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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | JUNE 13-19, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 40.04

THE GRILL GUIDE COMBING THE NORTH BAY FOR THE BEST BBQ INGREDIENTS P13

SHERIFF-ELECT P8 BERNIE & THE BELIEVERS P17 ‘HONKY’ P19


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Bohemian

Editor

Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor

Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Arts Editor

Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Copy Editor

Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Contributors

Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Harry Duke, James Knight, Jonah Raskin, Tom Tomorrow, Flora Tsapovsky

Interns

Amelia Malpas, Alex T. Randolph

Design Director Kara Brown

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2014 Metrosa Inc. Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2018 Metrosa Inc.

Cover illustration by Raisa Yavneh. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

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Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Swirl p12 Cover Feature p13 Culture Crush p16

Arts & Ideas p17 Stage p19 Film p20 Clubs & Concerts p21 Arts & Events p23

The Nugget p26 Classified p27 Astrology p27

ABOUT THE COVER ARTIST Raisa Yavneh is an Occidental-based illustrator. She has worked on a range of projects from maps to murals to anatomical illustrations. In her free time, she enjoys walking through the redwoods and scanning the night sky for UFOs. Find her at raisayavneh.com and on Instagram @dumptruck.jpg.


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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Head Spinner

of pants (he thought his were poisoned); offer to get him a blanket; wait him out.

A recent article in the Press Democrat about Branch Wroth’s Taser death by Rohnert Park police officers caused me to tremble with a mixture of anger and sadness. As I delved further into the article, my head began to spin as a plethora of potential remedies for peaceful resolution flooded my mind. Here’s a partial list: summon the mental-health crisis unit (which, we recently were informed by a separate article, serves the Highway 101 corridor); call an ambulance; buy him a new pair

One fact that must be highlighted above all others is that Wroth was inside a motel room and wasn’t posing an immediate threat to anyone. But he was experiencing a mental breakdown, for which he desperately needed professional help. I will leave you with this question: Has the state’s sanctity and respect for human life really degenerated to such a low point that expedience of process has become the preferred alternative to

THIS MODERN WORLD

careful, compassionate and meticulous preservation of a human life?

THOMAS DAVID BONFIGLI

Sebastopol

Dirty Downtown What is happening in downtown Santa Rosa? We have an $11 million square, yet the surrounding streets are strewn with garbage, broken glass, cardboard boxes flattened from where the homeless slept or will be sleeping. I’ve had to walk around puke and human

By Tom Tomorrow

waste, and I honestly don’t want to touch a thing downtown. Seems insane that parking prices and hours increased, the meter maids issue hundreds of tickets per day, events at the square generate thousands of dollars, and you’d think Santa Rosa could afford a cleanup crew on a daily basis. I know I’m supposed to feel good about coming downtown, but I don’t. Business owners should display more care outside of their doors.

MADALYN BRASHER

Santa Rosa

Inequities Last Monday night, I attended the Sonoma County Rises Summit on Equity, Recovery & Resilience. While waiting for the auditorium doors to open, I had the opportunity to chat with a woman (whom I’ll call Annie). She said that she has a nine-year-old daughter and has a full-time job. Despite the fact that she wishes she could afford to live in Sonoma County, she hasn’t the means to do so—hence, her homelessness. Annie has a support system in San Joaquin Valley, but the Sonoma County Court has ordered her to stay in Sonoma County because her daughter’s father shares custody of their daughter. She has sought help from agencies throughout Sonoma County but is stuck: she can’t afford to live here but has been ordered to stay here. I shared Annie’s story with a friend at the summit. I told him I felt guilty. He asked me if I felt guilty because I’m not homeless. Upon reflection, I said I felt guilty because I couldn’t offer her any resources she hadn’t already tried to help her get out of her dilemma. I guess I’m confused. The word “equity” kept coming up in the summit.

KATE JENKINS

Executive director, Friends Outside in Sonoma County Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants When does a letter to the editor go too far? BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he Bohemian’s letters and opinion pages, appropriately called “Rhapsodies & Rants,” is a free speech forum that invites community views and a wide range of perspectives. Sometimes a rant can create awareness of an issue worth considering. The counterpoint to that is that extremist views, without context or response, can legitimize dangerous extremism.

