingly every business sign was missing a letter or a light. ‘Can You Ever Forgive Me? opens Friday, Nov. 2, at Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

11/2–11/8

Honorable

Can You Ever Forgive Me? – CC & AD R 10:45-1:30-4:00-7:00-9:25 Beautiful Boy – CC & AD R 10:15-1:00-3:45-6:30-9:10

Tea With The Dames – CC 11:00-1:15-6:15, Thurs 11/8 only: 11:00-1:15

NR

Free Solo – CC

PG13 10:30-12:45-3:30-6:00-8:30

First Man – CC & AD PG13

3:15-8:15, Thursday 11/8 only: 3:15pm

The Old Man & the Gun – CC & AD PG13 11:00-1:45-4:15-6:45-8:50

Boy Erased – CC & AD

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Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance Foreign Language Film!Stone In Years!” – Box Office “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 9:15 CCRR DV (12:30) 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:00 7:20PG 9:45 (12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 7:10 9:20 RActor! (12:00 2:20 4:40) 7:00 9:10 2 Academy Award Including Best “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (1:30 4:20) 7:10 9:50 PG-13 CC DV (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00RNR CC DV SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No(12:20 One4:00 Could Make This Believable Exclusive! 2:40 5:00) 9:45 7:10 9:40 R7:25 One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!” – Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle Academy 8 Great Beers on Tap +Award Wine byNominee the Glass and Bottle

THE NUTCRACKER AND THE FOUR REALMS BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY

THE HAPPY PRINCE

ONCE R CC 8 Academy Noms Including A STAR ISAward BORN PRODIGAL SONS (1:00) 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:40 R

DV

(1:00) 3:10 5:20 7:30 9:40 R Best Picture, Actor & Best Director! (1:00 4:00) 6:50 9:40 (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” CCR DV “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly Funny!” – Newsweek (1:30) 4:10 6:45NR 9:30

FREE SOLO

THE GIRL THE DRAGON TATTOO Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, 6:45 Thu (12:10 4:40) 6:50 9:05 PleaseWITH Note:2:20 No 1:30 Show Sat, No No 6:45 Show Show Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award4:00 Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

THE OLD MAN AND THE GUN FROST/NIXON PG-13 CC DV

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:30(12:00) 2:45 5:00 5:00)9:50 7:20 R 9:25 – Slant Magazine

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD PG-13 CC “Deliciously unsettling!” THE HATE U GIVE PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (1:15) 4:10) 4:15 7:00 R (1:10 7:059:30 9:50

DV

THE presents GHOST Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

Closed Caption and Audio Description available for all films

Bohemian Rhapsody • A Star is Born The Nutcracker and the Four Realms The Old Man & The Gun Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

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PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK R CC DV Final Week! MID90S Michael Moore’s

Feb 26th at (12:00) 7:15 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROuS Fri/Sat/Mon/Tue/Thu: 9:55 SICKO MOVIES IN THE MORNING MAN IN AMERICA Sun/Wed: 9:55 Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun & Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PENTAGON PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at CC Box DV Office! PG-13 FIRST 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 MAN 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 Fri/Sat/Mon/Tue: (1:50 4:35) 10:15 7:20 AM VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA Their First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM Sun: 7:20 Wed: (2:50) 9:00 CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTINGThu: MARRIED (1:50) 9:00

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SAT NOV 3

NORTH BASS

$10–15/DOORS-SHOW 9/21+

SUN NOV 4

KUINKA

$10/DOORS 7⁄SHOW 8/21+

ON SALE NOW! NOVEMBER 7

FOREVER PAULA! Paula Abdul 2018 Tour NOVEMBER 10

Celtic Thunder X Tour

MON NOV 5

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT

ILLUMINATI CONGO & LACY REDHEAD

$10/$5 B4 10:30⁄DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

THU NOV 8

DONNA THE BUFFALO + RAYE ZARAGOZA

$17–20/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:45/21+

FRI NOV 9

THE SAM CHASE & THE UNTRADITIONAL BIRTHDAY SHOW! + THE CRUX

NOVEMBER 18

Righteous Brothers Bill Medley & Bucky Heard

$15/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, elisabeth@hopmonk.com

NOVEMBER 23

A Magical Cirque Christmas THURSDAY

COLLIE BUDDZ

FRIDAY

TAINTED LOVE

NOV 30 - DEC 2

NOV 1

Transcendence’s Broadway Holiday Spectacular

NOV 9

DECEMBER 3

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy Wild and Swingin’ Holiday Party DECEMBER 4

