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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Plan on It Planning is politics, especially in Santa Rosa and Sonoma County. The California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) is sometimes a “shield” here in Sonoma County to try and protect us, and nature, from bad political decisions (“The Sword and the Shield,” June 20). Poor planning, such as building houses on ridges in Fountain Grove, can lead to tragic consequences, as recently witnessed with last year’s fires. It is a sad fact that in our county greed rules, money talks and the biggest money has the strongest voice.

Now the “big money” wants to claim it is CEQA causing the “housing crisis.” Respectful disagreement can show the biggest problem is actually money; rather, the lack of financing for affordable housing, which is, and has been, the problem since at least 2008. According to a recent Business Insider article by Akin Oyedele on June 20, 2018, “Housing in the U.S. has not been this unaffordable since property values were in free fall 10 years ago.” The article cites Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions reporting, “Mortgage rates hit their highest level in seven years

THIS MODERN WORLD

last month, and the national average 30-year fixed rate is now above 4.4 percent, according to Bankrate.com.” This slows lending. The financial aspect of funding housing is more onerous than environmental constraints for many California building projects. “Big money voices” in Santa Rosa are now out flogging CEQA and the Endangered Species Act for protecting the California tiger salamander as reasons for the shortage of housing construction in Santa Rosa and Sonoma County. This is a cynical canard. There are numerous examples of projects

By Tom Tomorrow

being delayed by lack of funding, even when there are no CEQA or Endangered Species Act protection requirements. Many projects in Santa Rosa have been given incentives such as density bonuses and variances from local land-use controls, but still aren’t going forward. Others proceed slowly due to financing delays. Take the example of housing development near Railroad Square in Santa Rosa. No tiger salamanders there, but approved projects are still stalled. By planners or money?

DUANE DE WITT Santa Rosa

Political Grandstanding Is bringing on Erin Brockovich another tactic to divert additional responsibilities away from those like the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors? Besides local attorney Roy Miller casting total blame on PG&E, we now have attorney Noreen Evans saying Ms. Brockovich “understands PG&E’s pattern of corporate behavior” and “pattern of malfeasance.” This from a member of a large law firm. Does this malfeasance include making sure you have electricity and gas to your home and office 24/7, Ms. Evans? I want justice to prevail and to allow the facts to be presented and the responsibility spread around to all respective parties. It is not just PG&E. Evans and Brockovich’s rock-star media tour announcing “her high-profile participation in the lawsuit against PG&E” is nothing short of grandstanding and vaudeville-type showmanship. It is no secret who really will financially benefit from all of this. It seems now the biggest concern for those anti-PG&E activists and our so-called elected leaders is, what movie star will play them in the next upcoming disaster flick.

S. R. FINNEGAN

Sebastopol

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants

5

The Uncivil War

for

Summer

GOP outrage is banana cream pie in the sky BY TOM GOGOLA

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L

ate last week, State Sen. Mike McGuire was among a chorus of the outraged to tee off on the Trump immigration policy that separated children from their families and continues to do so despite the presidential flail-fest over the weekend. McGuire called the policy heartless and cruel, inhumane and indecent, “even by Trump standards.” He called the policy “barbaric.”

Those are strong words, which do not in themselves indicate that the state senator is a big fan of the “civility” argument being bandied about by Trump-intimidated politicians such as Nancy Pelosi. That’s because there is a big difference between the civility argument and everything that the Trump administration stands for. So why would high-profile Democrats such as Pelosi pile on to the bandwagon of hand-wringing that surrounded a recent spate of citizen-driven ejections of Trump officials from various restaurants around the D.C. area? Who knows, but Pelosi needs to be next on the list of officials worthy of public shaming. This ongoing food fight reminds one of another food-related act of resistance, which is now pretty much outlawed in this country because of, you know, terrorism. The 1960s in America were replete with instances of food-shaming politicians by, for instance, smashing a banana cream pie in their faces. As historical artifact, there is a delightful sense of theater around those pie-shame episodes of yore, and while it would be dreadfully irresponsible to suggest a return to this all-American form of protest . . . no, don’t do it. It’s terrorism! The updated pie-shaming approach to resistance is a far superior strategy in any event. These efforts to shame the otherwise shameless could fairly be described as “burrito shaming.” Two of the ejected Trumpians were forced out of Mexican restaurants, and both of them are shills for the worst of the worst of the deplorables who landed this lunatic in the White House. You want to eat in peace, Stephen Miller, Kirstjen Nielsen, Sarah Sanders? Here’s a suggestion: There’s plenty of available seating at Chick-fil-A and Papa John’s. Nobody will bother you there. Yes, I’m with Maxine Waters on this one. That’s not an incitement to violence, just as it’s not an act of terrorism to smash a banana cream pie in someone’s face—it’s justified resistance to policies that are cruel, inhumane, barbaric, indecent and inhumane. Tom Gogola is the news editor for the ‘Bohemian’ and the ‘Pacific Sun.’

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Paper THE

BACK TO COURT The defendants in the civil suit stemming from Andy Lopez’s death may still get qualified immunity.

Denied

Supreme Court rejects Sonoma County lawyers’ petition for writ of cert in Andy Lopez case BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he United States Supreme Court on Monday denied a petition filed by lawyers representing Sonoma County and Sgt. Erick Gelhaus of the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO).

The court rejected a petition for the court to issue a rare writ of certiorari that attorneys hoped would hold up a qualified immunity claim for Gelhaus in an ongoing federal civil rights lawsuit stemming from the 2013 police shooting death of 13-yearold Andy Lopez of Santa Rosa. The Supreme Court ruling

appeared to come as a surprise to some court watchers and reporters, who expected that the court might follow on from a recent writ it filed in another use-of-force case from earlier this year, Kisela v. Hughes, that was appealed to the high court—and grant Gelhaus qualified immunity. A report in the Los Angeles

Times from June 10 said the county’s lawyers “stand a good chance of prevailing” before the Supreme Court, despite very low odds that greet any petition that comes before the court. The county lawyers did not prevail. Noah Blechman, outside counsel for Sonoma County, says he’s disappointed but not especially surprised in the court’s decision, given that “only 2 percent of cases sent to the Supreme Court get reviewed and actually get rulings.” The ruling this week, he says, was disappointing but clarifying. In rejecting the petition, the court left open the issue of qualified immunity for Sgt. Gelhaus, Blechman says and, in doing so, also “leaves open legal and policy questions that impact law enforcement locally and nationwide.” The Supreme Court did not reject the county lawyers’ call for qualified immunity, but sent the case back to the U.S. District Court in Oakland for a potential trial, which would determine whether the Lopez shooting was justified under the Fourth Amendment and whether Gelhaus ought to be held personally responsible for the death of Lopez, who was carrying a replica AK-47 when he was shot. The fake weapon was an Airsoft rifle whose orange safety tip had been previously removed by a friend of Andy’s who owned the fake weapon. Attorneys for the county and the officer have argued that Gelhaus was justified in the tragic and divisive shooting. The SCSO was not surprisingly disappointed with the outcome, says Assistant Sheriff Clint Shubel. “We want to get clarity and guidance from the courts on the legal issue because it impacts community safety across the nation,” says Shubel. “This legal issue can affect the decisionmaking ability of peace officers under split-second, life-or-death situations. Every use-of-force situation is unique and can be


it was ‘undisputed’ that Andy brought his plastic toy up in the direction of the officer.” Blechman says he doesn’t know and won’t speculate on what factors in the Lopez case compelled the Supreme Court to reject the petition. A Supreme Court decision from earlier this year to accept a separate petition for a writ of certiorari had given rise to the possibility that the Supreme Court would rebuke the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals for overreaching in the Gelhaus case—as it argued had been the case in Kisela v. Hughes earlier this year.

‘The county’s unsuccessful appeals have already cost taxpayers some $4 million in attorney’s fees.’ That use-of-force case involved an officer who shot and killed a woman who was brandishing a knife, and the officer involved in the incident was granted qualified immunity. Contemporary police use-offorce guidance at the constitutional level stems from a landmark 1989 court decision, Graham v. Connor, which established a general rule of thumb for qualified immunity as being in play if an officer reasonably believes that his life, or others’ lives, may be at risk during an encounter with a perpetrator. The Graham decision set what’s known as an “objective reasonableness standard” to determine whether police activities are constitutionally chary. In its 2–1 ruling on the Gelhaus

appeal, the Ninth ruled that there were issues at hand that could only be resolved through a jury trial, given that there were strands of testimony previously given that were at apparent odds with one another. The judges cited Lopez’s young age as a factor in their ruling. Blechman wouldn’t say whether he believes Lopez’s age was a factor in the Supreme Court decision to not issue a writ of certiorari, as he notes that there’s no evidence on the record to indicate Gelhaus had any idea how old he was. In denying the writ of certiorari, the Supreme Court passed on the opportunity to take another swing at the Ninth—which is often singled out for its purported liberal bias by conservatives—as it had done in an April 18 ruling when a majority of the justices ruled on Kisela and noted that “this Court has repeatedly told courts—and the Ninth Circuit in particular—not to define clearly established law at a high level of generality.” As the local police-accountability community repeats its ongoing demand that the county settle the suit, Blechman says “we are going to continue to evaluate all available options to move this forward toward final resolution.” There are only two of them: settle with the family or go to trial. “This could end up in a trial jury situation,” Blechman says, noting that even if the Supreme Court didn’t want to hear the qualified immunity argument from Sonoma County, “we can still raise the qualified immunity issue. It is still viable.” The attorney for the Lopez family, Arnoldo Casillas, says he’s looking forward to a jury trial as he calls the high court’s decision “bittersweet for the family. They are certainly happy that every time any judicial officers have evaluated the shooting, they found that the facts did not support immunity and that there were very significant issues that a jury has to decide. But ultimately, they still lost a son.”

