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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | AUGUST 8-14, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 40.12

Laugh It Up

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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JUST FOR YUCKS Karen Willett and a host of other top comics will make you laugh at Pet-A-Llama Aug. 16-18, p10.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Palms Inn a Success

Yes, there are more sheriff calls to this property than your usual apartment complex (“Calls for Help,” July 31), but have you considered that the Palms Inn is actually saving the taxpayers money by getting people off the streets and thus cutting down on utilization of ambulance, emergency room, overnight hospitalization, and sheriff responses? A main purpose of the “housing first” model is to put a roof over the head of the most vulnerable homeless who are

costing the city hundreds of thousands in emergency service utilization in order to cut back on these costs. Not to mention all of the moral reasons, which should be reason enough to intervene. The Palms ultimately benefits law enforcement by cutting down on utilization. I would be interested in the statistics about sheriff responses in Santa Rosa since the Palms inception, and utilization of services among Palms residents previous to moving in versus six months or a year in. And yes, on-site mental health services would be fantastic and I fully support that, but there are on-site case managers

THIS MODERN WORLD

through Catholic Charities and the VA, it is not a free-for-all. These residents have a level of support and access to services. Sorry if this seems defensive I just feel like this is textbook cherry-picking of the data, and contains some language that is commonly used to disparage the efforts of combating homelessness, at least in the first half. This site is portrayed as some huge inconvenience to law enforcement. I believe in this project and am willing to put my money where my mouth is.

MITCHELL REBER

Santa Rosa

By Tom Tomorrow

Poignant Punks

I really appreciate the amount of research that went into this article “Mosh Split,” July 31). I felt like I was in Santa Rosa and feeling the crisis. Nice piece glad I read it! I really hope they continue to push music and arts into the community. It's not easy rebuild people's spirits after a fire.

DEBRA SLONIN

Via Bohemian.com

CDs For Me I've been an audiophile for 43 years. I have over 700 CDs that I'm ripping for my favorite songs only, and am looking to expand my collection. So imagine my horror when I found out that about the only music store left with a decent collection of CDs for sale is The Last Record Store (“A Positive Spin,” Aug. 1). I have driven all over Sonoma and Marin counties, and am finding that everyone else is going the LP route and dropping CDs. I say horror not because I have anything against the resurgence of LPs, but having been a major collector of LPs up until 33 years ago, there a lot of downsides to them that perhaps many have not thought through. On the short list, they are bulky and take up a lot of room, they melt, they scratch and they can't be played on your car system. The new sales pitch is that they sound better then CDs, but that depends on the recording. But what finally turned me off of LPs in the mid-80s was problems getting even newly pressed LPs that were not defective. I remember in 1985 I returned Boz Scaggs's first album nine times for scratches or skips. It was at that point that I said “never more.” I went CD, and I'm not going back. Good luck to the rest of you with your LPs.

KARIN

Via Bohemian.com Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants Supreme Court, not Russia imperils democracy BY ALICE CHAN

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hile we’re often distracted by allegations of Russian efforts to influence our elections, we’re ignoring a much more important danger: the U.S. Supreme Court’s homegrown threat to our right to vote and have confidence in the accuracy of our elections. A Supreme Court ruling in 2013 facilitated voter suppression. The Shelby v. Holder decision gutted the Voting Rights Act, and rolled back voting rights protections in states that had histories of discrimination in access to voting. Those effects made a huge difference in the 2016 presidential election. According to a recent study published by the Brennan Center for Justice, the effects of the 2013 ruling included increased voter ID requirements at polling places, redistricting without regard for racial makeup of the districts, disenfranchising minority voters and voter roll “purging,” i.e., removing voters for dubious reasons. The result was that after 2013, two million eligible voters were purged from voting rolls. In 2016, some elections officials further suppressed the vote by reducing the number of available polling places, making it more inconvenient for people to vote, printing an insufficient number of ballots, forcing voters to mark provisional ballots which have a higher chance of being rejected than regular ballots and allowing malfunctioning voting machines to “lose” votes.

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At the same time, the Supreme Court has allowed unlimited corporate money in politics. Three years before gutting the Voting Rights Act, the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling erased the prohibition on dark money in politics. Their specious reasoning was that the First Amendment prohibits the government from restricting political campaign spending by corporations. The result has been a deluge of corporate and dark money support for business-as-usual candidates. Who interfered more in elections: Russia or the Supreme Court? It’s easier to blame Facebook postings by alleged Russian operatives than to reverse Supreme Court rulings, but that’s what we’re going to have to do if we want to get our elections back. Alice Chan is an elections integrity activist and delegate to the California Democratic Central Committee. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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The Threat Within

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Paper THE

OB-GONE Who will care for the squalling cuties of Sonoma and their moms?

Bye-Bye Babies Sonoma Valley Hospital set to close obstetrics unit this fall BY STEPHANIE HILLER

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mall rural hospitals are struggling all over the country— and the North Bay is no exception. Sebastopol’s Sonoma West Medical Center, formerly Palm Drive, is up for sale. Petaluma

Valley Hospital is in talks with St. Joseph Health about the future of the facility. And Sonoma Valley Hospital is reducing services in order to keep its emergency room and diagnostic services open. On July 26, the hospital announced it would be closing its obstetrics unit in October. That high-cost unit has been

operating in the red for several years, says hospital CEO Kelly Mather. A drop in local births, combined with changes in the economics of healthcare delivery have contributed to the deficit, she says. Sonoma is increasingly a community of elders: Fewer young couples are starting families here, in part because of

the high cost of living. Births are down nearly 50 percent since 2010, and as a result, the Sonoma hospital’s OB unit has been operating at a loss of a half-million dollars a year. The decline in birth rates is a national trend. In May, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the U.S. birth rate is the lowest it’s been in 30 years, lower than the replacement rate needed to sustain the population. Some women are giving up motherhood in favor of careers, which are often set back by a pregnancy. The cost of raising a family today is another constraint, especially for women carrying large student loans. And motherhood often goes unsupported in our society. Women are penalized at work for becoming pregnant, as 88 percent of workers get no paid leave for maternity or other caregiving needs. The precipitous decline in birth rates isn’t the the only factor in Sonoma Valley Hospital’s decision. Reimbursements are also down, says Mather. “In the last four years, we’ve been reimbursed less. Kaiser has taken over the Bay Area. We end up with Medicare and Medi-Cal, which reimburse less.” Obstetrics patients are predominantly recipients of Medi-Cal, she says. “It doesn’t cover our costs.” Obstetrics, Mather says, is “a risky service to offer. If anything goes wrong with the baby, you have to have backup on hand— anesthesia, pediatrics, two nurses at all times.” The hospital’s total yearly revenue is running about $3 million below what it needs to be a sustainable operation. A big chunk of that is reimbursements from federal-government health programs. “Medicare is down over $2 million in the last year alone,” Mather says. “We’re closing services that don’t make money, so that we can continue to offer other services that do.” The OB unit will close Oct. 31. Competition from Kaiser is another factor, Maher say. Kaiser will cover emergency room costs at local hospitals—but not other services.


Sonoma Valley Hospital’s obstetrics unit has been operating in the red for several years. Losing the OB unit is an emotional issue, as the testimony at a recent public hearing attested: Women spoke of having had all their children at the hospital. Some watched their grandkids emerge from the womb, too. Now moms will have to go to Santa Rosa or Queen of the Valley in Napa. Some objected to having to make the drive. The OB cuts may also lead to more women having their babies at home. That would be welcome news to Sonoma midwife Kate Coletti, who also teaches yoga classes for birthing mothers. “I applaud it,” she says. “I believe [home-birthing] is an awesome option for women who are lowrisk and want to have a natural birth. . . . But the hospital OB will be missed.”

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Housing Hitch An eye-opening report on Forbes. com over the weekend made the social media rounds among local politicos and housing advocates as it proffered a sobering reality: just because you build a lot of housing, doesn’t mean it becomes more affordable. The financial fanzine based its story on an April report from the Federal Reserve that dove into the numbers in a few big metro areas around the country and came to the conclusion that rents are driven more by the availability of local amenities than they are by the number of housing units being built. The Fed report stood on its ear the notion that mixed-income housing developments are the key to an affordable and just housing scene for all. In Facebook comments over the weekend, affordablehousing-focused Santa Rosa city councilwoman Julie Combs reflected on the article and its implications regionally: “All that supply-and-demand stuff you’ve heard? Not exactly true. We can’t solve our housing crisis by building market-rate housing—we must strategically build affordable homes: Homes that a person with the middle income (around $68,000 a year) or less can live in. Apartments that seniors, veterans, restaurant workers, shop clerks and ag workers can afford.” Sonoma County lost some 5,000 homes during the 2017 wildfires and local electeds have pledged to build 25,000 on top of that in the rebuilding effort. The county joined Santa Rosa recently in declaring the local homeless problem a crisis.