LeAnn Rimes You & Me & Christmas special guest Barry Zito

DECEMBER 11

Tony Bennett

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

REGGAE • DOORS 8PM • 21+

COVERS⁄ TRIBUTE • DOORS 8PM • 21+

SATURDAY SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE W⁄ THE HUNKA HUNKA NOV 10 SKIDS HULA REVUE ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ MONDAY

SUICIDE GIRLS:

BURLESQUE NOV 12 BLACKHEART BURLESQUE • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ THURSDAY

WILLIE WATSON WITH

TEA TAYLOR NOV 15 WILLY FOLK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ FRIDAY

Y&T NIGHT 1

SATURDAY

Y&T NIGHT 2

SATURDAY

T SISTERS W⁄ BEN & ALEX

NOV 16 NOV 17

ROCK • DOORS 7PM • 21+

ROCK • DOORS 8PM • 21+

(OF THE BROTHERS NOV 24 MORRISON COMATOSE) FOLK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

11⁄25 X w ⁄ Elettrodomestico, 11⁄28 Los Lonely Boys w ⁄ Bang Data, 11⁄30 The Travelin McCourys & special guest David Grisman, 12⁄1 Petty Theft, 12⁄2 Whitey Morgan w ⁄ Alex Williams, 12⁄7 Andre Nickatina w ⁄ J.Lately, 12⁄8 The Grain w ⁄ The King Street Giants & The Big Fit, 12⁄9 The Slackers w ⁄ The Aggrolites & Viernes 13

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

MIRROR OF FOLK Richard Shindell will Cry Cry Cry if he wants to.

Cry Folk

Richard Shindell reflects on reuniting his supergroup BY DAVE GIL DE RUBIO

I

t’s been a busy past couple of years for Richard Shindell. In 2017, he released his 10th fulllength solo album, Careless. Then he reunited with former bandmates Dar Williams and Lucy Kaplansky to tour this year as Cry Cry Cry, the much loved folk supergroup who released a single folkrock covers album in 1998. Having wrapped up the reunion, Shindell is back touring solo. He performs in the North Bay with a show at HopMonk Tavern in Novato on Nov. 2. “I’m really happy about both things. I like the record—it was a long time in the making. And then to immediately follow it up with this amazing opportunity to put Cry Cry Cry together, which I thought would never happen, it’s just a blessing.” says Shindell. Given that Cry Cry Cry was originally a single album project, the reunion surprised Shindell as much as it did the fans. “I think there are a lot of different reasons [we reunited]. I can’t point to any one causal thing,” says Shindell. “Lucy [Kaplansky] and I made a record together back in 2015—the Pine Hill Project. It was a Cry Cry

Cry sort of project. There were other people’s songs, and the idea was to sing a lot of harmonies. It’s a record that Lucy and I had wanted to make for a long time. In fact, prior to the original Cry Cry Cry, Lucy and I had talked about making such a record and we never did. And partially that’s because Cry Cry Cry happened.” Shindell notes that the purpose of the 1998 self-titled album was to hold a mirror to the folk community at that juncture. “There was a deliberate effort made to record songs that we love by people that we knew in our community,” Shindell says. “Cliff Eberhardt for example. His ‘Memphis’ might be my favorite song on the record.” The band also recorded songs by performers they weren’t as familiar with. “There’s a Robert Earl Keen song,” Shindell says. “I don’t know Robert Earl Keen, but he’s a heck of a songwriter. Dar wanted to sing this R.E.M. song, ‘Fall on Me,’ so it wasn’t like we only wanted to do that one thing. There were songs that came from other areas. “Ultimately what you want to do when you make a record is just find out what sounds good.” Richard Shindell performs Friday, Nov. 2, at HopMonk Tavern, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 8pm. $25–$35. 415.892.6200.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Paula Abdul Multi-platinum pop star returns to the stage in “Straight Up Paula,” her first solo tour in 25 years. Nov 7, 8pm. $79 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The Lost Church Sneak Peek & Fundraiser Be the first to see the new performance space in Santa Rosa at open house event featuring local musician showcase. Nov 3, 6pm. Free. The Lost Church Santa Rosa, 427 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. thelostchurch.com.