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very difficult. When faced with a perceived deadly threat, peace officers need to know when and how they are legally allowed to protect the public they serve. They can only know this through clearly established law.” Blechman notes that when officers are involved in a situation where they “reasonably perceive” that their or their partner’s life, or the lives of nearby citizens, are at risk, and the officer is forced to make a split-second decision, “normally the officer is granted qualified immunity for being forced to make that difficult decision.” That principle has been upheld in numerous court decisions. One of the sticking points in the case is the position of the fake AK-47 itself when Gelhaus shot Lopez seven times, fatally wounding him. In previous testimony, the officer indicated that the replica rifle was pointed downward but swinging up toward him as Lopez turned around to face the officers after Gelhaus commanded him to drop the weapon. “I haven’t found any similar cases that had that high degree of danger that deputy Gelhaus faced,” Blechman says—where the officers involved didn’t receive qualified immunity for their role in a use-of-force incident involving a firearm, whether it was fake or not. Local activists in policeaccountability circles were gratified by the decision from the conservative Supreme Court to send the case back to the lower court, and called on the county to settle the suit with the Lopez family. “The county’s unsuccessful appeals to the U.S. District Court, U.S. Court of Appeals and now the U.S. Supreme Court have already cost taxpayers some $4 million in attorney’s fees,” charges Santa Rosa activist Kathleen Finigan. “Attorneys representing the Lopez family have shown that the county's filings include false statements about the shooting,” says Finigan, “most notably that


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version of Racer 5 IPA, the idea being that you can drink more of it, hurray, without melting too fast under the dual assault of solar radiation and dehydration from IPA’s higher alcohol content. Although the lightest of this group in alcohol by volume (abv), at 4 percent, amber-gold Pace Car also presents the most substantial IPA impression with a fresh, floral hop aroma and dry finish. This is the one if you want that big, dry IPA sensation without the big abv. Sumpin’ Easy is the 5.7 percent abv version of Little Sumpin’ Sumpin’—a sort of wheated IPA. Fruity, floral hops—hayride flavor bubblegum?—lead to a tangy, fresh beer with just an echo of the sweetness of the 7.5 percent “Little.” Bud Light vs. Fogbelt Zephyr Gose A whiff of the erstwhile “King of Beers” brings me back to a summer job I once had in a cornprocessing plant. It’s reasonably inoffensive, but not, after all, the top refresher. Reminiscent of the sour aroma of the bacterial beverage my hippie neighbor was growing in a jar in his kitchen that same summer, the Fogbelt Zephyr is an update on an old beer style. Although it’s brewed with apricots, the result is not tutti-frutti, and the tart flavors come together with appealing, fine-bubbled effervescence at 4.5 percent abv. Worth adding to the picnic table. Lagunitas Daytime Fractional IPA vs. Lagunitas IPA It’s dogeat-dog with these two. Daytime has a floral hop aroma but less of a dry finish than Pacer. At 4.65 percent abv, it’s a lighter than the 6.2 percent IPA, which is, oddly, less overtly hoppy. Smooth and inoffensive—like the big beer brands seem to be only in their fresh-poured, after-the-tour samples—Daytime should be the baseline of summer beer. Anderson Valley Summer Solstice The outlier here is a dark amber ale with natural flavors and spices added—wait, isn’t that for winter solstice? Actually, this cream ale is one of my favorites for early summer evening refreshment when the heat lets up and the light begins to dim—or is that just the beer?


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Rusty Cohn

10

HOT DAM While they have

been treated as nuisances, beavers help maintain and improve riparian habitat.

Leave It to . . .

Beavers! The key to a better North Bay environment

B

ill Ostrander was showing his brother-in-law around his Kenwood vineyard one summer day last year when the tour turned totally horror-show, from the perspective of a grape grower: suddenly, they came upon a patch of grapevines with wilted leaves, desiccated grapes and trunks cut in two. Ostrander had suspicions about who the culprit might be.

Ostrander’s vines, planted as Syrah in 1997, had already suffered a severe pruning once before, when they were cut in half and re-grafted onto another variety, “because Syrah wasn’t possible to sell,” the Kenwood resident says. The vineyard is just

two-and-three-quarters acres, but it provides him a little income. And his new Malbec vines had attracted some unwanted customers: beavers. When grape growers in Sonoma and Napa wine country encounter such a problem with beavers, as

BY JAMES KNIGHT

rare as that is, they are legally entitled to apply for a permit to have that animal trapped and killed. Yet Ostrander hesitated. He set up a digital “critter cam” to catch the culprit in the act, tried out various methods of fencing them out of the vineyard and documented his efforts in a lighthearted email series to friends and family that he called “Wet Caddyshack.” Clearly, there was something about this determined rodent that was different than, say, a common pocket gopher, which Ostrander says he would be happy to get rid of.

here’s something different about the beaver, indeed, as Ostrander learned from his interaction with a local cadre of “beaver believers” who are on a mission to help property owners live with the beaver, encourage their habitat and ultimately change the game plan for what they say is a woefully underappreciated keystone species in the state of California. The first step is getting past California’s “beaver blind spot,” as the Occidental Arts & Ecology Center’s Brock Dolman puts it. Dolman is co-director, with

T


counties, and there is no bag limit to the number taken. While Napa, Sonoma and Marin counties are excluded, beaver are considered a nuisance species everywhere, meaning that farmers, landowners and government agencies that encounter beaver problems may apply for depredation permits to have them removed.

‘If you can’t work it out with them, could be you’re the problem.’ And the only option is lethal removal, as longtime Napa grape grower Andrea “Buck” Bartolucci found when he asked the California Department of Fish and Wildlife about his beaver problem in 2013. One day while driving down the halfmile driveway of his 160-acre Madonna Estate Vineyard in the Carneros, Bartolucci noticed a similar problem to Ostrander’s: a string of grapevines cut down at the trunk. It was so methodically done that he initially wondered if an employee had become disgruntled, but he found it was beavers from nearby Huichica Creek. “They knocked down a couple of trees and had a party with the grapevines,” Bartolucci says. Fish and Wildlife recommended contracting the county trapper, and at the time, Bartolucci was impressed with the 60-pound creatures that were trapped. “They’re fierce!” Bartolucci says. “It’s not like Bucky Beaver.” Yet Bartolucci says the environment is important to him, having farmed his vineyard certified organically since 1991, and now laments that it was the only option that was given to him at the time. “I’m not the kind of guy who wants to do in an innocent

animal,” he says, “and if there was an alternative, I’d certainly look into that.” The sticking point is that Fish & Wildlife abides by a “shall issue” code when it comes to beavers. That is, if a landowner can verify property damage from beaver, the responding officer shall issue a depredation permit. Unlike some other Western states, California does not allow live trapping and relocation of beaver, or many other animals. Those permits numbered some 3,300 in 2016. Though California does not require records of depredations completed, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services does for its separate permits; it counted 836 in 2016. According to the local office for Sonoma and Napa counties, one permit was issued for beaver in 2018, but it was not verified that any were actually taken under that permit. his business as usual for beavers started to change after a pair of them wandered into Alhambra Creek in the middle of the city of Martinez in 2006. They built a dam and had yearlings, called kits, but the city’s application for a permit to make them go away did not sit well with locals who could see the kits playing as they drank their coffee. Resident Heidi Perryman formed the beaver advocacy group Worth a Dam, which holds its 11th annual Beaver Festival on June 30 in downtown Martinez. A few years later, a somewhat less celebrated pair of beavers set up house on Tulocay Creek, which passes under Napa’s Soscol Avenue at the Hawthorn Suites hotel. An otherwise unimpressive urban drainage, this section of Tulocay sprang to life after the beavers set up a serviceable little barrier of sticks and mud: numerous species of birds, amphibians and mammals like otter and mink have been observed by wildlife watchers keeping an eye on the pond, including wildlife photographer Rusty Cohn, who has photographed and made videos of beavers swimming, munching on cattails and even

T

falling asleep in mid-munch while trying to rebuild the dam after the rains of 2017. Luckily for the beavers, advocates have convinced the hotel to wrap the trees on their landscaped grounds with wire to deter the animals from gnawing on them, and a new hotel project now under development on the other side of the creek is not now affecting the beavers, who are rebuilding their dam after the higher water flows of last winter. The Napa County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, however, is responsible for the bank of the stream, not the proposed Cambria Hotel, under development by Southern California–based Stratus Development Partners. Lundquist praises the Napa agency as probeaver, saying, “I’m grateful that there are flood-control agencies that recognize the beavers, and I encourage all of our flood agencies to learn from the Napa district, because they’re doing a great job.” With the OAEC as consultants, the county plans to lower the water level of the beaver pond temporarily, to facilitate shoring up the bank, thus avoiding a number of potential pitfalls, according to Kevin Swift, who’s contracted to do the pondleveling work. Swift is the proprietor of Swift Water Design, a one-man, “nonlethal beaver-management” startup that, Swift says, would require 10 of him if even a fraction of the agencies and individuals currently trying to manage their beaver problems would call him. Swift assesses problems and implements solutions that, while relatively simple, require a different way of thinking about beavers. He speaks eloquently, if colorfully, about the rodents’ role in the environment. “They’re ignored, underappreciated, reviled and mismanaged in equal measure,” says Swift, who emphasizes that beavers, for all their engineering abilities, are not intellectual powerhouses. “It’s got a brain the size of an acorn. If you can’t work it out with them, could be ) 12 you’re the problem.”