Two letters to the editor that appeared in our May 16 issue may have crossed a line. The letters were written in response to a May 9 cover story by Tom Gogola about Republican senatorial candidate and anti-Semite Patrick Little, titled “Elephant in the Room.” The letters took aim at ethnic groups and have been called to our attention as doing nothing to promote a civil public discourse. One letter by a writer who identified himself as a Korean-American wrote that he found Koreans and Korean-Americans “bigoted, ignorant and selfishly indifferent.” The second letter attacked Jewish influence on the American political system and named a number of Jewish individuals. In retrospect, we should have not published either letter. Neither offered a reasonable argument or advanced a civil public discourse. To argue that any one group of Americans is less American than another, that all members of a group think alike or that anyone should be removed from participating in the democratic system, is repugnant. Bohemian letters must be free of libel, personal attacks or calls to violence. There is value in airing letters that some readers will find distressing. After all, the First Amendment is not for the protection of pleasantries. It’s for the protection of speech that some—or many—may find offensive. But there is no public service in promoting irresponsible, closed-minded thinking. Thanks in part to President Donald Trump’s flame-fanning rhetoric, white nationalism has emerged from its dark corner and into the light. The internet is awash with trolls spewing vitriol and emboldened by anonymity. While inflammatory discourse has become more common and acceptable, we’ll seek to keep our pages more constructive in the future by being more vigilant against hate speech.

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Paper THE

TOP COP Mark Essick says effective community policing would require 10,000 new deputies.

The Road Ahead Sheriff-elect Mark Essick charts course

I

t’s a sunny Friday morning on Railroad Square in downtown Santa Rosa, and sheriffelect Mark Essick is about to spend the day removing his large and numerously deployed campaign signs from around the county.

The newly elected sheriff of Sonoma County surprised everyone at the polls earlier in the week when he gained 57 percent

of the vote in a three-way race against former L.A. police captain John Mutz and Santa Rosa councilman Ernesto Olivares. As he eclipsed 50 percent of the vote on primary day, Essick was elected to his new post outright without a runoff in November. Today Essick is dressed casually in a San Francisco Giants T-shirt, jeans and a baseball cap as he sits before a big mug of coffee at the Flying Goat cafe and fields questions. Essick, 48, won’t

BY TOM GOGOLA take office until January, and next week he’s going on vacation. It’s been a long campaign season, but now it’s over. His pickup truck is in the parking lot, awaiting the piles of signage that were seemingly everywhere this spring as Sonoma County had its first contested sheriff’s race in a quarter century. Essick has been on the force of the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) for about that long, and as a manager, he’s been the

Courtesy of Mark Essick

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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point person on mental-health training for officers. He says the two biggest budget issues he’ll likely face when he takes office are both related to dealing with a shifting demographic at the Main Adult Detention Facility and the preponderance of mentally ill inmates at the jail. Today, some 40 percent of inmates suffer from one form of mental illness or another, “which is crazy,” Essick says. The state’s “realignment” approach to dealing with its overcrowded prisons by moving them into county lockups now means that the SCSO is dealing with an older and sicker demographic at the jail, whose traditional demographic, Essick says, was typically a young person doing a short bid at the jail on a misdemeanor charge. The state provided funds for localities to deal with fallout from realignment, and Sonoma County decided to put its $40 million in state realignment money into a new Behavior Health Unit (BHU), scheduled to break ground in late summer and be completed in about a year. The county is kicking in an additional $8 million, but it’s also been shedding mental-health workers in a climate of post-fire belt-tightening, and Essick has taken notice. “I have spent the last 10 years of my career training officers on this, creating these partnerships between our agency and Behavioral Health, and to have those people evaporate is going to be a huge impact on us.” And Essick says he’ll need to staff up the BHU when it’s completed. “We have calculated that we’ll need 24 additional correctional deputies to staff the BHU, so we are going to have to go back to the [board of supervisors] and ask for some additional allocations to staff that,” he says. “I could see myself going before the board of supervisors in the next year or so as sheriff and saying, ‘This was a great idea, we spent all of this money on it, and don’t forget— now we have to staff it.’” Essick will also be charged to continue to implement statemandated training required annually by the state of ) 10 California Commission


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10 Mark Essick ( 8 on Peace Officer Standards and Training. “Any police organization today runs so thin on staffing that every time we take someone off the line to train them, at least 80 percent of the time we have to backfill it with overtime.” During the campaign, Essick was pegged by opponents and detractors as an SCSO insider who couldn’t deliver on necessary reforms at the agency and who would continue an SCSO “culture” that’s been under fire for years. Critics argue that those “cultural” issues—a generally white and male force—came to a tragic head when a sheriff’s officer shot and killed a 13-yearold Latino boy in 2013. Any past progress in building community relations went out the window following the shooting. But the Andy Lopez shooting did prompt a series of reforms at SCSO, some of which Essick opposed at the time they were implemented, such as the creation of the Independent Office of Law Enforcement Review and Outreach. There’s also a direct line that can be drawn between the Lopez shooting and the creation of a new community engagement post at SCSO occupied by Misti Harris. During the campaign, all the candidates highlighted the need for better recruitment of women and minorities into the force. You can’t just stick an ad in the Latino community newspaper anymore, Essick says. “You have to do more,” and he pledges to do so in conjunction with the county’s Human Resources Department. Essick is well aware of the challenges ahead in rebuilding trust in Latino and police accountability circles in Sonoma County. If it’s a truism that all policing is community policing, those challenges are as much a matter of practicality as they are a sort of moral imperative to, as Essick puts it, keep extending the healing hand. As a practical matter, to fully engage in “community policing” in Sonoma County would require