NRBQ Influential rhythm and blues act headlines a stellar afternoon show also featuring Marty O’Reilly, Flamin’ Groovies and others. Nov 3, 3:30pm. $40. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

MARIN COUNTY Marin Homeless Aid Second annual benefit concert features North Bay favorites Fleetwood Mask and Illeagles. Nov 3, 7pm. $20-$50. Marin Center Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

Mild High Club Los Angeles-based psychedelic band rocks out in the Grate Room. Nov 1, 8pm. $20-$22. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

New Century Chamber Orchestra Orchestra opens its season with British violinist Anthony Marwood as guest concertmaster and soloist. Nov 4, 3pm. $29-$61. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

NAPA COUNTY Pablo Cruise Veteran San Francisco rock

and pop group fronted by David Jenkins is back in the North Bay for two shows. Nov 3, 7 and 9:30pm. $45 and up. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Vernon Reid & Band of Gypsys Revisited Guitarist and founder of Living Color pays tribute to Jimi Hendrix’s final album, “Band of Gypsys,” with his quartet. Nov 1, 7 and 9pm. $20-$40. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Nov 2, LoWatters. Nov 3, Old Time Machine. Nov 4, 2pm, Mike Spinrad. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

The Big Easy

Nov 1, Old Time Machine. Nov 2, SunHunter. Nov 3, Swamp Thang. Nov 4, Orion’s Joy of Sextet. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Cooperage Brewing Co Oct 31, Electric Funeral. 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787.

Nov 2, Fly Trap. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Oct 31, the String Rays. Nov 1, Travis Hayes. Nov 2, Charles Wheal Band. Nov 3, Bay Station Band. Nov 4, Timothy O’Neil Band. Nov 7, Nick Foster. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

OPEN MIC

Main Street Bistro

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9 • 8PM

Occidental Center for the Arts

Nov 2, the Farallons. Nov 3, Redwood Arts Council presents the ATOS Trio. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

The Phoenix Theater

Nov 2, the Kitchen Knights with Impossible Odds and Midnight Transit. Nov 3, Mike Sherm. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

JUNK PARLOR

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10 • 8PM

SONOMA SOUND SYNDICATE WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 • 7–10PM

BURNSIDE BAND

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 • 8PM

Dia de los Muertos

fiesta flags • Frida Kahlo • nichos paper flowers • skeleton figurines ofrendas • tin hearts 605 Fourth Street | Downtown Santa Rosa 707-579-1459 | M-Sa 10:30-6, Su 12-5

THE POYNTLYSS SISTARS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 • 8PM

THE BEGUILERS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24 • 7PM

RIVERTOWN TRIO

HAPPY HOUR: MON—FRI, 4PM—6PM BRUNCH: SAT, SUN 11AM—2PM

Mon—Thu: 11:30am—9pm, Fri—Sat: 11:30am—12am Food served til 11pm; Fri, Sat & Karaoke Wed til 10

707.559.5133 101 2ND ST #190, PETALUMA

FOR RESERVATIONS:

Nov 2, Timothy O’Neil Band. Nov 3, the Sidemen. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Redwood Cafe

Nov 2, SSU Choral Festival. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

The Star

Nov 4, Kuinka. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

THE SIDEMEN

Red Brick

Nov 3, Atilla Viola & the Bakersfield Boys. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

HopMonk Sebastopol

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3 • 8PM

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 • 8PM

Nov 1, Collie Buddz. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Nov 3-5, “Dancing Across Time” with the Santa Rosa Symphony. Nov 7, Kenny Barron Quintet. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

TIMOTHY O’NEIL BAND

KARAOKE

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2 • 8PM

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Nov 3, French Oak. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Nov 2, Project 4 Band. Nov 3, Konsept Party Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

KARAOKE

Nov 1, Susan Sutton. Nov 2, Don Olivet Jazz Trio. Nov 3, Yancie Taylor. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Oct 31, Halloween concert with Midnight Sun. Nov 1, A Case of the Willys. Nov 2, Bohemian Highway. Nov 3, Nostalgia-palooza with Hangman’s Daughter and Ounou. Nov 4, Gypsy Kisses. Nov 5, West Coast Songwriters. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Flamingo Lounge

EVERY MONDAY • 6:30–9:30 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31 • 7–10PM