11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Kate Lundquist, of OAEC’s WATER Institute (Watershed Advocacy, Training, Education and Research), established in 2004 to study and promote watershed issues. The awardwinning duo’s “Bring Back the Beaver” campaign, started in 2009, went back on the road in the North Bay last month with a talk in connection with a screening of the environmental documentary Dirt Rich in Novato; appearances continue through June in Napa, Sonoma and Marin counties. “A lot of people just don’t know that we have beaver in California,” says Lundquist, who says that their current presentation is an update on a 2015 talk they gave in Sonoma to help answer the question: “That’s an East Coast thing, right?” Despite the Canadian-sounding name, charismatic Castor canadensis is native to all of North America, and is a close relative to the Eurasian beaver, Castor fiber, which Europeans exploited to near extinction for its castor oil and the fine hat-making properties of its dense fur. The discovery of beaver and other hapless, furry critters in the New World inspired a “Fur Rush” long before the Gold Rush. Turns out, according to Lundquist, when the Russians founded Fort Ross in 1812, it was actually kind of late in the game—and trappers had been exploiting the West Coast for decades before the legendary “mountain men” trappers descended on the Golden State from overland to clean up the rest. Although a historical account from General Mariano Vallejo found the Laguna de Santa Rosa “teeming with beaver” in 1833, by 1911 California had about 1,000 beavers left before legislators passed a law briefly protecting the aquatic rodents. Following a quarter-century-long campaign to reintroduce beaver to erosionthreatened habitat (the highlight of the “Bring Back the Beaver” show is the parachuting “beaver bomb” developed during the time), they were determined nonnative and invasive for decades thereafter. Today in California, trapping beaver is permitted in 42 of 58


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

Beavers ( 11

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Currently, Swift is working with a property manager in Glen Ellen who’s got a beaver that’s blocking a spillway in an old stock pond located near a confluence of streams. “It looks like, way back when, a rancher went and put in a dam,” he says, “just where a beaver would, really.” It’s not in use, but the property owner can’t risk being responsible for a failure of the old dam, either. The solution lies in understanding the beaver’s simple needs. A beaver’s “programming set is very small,” says Swift, “but profound in its implications. It’s like, if you hear running water, and you feel like you’re going to get eaten, make the running water stop making that noise. As soon as it stops making that noise, punch a hole in a creek bed somewhere and make more of yourself. And you’re good.” Beavers build dams mainly to stay safe from predators, such as coyotes. Secondarily, the flooded area around the dam encourages felled riparian tree species, like willow, to sprout back and create more beaver food. “I mean,” says Swift, “it’s just this tiny, tiny little sliver of code, out of which falls an entire ecosystem.” Swift makes no claims to sentimental concern for the animals, joking, “If you want to shoot a beaver in the head and make a hat, I’m OK with that.” More seriously, he points to the waste of potential environmental services the current policy promotes. “It seems to me that all the laws are backwards,” he says. “You don’t need a permit to destroy a beaver dam that makes critical habitat for rare, threatened and endangered species—but you might need a permit to put in a float-control device that’s hydrologically invisible and maintains the habitat for rare, threatened and endangered species. How does that work?” Coho salmon, chief among those threatened and endangered species, first inspired the OAEC’s Dolman and Lundquist to think about beavers. Coho, which

experienced a sharp decline in population in the 20th century, as well as other salmonid species, require cool water, complexity of habitat and water flow in summer and fall. “And our sense was, we need all the help we can get,” says Dolman. “We kept coming across these papers, especially work out of Oregon and Washington state,” he says, that showed “a positive correlation . . . between beneficial beaver habitat and a support for coho salmon, specifically—also steelhead and Chinook.” “And it just got us thinking,” says Dolman in his 2015 presentation in Sonoma. “We ought to bring another tool in the toolbox here. And so we began really looking at beaver as an additional component to how we could recover these endangered species.” In Sonoma County’s Russian River watershed, a host of agencies contributed to a salmon release and the construction of an expensive beaver pond analog in 2013, touted to promote the return of coho that, ultimately, would not be dependent on a hatchery. Beaver believers say that this, and much more, could be more cheaply achieved by simply letting the beavers alone. No beavers have been documented in the Russian River watershed, but there is an unsubstantiated report of a beaver being killed in reputedly environmentally conscious west Sonoma County— perhaps the “disperser” that had previously been observed moving west from Spring Lake in Santa Rosa. Some cattle ranchers in Nevada, in fact, are moving further ahead in beaver consciousness than landowners in California wine country, according to Lundquist. “They stopped shooting them, and suddenly they have more water,” Lundquist says. Some have gone on record as saying they wouldn’t be in ranching now if it weren’t for the beaver. Perhaps wine country has some catching up to do in this regard, when a property like Napa County’s Domaine Chandon, which is certified Fish Friendly Farming for one of its vineyards,


eanwhile in Kenwood, grape grower Bill Ostrander has found a way to live with the beavers.

M

After consulting with Dolman, he installed a fairly inexpensive, single-strand electric fence that only had to reach four inches off the ground—beavers can’t jump, and since they’re generally covered in water, they’re highly conductive. Ostrander had thought about the usual option. “Yeah, I thought about it,” he says, “but it was fairly straightforward and inexpensive to put up the electric fence, and not a lot of trouble as far as impacting the operations in the vineyard.” Although he hasn’t seen the rodents personally, it does seem that Ostrander enjoys observing them, as well as the other animals caught on camera, like the surprise appearance of a family of otters. It should be no surprise if the mere “life support” activities that various agencies employ to keep salmonids and other threatened species won’t cut it through the upcoming challenges of climate change, says the outspoken Swift. “Until we can coexist with beavers, those of us in the restoration movement, those of us that want to move the dial in a positive direction, are hamstrung by a regulatory environment that’s solely focused on doing less bad less often.” Swift looks forward to a day when the state can start turning the beaver’s tail in the other direction. “If you’re headed south, it doesn’t matter how slowly you go south—you’re never getting north.” Science Buzz Cafe’s Beaver in California Slide Show screens at HopMonk Tavern in Sebastopol, June 27 at 7pm. 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. facebook.com/ sciencebuzzcafe. Ben Goldfarb is joined by the OAEC’s Kate Lundquist and Brock Dolman on June 29 at 7pm at Copperfield’s Books in San Rafael for a signing and discussion of ‘Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter.’ 850 Fourth St., San Rafael. copperfieldsbooks.com/event/bengoldfarb. For information on the Martinez Beaver Festival on June 30, from 11am to 4pm, visit martinezbeavers.org.

13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

can claim on its website, “We embellish waterways with native vegetation, maintain wildlife corridors, preserve forested areas in the vineyard and employ clean water protection to encourage fish habitat and spawning,” while applying for a 2013 permit to kill beaver in that very same fishspawning habitat. And if the beaver believers are right, as the numerous scientific studies they point to suggest, there is no better way to be fish-friendly than to be beaver-friendly. The beavers are not going away. There are some intractable parties, such as the absentee landowner on Sonoma’s Leveroni Road who, according to state records, refuses to consider alternative options to repeated depredation permit requests. But ultimately this approach is doomed to fail, says Swift. “A story you often hear in California,” says Swift, “is, ‘I’ve been going down to that place for an hour every day for X number of years, and I’ve shot and trapped Y number of beavers, and they’re still there!’ Yeah, you’re in beaver habitat! Geology drives beaver habitat. Unless you can literally move mountains, you’re not changing anything about beavers’ attraction to your site.” Lundquist says killing beavers is neither a viable nor economical strategy. “For one, people hold candlelight vigils, like they did in Tahoe. And it can be really bad press if you’re trying to do the right thing—or be seen as doing the right thing, anyway.” Thus far, few Sonoma and Napa wineries seem to have any clue as to what that right thing may be. The 427-page California Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Workbook, for instance, on which the Sonoma County Winegrowers bases its initiative to make Sonoma County 100 percent sustainable by 2019, only mentions beavers incidentally in a section on “often overlooked” aquatic habitats.

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

YOUNTVILLE

Americana Existence

Jayme Stone didn’t choose the folk life; the folk life chose him. The celebrated banjo star and bandleader takes a lifetime of old Appalachian tunes, Creole spirituals and other music that has been a part of the American experience for centuries and modernizes them for today’s audiences in his latest project, Jayme Stone’s Folklife, also the name of his latest album. This week, Stone and his band of folk stars play in Napa Valley as part of an Americana series co-presented by the Napa Valley Museum on Friday, June 29, at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Drive, Yountville. 7pm. $20. 707.944.9900.