Stanko Bancos The California Reinvestment Coalition is asking for citizen and

nonprofits’ help in stemming what they say is another emergent nightmare for undocumented persons: some American banks have taken steps to close the accounts of non-citizens. “The practice of targeting immigrants for discrimination is unacceptable and illegal,” says CRC executive director Paulina Gonzalez. “We are concerned that banks are taking steps that are unnecessary and not required by federal law.” The organization has an ongoing campaign called Here to Stay, which has focused its efforts on “building financial security and economy opportunity for all,” she says, which includes helping them open checking accounts if they don’t have a Social Security number.

‘Big Man’ Honored A celebration of the life of Elbert “Big Man” Howard is scheduled for Aug. 25 at DeFremery Park in Oakland. Howard, a Santa Rosan and co-founder of the Black Panther Party in the 1960s, died on July 23. He was 80. The commemorative event will feature a who’s who of prominent AfricanAmerican activists from the Civil Rights era, including Bobby Seale, Kathleen Cleaver, Angela Davis and Emory Douglas. Seale was one of the “Chicago 8” put on trial in the aftermath of the 1968 police riot during the Democratic National Convention. Cleaver is a law professor and the wife of the late author Eldridge Cleaver. Angela Davis is the powerhouse countercultural icon from the era and graphic artist Emory Douglas is the former Minister of Culture for the Black Panthers. The event is at 1pm at the Bobby Hutton Grove in the park. Meanwhile, the struggle continues: Oakland was recently in the news after an outraged white woman called the cops on a group of African-Americans for having a picnic. —Tom Gogola

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

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Sonoma Valley also plans to eliminate its skilled nursing facility and turn over its homehealth care service over to an independent provider. “These changes reflect a long-term national trend for community hospitals of moving away from inpatient care to outpatient services. Advances in medical care and technology, in addition to insurance mandates, are driving this trend,” writes Joshua Rymer, chair of the Sonoma Valley Hospital board of directors, in a summary of the meeting posted on the hospital’s website.


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Dining

sandwiches that focus on the egg-heavy, breakfast variety, with additions like spring onion conserva and bacon. Bun No. 17, a creation the team worked on for three weeks, is a hybrid of a milk and a potato bun, sprinkled with sea salt. If there is a cookie with a gimmicky twist, that would be the Rocky Road, a mix of chocolate bits, marshmallows, walnuts and more, and inspired by the icecream flavor. Other tasties include glutenfree muffins and cookies, which are made with Thomas Keller’s Cup for Cup gluten-free flour and a raw vegan tiramisu with dates replacing the cookie layer.

‘Hopefully, your heart and soul are in it, and folks dig it.’

ONE SMALL STEP Honey & the Moon offers a menu long on vegan and gluten-free items, which are quite tasty.

Lunar Eclairs

Honey & the Moon bakery shoots for stardom in Sonoma BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

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t’s hard to surprise people with pastries. One route is to go extra-healthy, making it a vehicle for super-foods, or make it a crossover gimmick, like the cronut or the tacro. Newcomer Honey & the Moon Coffee and Bakeshop attempts neither, and yet it is ambitious.

“We’re looking up to Tartine in San Francisco,” says owner James Hahn, referring to the world-famous chain of breads and pastries. “One day, we hope to rise to their standard.” Honey & the Moon is the newest business from Hahn and wife Mila Chanamé, who also own Sonoma’s 10-year-old Sunflower Caffé. This summer, the Santa Rosa–based couple, along with newly minted business partners

and ex-employees Aaron Mills and Melissa Cameron, took over the city’s Breakaway Cafe as well. They plan to refurbish and relaunch it in October as Mint & Liberty Diner, with a new menu by chef Michael Segal. While Mills runs the operations at Sunflower, Cameron, Chanamé and Hahn collaborate on the menu. There are morning buns, goat cheese quiches and an assortment of cookies and

The menu touts several shout-out offerings: The coffee comes from Petaluma’s Acre Coffee Roasters, the butter from Petaluma Creamery. The maple syrup is from Branon Family Maple Orchards in Vermont. The name is a local confection, combining the California bear’s favorite food and Valley of the Moon, where the bake-shop is located. “It’s also inspired by the expression ‘To the moon and back,’”—as in “I love you to the moon and back”—Chanamé says, “which mirrors our profound passion for what we do. Promising the moon is no easy commitment, but with love, anything is possible.” Is Tartine-grade hype around the corner? “My guess would be that you don’t manufacture it, it just happens,” Hahn says. “Hopefully, your heart and soul are in it, and folks dig it.” Honey & the Moon, 720 W. Napa, St., Sonoma. 707.934.8797.


Groovy Grav Sonoma County heritage apple unlikely hero of craft cider BY JAMES KNIGHT

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ere’s a bit of an irony about the heritage Gravenstein apple, darling of Sonoma County’s recent craft cider boom: it isn’t really a heritage cider apple at all. But a bitter irony, it is not.

“It’s shockingly good!” says Chris Condos, cofounder of Horse & Plow, a Sebastopol winery that’s also a cidery, of the Grav. What the apple lacks in tannin, which gives traditional European cider a backbone in a blend, it makes up

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Swirl

for in acidity and floral aromatics, Condos says. Available at the Gravenstein Apple Fair this year, Horse & Plow’s collaboration cider Tilted Plow, with Windsor’s Tilted Shed cidery, combines Gravenstein goodness with the firm tannin and orange oil, Muscat-like aromatics of the Muscat de Bernay apple. Last week, I asked a group of Bohemians for their take on four takes on local, mostly Gravenstein ciders. Ethic Ciders Gravitude Sparkling Dry Cider ($9.99) This newcomer focuses on organically grown heritage apples while they grow their own orchard of cider varieties. Fermented with wine yeast strains, this 90 percent Gravenstein cider is clean and crisp, showing fine effervescence, mellow notes of this mellow apple, and has an extra brut-style finish. A big hit with Bohemians, it’s 7 percent alcohol by volume (abv). Horse & Plow Gravenstein Sonoma County Cider ($14) Looking for “funk,” a legitimate, and not really negative, cider tasting term? Find it here. Fermented on naturally occurring yeasts, aged in neutral barrels and bottle-conditioned, this is a slightly cloudy, funky or medicinal smelling but also ebulliently floral example of Grav gone wild, the kind of rustic refresher that gets me ready to go out and cut some more hay. But seems like some first-time tasters of craft cider may not appreciate the style. 8 percent abv. Ace Blackjack Gravenstein Cider ($9.99) The Sebastopol cider pioneer returns to its roots with this special release from local apples. A county fair, caramel apple character comes from aging in Chardonnay barrels. 9 percent abv. Local cider makers have kicked off the first-ever Sonoma County Cider Week, culminating in the cider-soaked Gravenstein Apple Fair. Cider Week events still to come include a Sonoma Strong collaboration release at Barley & Bine Beer Cafe in Windsor, Wednesday, Aug. 8, 5–8pm; Cider on the Patio at Campo Fina, Healdsburg, 5:30–8:30pm; cider pairing at Spinster Sisters in Santa Rosa, Saturday, Aug. 11, 5–9pm, and more at sonomacountyciderweek.com.

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The Funny Boom Pet-A-Llama Comedy Festival features Sonomaraised Brian Posehn and other stars of standup BY CHARLIE SWANSON

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hen standup comedy went mainstream in the 1980s, it was largely confined to the comedy club, a ubiquitous term for the low-ceilinged, low-lit rooms where comedians rattled on with observational wit in front of brick walls on television shows like An Evening at the Improv and Caroline’s Comedy Hour. A lot has changed in standup in the last three decades, beginning with the advent and evolution of the alternative comedy scene that moved standup out of the comedy club and into comic-book shops, taprooms, black-box theaters, jazz clubs, dive bars and rock venues. This month, the North Bay gets a major dose of a new crop of top alternative comedians at the inaugural Pet-A-Llama Comedy Festival, which boasts more than a dozen hilarious shows taking place at the Mystic Theatre, the Big Easy and elsewhere in downtown Petaluma Aug. 16–18. Headlining the opening night show is Sonoma-raised comedian, writer and actor Brian Posehn. At six-foot-seven-


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osehn first got on a stage while attending college in Sacramento, performing at a local bar the week he turned 21. “It went awesome,” he says. “And