Oct 31, Sessions Halloween and anniversary celebration. Nov 1, Jake Levant. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.6390.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Nov 1, Country Line Dancing. Nov 2, Dead Again. Nov 3, Lee Vandeveer. Nov 5, Blues Defenders pro )

20

OPEN MIC EVERY MON > sign up at 7:30, starts 8 > Viva Open Mic host Dean Martian

SMART IS HOT TRIVIA EVERY WEDS All shows 8pm except as noted > NO COVER

Maenad Alignment by Michael McMillan, 2003

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

NOV 2 >

AWESOME HOTCAKES

NOV 3 >

THIRD RAIL

NOV 9 >

BUCK NICKELS AND LOOSE CHANGE

NOV 10 >

TIMOTHY O’NEIL BAND

NOV 16 >

ALIEN HIT RADIO

NOV 17 >

GENTLEMEN SOLDIERS

NOV 23 >

JANIE AND THE REFORMED

NOV 24 >

THE RENOVATORS

NOV 30 >

eNEGATIVE

Download the

Hope & Love Radio App

on iPhone, Google Play or listen on iTunes http://108.59.9.147:8236/stream

1018 Santa Rosa Plaza, Santa Rosa SR PLAZA PARKING VALIDATION 707.327.2822 | 2treadbrewing.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 31- NOVE MBER 6, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Calendar

19

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey


NO RT H BAY BO HE MIAN | O CTO BE R 31-NOVE M B E R 6, 20 18 | B O HE M IA N.COM

20

Outdoor Dining Sat & Sun Brunch 11–3

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week Wed 10⁄31 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $32–35• 21+

Din ner & A Show

Matt Jaffe Band Nov 2 Original, Compelling 8:00 ⁄No Cover Fri

Smith’s “Supper Club” Nov 3 Lavay Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Sat

Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:00

Nov 4 LoWatters High Lonesome Twang to Lowdown Roots Sun

4:00 ⁄No Cover

a n ce Nov 10 Stompy Jones featuring D arty! Sat

Annette Moreno 8:00

“The Original Rancho Nov 17 Allstars 20 Years Later” Sat

P

r You with Dallis Craft, Mike For ncing ! a D Duke, and Angela Strehli leasure P 8:00

Join

Calendar ( 19

Us! Thursday, Nov 22 for Our Traditional

Thanksgiving Dinner Call for Reservations

20th Anniversary Weekend!

OU T ! Anniversary Show S OL D Fri Nov 30 Paul Thorn Band Sat Dec 1 Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun Trio e Sun D a nc Dec 2 HowellDevine Party!

Thu

Nov 29

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Sebastiani Theatre Presents

Brewmaster November 12th

The Mother Hips Rock & Roll Halloween Bash + San Geronimo

Thu 11⁄1 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–19• All Ages

ANGELEX

feat Angeline Saris & Lex Razon with Otis McDonald feat members of Jazz Mafia & Atta Kid

Fri 11⁄2 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $10–15 • All Ages

IrieFuse + Sol Horizon

Sat 11⁄4 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $22–27 • All Ages Jeffrey Foucault (seated)

+ Dusty Heart

jam. Nov 7, honky-tonk night. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

2 Tread Brewing Company

Nov 2, Awesome Hotcakes. Nov 3, Third Rail. 1018 Santa Rosa Plaza, Santa Rosa. 707.327.2822.

Whiskey Tip

Nov 3, the Y Axes with Above Average and Reisender. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Fri 11⁄9 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $20–25 • 21+

Soul Ska's Tribute to Coxsone Dodd's Legendary Studio One Thu 11⁄15 • Doors 7:30pm ⁄ $15–20 • All Ages The Soul Travelers feat Austin & Caroline de Lone, Amber Morris, April Grisman, Jimmy Dillon & many more

TWO SHOWS!