P E TA L U M A

Free Range Radio Already streaming online and broadcasting part-time on the 103.3-FM band, Petaluma Community Access radio station KPCA gets into the live music game this week when it presents four Bay Area bands making waves in the independent music scene. Headliners NRVS LVRS (“Nervous Lovers”) captivate with dreamy electro-pop creations. The Y Axes make the most of their glossy pop sounds with energetic etherealness. New Spell are a cerebral duo centered around synthesizers, and Flour Flour mix musical ingredients like rock and folk. KPCA presents this concert on Saturday, June 30, at the Phoenix Theatre, 201 Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $10. 707.762.3565.

—Charlie Swanson

N A PA

Moving Art Recently renovating its 200-acre property, the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art invites a new crop of Bay Area artists to create engaging works onsite in the second part of its year-long exhibition, ‘Be Not Still: Living in Uncertain Times,’ opening this weekend. Each of the four artists use the space to respond to current events and relevant social topics though large-scale installations. The public can get their first look at these new works at reception for the exhibit on Saturday, June 30, 5200 Sonoma Hwy., Napa. 5pm. Free; RSVP requested. 707.226.5991.

SEBASTOPOL

Good Neighbors For over 30 years, young television audiences visited Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood and sang neighborly songs with minister-turned-TV-star Fred Rogers. An advocate for kindness and imagination, Rogers was also a huge proponent of public media and positive programming. All of that goes into Academy Award– winning director Morgan Neville’s new documentary, ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?,’ currently playing in and around the North Bay. This weekend, the film gets a special screening to benefit local media company KRCB and children’s service group First 5 Sonoma County on Sunday, July 1, at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. Noon. $9–$11.50. 707.829.3456.

PERENNIAL MUSIC Acclaimed singer-songwriter and longtime Nashville favorite Mary Chapin Carpenter performs in Napa at the Uptown Theatre on Saturday, June 30. See Clubs & Venues, p19.


STAY DANGEROUS Military veteran and grandmother Kenyetta Todd combines costume design and burlesque when she performs as Dangerous Dollie.

Hello, Dollie

Kenyetta Todd shares her passion for performance with North Bay Cabaret BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

n her everyday life, Santa Rosa’s Kenyetta Todd is a 53-year-old grandmother and military veteran living with PTSD. But when she takes the stage, she transforms into Dangerous Dollie, a burlesque character Todd has developed over the last decade.

Todd performs this weekend at North Bay Cabaret’s four-year

anniversary show in Santa Rosa. “I love the North Bay Cabaret because it gives me a creative outlet,” Todd says. “It’s a safe place for people to showcase their creativity.” Born in Philadelphia, Todd moved to California in 1992, and was stationed at the Coast Guard’s Training Center Petaluma in Two Rock. When she got out of the military in 1996, she stayed in Sonoma County.

Though she’s long held a love for dance and costume design, Todd never thought to combine the two into burlesque performance—which mixes those elements in stage routines that involve bawdy humor and striptease—until her friends threw a pole-dancing class and party for her 45th birthday. “They had another class called burlesque dancing and I took that class,” she says, “and the next

thing you know, I was asked to be in a show, and I’ve been in shows ever since then.” Also an avid cosplayer, Todd frequently designs and creates elaborate costumes and attends events in character. “Funny thing is, in the military I was a test model for the new uniforms for women, so I helped them tailor the costumes there— well, might as well call them costumes,” Todd says with a laugh. “I’ve always had a hand in sewing, and [with burlesque], I can fluctuate from costume design to music and more.” One thing in particular she loves about burlesque, she says, is that “it doesn’t always have to be sexy; it can be funny, it can be political—it’s welcoming for any kind of artistry you want to present.” Aside from Todd’s frequent appearances at the North Bay Cabaret, she’s performed as Dangerous Dollie at events like the Folsom Street Fair and the recent Pride event in San Francisco. Joining Todd onstage at the upcoming North Bay Cabaret show will be a wide range of performers, including bellydancer Pauline Persichilli, local musician Big Kitty, and Angelique Benicio, a visual and performance artist from San Rafael who will debut a new art piece called The Carnival of Lost Memories. “There are a lot of creative people, and everybody’s looking for a stage,” Todd says. “The North Bay is a really nice place if you’ve never been on a stage— everybody is welcoming. The positivity is wonderful.” North Bay Cabaret’s four-year anniversary show happens Saturday, June 30, at Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm. $20–$25. nbc4year.brownpapertickets.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Ideas

15


Fine Dining For Wild Birds

Stage Ray Mabry

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

GET HAPPY Shaleah Adkisson, left,

and Courtney Markowitz sing a duet made famous by Judy Garland and Barbra Striesand.

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Ticket to Paradise Transcendence offers a roving musical revue BY HARRY DUKE

T

ranscendence Theatre Company opens its seventh season of Broadway Under the Stars in Jack London State Park with Stairway to Paradise, the first of four staged concert events scheduled this year.

The company takes performers with Broadway, touring company, film and television experience and creates an original themed musical revue around them. This year’s theme is “Every Moment Counts” and director-choreographer Tony Gonzalez has designed 20-plus production numbers full of memorable moments. The Transcendence playlist includes Broadway show tunes, a mix of recent and past pop hits, classic rock and specialty numbers.

They’re all done in Broadway-style, occasionally with a twist. It often works, but sometimes it doesn’t. The first act runs the gamut from numbers from South Pacific, The Wiz, and Victor/Victoria to “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard” and “The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy)” by Paul Simon. Highlights include a recreation of the famous Judy Garland/Barbra Streisand duet of “Get Happy/Happy Days Are Here Again” with Courtney Markowitz and Shaleah Adkisson, and Christine Lavin’s popular “Air Conditioner” song, also done by Adkisson with Tim Roller. The act ends on a local note with a performance of “Everything,” a tribute song written by songwriters Mark Beynon and Joe Label, and the Transcendence version of “Oklahoma,” which morphs the Rodgers and Hammerstein classic into “Oh, Sonoma!” The second act includes numbers from Cabaret, Into the Woods and The Sound of Music mixed with Justin Timberlake, Van Halen and, in the evening’s one clear misstep, Don McLean’s “American Pie.” Sorry guys, but perky, Cheshire cat–like grinning performers singing “This’ll be the day that I die” just doesn’t work for me. It’s a little creepy. Things snap back with a jaunty Michael Linden performing Drew Gasparini’s “A Little Bit” and largescale numbers with Timberlake’s “Can’t Stop the Feeling” and Van Halen’s “Right Now” before concluding with “Finale B” from Rent. Dress in layers, pack a picnic, indulge in some wine or food purchased from local food trucks and vintners serving on-site, then sit back and enjoy a unique North Bay entertainment experience. Rating (out 5 five): ‘Stairway to Paradise’ runs Friday– Sunday through July 1. Jack London State Historic Park, 2400 London Ranch Road, Glen Ellen. Doors open for picnicking at 5pm; show starts 7:30pm. Tickets $45–$150. 877.424.1414. transcendencetheatre.org.


MEN WITH HATS The fuse is lit for

the Dead Winter Carpenters’ show at Long Meadow Ranch in St. Helena.

Rock the Fourth

Independence Day concerts abound in the North Bay BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

f nothing else, the Fourth of July is one of the loudest holidays of the year, with booming fireworks commemorating America’s birthday everywhere you look. In the North Bay, many of these fireworks are accompanied by live music, and this year’s selection of Fourth of July concerts includes popular local bands, lively community celebrations, longstanding family traditions and more. In Sebastopol, the skies light up a day early at the 45th annual Fireworks Extravaganza & Music Festival, hosted by the Kiwanis Club on July 3. Music lovers can come together on the football field at Analy High School to hear the dance-inducing music of Buzzy Martin & the Buzztones and the bluesy licks of Volker Strifler beginning at 6pm. The next day, Sebastopol embraces the idea of “United

For more information on these and other July 4 concerts, see Music Calendar, p18.

17 Thu 6⁄28 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages

THE ELECTRIC FLAG 50TH ANNIVERSARY

with Nick Gravenites, Barry Goldberg

& Harvey Mandel

Fri 6⁄29 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$32 • 21+

Fleetwood Mask

The Ultimate Tribute to Fleetwood Mac Sat 6⁄30 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $10–$15 • All Ages

Moonalice with SF Airship Acoustic A Benefit for Internet Archive Sun 7⁄1 • Doors 4:30pm ⁄ $10–$15 • All Ages

Jerry's Middle Finger

Thu 7⁄5 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $19–$22 • All Ages Jazz Is PHSH AN ALLSTAR INSTRUMENTAL TRI BUTE TO PHISH Fri 7⁄6 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages

THE EDGE

aka SF Music Club Dance Party Reunion feat Jimmy Dillon and Lorin Rowan Sun 7⁄8 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$18 • All Ages

An intimate celebration of Townes Van Zandt feat

members of San Geronimo, The Mother

Hips/Green Leaf Rustlers, Brian Jonestown Massacre & more

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saT jul 14 bastille day Celebration 7pm/$10 Capturing reality Photography May 14–July 17...Stan Angel, Kenneth Bradley,Michael Riley, Cathy Thomas.