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then the second time I had completely new material, and it all stunk, it all went terribly. But I still loved it so much. I was bitten.” In 1995, comedians Bob Odenkirk (Better Call Saul) and David Cross (Arrested Development) discovered Posehn and hired him as a writer and actor for Mr. Show, which launched his career. “That still is my favorite job I’ve ever had, working for those two guys,” he says. “I owe them a lot. I learned how to write through them, but I also wouldn’t be on Big Bang Theory and some of these other shows that I wound up doing if it wasn’t for those guys.” In the 1990s, Mr. Show was considered “the cool kid thing,” according to Posehn, among other television writers and producers, and soon he got gigs on shows like Seinfeld, Friends, Just Shoot Me and many others. “That’s all from Bob and David finding my surliness to be amusing and putting me on their TV show,” he says. In his comedy, Posehn explains that the most important thing for him is to be himself. “Most of what alternative comedy is to me is people being more real onstage,” he says. A lifelong nerd who grew up reading comic books and riding the bus from Glen Ellen to Santa Rosa’s Last Record Store, Posehn’s comedy often talks about his love of all things pop culture, which has also transitioned into penning issues of Deadpool for Marvel Comics, composing mock heavy metal tracks with members of Anthrax—and writing his soonto-be released first book, Forever Nerdy: Living My Dorky Dreams and Staying Metal. “That is who I am, I am a fanboy,” Posehn says. “So that came out in my standup, and when I saw that people actually liked it and identified with it, it encouraged me to go further. It’s like, I can talk about Star Wars for 10 minutes and people aren’t going to yell, ‘Boring’? It’s been great.” ) 13

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inches, and usually sporting a bushy beard, Posehn is a gentle giant in comedy, a pioneering voice of the alternative scene since he appeared on HBO’s groundbreaking sketch comedy series Mr. Show with Bob and David in 1995. Posehn grew up in Glen Ellen and Sonoma after his family moved there from San Jose in 1975, when he was 9. Though it was small-town living, Posehn remembers being enamored with the region almost immediately. “I already loved that it had been in commercials in the ’70s and it was like this touristy cool little place,” Posehn says by phone from his home in Los Angeles. “One of my favorite things about Sonoma was that they knew what was great about it and kept certain things away—like we didn’t get a McDonalds until I was in high school. “I loved growing up there. You know, I’ve talked a lot about getting picked on and all that, but I think that would have happened in any town I went to at nine years old with the glasses and the bowl haircut,” says Posehn. “And then when I got braces and headgear, it’s like, what else are kids going do? Of course they’re going to make fun of that kid.” Luckily, Posehn was funny from a young age, and says that comedy is what turned things around for him at Sonoma Valley High School. “I was the nerdy picked-on kid, but by junior or senior year most kids knew I was funny and kinda weird,” Posehn says. “I would say amusing things, and that really helped me become more social. My humor definitely won me friends.” Growing up, comedy as a career never came into Posehn’s mind, though he recalls that a teacher in high school once told him that she used to write jokes for Phyllis Diller, and that idea clicked with him.


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Featuring new work by: Victor Cartagena, Ranu Mukherjee, Lava Thomas, and Lexa Walsh

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FUNNY PEOPLE Guy Branum and Caitlin Gill.

Comedy ( 11 et-A-Llama Comedy Festival founder and director Dominic Del Bene was also raised in the North Bay, and after years in the music industry, has worked in the Bay Area comedy scene for over a decade. Since starting with San Francisco record label Rooftop Comedy Productions, the Petaluma-based Del Bene has been busy producing content for comedians and producing events for groups like SF Sketchfest. He also runs his own label, Blonde Medicine, and hosts a radio show on KPCA Petaluma. For Del Bene, Pet-A-Llama is the intersection of all of his interests. “I have an office in downtown Petaluma, and outside of my window I just look at the Mystic Theatre longingly all day,” he says. “I’ve always wanted to book comedy shows there.”

P

Rather than hosting occasional one-night stands, Del Bene decided to create the festival as a way to showcase several big names all at once. “I’ve worked on a number of festivals before, and it’s a good way to get everybody excited once a year instead of trying to develop a scene that isn’t exactly focused on comedy in Sonoma County.” Leading up to Pet-A-Llama, Del Bene has been testing the local comedy waters, bringing headlining performers like Judah Friedlander to town for shows at venues like the Griffo Distillery. He’s been excited by the response from North Bay audiences at these shows, and he notes there is a burgeoning open mic comedy scene happening at bars like Jamison’s Roaring Donkey. “If people see some of the greats in their own backyard, it might help impact the pace at which that stuff is ) 14


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SKLAR HAR HAR The brothers put the funny in small town news for dummies

Comedy ( 13 developing,” Del Bene says. The Mystic hosts Posehn on Aug. 16 and Del Bene has booked an impressive lineup of performers for the rest of the festival. On Aug. 17, Los Angeles comedian Todd Glass & the Todd Glass Band, recently seen on the Netflix special Todd Glass: Act Happy, will bring rapidfire repartee to the Big Easy with guests like Blake Wexler and Emma Arnold, while standup’s most famous twins, the Sklar Brothers, take over the Mystic to present a live version of their popular podcast Dumb People Town, in which they skewer local news stories culled from small-town sources across the country. Other notable names scheduled to appear at Pet-A-Llama include Canadian actor-comedian Scott Thompson, who portrays his socialite character Buddy Cole from The Kids in the Hall television series. Thompson was a principal member of the hit TV series. Beyond the Mystic, author, television writer and comedian Guy Branum makes his way to Copperfield’s Books in Petaluma for a reading from his new collection of essays, My Life as a Goddess.

Comedians Ryan Sickler and Jay Larson present their storytelling podcast, The CrabFeast. Comedian and musician Drennon Davis hosts The Imaginary Radio Program, and the fast-rising comedy group the Dress Up Gang, featuring Healdsburg native Cory Loykasek, offer a screening from their yet-tobe-released TV series with the TBS network. “There’s going to be a lot of diverse programming, and I’m excited about all of it,” says Del Bene. “I would like to say we’ve been really lucky to work with so many local businesses who’ve been supportive of this,” adds Del Bene, who points to charitable partner Petaluma Paints, the participating venues and sponsors like Windsor’s Barrel Brothers Brewing Company, who’ve released a special Pet-A-Llama Hazy IPA in custom cans around the North Bay. “I’m glad it came together,” Del Bene says. “I’m hopeful we can create a community that’s supportive of comedy.” Pet-A-Llama Comedy Festival kicks off on Thursday, Aug. 16, with Brian Posehn, Johnny Taylor Jr. and Irene Tu at the Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N., Petaluma. For full schedule and tickets, visit petallama.com.


15

The week’s events: a selective guide

PEACE, LOVE & LIVESTOCK Creedence Clearwater Revisited kicks off five nights of headlining concerts at the Napa Town & Country Fair on Wednesday, Aug. 8. See Events, p23. SONOMA COUNTY

FREESTONE

SONOMA

N A PA

Cider Country

Garden Party

Stories by the Glass

Beat of the World

The local crop of quality ciders continues to grow, and leading up to the Gravenstein Apple Fair this weekend, several cideries have banded together for the inaugural Sonoma County Cider Week, boasting tap takeovers and showcase events at various venues. Join Agrestic Cider and Leaky Barrel Cider as they release a #SonomaStrong collaboration cider benefiting wildfire victims at Barley & Bine Beer Cafe in Windsor on Wednesday, Aug. 8, or try Tilted Shed and Horse & Plow’s limited-run Gravenstein Apple Fair collaboration at Spinster Sisters in Santa Rosa on Saturday, Aug. 11, among other events. For event details, visit sonomacountyciderweek.com.

With a newly re-landscaped welcome garden, Osmosis Day Spa Sanctuary welcomes the public to its sanctuary for a benefit concert for the Center for Climate Protection that will feature poetry and music. Start the evening with a cheese and wine reception featuring Freestone Artisan Cheese and Matanzas Creek Winery with music by Bruce Klein in the newly remodeled entrance area. Then experience the spa’s cedar enzyme foot baths and the ecstatic verse of Rumi’s Caravan, with poets like Kay Crista and Doug von Koss accompanied by musicians in a performance on Thursday, Aug. 9, at Osmosis Day Spa Sanctuary, 209 Bohemian Hwy., Freestone. 6pm. $35. 707.823.8231.

Sonoma County and Zinfandel wines have a long and tasty history, and today more than 50 local wineries from Russian River Valley to Sonoma Valley make a version or blend involving the heritage grape. Hear and taste for yourself at the upcoming Zinfandel Stories walk-around tasting event, where winemakers will share their passion for Zin in conversation and wine pouring. Arranged by region, this walking wine tour covers the gamut, and for members of the Zinfandel Advocates & Producers organization, there are special extras on hand. Find your favorite Zin on Sunday, Aug. 12, at Cline Cellars, 24737 Arnold Drive, Sonoma. 3pm. $40–$55. zinfandel.org.

San Francisco native and internationally renowned percussionist Brian Melvin has done it all and played with everyone from Bob Weir to Jaco Pastorius. Melvin has even recently worked with Estonian band Land of Drums, and his involvement in world music is as rich as his work in classic rock and jazz. This month, Melvin gathers an ensemble of talented friends to perform in his wideranging project FOG, featuring special guest Barry Sless (David Nelson Band, Moonalice) on pedal steel and guitar on Wednesday, Aug. 15, at the Blue Note Jazz Club, 1030 Main St., Napa. 7pm, 9pm. $15–$35. 707.880.2300.