Fri 11⁄16 • Doors 5:30pm ⁄ $15 • All Ages "Superhero Kids Show" & Fri 11⁄16 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–32 • 21+ Foreverland An Electrifying 14-Piece Michael Jackson Tribute Sat 11⁄17 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $17–19 • All Ages Corduroy A Pearl Jam Tribute Band

Alice in the Garden

Tribute to Alice in Chains & Soundgarden www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

MARIN COUNTY HopMonk Novato

Nov 1, Trip with Big Twang Theory. Nov 2, Richard Shindell. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 31, the Mother Hips Rock & Roll Halloween Bash with San Geronimo. Nov 1, Angelex. Nov 2, IrieFuse and Sol Horizon. Nov 3, Marin Charitable benefit with Super Diamond. Nov 4, Jeffrey Foucault with Dusty Heart. Nov 5, Tab Benoit. Sold-out. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Oct 31, Halloween with Louis York & the Shindellas. Nov 3, JD & the Straight Shot. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue

Nov 4, 2pm, Rob Watson and friends with Vernon Black. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Silo’s

Bullitt

Nov 2, Mister Completely and Tommy Odetto. Nov 4, an unplugged evening with the Everly Brothers Experience. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

A Christmas Carol

Art Openings

With Beer Tasting!

November 19th

The Play By Silver Moon Theatre December 14,15,16

www.SebastianiTheatre.com

SONOMA COUNTY 33 Arts

Nov 3-4, “Fashionable Art Glass & Swans Sculptures,” see exquisite glass jewelry and fabulous ceramic swans.

Reception, Nov 3 at noon. 3840 Finley Ave, Bldg 33, Santa Rosa. 415.601.5323.

Graton Gallery

Nov 1-Dec 2, “From Clayton to Graton 2,” longtime friends Rik Olson and Fred King return to display their latest works. Reception, Nov 3 at 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Nov 3-30, “Siddharth Parasnis: Serendipity,” renowned Bay Area artist exhibits his latest paintings. Reception, Nov 3 at 4pm. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Comedy Electile Dysfunction

Presented by Evil Comedy. Nov 3, 7:30pm. $5. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Dance World of Dance Live Continent-spanning tour celebrates the human spirit and sick dance moves. Nov 5, 8pm. $39 and up. Luther

Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Events Bark After Dark

Fun-filled evening features adoptable animals, dinner and desserts, silent and live auctions and more to help homeless pets. Nov 3, 6:30pm. $25-$50. Rohnert Park Community Center, 5401 Snyder Ln, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3456.

Blind Scream Haunted House

Two terrifying haunted-house experiences under one roof get you in the mood for Halloween. Through Oct 31. $15-$35. SOMO Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. blindscream.com.

Dia de los Muertos in Monte Rio

Celebrate the Mexican holiday with an altar honoring loved ones who have passed, snacks, candle lighting and face painting. Nov 2, 4pm. Monte Rio Community Center,

20488 Hwy 116, Monte Rio, 707.865.9956.

Rise Up, Make Some Noise

Women’s march and rally is an inclusive event. Nov 3, 10am. Free. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa, 707.701.3620.

Santa Rosa Doll & Toy Show

Browse vintage toys and modern dolls. Nov 4, 10am. $6. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

Film CinemaBites

See award-winning documentary, “Theater of Life,” about chef Massimo Bottura and dine with St. Helena’s The Charter Oak. Nov 5, 5pm. $45. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

An Evening with Katinka Faragó

Producer has worked in the Swedish film industry for more than 60 years, and is renowned for her professional association with filmmaker Ingmar Bergman. Nov 3, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Napa Valley Film Festival

The ultimate film, food and wine experience features independent and studio features with celebrity guests galore. Nov 7-11. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa. nvff.org.

Novato Green Film Series See the documentary “Made in the Shade,” which chronicles Sacramento’s path to becoming the ‘City of Trees.’ Nov 1, 6:30pm. Novato City Hall, 901 Sherman Ave, Novato. 415.899.8900.

Petaluma Cinema Series See SPike Lee’s latest masterpiece, “Blackkklansman,” with lecture and discussion. Nov 7, 6pm. $6. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, SRJC Petaluma Campus, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma.

The Prairie Trilogy

Filmmaker Rob Nilsson presents a screening of this newly restored trio of documentaries. Nov 1, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center,


1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Weed the People

Readings Napa Bookmine

Food & Drink Bodega Land Trust Fall Harvest Community Dinner

Nov 2, 6pm, “Footslog” with Jeremy Benson. Nov 3, 6pm, “Other People’s Love Affairs” with D Wystan Owen. Nov 4, 3pm, Napa Valley Writers Open Mic. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Napa Bookmine at Oxbow

Heritage Turkey Sunday Supper

Nov 3, 6pm, “Smart Ass” with Margaret Winslow. 3740 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa 707.252.8002.