Visit our website, redwoodCafe.CoM 8240 old redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. CALENDAR WED JUN 27 • SONG LAB EVERY LAST WEDNESDAY 8PM / 21+ / FREE THU JUN 28 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY 8PM / 21+ / $10 FRI JUN 29 • T SISTERS (TRIO) DOMENIC BIANCO SOLO 8PM / 21+ / $20 SAT JUN 30 • JOE VALLEY BAND AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SUN JUL 1 • TWIN OAKS BACKYARD BBQ SERIES, COFFIS BROTHERS & MOUNTAIN MEN 5PM / ALL AGES /$20 SHOW + BBQ / $10 SHOW ONLY CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

We Stand” at the seventh annual Peacetown Summer Concert series kick-off at Ives Park. Jim Corbett, best known locally as the founder of music education and events organization Mr. Music Foundation, runs Peacetown with a strong commitment to neighborly camaraderie, and this season’s opening concert—dubbed an “(Inter)dependence Day” event— honors that notion and includes music from cordial Sonoma County artists Jon Gonzales, the Big Fit (formerly known as Frobeck), Bottle Shock and the Poyntlyss Sistars beginning at noon and playing until 8pm. Another neighborhood staple in Sonoma County, Santa Rosa’s longrunning “Red, White & Boom” fireworks show at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds features North Bay favorites the Pat Jordan Band, the Dylan Black Project and Wonderbread 5 taking the stage alongside dozens of local vendors to set the mood for fireworks. The Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds in Petaluma also hosts a free Fourth of July fireworks show with local rockers the Grain and the Highway Poets belting out soulful, swaggering sets of music with Lagunitas beer and local food on hand. Napa Valley’s offerings of Independence Day parties start early, with the Symphony & Salsa Celebration on July 1 at the CIA at Copia in Napa. The free outdoor show boasts Symphony Napa Valley performing patriotic selections like “Stars & Stripes,” while Bay Area veteran Latin band Candela play their signature high-energy originals that get the crowds moving, followed by a pyrotechnic display. In St. Helena, the Fourth features genre-bending Americana act Dead Winter Carpenters (pictured) sweating it out at the Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch as part of the seasonal Bluegrass-Fed Concert series. Fans can sit on the lawn and enjoy a delectable dinner with the music, before fireworks go off at nearby Crane Park.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

Firefall

at Silos Napa, June 29 & 30 FRIDAY

MIDTOWN SOCIAL WITH

SUNDAY

KATCHAFIRE NOTIS HEAVYWEIGHT

JUN 29

Concerts

MARSHALL HOUSE PROJECT & BANJO BOOM BOX FUNK⁄SOUL• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SONOMA COUNTY

ROCKAZ, E.N YOUNG & IMPERIAL SOUND REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

JUL 8 FRIDAY

JUL 13 SATURDAY

North Bay Cabaret Four-Year Anniversry

SAVED BY THE 90'S

COVER ⁄ TRIBUTE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

STEELIN' DAN

MUSIC OF STEELY DAN JUL 14 THE COVER ⁄ TRIBUTE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ TUESDAY

Rare opportunity to see this band LIVE in a small venue.

FRIDAY

Meet and Greet included with 7pm show.

STEPHEN MALKMUS & JICKS WITH SOCCER MOMMY JUL 17 THE INDIE ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ JUL 27 THURSDAY

AUG 2 FRIDAY

AUG 3

BOOKER T. JONES SOUL• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

ZOSO: THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE COVERS ⁄ TRIBUTE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

RAGING FYAH

70’s hits include: You are The Woman, Just Remember I Love You Tickets: $59– $80

WITH CRSB

REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

8⁄5 Ace Frehley, 8⁄10 Charley Crockett with The Highway Poets, 8⁄11 Freddie McGregor 8⁄16–8⁄18 Pet-A-Llama Comedy Festival, 8⁄19 Amanda Shires, 8⁄30 Igor & Red Elvises, 9⁄1 John Courage & The Coffis Bros, 9⁄7 Movie Showing: Reel Rock 12, 9⁄8 The Zombies, 9⁄12 Marcus King Band

530 Main Street, Napa 707.251.5833 | silosnapa.com

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

SAT, JUL 7

ROSAPALOOZA! FEATURING

CORDUROY, ALICE IN THE GARDEN AND PLUSH FRI, JUL 20

ROCK CANDY WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

THE GRAY COATS

Outdoor Dining Sat & Sun Brunch 11–3

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

Fri

String Rays Jun 29 The Original, Rockin’ Americana 8:00 / No Cover

Thorn Band Jul 21 Paul Dinner Show 8:30 Sat

BBQs on the Lawn are Back!

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

4th of July Weekend

Sun

Stoned Soul Picnic

Blues Broads / Sons of the Soul Revivers Jul 4 The Zydeco Flames Jul 1

SAT, JUL 21

Wed

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Sun Peter Rowan’s Annual

MIDTOWN SOCIAL P BUTTA QUARTET SAT, AUG 11

LA GUNS WITH SPECIAL

GUESTS THE BUTLERS FRI, AUG 31

VICIOUS RUMORS WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

ANCESTORS WRATH AND MORE TBA!

HOUSE OF ROCK 3410 Industrial Drive

Jul 8

Birthday Bash Tommy Castro & The 15 Jul Painkillers /The Illeagles Sun Jul 22 Paul Thorn Band Sun Jul 29 the subdudes Sun Chuck Prophet Aug 5 Sun

Sun

Aug 12

& the Mission Express + special guest Matt Jaffe

“Uncle” Willie K Aug 19 Asleep at the Wheel Sun

SANTA ROSA 707.709.6039

Reservations Advised

ROCKSTARUNIVERSITY.COM

On the Town Square, Nicasio

TICKETS & INFO:

Music

415.662.2219

www.ranchonicasio.com

Eclectic live variety show featuring a jam-packed lineup of local and Bay Area performers includes burlesque, bellydancers, circus acts, improv comedy, live music, shadow puppetry, fire arts and more. Jun 30. Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

NRVS LVRS

Pronounced “Nervous Lovers,” the darkwave project of San Francisco husband-and-wife duo Andrew Gomez and Bevin Fernandez headlines show hosted by KPCA radio station. Jun 30, 8pm. $10. The Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Peacetown

Annual concert series kicks off with an “(Inter)dependence Day” show featuring Bottle Shock, Poyntlyss Sistars and others. Lagunitas beer, local wine and food trucks are also on hand. Jul 4, 12pm. donations welcome. Ives Park, Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol, peacetown.org.

MARIN COUNTY The Electric Flag

Chicago blues-rock pioneers mark 50 years of music with a concert featuring members Nick Gravenites and Barry Goldberg and guitarist Harvey Mandel. Jun 28, 8pm. $22-$27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Ernest Ranglin

Jamaican guitarist who helped create the guitar style that defined ska performs with an all-star band and local favorites Soul Ska. Jul 3, 8pm. $30-$35. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

The Zydeco Flames

Rollicking band turns up the heat for an annual Fourth of July BBQ and party full of funky dancehall jams. Jul 4, 4pm. $20. Rancho Nicasio, 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

NAPA COUNTY Dead Winter Carpenters

Long Meadow’s bluegrassfed concert series welcomes Tahoe-based Americana band to play before St Helena’s July fourth fireworks display. Jul 4, 5pm. $35-$45. Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, 738 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.4555.

Jayme Stone‘s Folklife

Award-winning banjoist and composer bridges folk, jazz and chamber music in his latest musical outfit. Jun 29, 7pm. $20. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Symphony & Salsa Spectacular

Symphony Napa Valley and Latin band Candela combine to play American classics like “Stars and Stripes” along with salsas and cha-chas. Fireworks to follow. Jul 1, 7pm. Free. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Jun 29, Mike Saliani. Jul 1, 2pm, the Beat Meters. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Jun 29, Summer ‘18 artist showcase with GLO and Starlight Mikka. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Jun 27, Wednesday Night Big Band. Jun 28, Savanah flamenco. Jun 29, Riffat Sultana. Jun 30, 1pm, the Grain. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Brewsters Beer Garden Jun 28, the Hossettes. Jun 29, Joe Valley Band. Jun 30, 2 and 6pm, Danny Montana and the Beer Scouts. Jul 1, Matt Bolton. Jul 4, 2pm, Identity Crisis. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

Cellars of Sonoma

Jun 30, 3pm, Simon Kinsman. Jul 1, 2pm, Emily Hamilton. 20

Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Cloverdale Plaza

Jun 29, 6:30pm, Friday Night Live at the Plaza with David Luning Band. 122 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.4410.

Crooked Goat Brewing Jun 30, 3pm, Sean Carscadden. Jul 1, 3pm, Stav McAllister. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Elephant in the Room Jun 29, the Gypsy Trio. Jun 30, Brycon the DJ and Max Wordlow. Jul 1, Steve Pile Trio. Jul 3, Dirty Red Barn. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, elephantintheroompub.com.

Flamingo Lounge

Jun 29, Rewind. Jun 30, the Rock and Roll Rhythm Revue. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge Jun 30, John Courage Trio. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Jun 27, Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Orchestra at Temple Square. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Healdsburg Plaza

Jul 3, 5pm, Tuesdays in the Plaza with Trace Repeat. 217 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301.

Hood Mansion Lawn

Jun 29, 5:30pm, Funky Fridays with Stax City. 389 Casa Manana Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.833.6288. funkyfridays. info.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Jun 29, Afrolicious and B-Side Players. Jun 30, Trapeze Worldwide. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Jun 29, Jeff Campbell. Jun 30, Frankie Bourne. Jul 1, 1pm, Brian Belknap. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Jun 30, Adam Schulman Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Juilliard Park

Jul 1, 5pm, Live at Juilliard with Burnside. 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa, srcity.org.