—Charlie Swanson

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 8-14, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Arts Ideas LIKE A FOX IN THE HENHOUSE Sebastopol’s Gravenstein Apple Fair again showcases the growing variety of local ciders and apple-inspired food.

Apple Days

‘Sweetest fair in Sonoma County’ marks 45 years BY JAMES KNIGHT

A

harvest fair on the second weekend of August?

It does seem early, at a time of the year when gardeners in many parts of the North Bay are lucky to pluck a sun-ripened red tomato or two from the vine, and vineyards are still full of sour, green grapes. Yet the timing’s just right for what organizers of the Gravenstein Apple Fair call the “sweetest little fair in Sonoma County.”

The Grav is an early-ripening apple, as a quick tour of Sebastopol back roads this week will demonstrate. See the fourby-four bins—some, new white plastic; some, weathered old plywood holding up against the years—alongside a tractor or two staged in an orchard. Over here, a thicket of wooden poles holds up three limbs groaning with fruit. There, a picker on a tall ladder tucks apples into a big bag slung over her shoulder. And everywhere, that telltale aroma,

as the signature apple of Sonoma County is the first to fall from the tree in late summer, is just beginning to waft about: apples turning from green to red to brown on the hot, dusty Goldridge ground. It’s tempting to say the Gravenstein is like the Pinot Noir of local pomes—tender, it bruises easily and doesn’t ship like other often less flavorful commercial varieties—if it wasn’t for the bad sap between the two, after apple trees were ripped

up and burned in great piles by the thousands and replaced by grapevines in the 1990s. So maybe the Zinfandel of apples? The Gravenstein apple, native of Denmark, reportedly arrived on the shores of the Sonoma Coast with Russian settlers and, although less obscure worldwide than Zinfandel, reached heights of popularity in Sebastopol, California, one-time Gravenstein apple capital of the world. The Apple Fair, though celebrating 45 years on Aug. 11 and 12 this year, is kind of a late arriver, created by Sonoma County Farm Trails as its main fundraiser supporting local agriculture, while celebrating the holdouts among this heritage apple. Now the Gravenstein is enjoying a second act as the star apple of local craft cider. Two centuries after the Russian colony at Fort Ross was established, way back in 2012, Tilted Shed cider makers Ellen Cavalli and Scott Heath launched their ciders at the fair, but were squeezed into a corner of the wine tent. The next year it was dubbed the wine and cider tent, and in 2015 they got their own cider tent, which this year features the boozy beverage with terroir and a kick from 17 local producers. The fair keeps cider, wine and microbrew in their respective tents, available by the glass ticket at $6 per ticket, but a funny thing crops up on the way to the ticket stand: an extra $20 buys entry to the oak-shaded oasis of the Artisan Tasting Lounge. Here, beer, cider, wine and craft spirits are poured alongside cheese and nibbles from the likes of Redwood Hill Farm, Moonlight Brewing, Spirit Works—and look, over here is Michele Anna Jordan with an apple-inspired treat. Sip Heidrun Meadery’s bee-friendly tipple,


Gravenstein Apple Fair, Saturday, Aug. 11, and Sunday, Aug. 12, Ragle Ranch Park, Sebastopol. 10am–6pm. Tickets, $15; seniors (65-plus), veterans, bike riders, $12; children 6–12, $10. Artisan Tasting Lounge, 11am–6pm; $20 plus fair admission. 707.837.8896.

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spy Eye Cyder from the latest converts to Johnny Appleseed, cult winemakers Radio-Coteau, and then go round again. There are so many purveyors in this space, in fact, they’ve got them working in shifts—i.e., not all spirits, cheese and cider businesses on the list will be there at once. But there’s no crowd to wait for the next taste. Conducting an investigation into the amenities of the Artisan Tasting Lounge on the last day of the fair, 2017, our Bohemian reporter found it difficult to leave the Artisan Tasting Lounge. Why venture out? To pet the llamas and baby goats, of course. More hands-on opportunities available for cow milking at 12:30 daily; look and learn how to do sheep shearing right at 4:30. A full schedule of the Agrarian Games, née Farmer Olympics, sponsored by Community Alliance with Family Farmers and Farmers Guild, offers the hayseed advantage in such contests as the potato-sack race, hay-bale toss, watermelon-seed spitting, compost relay and . . . chicken-poop bingo. So then, back to the food. Get there early and beat the long line for grandma’s apple fritters, a fair fave since 1986, when they cost 25 cents. The recipe for grandma’s fritters is closely guarded by the Masonic Goldridge Order of Eastern Star, so maybe don’t ask. A vendor new to the fair this year, Clint McKay offers a sweet take on his traditional Pomo Indian food with fry cake apple shortcake. Non-apple-related foodstuffs also abound, including Estero Café’s all-local version of an American summer fair standby: the corn dog, made with local dog, corn and all. But just to remind us that it’s all about the apples, the fair allows shoppers free 30-minute admittance to the fair just to make a beeline for a box of apples from local grower Lee Walker. Get them apples!

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ranscendence Theatre Company’s seventh season of Broadway Under the Stars continues with a dancecentric production titled, appropriately enough, Shall We Dance. The show runs through Aug. 19 at Jack London State Historic Park in Glen Ellen.

Transcendence imports Broadway and national touring professionals to populate its productions, so the caliber of performance is always quite high. Director Lesley McDonald and choreographer Mark Kimelman guide a cast of 17 talented artists through a program featuring songs from 18 Broadway shows like The King and I and Hamilton,

as well as pop hits from artists like Madonna and Ed Sheeran. The show opens, as is tradition, with a passage from Jack London as introduced by a coterie of tap dancers. The full company then welcomes the audience with an amusing adaptation of “Be Our Guest” from Beauty and the Beast that replaces banquet table staples with wine varietals, though I’m not quite sure what dancing strawberries are doing on the stage. The (mostly) fast-paced, 40-minute first act includes numbers from In the Heights, West Side Story, My Fair Lady and Kiss Me, Kate. The highlight of the act is an energetic production of Louis Prima’s “Sing, Sing, Sing” which incorporates a variety of dance styles that complement its swing roots. Things slow down with “Mama Who Bore Me” from Spring Awakening, which seems tonally out of step in a mostly joyous program, before concluding on a lighter note with the hilarious “A Musical” from Something Rotten. Act two features dancing set to numbers from a diverse group of artists ranging from Janelle Monáe (“Tightrope”) to Madonna (“Vogue”). The evening’s most visually striking moment comes courtesy of a tango-infused production of the Police’s “Roxanne” from Moulin Rouge with the winery ruins bathed in red. The juxtaposition between the diversity in dance styles and music selection with the lack of diversity among the cast is noticeable. For a company that imports a great deal of its talent from New York, the relatively small number of artists of color in the cast is disappointing. Simply put, it’s jarring to have Coolio’s “Gangsta’s Paradise” and Michael Jackson’s “Bad” sung and danced by a bunch of white guys, talented as they may be. It’s time for Transcendence’s cast to be as colorful as the costumes they wear. Rating (out 5 five): ‘Shall We Dance’ runs Friday–Sunday through Aug. 19. Jack London State Historic Park. 2400 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Doors open for picnicking at 5pm; show starts at 7:30pm. Tickets $45–$150. 877.424.1414. transcendencetheatre.org.


Film

19

KLANDESTINE John David Washington plays a cop who boldly goes where no black man has gone before.

Under the Hood

I N S ON OM A VA L L E Y

‘BlacKkKlansman’ another timely entry in the Spike Lee canon BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

BUTS18_Boho_14SQ_TRIO.indd 1

In Colorado Springs in the late ’70s, rookie detective Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) is sent undercover at the local college’s Black Student Union. Noting a classified ad seeking recruits to the KKK, Stallworth makes a spontaneous prank call. The gang is enthusiastic to meet Ron, so the detective talks his partner, Flip (Adam Driver), into impersonating him at an audition with the secret society. “For you, this is a crusade,” the Jewish Flip tells Ron. “For me, this is a job.” Through exposure to the KKK’s Jewhatred, Flip comes to identify his common cause with Ron. Together, they learn the rites and the secret handshake, and discover you’re not supposed to mention the K-word around Klansmen eager to mainstream their organization. It’s easy to get wrapped up in this story, thanks to Lee’s force, thoughtfulness and evenhandedness. The KKK members are sometimes formidable, sometimes lonely. The only one-dimensional character is a cracker imbecile played by Paul Walter Hauser, as the kind of dunce that scratches his forehead with a pistol barrel. Lee’s own double-consciousness—loving cinema while realizing it sometimes poisons people—is apparent in an impressive scene with His Eminence, Harry Belafonte. The 90-year-old performer plays an instructor recounting the grisly details of a lynching, who makes the point of mentioning that the vicious mob had been ginned up by a viewing of 1915’s racist sensation The Birth of a Nation. This is a big movie from Lee, warm and smart. It’s not essentially radical, unless the subject of self-defense is radical. For instance, BlacKkKlansman comes out in favor of supporting your local police, as long as they’re trying to hunt down the Klan. ‘BlacKkKlansman’ opens Friday, Aug. 10, in wide release in the North Bay.