All-star team of chefs prepare a reception and family-style meal with the best autumn ingredients from local farms and purveyors. Nov 4, 3pm. $100. Atwood Ranch, 12099 Sonoma Hwy, Glen Ellen, 707.318.7526.

Rio Nido Roadhouse Chili Cook Off

Home cooks are invited to show off their skills and tickets get you tastings, plated meal and live music. Nov 3, 1pm. $20. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido, 707.869.0821.

Tequila Train

Napa’s wine train commemorates the Day of the Dead with a traditional Mexican menu from Criollo’s Chef Luis Arellano. Nov 1. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa, 800.427.4124.

For Kids Dia de los Muertos Storytime

Nov 3, 10:30am, “Gwen the Rescue Hen” with Leslie Crawford. 610 First St, Shop 4, Napa. 707.726.6575.

Napa Copperfield’s Books

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Nov 3, 2pm, “Fun in the Mud: A Wetlands Tale” with Sally Bolger. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Nov 2, 7pm, “The Cards Don’t Lie” with Sue Ingalls Finan. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Nov 4, 1pm, “Seven Secrets to Healthy Happy Relationships” with Don Miguel Ruiz Jr. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Theater 101 Dalmatians KIDS

A fantastic theater experience for young audiences. Nov 2-11. $5. Steele Lane Community Center. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa, atheaterforchildren.com.

includes reading and singalong. Nov 4, 2pm. Free with admission. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

The Addams Family Musical

Lectures

Blithe Spirit

Anne Lamott & Eve Ensler in Conversation

Through Nov 4. $15-$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600. A cantankerous novelist is haunted by the ghost of his late wife in this classic comedy. Through Nov 4. $23-

God of Carnage

Two sets of parents try to civilly discuss a problem between their kids, but the night devolves into chaos in this biting comedy. Through Nov 11. $21-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

and Ssu Snow Club

present Warren Miller’s

Pre-Party! Free admission

for NorCal Film release “face of winter”

Winter starts with Warren Miller

Win new gear and get ready to shred this winter!

Hand to God

Left Edge Theatre presents the award-winning comedy featuring a hand puppet possessed by the devil. Through Nov 11. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play

“The Simpsons” serves as inspiration for this original post-apocalyptic tale that is funny, bleak and bizarre. Oct 31-Nov 4. $10-$17. Evert B. Person Theater, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.4246.

Outside Mullingar

Two introverted misfits in rural Ireland take a journey that is heartbreaking, hilarious and deeply moving. Through Nov 4. $10-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

© Chad Chomlack

Local chefs prepare a bountiful fall harvest dinner, with a silent auction and live classical guitar by Pablo Rodriguez. Nov 3, 5:30pm. $20. McCaughey Hall, 17184 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. bodegalandtrust.org.

$33. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

The Rocky Horror Show That sweet transvestite, Dr. Frank-N-furter, and his motley crew return in the original stage musical. Through Nov 3. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Spy Who Killed Me Get a Clue Productions hosts an interactive and humorous murder-mystery dinner theater experience. Sat, Nov 3, 7pm. $68 (includes meal). Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. getaclueproductions.com.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

We will show some of his daredevil movies. Enjoy a clip of the 2018 film “Face of Winter” HUGE RAFFLE GIVEAWAY— 3 tickets for $5 Tickets sales support SSU Snow Club.

wed Nov 14

Prizes include:

• Film tickets for Nov. 17 Mystic Theatre, Petaluma and Nov. 23 Marin Center, San Rafael film premieres • Film DVDs • Blizzard Tecnica skis • 2 Marmot featherless jackets • Hydration packs • Snow apparel

5:00–7:30

two lions Band at 4:20 at Lagunitas Petaluma Tap Room 1280 N McDowell Blvd Petaluma

info 707.527.1200

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 31- NOVE MBER 6, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Cannabis documentary focuses on how the plant helps children suffering from cancer, with director on hand for Q&A. Nov 4, 2pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Bestselling author and Tony Award-winning playwright speak on several relevant topics. Nov 1, 8pm. $39-$49. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.


THE

Nugget

eed the People is director Abby Epstein and executive producer Ricki Lake’s timely and compelling documentary about using cannabis oil as an alternative medicine for children with cancer. The film features half a dozen case studies of babies and teens who take this form of medical marijuana to reduce tumors. It is, as one believer states in the film, “not a cure, but an extension of life.”