about another 10,000 officers on the beat, he says. “That is the challenge for us,” he says, “and not just because we’ve kind of drifted off that course in the last six years, but also because the beat-cop mentality is way easier to do when you have a downtown core, when you have bikes, foot patrols. “In Sonoma County, we have about 20 distinct communities, and it would be my dream if we could have a communitypolicing presence in all those communities. I see that as a challenge. Guerneville is great because we have a substation there, but we don’t have one in Geyserville or Penngrove—and wouldn’t it be cool if we did?” Essick’s election comes at a moment when law enforcement agencies across the country are re-examining tried-and-truisms around policing, especially when it comes to use-of-force issues. Longstanding police protocols, such as the “21-foot rule” and the principle of “drawing a line in the sand” when dealing with perpetrators, are being reexamined, if not outright set aside, as agencies incorporate de-escalation tactics into their training protocols and work to enhance communication between officers and the communities they serve. The 21-foot rule delineates a line where a perpetrator, even if unarmed, is in a position to attack a peace officer, and a 2016 Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) recommendation highlights that de-escalation training is a necessary precondition to eliminating the old rules and traditions. Essick gives props to Mutz and Olivares for raising diversity and de-escalation training issues in the campaign. Throughout the campaign, Essick identified a very tricky nexus point of homelessness, mental illness and use of force as he waded into issues raised by the PERF study, which called for use-of-force reform, highlighted communication as a prime de-

escalation strategy, and that encouraged more training in mental-health for officers, “crisis intervention training” or CIT. As a trainer, Essick’s speciality is CIT. Essick may be the new sheriff in town, but he’s also just a regular guy. He grew up in Novato and listened to Def Leppard and AC/ DC as a kid, and says his first concert ever was AC/DC at the Cow Palace. He graduated high school in 1988 and is married with two kids. On his downtime, he likes to go camping with his wife, bicycling with his son, and says he attends the Healdsburg Community Church, a halfPresbyterian and halfMethodist house of worship which he’s been going to for three years. “I grew up in a family that was absolutely non-religious,” Essick says. “We never went to church, and I was a non-church-going person for the first 45 years of my life, though I wasn’t against it or anything.” That changed when Essick and his wife were on the edge of being empty-nesters (their children are 19 and 21 years old), and all the various communityservice activities they’d done that involved their children “started to evaporate for us,” Essick says. “My wife and I were having dinner one night, and I said, ‘I’d kind of like to check out going to church.’ And she said, ‘Yeah, let’s check that out.’ It was very natural for us, this next step to serve our community. We’d heard from friends about the Healdsburg Community Church, a husbandand-wife team are the pastors, and the first time we went—the subject was forgiveness. Someone came to Jesus and said, ‘How many times are you going to forgive that person for his wrongdoing?’ And Jesus says something to the effect of, ‘I will never stop forgiving him.’” Essick pauses. “Look, I’m not a person who can quote you chapters from the Bible, I’m just

‘We are always in a process of learning about ourselves.’

not, but they talk about Jesus washing the feet of the Samaritans, and at that point, the Samaritans were the under-people, they were the dregs of society, and Jesus would wash their feet. People said, ‘Why are you doing that?’ Service. And my mentality on that is you never stop. You always have to take the higher road, look for the sunny side of the situation and keep extending the hand. If it gets batted away, take a different route.” During the campaign, Essick took some heat for his departure from the Republican Party, which his opponents framed as a matter of political expediency. But Essick describes himself as a moderate who has voted for Democratic and Republican candidates. As the father of a 19-year-old daughter, he says he left the Republican Party after Trump was elected, because the party left him. “I’ve always voted my conscience,” he says, noting that he’s been a member of both parties over his lifetime. “As a Democrat, I probably voted for Republicans, and as I Republican, I’ve supported Democrats. I voted for President Obama, and I have no problem saying that. I was really disappointed in the way Trump talked about women. Really disappointed. I thought the Republican Party was the party of moderation, but it’s not.” Essick later notes that his daughter’s career objective is to work a position similar to the one held by Misti Harris, whose job was created in the aftermath of the Lopez shooting. “We all evolve,” Essick says, as he reflects on a hard-fought campaign. “Of the hundreds of people I met during the campaign, one or two of them stood out as jerks, but mostly they were really, really good people, and having them come up to me and say, ‘I want to support you, but here is what is important to me,’ hearing that perspective, definitely enlightened me. We are always in a process of learning about ourselves, evolving as humans, and if I can be more compassionate, more understanding, that’s a work in progress that I’d like to get to.”