AUGUST 3 - SEPTEMBER 9, 2018

Get Tickets Now 877 424 1414 | BestNightEver.org

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wenty eighteen has been a phenomenal year for black-themed films, and Spike Lee’s oddly merry, nostalgic and ultimately hopeful BlacKkKlansman, released on the anniversary of the shame of Charlottesville, continues the streak.

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On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Diego’s Umbrella Marches On

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

t does not take long for San Francisco gypsy rock band Diego’s Umbrella to hook an audience. In fact, it took all of two notes for the five-piece outfit to turn HopMonk Tavern’s session room in Novato from a casual crowd into an ecstatic dance party when they headlined the venue last month. “That really just comes from years and years of touring and playing as many shows as our bodies will allow,” says percussionist Jake Wood. After more than a decade together and with nearly 1,000 shows under their belt, it’s obvious that Diego’s Umbrella has mastered the craft of performing live, and the group has an unspoken connection onstage

when they dive into musical medleys that cross genres between heavy metal riffology, Croatian folk and Klezmer music. “Pretty quickly, people realize that we’re on stage having fun, and it’s just really infectious,” says Wood. “We have sentimental moments and songs that range from different emotions, but overall, if you put a song like ‘Hava Nigela’ into your set, you’re setting a tone that you can’t really deny. The aspect of having fun is very real. It certainly is for me.” Wood is joined under the umbrella by guitarists and vocalists Tyson Maulhardt and Vaughn Lindstrom–who began the project as a duo nearly 20 years ago–and violinist Jason Kleinberg and bassist Johann Hill, aka Red Cup. “It’s a very special group of people,” says Wood. “I think we all really appreciate the camaraderie we have.” Before joining the band, Wood was a freelance drummer. Last year he took advantage of some Diego’s Umbrella down time to get back into that world. He landed his first professional theater gig as a percussionist with the touring company of “Hamilton: An American Musical.” “The level of musicianship in the orchestra blew me away every night,” says Wood. “It was pretty humbling.” Diego’s Umbrella is back in full force this summer. There’s a new album in the offing and a performance under the afternoon sun at the Gravenstein Apple Fair in Sebastopol on Aug. 11. There, they will be joined by the likes of Sonoma County folk trio Rainbow Girls and blues powerhouse Wendy DeWitt. “Our latest touring motto is ‘thrash responsibly,’” jokes Wood. “We want to have a ton of fun, but we’re not 23 years old anymore, so we’re exercising some levels of precaution.” Gravenstein Apple Fair runs Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 11-12, at Ragle Ranch Park, 500 Ragle Ranch Rd, Sebastopol. 10am to 6pm both days. $10-$15; kids 5 and under are free. gravensteinapplefair.com


Concerts Clubs & SONOMA COUNTY Venues Dana Cooper

Veteran troubadour’s mixture of flat-picking, finger-picking and percussive strumming style is legendary among other guitarists. Aug 10, 7pm. $20. Paul Mahder Gallery, 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Freddie McGregor

Internationally acclaimed, Grammy-nominated reggae singer performs off his latest project “True to My Roots.” Aug 11, 8:30pm. $23. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

MARIN COUNTY KWMR Summer Block Party

Celebratory concert features Bay Area country music legends Red Meat and West Marin favorites the Haggards, with BBQ, beverages and more. Aug 12, 1pm. Free admission. Love Field, 11191 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Pt Reyes Station.

The Mendieta Sisters

Dynamic trio perform music with a Spanish flare and incorporate stories and costumes associated with famous women of Spanish, Mexican and California history. Aug 12, 4pm. $15-$20. Old St Hilary’s Landmark, 201 Esperanza, Tiburon. 415.435.1853.

NAPA COUNTY Music in the Vineyards

Month-long, nationally acclaimed chamber music festival showcases the finest classical musicians in the picturesque settings of Napa’s wineries and venues. Through Aug 26. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa. musicinthevineyards.org.

Napa Live: Inside & Out

Annual live music crawl includes musicians performing in stores, parks, plazas, patios and throughout Napa’s many venues. Aug 12, 12pm. Free. downtown, Main street and Town Center, Napa. donapa.com.

SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Aug 9, I Will Follow You with Tori Paquet. Aug 10, the Cork Pullers Trio. Aug 11, the Larkdales. Aug 12, 2pm, Lori B & the Jazz Pack. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Bear Republic Brew Company Lakeside

Aug 10, 6:30pm, Howling Coyote Tour with Tommy Anderson and Rosemary Tracy. 5000 Roberts Lake Rd, Rohnert Park, 707.585.2722.

The Big Easy

Aug 9, Pretty in Between and Brooks Forsyth. Aug 10, Marcus Cartwright and the Blues Defenders with Slim Coyote. Aug 11, Fly by Train. Aug 12, Dave Gonzalez and Suzanna Von Tassel with the Bearded Men and Derek Irving. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Brewsters Beer Garden Aug 9, Fog Holler. Aug 10, the Fabulous BioTones. Aug 11, 2 and 6pm, Frankie Bourne and the B Sharps. Aug 12, 3pm, Norman Collins & the Tumblers. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

Aug 11, 12:30pm, Volker Strifler. 2306 Magnolia Lane, Healdsburg. 707 857-2500.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

Aug 11, Blue Radio. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

AUG 10

Green Music Center Weill Hall

AUG 11

Aug 10, Hunter Hayes. Aug 12, Chris Botti. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Healdsburg Plaza

Aug 14, 5pm, Celebration of Latino art and music. 217 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301.

Hood Mansion Lawn

Aug 10, 5:30pm, Funky Fridays with Jami Jamison Band. 389 Casa Manana Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.833.6288. funkyfridays.info.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Aug 10, La Gente and Buck Thrifty. Aug 11, Blane Lyon healing benefit with Sol Horizon. Aug 13, DJ Leone. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Aug 10, Wendy DeWitt. Aug 11, Garrin Benfield. Aug 12, 1pm, Jess Jones & Kimber Springs. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100. Aug 11, Greg Hester Jazz Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Ives Park

Aug 11, 12pm, Hey Jude. 19410 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.857.1651.

Cloverdale Plaza

KRSH

Aug 10, 6:30pm, Friday Night Live at the Plaza with the Nightowls. 122 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.4410.

Crooked Goat Brewing

Aug 11, 1pm, Henhouse Brewing & Crooked Goat Brewing collaboration release with Parcivillian and Aerocksmith. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Elephant in the Room Aug 8, Karl Blau with the Easy Leaves. Aug 12, 6pm, Awesome Hotcakes. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, elephantintheroompub.com.

Flamingo Lounge

Aug 10, Super Cool Thang. Aug 11, salsa night. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

SATURDAY SUNDAY

AUG 19

CHARLEY CROCKETT

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WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Hotel Healdsburg

Aug 15, 5pm, “Peacetown” with Halden Wofford & the Hi-Beams. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol. peacetown.org.

Clos du Bois

FRIDAY

Aug 9, 5:30pm, Blues with Bowker presents Wee Willie Walker & the Anthony Paule Soul Orchestra. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.0707.

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LA GUNS WITH SPECIAL GUESTS THE BUTLERS FRI, AUG 31

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WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

ANCESTORS WRATH, INTENSE AND NIVIANE

Lagunitas Tap Room

Aug 8, Erica Sunshine Lee. Aug 9, the Gentlemen Soldiers. Aug 10, DoppelGang. Aug 11, the Good Bad. Aug 12, Muncie. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Bistro

Aug 10, 2’s Enuf Blues Band. Aug 11, Levi Lloyd Blues Band. Aug 12, Four Shillings Short. Aug 15, Dean Getch. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

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Music

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Music ( 21

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 8-14, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Krew Roundup. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377. Wed 8⁄8 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–$35 • All Ages

Barry Zito

2018 LIN

Thu 8⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $10–$15 • All Ages Celebrate "Garcia Day" on the 23rd Anniversary of Jerry's Passing with

E UP

Jerry's Middle Finger

Aug 16

Sat 8⁄11 • Doors 7:30pm ⁄ $17–$19 • All Ages

SAN FRANCISCO AIRSHIP

RUSH vs YES

An Epic Evening of Progressive Rock Sun 8⁄12 • Doors 3pm ⁄ $12–$15 • All Ages

Jefferson Airplane Evolution

SambaDá Family Show!

Aug 30

Thu 8⁄16 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–$30 • All Ages

COCO MONTOYA

Blistering Contemporary Blues

Sep 13

MIDNIGHT SUN

Fri 8⁄17 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $30–$34 • 21+

Afribean Soul, Rhythm & Roll

RockinThe

R i ve r .