Marijuana is still classified by the DEA as a Schedule 1 drug, though, as the film notes, the government has a medical patent on marijuana. In America, there has been minimal research on the effects of treating cancer with cannabis—most studies show the negative, not positive effects— but in countries like Israel and Spain, there are encouraging findings about the drug’s healing properties. Weed the People firmly establishes the drug-policy issue as a human-rights issue and follows several families benefiting from cannabis treatment to track their progress. “We met a little girl who was 30 pounds and six years old,” Lake says, “and this is crazy, but we moved her and her family into our house, and took her to osteopaths and a cannabis doc. Weed the People comes from our personal experience and natural curiosity.” The film features several women on the front lines, including Mara Gordon, co-founder of Aunt Zelda’s, which creates and sells cannabis oils to patients, and Bonni Goldstein, a medical director at Canna Centers, who lectures on the efficacy of cannabinoid therapy. It is one of four documentaries Lake has produced on social issues, after The Business of Being Born, Breastmilk and the forthcoming Sweetening the Pill. The film, Lake says, was made “specifically to take the stigma away. It’s not about legalization, regulation or getting high; it’s about children dying of cancer and the heroic docs and scientists putting their time into this. “There are enough films about drug reform and legalization,” Lake adds. Weed the People “was about the kids and following the stories, and hopefully to get change to happen.”

“It wasn’t my medicine or my cause,” Lake says, “but my husband passed away, and [cannabis] was his passion.”

‘Weed the People’ screens at UA Berkeley 7 on Nov. 3 at 7pm, and again at Rialto Cinemas in Sebastopol on Nov. 4 at 2pm. Source: Alternet.

Longest permitted dispensary in Sonoma County

We Have Mochi! Mochi Gold Seal

SF Easy 101 Access

CBD YA New Ricki Lake doc chronicles the medical benefits of cannabidiol.





NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTOBE R 31- NOV E M BE R 6, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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2425 Cleveland Ave #175 Santa Rosa CA 95403 707.526.2800

Open 7 Days a Week 10:00 am—7:00 pm

SonomaPatientGroup.com A10-18-0000177-TEMP

Lake’s Latest

Talk-show host Ricki Lake on her new film about CBD

Cannabis Harvest Fesval W November 3!

BY GARY M. KRAMER

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Astrology For the week of October 31

ARIES (March 21–April 19) You have officially arrived at the heart of the most therapeutic phase of your cycle. Congratulations! It’s an excellent time to fix what’s wrong, hurt or distorted. You will attract more help than you can imagine if you summon an aggressive approach toward finding antidotes and cures. A good way to set the tone for your aggressive determination to feel better is to heed this advice from poet Maya Angelou: “Take a day to heal from the lies you’ve told yourself and the ones that have been told to you.” TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

U2’s singer Bono, born under the sign of Taurus, says that all of us suffer from the sense that something’s missing from our lives. We imagine that we lack an essential quality or experience, and its absence makes us feel sad and insufficient. French philosopher Blaise Pascal referred to this emptiness as “a God-shaped hole.” Bono adds that “you can never completely fill that hole,” but you may find partial fixes through love and sex, creative expression, family, meaningful work, parenting, activism and spiritual devotion. I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I have a strong suspicion that in the coming weeks you will have more power to fill your God-shaped hole than you’ve had in a long time.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “Most of our desires are clichés, right? Ready to wear, one size fits all. I doubt if it’s even possible to have an original desire anymore.” So says a character in Gemini author Tobias Wolff’s short story “Sanity.” Your assignment in the coming weeks, Gemini, is to refute and rebel against this notion. The cosmic rhythms will work in your favor to the degree that you cultivate innovative yearnings and unique urges. I hope you’ll make it your goal to have the experiences necessary to stir up an outbreak of original desires. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