KRSH

Jun 28, 5:30pm, Two Lions Band with Joan Shelly. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.0707.


Lagunitas Tap Room

Main Street Bistro

Sonoma Speakeasy

Jun 28, Aidan Ejumally & the Seared Whiskers. Jun 29, VHS Band. Jun 30, Ten Foot Tone. Jul 1, Sonoma blues jam. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Blue Note Napa

Jun 27, Danielle Nicole. Jun 28, Reed Mathis Trio. Jun 29, Funk Revival Orchestra. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Jun 28, Susan Sutton. Jun 29, Don Olivet Jazz Trio. Jun 30, Levi Lloyd Blues Band. Jul 1, Cazadero Jazz Project. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

The Star

Buster’s Southern Barbecue

Montgomery Village Shopping Center

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Jun 30, 12pm, Petty Theft. Jul 1, 12pm, Garratt Wilkin & the Parrotheads. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

Murphy’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Jun 29, Jay Dub & Dino. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Jun 27, SEVA 40th Anniversary with Dark Star Orchestra. Jun 29, Midtown Social. Jun 30, Slum Village. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

The Phoenix Theater

Jun 29, Mutt with Immortalica and Ancestors Wrath. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Red Brick

Jun 28, Ricardo Peixoto Quintet. Jun 29, Sweet City Blues Band. Jun 30, Batacha Salsa Group. Jul 1, 5pm, Foxes in the Henhouse. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Redwood Cafe

Jun 27, Holus Bolus. Jun 28, the Higher Logic Project. Jun 29, Afrofunk Experience. Jun 30, Pride celebration with Sang Matiz. Jul 1, 5pm, Gypsy Kisses. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Jun 29, Jonathan Poretz. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Jun 30, the Sun Kings. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Rock Star University House of Rock

Jun 30, Lick It Up with Union Jack & the Rippers. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

The Sandman Hotel

Jun 29, 6pm, Sandman Summer Nights with Three for Silver. 3421 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.490.5523.

Jun 28, Northbass presents Staunch & Circumstance with AphroDJZaque & B-Nasty. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.6390. Jun 29, T Sisters and Domenic Bianco. Jun 30, Joe Valley Band. Jul 1, Backyard BBQ with Coffis Brothers & the Mountain Men. Jul 2, the Blues Defenders pro jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Viansa Winery

Jun 30, 11am, Don Trotta. Jul 1, 11am, Sean Carscadden. 25200 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.935.4700.

Windsor Town Green Jun 28, 6pm, McKenna Faith. 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor, townofwindsor.com.

MARIN COUNTY HopMonk Novato

Jun 30, Dallas Caroline. Jul 1, 5pm, cookout concert with Steve Poltz and Lisa Sanders. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

19 Broadway Club

Jun 28, Frankie Bourne Band. Jun 29, Roots Man Project. Jul 1, Elvis Johnson’s blues jam. Jul 3, Blues Champions. Jul 4, Damon LeGall Band. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Rancho Nicasio

Jun 29, the String Rays. Jul 1, BBQ on the lawn with the Blues Broads and Sons of the Soul Revivers. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sweetwater Music Hall Jun 29, Fleetwood Mask. Jun 30, Moonalice with SF Airship acoustic. Jul 1, 5pm, Jerry’s Middle Finger. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Jun 28-Jul 1, moe. with Phil Lesh. Sold-out. Jun 29, Top 40 Friday dance party. Jun 30, Colonel & the Mermaids. Jul 4, 2pm, Fourth of July with Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Jun 30, David Ronconi. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

KEEPING MUSIC IN THE SCHOOLS

Jul 1, 3pm, Groovality with Paul Branin. Jul 4, 3pm, Rob Watson with Vernon Black. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605. Jun 29, One Sharp Mind. Jun 30, Michelle Lambert. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Jun 30, Jon Shannon Williams. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

First United Methodist Church

Jul 3, 6 and 8pm, Oakland Interfaith Gospel Choir. 625 Randolph St, Napa.

Goose & Gander

Jul 1, 1pm, Marty O’Reilly. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

JaM Cellars

Jun 28, Anthony Presti. Jun 29, the Deadlies. 1460 First St, Napa. 707.265.7577.

Lucky Penny Community Arts Center Jun 30, the Dynamic Duet with Daniela Innocenti Beem and Julie Ekoue-Totou. 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Railroad Earth

The Brothers Comatose • Melvin Seals & JGB Royal Jelly Jive • Ron Artis II & The Truth The Sam Chase & The Untraditional Danny Click & The Hell Yeahs • Rainbow Girls The Coffis Brothers & The Mountain Men Afrofunk Experience • La Gente Black Sheep Brass BanD • Mike Saliani Band Dirty Red Barn • The Peach Thieves

Saturday

Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds, Petaluma, Ca TICKETS : WWW.PETALUMAMUSICFESTIVAL.ORG

Lyman Park

Jun 28, 6pm, Tiki Lounge Lizards. 1498 Main St, St Helena. sthelena.com.

Robert Mondavi Winery

Jun 30, Gavin DeGraw with the California Honeydrops. Sold-out. 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 888.766.6328.

Silo’s

Jun 28, Phillip G Smith and the Gentlemen of Jazz. Jun 29-30, Firefall. Jul 4, Fireworks viewing party with the Rhythm Method 4. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

CREATIVE. LOCAL. FRESH.

Jun 28, Chris Isaak. Jun 30, Mary Chapin Carpenter. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Veterans Memorial Park

Jun 29, 6:30pm, Napa City Nights with Jinx Jones and Otis & the Smokestacks. 850 Main St, Napa. napacitynights.com.



w w w . p u b r e p u b l i c U SA . c o m (707) PUB-9090

# f r e s h fa r e

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Jun 27, the Beer Scouts. Jun 28, Travis Hayes Duo. Jun 29, the Tahoes. Jun 30, the Deltaz. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.


Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Gallery Openings

five and under are free. Napa County Fairgrounds, 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga. visitcalistoga. com.

$15-$20 at the gate. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art

Fireworks Over Bodega Bay

The pyrotechnics are viewable from all over the Bay. Jul 1, 9:30pm. Free. Westside Park, Westshore Road, Bodega Bay. visitbodegabayca.org.

Monte Rio Big Rocky Games

Jun 27-Dec 31, “Be Not Still: Living in Uncertain Times,” two-part exhibit continues with featured artists Victor Cartagena, Ranu Mukherjee, Lava Thomas and Lexa Walsh addressing current sociopolitical issues. Reception, Jun 30 at 5pm. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10 to 6. 707.226.5991.

Comedy Aiko Tanaka

Actress and comedian has been seen on “The Howard Stern Show” and appeared in a “Fast & Furious” flick. Jun 30, 7pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Bianca Del Rio

Alter ego of comic Roy Haylock and former winner of “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” is known for her foul mouth and unapologetic humor. Jun 30, 8pm. $39 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Charles Krug Comedy Series

Dog training the with love, natural way not treats Offering:

• private sessions • boot camp

an intensive 3 week in board program with unlimited owner follow-up

TRAINING EVALUATIONS always FREE by appointment We have over 45 years of experience training dogs and their people. From helping you raise a well adjusted puppy to resolving serious behavioral issues—our expertise gets RESULTS!

incrediblecanine.com • 707.322.3272

San Francisco funnyman Paco Romane headlines a night of laughs and wine. Jun 29, 7:30pm. $28. Charles Krug Winery, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.3993.

Comedy at the Blue Note

Hawaii comedy and television star Andy Bumatai performs with guest Kamaka Brown. Jun 30, 7:30 and 9:30pm. $15-$35. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Events Fiesta Mexicana & Jaripeo

Latino cultural celebration features a carnival, Mexican bull riding, live music and food. Jul 1, 2pm. $15-$45; kids

Green Music Center’s Fourth of July Fireworks Spectacular Transcendence Theatre Company presents a showstopping program celebrating the spirit of America before the largest fireworks display in Sonoma County. Jul 4, 7:30pm. $25 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Guerneville Fireworks & Independence Day Celebration Kick off the weekend’s festivities and enjoy fireworks show over the Russian River. Jun 30, 3pm. Downtown Guerneville, Main St, Guerneville. russianriver.com.

Kenwood Fourth of July Hometown Parade

Pancake breakfast, footrace and parade is followed by music, food and fun in the park. Jul 4. Free. Kenwood Plaza Park, 200 Warm Springs Rd, Kenwood.

The Magic of Adam Trent

Immersive entertainment extravaganza of magic, comedy and music will entertain the entire family. Jun 28, 8pm. $29$49. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Marin City Juneteenth Festival

Festival commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States features live entertainment, food, art, fashion and more. Jun 30, 10am. Free admission. George Rocky Graham Park, 850 Drake Ave, Sausalito. marincitycsd.org.

Marin County Fair

It’s “All for One & Fun for All” this year at the fair, with art, agriculture, nightly fireworks and concerts from Michael Franti, the Beach Boys, LeAnn Rimes and others. Jun 30-Jul 4.

Weekend full of fun games for kids, teens and adults includes fireworks on Sunday. Jun 30-Jul 1. Monte Rio Riverfront Meadow, Rocky Beach, Monte Rio. monterio.org.