An Evening with

Zach Gill of ALO & Jack Johnson (seated) The Purple Ones

Insatiable Tribute to Prince Sat 8⁄18 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $17–$22 • All Ages

Grateful Shred

us

with very special guest Mapache Sun 8⁄19 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$20 • All Ages

Mystic Bowie's Talking Dreads Reggae Tribute to Talking Heads Fri 8⁄24 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $32–$37 • 21+ Jamaican Reggae Legends

Black Uhuru

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Montgomery Village Shopping Center

Aug 9, 5:30pm, Slim Man. Aug 11, 12pm, Summer of Love with Big Bad Boogie Rock. Aug 12, 1pm, Mixed Nuts. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

Murphy’s Irish Pub & Restaurant

Aug 10, Timothy O’Neil Band. Aug 11, Blithedale Canyon. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

CALENDAR THU AUG 9 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP WITH SPECIAL GUEST MICHAEL GABRIEL EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY 8PM / 21+ / $10 FRI AUG 10 • PARDON THE INTERUPTION AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT AUG 11 • ATTILA VIOLA AND THE BAKERSFIELD BOYS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 7:30PM / 21+ / FREE SUN AUG 12 • TWIN OAKS BACKYARD BBQ SERIES, CASH’D OUT 5PM / ALL AGES /$30 SHOW + BBQ / $20 SHOW ONLY MON AUG 13 • THE BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM EVERY MONDAY! 7:30PM / 21+ / $10 CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Sonoma Springs Community Hall

Aug 10, “Jews-Blues-Sufi” with Earl Blue and Sukhawat Ali Khan. 18627 Sonoma Hwy, Boyes Hot Springs. springshall. org.

The Star

Aug 10, Awesome Hotcakes. Aug 11, DJ Chalice and Mr Element. Aug 12, American roots night. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.6390.

Taft Street Winery

Aug 10, Charley Crockett with Highway Poets and Whiskerman. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Aug 12, 2pm, Gator Nation Band. 2030 Barlow Lane, Sebastopol. 707.823.2049.

Osmosis Day Spa

Aug 9, Levi’s Workshop. Aug 10, Pardon the Interruption. Aug 11, Attila Viola & the Bakersfield Boys. Aug 12, backyard BBQ with Cash’d Out. Aug 13, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Aug 15, honky-tonk night. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Aug 9, 6pm, benefit concert for Center for Climate Protection with Rumi’s Caravan. 209 Bohemian Hwy, Freestone. 707.823.8231.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Aug 10, Erica Sunshine Lee. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Red Brick

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS.

Copasetics. Aug 11, Scarlett Letters. Aug 12, Sonoma blues jam. Aug 14, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Aug 9, J Kevin Durkin. Aug 10, Soul Fuse. Aug 11, Miss Moonshine. Aug 12, the Lucky Losers. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Redwood Cafe

Aug 9, Disclaimer. Aug 10, Onye & the Messengers. Aug 11, “Dark Side of OZ” with Randy Teaford aka the Professor. Aug 12, 5pm, Celtic fiddle & Irish jam. Aug 14, French Oak. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Aug 11, the Pulsators. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Aug 11, Jerry Garcia celebration with THUGZ. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Rock Star University House of Rock Aug 11, LA Guns with the Butlers. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Schug Winery

Aug 11, 1pm, Banjo Boombox. 602 Bonneau Rd, Sonoma. 707.939.9363.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Aug 8, the Acrosonics. Aug 9, King Daddy Murr & Prince of Thieves. Aug 10, New

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Whiskey Tip

Aug 10, Common Knowledge. Aug 11, Firme, Funky & Fresh with Cera Sera. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Windsor Town Green Aug 9, 6pm, the Big Fit. 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor. townofwindsor.com.

MARIN COUNTY 19 Broadway Nightclub

Aug 9, Book of Birds. Aug 11, Jeffro Squid with the Theory. Aug 12, Westerly. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 8, Barry Zito. Aug 9, Jerry’s Middle Finger. Aug 11, Rush vs Yes. Aug 12, 3:30pm, SambaDá Family Show. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

The Tavern on Fourth Aug 10, Hella Fitzgerald with Lilan Kane. 711 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.4044.

Terrapin Crossroads

Aug 9, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Aug 10, Top 40 Friday with RIG featuring Garrin Benfield. Aug 11, Ancient Baby. Aug 11, David Nelson Band in the Grate Room. Aug 12, Midnight North. Aug 13, Grateful Monday with Stu

Allen and friends. Aug 14, FOG with Brian Melvin and Barry Sless. Aug 15, Incubators. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Aug 8, Austin Hicks. Aug 11, David Ronconi. Aug 15, Zak Fennie. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Beringer Vineyards

Aug 11, Ragtag Sullivan Trio. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

Blue Note Napa

Aug 8, Carlos Henrique Pereira. Aug 9, the Dustbowl Revival. Aug 10, Papa Joe & the New Deal. Aug 11, More Than Acoustic with David Victor and friends. Aug 14, Duncan’s Catch. Aug 15, FOG with Brian Melvin and Barry Sless. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue

Aug 12, 3pm, Rob Watson with Vernon Black. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards

Aug 11, Craig Corona. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Aug 11, Jinx Jones & the KingTones. Aug 12, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Goose & Gander

Aug 12, 1pm, John Courage. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Lyman Park

Aug 9, 6pm, Ordinary Sons. 1498 Main St, St Helena. sthelena.com.

Priest Ranch Tasting Room

Aug 9, 6pm, Davies Dukes. 6490 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8200.

Silo’s

Aug 9, Janice Maxie Reid and Mike Greensill. Aug 10, Garage Band 101 for Adults. Aug 11, When Doves Cry. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

Aug 11, Amos Lee. Aug 12, Clint Black. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Veterans Memorial Park

Aug 10, 6:30pm, Napa City Nights with the Billy Martini Show and the 7ths Sons. 850 Main St, Napa. napacitynights. com.


Arts Events SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery

Aug 11-31, “Alejandro Salazar Solo Exhibit,” born and raised in Colima, Mexico, Salazar lives and paints in the North Bay. Reception, Aug 11 at 4pm. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Aug 9-Jan 27, “Working Dogs,” new exhibition celebrates four-legged heroes as Charles Schulz portrayed them in “Peanuts.” 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Redwood Cafe

Aug 8-Sep 11, “Adventures in Art,” see acrylics and watercolors from featured artists Deb Breton, Sarah Hessinger and Chelsea Weisel. Reception, Aug 14 at 6pm. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Open daily. 707.795.7868.

NAPA COUNTY Sofie Contemporary Arts

Aug 8-Sep 9, “New Naturals,” Bay Area artists Jann Nunn, Bill Russell and Jonah Ward create images that simultaneously evoke a sense of the known and unknown. Reception, Aug 10 at 5:30pm. 1407 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.341.3326.

Comedy Brendon Walsh & Brett Erickson

The two bold and funny standups can be found on podcasts, television and in comedy clubs. Aug 10, 6:30pm. $15-$20. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Debra DiGiovanni

Canada’s favorite female comedian is also called the best standup to see after a messy breakup. Aug 9, 7:30pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

The Dick ’an Dyke Show

Drag and variety hour is hosted by local performers Danny Packin and V Position. Aug 10, 7:30pm. $12. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

The Gentlemen Bastards Local improv comedy troupe takes over the bar for a night of on-the-spot silliness. Aug 12, 6pm. Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Jim Gaffigan

Superb standup finds the funny in being a family man in his new “The Fixer Upper” tour. Aug 9, 7 and 9:30pm. $59-$75. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Dance Marin Ballet

Sundays, 4:30pm. through Aug 26, Sevillana Dance Series, teens and adults are invited to learn the festive Spanish folk dance. $34, andrealacanela. com. 100 Elm St, San Rafael.

Events Artsy Dogs of Kokomo Join Paws for Love in a day of art, dogs, wine, food and fun for all. Aug 11, 11am. Free; donations welcome. Kokomo Winery, 4791 Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.0200.

Awaken your Senses: Ancient Rhythms, Ancient Grains

In depth conversation, cooking demonstration, tastings and performances explore the historical and cultural intersections between music and food. Aug 12, 11am. $135. McEvoy Ranch, 5935 Red Hill Rd, Petaluma. 707.769.4138.

The Big Give-Back

Monthly benefit program raises funds for local nonprofits with live music and a pop-up sample shop. Aug 11. Hanna Winery, 9280 Hwy 128, Healdsburg. 800.854.3987.

Center for Visual Music Symposium

Three-day event features talks, screenings and receptions

centered on exploring and preserving visual music. Aug 14-16. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. centerforvisualmusic.org.

CobUnity Celebration

Living Earth Structures celebrates 10 years in Sonoma County with film and presentation about the natural building work and a discussion about creative solutions for low-cost housing, with potluck dinner. Aug 8, 6pm. $10-$20. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. livingearthstructures.com.

Gravenstein Apple Fair

Celebrate all things apple at this popular event that includes live music on two stages, arts and crafts vendors, local food, wine, cider and beer, children’s corner, chef’s tent and much more. Aug 11-12. $10-$15. Ragle Ranch Park, 500 Ragle Rd, Sebastopol. farmtrails.org.