If you’re a typical member of the Cancerian tribe, you’re skilled at responding constructively when things go wrong. Your intelligence rises up hot and strong when you get sick or rejected or burned. But if you’re a classic Crab, you have less savvy in dealing with triumphs. You may sputter when faced with splashy joy, smart praise or lucky breaks. But everything I just said is meant to be a challenge, not a curse. One of the best reasons to study astrology is to be aware of the potential shortcomings of your sign so you can outwit and overcome them. That’s why I think that eventually you’ll evolve to the point where you won’t be a bit flustered when blessings arrive. And the immediate future will bring you excellent opportunities to upgrade your response to good fortune.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “Each of us needs something of an island in his life,” said author John C. Keats. “If not an actual island, at least some place, or space in time, in which to be herself, free to cultivate his differences from others.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Leo, you’ll be wise to spend extra time on your own island in the next two weeks. Solitude is unlikely to breed unpleasant loneliness, but will instead inspire creative power and evoke inner strength. If you don’t have an island yet, go in search! VIRGO (August 23–September 22) I’m rooting for you to engage in experimental intimacy, Virgo. I hope you’ll have an affinity for sweet blends and incandescent mixtures and arousing juxtapositions. To get in the right mood for this playful work, you could read love poetry and listen to uplifting songs that potentize your urge to merge. Here are a few lyrical passages to get you warmed up. (1) “Your flesh quivers against mine like moonlight on the sea.” —Julio Cortázar. (2) “When she smiles like that she is as beautiful as all my secrets.”—Anne Carson. (3) “My soul is alight with your infinitude of stars . . . The flowers of your garden blossom in my body.”—Rabindranath Tagore. (4) “I can only find you by looking deeper, that’s how love leads us into the world.”—Anne Michaels. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Of course I want you to have more money. I’d love for you to buy experiences that expand your mind, deepen your emotional intelligence and foster your ability to

BY ROB BREZSNY

create inspiring forms of togetherness. My soul would celebrate if you got access to new wealth that enabled you to go in quest of spiritual fun and educational adventures. On the other hand, I wouldn’t be thrilled about you spending extra cash on trivial desires or fancy junk you don’t really need. Here’s why I feel this way: to the extent that you seek more money to pursue your most righteous cravings, you’re likely to get more money.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“Penetralia” is a word that means the innermost or most private parts, the most secret and mysterious places. It’s derived from the same Latin term that evolved into the word “penetrate.” You Scorpios are of course the zodiac’s masters of penetralia. More than any other sign, you’re likely to know where the penetralia are, as well as how to get to them and what to do when you get to them. I suspect that this tricky skill will come in extra handy during the coming weeks. I bet your intimate adeptness with penetralia will bring you power, fun and knowledge.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Sagittarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke suggested that we cultivate an alertness for the ever-present possibility of germination and gestation. On a regular basis, he advised, we should send probes down into the darkness, into our unconscious minds, to explore for early signs of awakening. And when we discover the forces of renewal stirring there in the depths, we should be humble and reverent toward them, understanding that they are as-yet beyond the reach of our ability to understand. We shouldn’t seek to explain and define them at first, but simply devote ourselves to nurturing them. Everything I just said is your top assignment in the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) You’re in a phase of your cycle when your influence is at a peak. People are more receptive than usual to your ideas and more likely to want the same things you do. Given these conditions, I think the best information I can offer you is the following meditation by Capricorn activist Martin Luther King Jr. “Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice, and justice at its best is power correcting everything that stands against love.” AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Aquarian environmentalist Edward Abbey spent much of his life rambling around in the great outdoors. He was an emancipated spirit who regarded the natural world as the only church he needed. In an eruption of ecstatic appreciation, he once testified that “life is a joyous dance through daffodils beneath cerulean blue skies and then, then what? I forget what happens next.” And yet the truth is, Abbey was more than a wild-hearted Dionysian explorer in the wilderness. He found the discipline and diligence to write 23 books! I mention this, Aquarius, because now is a perfect time for you to be like the disciplined and diligent and productive version of Abbey. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

For renowned Piscean visual artist Anne Truitt (1921–2004), creating her work was high adventure. She testified that artists like her had “to catapult themselves wholly, without holding back one bit, into a course of action without having any idea where they will end up. They are like riders who gallop into the night, eagerly leaning on their horse’s neck, peering into a blinding rain.” Whether or not you’re an artist, Pisces, I suspect your life in the coming weeks may feel like the process she described. And that’s a good thing! A fun thing! Enjoy your ride.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 3 1- NOVE MBER 6, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Profile for Metro Publishing

North Bay Bohemian 1844  

October 31-November 6, 2018

North Bay Bohemian 1844  

October 31-November 6, 2018