Napa Fourth of July Celebration

Daylong party begins with a parade, includes a event at Oxbow Commons with music and kids’ activities and concludes with fireworks. Jul 4. Downtown Napa, Second and Scool streets, Napa. donapa.com.

Penngrove Parade & BBQ

Forty-second annual parade down Penngrove’s main street includes BBQ featuring Lagunitas beer, kids activities and live music by Trainwreck Junction in the park. Jul 1, 11am. Free. Penngrove Community Park, 11800 Main St, Penngrove.

Petaluma Fourth of July Celebration

Enjoy live music from the Grain and Highway Poets, local food and beer and kids activities before the grand fireworks display. Jul 4, 5pm. Free admission. Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds, 175 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Red, White & Boom!

Popular event features music by Pat Jordan Band, Wonderbread 5 and others, with local food and kids’ activities, capped off by fireworks. VIP packages available. Jul 4, 3pm. $5-$10/ kids 5 and under are free. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. srboom.com.

Rock the Ride Napa

Join in a fundraising bike ride or walk to help prevent gun violence with local and national leaders on hand. Jun 30. Downtown Yountville, Washington St, Yountville, rocktheridenapa.com.

Sebastopol Fireworks & Music Festival

Kiwanis Club of Sebastopol’s annual event boasts live music


reception featuring a vantage point to see several fireworks displays. Jul 4, 6:45pm. $50/ kids 12-17 are $10. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.5712.

Sonoma Fourth of July Celebration

Fourth of July San Francisco Bay Sailing

St Helena Fourth of July Fireworks Show

Sonoma Plaza Ghost Walking Tour

Old-fashioned parade kicks off a day that honors local heroes and includes games, activities, music and fireworks at dusk. Jul 4, 10am. Free. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.1090.

Bring a picnic and lawn games, and view the fireworks from the baseball field. Jul 4, 9pm. Free. Crane Park, 360 Crane Ave, St Helena, cityofsthelena. org.

Star-Spangled Social

Calistoga’s annual Independence Day celebration comes complete with parade, carnival, food, games, music, and of course, fireworks. Jul 4. $15-$20/ kids 5 and under are free. Napa County Fairgrounds, 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga. visitcalistoga.com.

Summer Nights at RLSM Museum dedicated to writer Robert Louis Stevenson stays open late and serves up refreshments to give the community a chance to experience its offerings. Fri, Jun 29, 5pm. Free admission. Robert Louis Stevenson Museum, 1490 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.3757.

Windsor Kaboom!

Early Independence Day party includes live music by Foreverland and others, with kids activities and fireworks display. Jul 3, 4pm. $5-$10/ kids 2 and under are free. Keiser Park, 700 Windsor River Rd. Windsor, windsorkaboom. com.

Field Trips Fleet Feet Sunset Run

Explore miles of picturesque trails with Fleet Feet Santa Rosa. Jun 28, 6pm. Free. Notre Vue Estate Winery & Vineyard, 11010 Estate Lane, Windsor. 707.433.4050.

Fourth of July Fireworks Hike

Climb the tallest mountain in Sonoma Valley for an evening

Get spectacular views of the Bay with brunch, afternoon or evening sails aboard a schooner ship. Jul 4. Schooner Freda B, Slip 907, Sausalito Yacht Harbor, Sausalito. 4153310444.

Explore the dark but interesting history of Sonoma’s past. Reservations required. Jun 29, 7pm. $28. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. 888.298.6124.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

KRCB Public Media and First 5 Sonoma County present a screening of the documentary about PBS’s popular children’ TV host Fred Rogers. Jul 1, 12pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Food & Drink All-American Zin Day

Film

Multiple wineries celebrate Zinfandel wine with tastings and food pairings. Jun 30, 11am. $55. Dry Creek Valley, various locations, Healdsburg. familywineriesdrycreek.com.

Among Wolves

Bubbles & Bags

Sebastopol Documentary Festival’s “Best of the Fest” series screens the doc about an unorthodox leader of a small-town motorcycle club in Bosnia Herzegovina. Jun 28, 7pm. $12. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Five Seasons

New doc on revolutionary landscape designer Piet Oudolf screens with filmmaker Thomas Piper appearing for Q&A. Jun 30, 4:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222. Jul 1, 6:30pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840. Jul 2, 7:45pm. $10. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Freedom of the Heart

Award-winning doc about film the life of a horse from birth to six months old screens as a fundraiser for the Pony Express’ equine assisted skills for youth. Jun 28, 6pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222.

Green Music Center’s Movies on the Green

Pack a picnic and sit on the lawn at Weill Hall to see the recent animated hit “Coco.” Jun 29, 7pm. Free. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Twelve Pianos

Filmmaker and musician Dean Mermell presents and

21

discusses his documentary about his project with multidisciplinary artist Mauro ffortissimo. Jun 28, 7:15pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

by Buzzy Martin and Volker Strifler with games and relays, food and more. Jul 3, 5:30pm. $5-$10/kids 5 and under are free. Analy High School, 6950 Analy Ave, Sebastopol. 707.824.2300.

Champagne-fueled cornhole tournament features BBQ, DJs and more. Jun 30, 12pm. $50. Korbel Champagne Cellars, 13250 River Rd, Guerneville. 707.824.7000.

Chosen Family Pride BBQ

Bring your chosen family and celebrate Pride month with delicious food, music and community. Jun 27, 5pm. Voices, 714 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. lgbtqconnection. org.

Dinner Under the Redwoods

Forest Unlimited benefit features delicious food, live music, silent auction and a talk on fire ecology by Dr Chad Hanson. Jun 30, 3pm. $45-$60. Anderson Hall, 5240 Bohemian Hwy, Camp Meeker. 707.887.7433.

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Fourth of July on the Wine Train

$20/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

View the Yountville fireworks from the comfort of the train and enjoy a gourmet dinner. Jul 4. $174 and up. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa. 800.427.4124.

SAT JUN 30

TRAPEZE WORLDWIDE + THE KLOWN, MALARKEY, ATOM SMITH

$20–120/DOORS 9/SHOW 10/21+

Learn to cut and package fresh, premium farm-raised meats for your freezer or home dry-aging and take home over $400 of custom-cut meat. Jul 2, 6pm. $450. Napa Valley Cooking School, 1088 College Ave, St Helena. ) 707.967.2901.

22

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Jul 5 • THE EVERLY BROTHERS EXPERIENCE Featuring the Zmed Brothers Jul 19 • MARLEEN VALENTE AND INVASION LATINA

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Aug 2 • LUVPLANET American Rock n Roll Aug 16 • SAN FRANCISCO AIRSHIP Jefferson Airplane Evolution

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JUNE 27- JULY 3, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

Wine Country

Cannasseurs Voted #1

Dispensary/delivery service in the Napa Valley by Bohemian Readers

A E

( 21

Season of Wine & Lavender

The Sonoma Valley estate becomes an ocean of lavender and offers a variety of experiences including winetastings, harvest lunches, celebration dinners and open houses. Book events online now. Through Jul 31. $5-$10 and up. Matanzas Creek Winery, 6097 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. matanzascreek.com.

Spoonbar’s Fourth of July Celebration

Call to find out how you can get your medicine delivered today! 707.363.3291 Check out our menu on weedmaps! 5 star ★★★★★ products and service No doctors recommendation? Get it online through our website and save $10! www.winecountrycollective.com

Enjoy live music from singersongwriter Daisy O’Connor and Spoonbar’s famous fried chicken before heading out to see the fireworks. Jul 4, 4:30pm. Spoonbar, 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

Tacos, Tequila & Trivia Test your knowledge and enjoy an evening in the museum. Jun 29, 6pm. $24-$30. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

For Kids Accredited Investors Opportunity to Invest  in the Sonoma County Dispensary Industry



Invest Locally Majority Employee-Owned Learn about opportunities in the Sonoma County Cannabis Industry by attending our meeting of prospective Sonoma County investors.

Saturday, June 30 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm

Tuesday, July 3 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm

Sonoma Valley Library 755 W. Napa St. Sonoma

1150 State Farm Dr. Santa Rosa



Phone # 707-623-9704 M10-17-0000119-TEMP A10-18-0000177-TEMP

Fourth of July Kids’ Parade & Duck Dash

Youngsters can walk or ride their bikes in a parade and enjoy games including the rubber duck race. Jul 4, 10:30am. Free admission. Healdsburg Plaza, 217 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301.

New World Ballet Summer Arts Camp

World-class guest artists offer courses in various dance styles, percussion and more to kids ages three and up. Scholarship programs available. Through Jun 28 and Through Jul 21. New World Ballet, 905 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.536.9523.

Summer Cyber Security Camp

High school students can get introductory information security training and participate in team competitions and awards. Meals provided. Through Jun 29. Free. SRJC Petaluma Campus, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. petaluma.santarosa.edu/ summer-cyber-camp.

Summer Wonder Camp Camps for children ages five to eight are designed

to be hands-on and full of art, science, exploration and imaginative play. Through Aug 10. $330 per week. Children’s Museum of Sonoma County, 1835 W Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4069.