The Great Train Days

Redwood Empire Garden Railway Society shows off their model trains and buildings. Build your own train tracks, listen to train music or hear a story about trains. Aug 11-12. Children’s Museum of Sonoma County, 1835 W Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4069.

Harlem Globetrotters

World-famous basketball ambassadors of good will play two exhibition games in Santa Rosa. Aug 8-9, 7pm. $32 and up. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 866.777.8932.

Napa Town & Country Fair

Fair is themed “Peace, Love & Livestock” and features carnival rides, farm activities, exhibits and other fun. Aug 8-12. $10-$13/kids and under are free. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa, napavalleyexpo.com.

Sonoma County Fair

Annual fair’s assortment of carnival rides, horse races, festive foods, free concerts, local agriculture, art and craft exhibits and family fun return to Santa Rosa with a “Salute to Heroes” theme. Through Aug 12. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 )

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Gallery Openings

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Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Summer Open Studio at Chalk Hill

THE DRIVE’S NEWEST SEGMENT

Celebrate the art and creativity of several artists-in-residence with entertainment and refreshments. Aug 12, 1pm. Chalk Hill Residency, 13427 Chalk Hill Rd, Healdsburg. chalkhillresidency.com.

“CANNABIZ” with co-host Nick Caston MONDAYS AT 4:20 ON KSRO 1350 AM, 103.5 FM, 94.5 FM

Sunset Dinner

Honoring the legacy of worldrenowned potter Marguerite Wildenhain, and benefiting Pond Farm Pottery, the annual event includes reception and tour. Aug 11, 5pm. $125 and up. Austin Creek State Recreation Area, 17000 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. stewardscr.org.

THE DRIVE WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS 3 TO 6 To become a Drive sponsor contact Cathy Ratto at cathy.ratto@yahoo.com /JAXONDRIVE

Dog training the with love, natural way not treats Offering:

• private sessions • boot camp

an intensive 3 week in board program with unlimited owner follow-up

TRAINING EVALUATIONS always FREE by appointment We have over 45 years of experience training dogs and their people. From helping you raise a well adjusted puppy to resolving serious behavioral issues—our expertise gets RESULTS!

incrediblecanine.com • 707.322.3272

Field Trips Vamos Afuera

Spanish-language family event includes an overview of the Laguna and the center’s Heron Hall, walk through nearby creeks and a picnic dinner. Aug 12, 5:30pm. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Film Apéro & a Movie

Enjoy French appetizers and wine paired with a screening of the French film “My Best Friend,” and a river view. Aug 12, 5pm. $20. Napa Valley Yacht Club, 100 Riverside Dr, Napa.

The Battle for Jack London’s Mountain

See the new short film about the effort to save Jack London State Park from the wine country fires last October. Space is limited. Aug 9, 5pm. $20. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Harold & Maude

Final Passages’ monthly film and discussion series presents the offbeat 1971 cult classic comedy, with discussion. Aug 14, 6:30pm. $5-$15. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. finalpassages. org.

Sunset Cinema Series Spread out on the lawn for an

outdoor screening of “Amanda & Jack Go Glamping,” a lighthearted fan favorite from the 2017 Napa Valley Film Festival. Aug 9, 6:30pm. $10. Charles Krug Winery, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.3993.

Food & Drink Carneros Cornhole & Wine Tasting

Carneros Wine Alliance once again mixes outdoor activity and winetasting for a fun afternoon benefitting Carneros and Schell-Vista Fire Departments. Aug 11, 4pm. $40. ZD Wines’ Private Carneros Estate, 1080 Cuttings Wharf Rd, Napa. 800.487.7757.

Discovering Spain

Guest winemaker Michael Cooper leads a class about Spanish wine with tastings from Vinos del Viento. Aug 9, 6pm. $20. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Greek & Middle Eastern Food Festival

Eat, drink and enjoy traditional Mediterranean food and music in this 12th annual festival. Aug 11-12, noon. Free admission. St. George Orthodox Church, 7311 College View Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.583.3992.

Hands-On Sushi Class Chef Ed Metcalfe from Shiso Modern Asian Cuisine leads the class, with wine and lunch included. Aug 11, 11am. $85. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Judd’s Hill Harvest Party

Get a look at Napa Valley’s 2018 harvest and sample new fall releases. Aug 12, 12pm. $55. Judd’s Hill Winery, 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.255.2332.

Kendall-Jackson’s Farm-to-Table Dinner Series

A wine country culinary experience that can’t be missed. Sat, Aug 11, 5:30pm. $125-$175. Kendall-Jackson Wine Estate & Gardens, 5007 Fulton Rd, Fulton. 707.576.3810.

Murder Mystery Dinner Enjoy a lovely four-course meal and intriguing interactive entertainment. Aug 11, 7pm. $75. Tudor Rose English Tea Room, 733 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.535.2045.

Sonoma County Cider Week

Local cider makers converge at several venues for tap takeovers, new release parties and more celebrating the region’s robust cider community. Through Aug 12. various locations, around Sonoma County, Santa Rosa, sonomacountyciderweek.com.

Summer Wine Cocktail Tastings

Meadowcroft Wines team up with Prohibition Spirits for a collaborative cocktail showcase. Sat, Aug 11. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Wags, Whiskers & Wine Annual fundraising gala for Humane Society of Sonoma County includes fine wines and brews, gourmet dinner, silent and live auctions, animal pals on hand and more. Aug 10, 5:30pm. $175. Trentadue Winery, 19170 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.433.2768.

Winemaker Dinner & Bocce Tournament

Sporty event includes a family-style farm-to-table feast. Aug 11, 4pm. $165. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.8100.

Winemaker Dinner Series

Monthly meal this time welcomes Kendall-Jackson Estate to pour. Aug 10, 6:30pm. Bay View Restaurant at the Inn at the Tides. 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2751.

Zinfandel Stories

Sample several Sonoma County zinfandels during this distinctive walk-around tasting. Aug 12, 3pm. $30-$55. Cline Cellars, 24737 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.940.4025.

For Kids Family Fun Day at Napa Valley Museum

All ages are welcome to come, play and learn with the glass master Randy Strong. Aug 11, 11am. Free. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

New World Ballet Summer Arts Camp

World-class guest artists offer courses in various dance styles, percussion and more to kids ages three and up. Scholarship programs available. Through Aug 11. New World Ballet, 905


Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.536.9523.

Summer Wonder Camp

Lectures Be Not Still in Conversation

Exhibition artist Victor Cartagena and others discuss the relationship of immigration, community, and labor with Cartagena’s work on view. Aug 11, 3pm. $10. di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

New Naturals Artists’ Talk

Exhibiting artists Jann Nunn, Bill Russell and Jonah Ward discuss their work, including choice of media, approach, process and concepts, with Q&A and a reception to follow. Aug 10, 5:30pm. Sofie Contemporary Arts, 1407 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.341.3326.

Second Saturday Cartoonist

Meet, watch and talk to designer and illustrator Michelle McNeil. Aug 11, 1pm. Free with admission. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Readings Art Museum of Sonoma County

Aug 9, 7pm, “How a Mountain Was Made” with Greg Sarris. $10-$16. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa 707.579.1500.

Calistoga Copperfield’s Books

Aug 10, 6pm, “Visible Empire” with Hannah Pittard. 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga 707.942.1616.

Jack London State Park

Aug 12, 2pm, Jack London Short Story Read-Aloud with Doc Stull. Free; $10 parking. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen 707.938.5216.

Napa Main Library

Aug 9, 7pm, “Rising: Dispatches

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Aug 8, 7pm, “This Body’s Not Big Enough for Both of Us” with Edgar Cantero. Aug 12, 2pm, Marin Poetry Center Summer Traveling Show. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Aug 15, 7pm, “Good Luck with That” with Kristan Higgins. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Theater Audacity

Laugh, cry and cringe in an evening of musical merriment chronicling the political circus that has become the US presidency. Aug 9, 7:30pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Being Salmon, Being Human

Unique storytelling performance from Norway combines traditional tales, original music and contemporary philosophy to explore the extraordinary lives of wild salmon. Aug 15, 7pm. $15. Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, 15290 Coleman Valley Rd, Occidental. 707.874.1557.

Broadway Under the Stars

Transcendence Theatre Company’s summer-long series of performances continues with “Shall We Dance,” featuring music from Broadway and beyond in an incredible showcase. Through Aug 19. $45 and up. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

The Comedy of Errors

Bring a picnic dinner and watch this comical Shakespeare play outdoors in the nearby Cannery ruins. Aug 10-Sep 2. $18-$36. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Hairspray

Tony Award-winning musical is presented by the Throckmorton Youth Performers. Through Aug 12. $15-$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

25

Heroes

Gentle comedy looks into the hidden world of three retired survivors of World War I who attempt to escape from a French military hospital in 1959. Aug 10-19. $12-$25. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 8-14, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Camps for children ages five to eight are designed to be hands-on and full of art, science, exploration and imaginative play. Through Aug 10. $330 per week. Children’s Museum of Sonoma County, 1835 W Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4069.

from the New American Shore” with Elizabeth Rush. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change The classic comic musical revue about relationships gets an update and features four actors playing multiple roles. Through Aug 19. $10-$35. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Pack blankets, chairs and picnic goodies and enjoy Shakespeare under the stars, featuring members of the Raven Players. Through Aug 11. $10-$25. Seghesio Family Vineyards, 700 Grove St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3579.

The Savannah Sipping Society

Ross Valley Players presents a laugh-a-minute comedy about four Southern women trying escape their day-today routines. Through Aug 12. $22-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The Tasting Room

New wine country comedy by Lucky Penny co-founder Barry Martin is about a struggling winery that gets a chance to impress a famous wine critic. Through Aug 12. $22-$32. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Two Gentlemen of Verona

Enjoy Shakespeare under the stars with picnic tables and patio seating available. Aug 8-19. Buena Vista Winery, 18000 Old Winery Rd, Sonoma, 800.926.1266.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Symposium plays matchmaker for wine, weed BY JAMES KNIGHT

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1 Year Anniversary

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K

eynote speaker Dr. Bill Silver kicked off the second annual North Coast Wine & Weed Symposium last week by conjuring a vision of long ago: picture a group of teens hiding out in a basement in New England on a snowy day in the 1980s, sipping some rotgut called Wild Irish Rose with cream soda, and furtively blowing clouds of Acapulco Gold out the window (sub in Bartles & Jaymes wine coolers and a Thai stick, and it sounds like a foggy evening in the North Bay long ago).

It wouldn’t have occurred to one of those teens, Silver tells the crowd, that one day he would smoothly, and quite legally, shift jobs almost overnight from the wine business to the weed business. “There are no words to describe what is happening right now.”

Having Silver headline the event, held at the Hyatt Regency in Santa Rosa, was a coup for its sponsor, the Wine Industry Network, which offers a news service, trade events and other wine business resources. Formerly the dean of the School of Business and Economics at Sonoma State University, where he helped cultivate the school’s wine business program, Silver took a gig as CEO of CannaCraft, the Santa Rosa cannabis extract business, in January, so he, along with the roster of highly accomplished lawyers, investors and entrepreneurs presenting at seminars throughout the day, was well placed to answer the question— . . . um, what was the question again? The obvious question has an easy answer, as it turns out. Will there be weed in my wine? Not at this time. Wineries, which are federally regulated, will not touch the stuff. They may, however, cobrand with cannabis companies to offer products to their wine club lists, which panelists in the seminar on cannabis opportunities for the wine industry suggested was a tantalizing prospect for marketing professionals in the wine business. They’ve got wineries lined up in the pipeline, several say. But here’s the thing: they’re all waiting for the other guy to go first. Other presenters, like Brian Applegarth, founder of Emerald County Tours, enthused about the tourism potential of historic growing regions and other winelike weed events like food pairings. Several exhibitors, including the Solful dispensary in Sebastopol, made the case for weed-aroma appreciation. It’s a bit of a head trip, if you will, to see wine glasses full of buds in a corporate hotel lobby, but that much is legal, after all, in 2018—just no samples with active ingredients. It will be a while before you hear someone cry out, “Sommelier, there’s weed in my wine!”


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According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you need this advice from mythologist Joseph Campbell: “Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again.” He says it’s “a rescue land . . . some field of action where there is a spring of ambrosia—a joy that comes from inside, not something external that puts joy into you—a place that lets you experience your own will and your own intention and your own wish.” Do you have such a place, Taurus? If not, now is a great time to find one. If you do, now is a great time to go there for a spell and renew the hell out of yourself.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) When he was 20 years old, future U.S. President Thomas Jefferson had an awkward encounter with a young woman who piqued his interest. He was embarrassed by the gracelessness he displayed. For two days afterward, he endured a terrible headache. We might speculate that it was a psychosomatic reaction. I bring this up because I’m wondering if your emotions are also trying to send coded messages to you via your body. Are you aware of unusual symptoms or mysterious sensations? See if you can trace them back to their source in your soul. CANCER (June 21–July 22) There’s a zone in your psyche where selfishness overlaps generosity, where the line between being emotionally manipulative and gracefully magnanimous almost disappears. With both hope and trepidation for the people in your life, I advise you to hang out in that gray area for now. Yes, it’s a risk. You could end up finessing people mostly for your own good and making them think it’s mostly for their own good. But the more likely outcome is that you will employ ethical abracadabra to bring out the best in others, even as you get what you want, too. LEO (July 23–August 22) You probably gaze at the sky enough to realize when there’s a full moon. But you may not monitor the heavenly cycles closely enough to tune in to the new moon, that phase each month when the lunar orb is invisible. We astrologers regard it as a ripe time to formulate fresh intentions. We understand it to be a propitious moment to plant metaphorical seeds for the desires you want to fulfill in the coming four weeks. When this phenomenon happens during the astrological month of Leo, the potency is intensified for you. Your next appointment with this holiday is Aug. 10 and 11. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) In her poem “Dogfish,” Virgo poet Mary Oliver writes, “I wanted the past to go away, I wanted to leave it.” Why? Because she wanted her life “to open like a hinge, like a wing.” I’m happy to tell you, Virgo, that you now have more power than usual to make your past go away. I’m also pleased to speculate that as you perform this service for yourself, you’ll be skillful enough to preserve the parts of your past that inspire you, even as you shrink and neutralize memories that drain you. In response to this good work, I bet your life will open like a hinge, like a wing—no later than your birthday, and most likely before that. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Libran fashion writer Diana Vreeland (1903–1989) championed the beauty of the strong nose. She didn’t approve of women wanting to look like “piglets and kittens.” If she were alive today, she’d be pleased that nose jobs in the U.S. have declined 43 percent since 2000. According to journalist Madeleine Schwartz writing in Garage magazine, historians of rhinoplasty say there has been a revival of appreciation for the distinctive character

BY ROB BREZSNY

revealed in an unaltered nose. I propose, Libra, that in accordance with current astrological omens, we extrapolate some even bigger inspiration from that marvelous fact. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to celebrate and honor and express pride in your idiosyncratic natural magnificence.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“Maybe happiness is this: not feeling like you should be elsewhere, doing something else, being someone else.” This definition, articulated by author Isaac Asimov, will be an excellent fit for you between now and Sept. 20. I suspect you’ll be unusually likely to feel at peace with yourself and at home in the world. I don’t mean to imply that every event will make you cheerful and calm. What I’m saying is that you will have an extraordinary capacity to make clear decisions based on accurate appraisals of what’s best for you.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

I’ve compiled a list of new blessings you need and deserve during the next 14 months. To the best of my ability, I will assist you to procure them. Here they are: a practical freedom song and a mature love song; an exciting plaything and a renaissance of innocence; an evocative new symbol that helps mobilize your evolving desires; escape from the influence of a pest you no longer want to answer to; insights about how to close the gap between the richest and poorest parts of yourself; and the cutting of a knot that has hindered you for years.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “It has become clear to me that I must either find a willing nurturer to cuddle and nuzzle and whisper sweet truths with me for six hours or else seek sumptuous solace through the aid of eight shots of whiskey.” My Capricorn friend Tammuz confided that message to me. I wouldn’t be surprised if you were feeling a comparable tug. According to my assessment of the Capricorn Zeitgeist, you acutely need the revelations that would become available to you through altered states of emotional intelligence. A lavish whoosh of alcohol might do the trick, but a more reliable and effective method would be through immersions in intricate, affectionate intimacy. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Not even 5 percent of the world’s population lives in a complete democracy. Congratulations to Norway, Canada, Australia, Finland, Ireland, Iceland, Denmark, New Zealand, Switzerland and Sweden. Sadly, three countries where my column is published—the U.S., Italy and France—are categorized as “flawed democracies.” Yet they’re far better than the authoritarian regimes in China and Russia. (Source: The Economist.) I offer this public service announcement as a prelude to your homework assignment. According to my astrological analysis, you will personally benefit from working to bring more democracy into your personal sphere. How can you ensure that people you care about feel equal to you, and have confidence that you will listen to and consider their needs, and believe they have a strong say in shaping your shared experiences? PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Mystic poet Kabir wrote: “The flower blooms for the fruit: when the fruit comes, the flower withers.” He was invoking a metaphor to describe his spiritual practice and reward. The hard inner work he did to identify himself with God was the blooming flower that eventually made way for the fruit. The fruit was his conscious, deeply felt union with God. I see this scenario as applicable to your life, Pisces. Should you feel sadness about the flower’s withering? It’s fine to do so. But the important thing is that you now have the fruit. Celebrate it! Enjoy it!

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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August 8-14, 2018

North Bay Bohemian 1828  

August 8-14, 2018