Readings Book Passage

Jun 27, 7pm, “I Will Be Complete” with Glen David Gold. Jun 29, 7pm, “Ozland” with Wendy Spinale. Jun 30, 11am, “Love Is Love” with Michael Genhart. Jul 2, 7pm, “The Blind Pool” with Paul McHugh. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Carole L Ellis Auditorium

Jul 1, 4pm, “”Let There Be Laughter” with Michael Krasny, in conversation with Isabel Allende. RSVP required. 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma 415.392.5225.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Jun 29, 7pm, “Guardian Angels & Other Monsters” with Daniel H Wilson. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Petaluma Veterans Memorial Hall

Jun 28, 7pm, “The Three Questions” with Don Miguel Ruiz, in conversation with his son, do Jose Ruiz. Includes copy of the book. $40-$50. 1094 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma 707.762.8928.

Theater Broadway Under the Stars

Transcendence Theatre Company’s annual outdoor song and dance performance series kicks off with “Stairway to Paradise,” featuring songs from Broadway and beyond. Pre-show picnics available. Through Jul 1, 5pm. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, transcendencetheatre.org.

Cosmos: Planet Home Fairfax Theatre Company’s original production uses special effects, dance and music to tell the story of the universe. Jun 28-Jul 21. $10-$20. Fairfax Pavilion, 142 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. 415.779.8382.

The Gumshoe Murders

Murder-mystery dinner theater

show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception. Reservations required. Sat, Jun 30, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions.com.

Hamlet

Marin Shakespeare Company presents the epic drama in a contemporary setting in this production directed by Robert Currier. Through Jul 8. $12-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael. marinshakespeare.org.

Honky

Left Edge Theater presents the dark comedy about race, rhetoric and basketball shoes. Through Jul 1. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Illyria

Modern musical take on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” mixes mistaken identities and clever melodies for a romantic tale of hijinks. Through Jul 8. $22-$38. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Shakespeare’s Will

Spirited and sensual imagining of the inner life of Anne Hathaway, Shakespeare’s wife, stars Elena Wright. Through Jul 8. $12-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael. marinshakespeare.org.

Shrek, the Musical

Raven Players presents the music-filled stage show about the unlikely hero. Through Jul 8. $10-$35. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Straight White Men

When Ed and his three adult sons come together to celebrate Christmas, they confront issues about identity and privilege. Through Jul 8. $10-$49. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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For the week of June 27

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Your best ideas and soundest decisions will materialize as if by magic while you’re lounging around doing nothing in a worryfree environment. So please make sure you have an abundance of relaxed slack and unhurried grace. Treat yourself to record-setting levels of comfort and selfcare. Do whatever’s necessary for you to feel as safe as you have ever felt. I realize these prescriptions might ostensibly clash with your fiery Aries nature. But if you meditate on them for even two minutes, I bet you’ll agree they’re exquisitely appropriate for you right now. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“It is always what is under pressure in us, especially under pressure of concealment—that explodes in poetry.” Taurus poet Adrienne Rich wrote that in an essay about the poet Emily Dickinson. She was describing the process of tapping into potent but buried feelings so as to create beautiful works of literature. I’m hoping to persuade you to take a comparable approach: to give voice to what’s under pressure inside you, but in a graceful and constructive way that has positive results.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Introductory offers are expiring. The bracing thrills of novelty must ripen into the cool enjoyments of maturity. It’s time to finish the dress rehearsals so the actual show can begin. You’ve got to start turning big, bright fantasies into crisp, no-nonsense realities. In light of these shifting conditions, I suspect you can no longer use your good intentions as leverage, but must deliver more tangible signs of commitment. Please don’t take this as a criticism, but the cosmic machinery in your vicinity needs some actual oil, not just your witty stories about the oil and the cosmic machinery. CANCER (June 21–July 22) In the coming weeks, you will have an excellent chance to dramatically decrease your Wimp Quotient. As the perilously passive parts of your niceness toughen up, I bet you will encounter brisk possibilities that were previously off-limits or invisible to you. To ensure you remain in top shape for this delightful development, I think you should avoid entertainment that stimulates fear and pessimism. Instead of watching the latest flurry of demoralizing stories on Netflix, spend quality time summoning memories of the times in your life when you were unbeatable. For extra credit, pump your fist 10 times each day as you growl, “Victory is mine!” LEO (July 23–August 22) It’s not so bad to temporarily lose your bearings. What’s bad is not capitalizing on the disruption that caused you to lose your bearings. So I propose that you regard the fresh commotion as a blessing. Use it as motivation to initiate radical changes. For example, escape the illusions and deceptions that caused you to lose your bearings. Explore unruly emotions that may be at the root of the superpowers you will fully develop in the future. Transform yourself into a brave self-healer who is newly receptive to a host of medicinal clues that were not previously accessible.

BY ROB BREZSNY

Jean-Paul Sartre: “We only become what we are by the radical and deep-seated refusal of that which others have made us.”

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

André René Roussimoff, also known as André the Giant, was a French actor and professional wrestler. He was 7 feet, 4 inches tall and weighed 520 pounds. As you might imagine, he ate and drank extravagantly. On one festive occasion, he quaffed 119 bottles of beer in six hours. Judging from your current astrological indicators, Scorpio, I suspect you may be ready for a binge like that. JUST KIDDING! I sincerely hope you won’t indulge in such wasteful forms of “pleasure.” The coming days should be a time when you engage in a focused pursuit of uplifting and healthy modes of bliss. The point is to seek gusto and amusement that enhance your body, mind, and soul.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

On her 90th birthday, my Great-Aunt Zosia told me, “The best gift you can give your ego is to make it see it’s both totally insignificant and totally important in the cosmic scheme of things.” Jenna, my girlfriend when I was 19, was perhaps touting a similar principle when, after teasing and tormenting me for two hours, she scrawled on my bathroom mirror in lipstick, “Sometimes you enjoy life better if you don’t understand it.” Then there’s my Zen punk friend Arturo, who says that life’s goodies are more likely to flow your way if you “hope for nothing and are open to everything.” According to my analysis of the astrological rhythms, these messages will help you make the most of the bewildering but succulent opportunities that are now arriving in your vicinity.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) In accordance with the astrological beacons, I have selected two pieces of advice to serve as your guiding meditations during the next seven weeks. You might want to write them on a piece of paper that you will carry in your wallet or pocket. Here’s the first, from businessman Alan Cohen: “Only those who ask for more can get more, and only those who know there is more, ask.” Here’s the second, from writer G. K. Chesterton: “We need to be happy in this wonderland without once being merely comfortable.” AQUARIUS (January 20–February18) Ecologists in Mexico City investigated why certain sparrows and finches use humans’ discarded cigarette butts in building their nests. They found that cellulose acetate, a chemical in the butts, protects the nests by repelling parasitic mites. Is there a metaphorical lesson you might draw from the birds’ ingenious adaptation, Aquarius? Could you find good use for what might seem to be dross or debris? My analysis of the astrological omens says that this possibility is worth meditating on. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Here’s my list of demands: 1. Avoid hanging out with people who are unreceptive to your influence. 2. Avoid hanging out with people whose influence on you is mediocre or dispiriting. 3. Hang out with people who are receptive to your influence and whose influence on you is healthy and stimulating. 4. Influence the hell out of the people who are receptive to your influence. Be a generous catalyst for them. Nudge them to surpass the limits they would benefit from surpassing. 5. Allow yourself to be deeply moved by people whose influence on you is healthy and stimulating.

I suspect that sometime soon you will come into possession of an enchanted potion or pixie dust or a pouch full of magic beans—or the equivalent. If and when that occurs, consider the following protocols: 1. Before you use your new treasure, say a prayer to your higher self, requesting that you will be guided to use it in such a way as to make yourself wiser and kinder. 2. When you use it, be sure it harms no one. 3. Express gratitude for it before and during and after using it. 4. Use it in such a way that it benefits at least one other person or creature in addition to you. 5. See if you can use it to generate the arrival or more pixie dust or magical beans or enchanted potion in the future. 6. When you use it, focus on wielding it to get exactly what you want, not what you sort of want or temporarily want.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) “If I didn’t define myself for myself, I would be crunched into other people’s fantasies for me and eaten alive.” Activist author Audre Lorde said that, and now, in accordance with your current astrological and psychological needs, I’m offering it to you. I realize it’s a flamboyant, even extreme, declaration, but in my opinion, that’s what is most likely to motivate you to do the right thing. Here’s another splashy prompt, courtesy of philosopher

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

JUNE 27- JULY 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

out position from Tuesday to Friday, including childcare and light housekeeping. Must be good with children, English speaking, and non-smoking. $ 750/weekly. You can contact me by email: claudiapredacoop1960@gmail.com or phone: 240.353.0799

Fixe r hom e

Astrology

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN |

Classifieds

FREE WILL


y Oliver’s Own y

Fruit

Pies

For the first time ever, we’re proud to offer our house made Oliver’s

Own seasonal pies. Handcrafted in our Windsor bakery commissary, we are excited to feature two delicious Apple Pies, Lattice or Streusel-Topped, or tangy bright Sour Cherry Pie.

Tender crusts, glistening fruit, buttery-crisp

Real Food. Real People.

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streusel, what’s not to celebrate? It’s “pie” time you come in and try them all.

We Will Be Open 7am to 9pm On the 4th of July 9230 Old Redwood Highway • Windsor • 687-2050 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123 | 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530

Profile for Metro Publishing

North Bay Bohemian 1826  

June 27-July 3, 2018

North Bay Bohemian 1826  

June 27-July 3, 2018