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Four takes on four Zinfandel wines BY JAMES KNIGHT

S

omewhere in between Mother’s Day and the Fourth of July—between brunch and barbecue—rosé season transitions to Zinfandel season. If it’s Father’s Day that marks the turn, all the more apropos for the granddaddy of California wine.

Zin is at home in the North Bay. Sonoma County is, in terms of Zinfandel acreage, a distant second to San Joaquin County, home to some pretty decent Lodi Zinfandel, and maybe a portion of the Central Valley’s inland sea of white Zinfandel. But Zin’s good reputation for red wine quality, outside of a few notable spots around the state, has a more than 150-year record here. The Kenwood Vineyards 2014 Sonoma County Zinfandel ($18) may be the kind

of uncomplicated, tangy and redfruited hamburger washer that many people think about when they think Zin, but it’s just the beginning. Zin has classic style. Kenwood’s 2013 Six Ridges Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel ($26) is the epitome of that valley’s Zin style. Wine-soaked wood and Mexican chocolate spices, cinnamon and vanilla, kick up a blackberry-flavored sipper that’s not too tangy, not too tannic— just right. Zin has historicity. A darker, more brooding Zin, if you will, Kenwood’s 2014 Jack London Vineyard Sonoma Mountain Zinfandel ($28), comes from the northeast-facing flank of a dark, brooding mountain. This wine teases with fruit and spice scents of raspberry and bergamot— patchouli, maybe—and with fanciful notions of Jack London, vintner, which he was not. However, much of the red wine enjoyed by the author and other Californians around the turn of the previous century was certainly Zinfandel. Here, a wave of sweet red berry flavor carries furry tannins across the tongue. Zin has backup. Although the Sidebar Cellars 2016 Russian River Valley Zinfandel ($28) contains less Zin than the previous vintage, which was labeled as a “red blend,” with 78 percent it makes the varietal cut (75 percent is required by law), so why not? Part of the charm, but also the intangible value, of oldvine Zinfandel plantings is that they include a seemingly random hodgepodge of accessory vines. This wine comes from a vineyard originally planted in 1890, and contains Petite Sirah, a common companion to Zinfandel, along with some real outliers like Beclan, Peloursin, Plavac Mali, Palomino and Monbadon. An unusually large fraction of Alicante Bouschet contributes color to this wine, which seems also aromatic of purple ink, along with oily oak, Graham cracker and chocolate biscuit. Why all of those other grapes? Well, in this wine the combination makes for a palatecoating yet surprisingly supple mix of blackcurrant and boysenberry liqueur flavors—maybe those forefathers knew best, after all.


Burger Let the North Bay be your oyster as you create a backyard feast BY TOM GOGOLA, STETT HOLBROOK AND FLORA TSAPOVSKY

W

hile there are plenty of North Bay restaurants that do burgers and barbecue very well, summer wouldn’t be summer without your own backyard cook-out. You could run to the grocery store for a one-stop shop for all your barbecue needs, but this being the food and drink paradise of North Bay, you can turn your cookout into a showcase of all the great homegrown ingredients the region has to offer. ) 14

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Building a Better

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NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14 Burger ( 13

What follows is our grilling dream team of all the best fixings— meat, cheese, buns, pickles, condiments and even fuel from across the North Bay. We know it’s unlikely you’ll travel the region to acquire all these provisions, but isn’t cool to know you could? Even if you just pick up a few of these signature ingredients and products, you’re sure to elevate your grilling game. Of course, there are more than a few wine and beer choices in the North Bay. We’ll leave the part up to you, but do check out James Knight’s rundown of barbecuefriendly Zinfandel in this week’s Swirl (p12). So here’s to summer, friends and good local food on the grill!

The Meat of the Matter You have to start with the best, which is why a proper North Bay grill fest must honor the sturdy and multi-platform meat emporium that is Marin Sun Farms. Right out of the gate, the grillable ground beef is consistently leaps and bounds beyond the corporate ground chuck routine, with all of that allowable water content and antibiotic back-bite. Blech. A typical Marin Sun burger, drawn from humane pastures and dales, has hints of sirloin to go with a juicy, bloody disposition that is at once all-natural and viscerally pleasurable. The Marin Sun Farms corporate philosophy is just right: all their animals are pasture-raised on a local family farm, the cows are lovingly embraced until their last and final date with destiny, and the fat-to-meat ratio is absolutely exquisite when it comes to grillability. The North Bay staple sells chickens and lamb, too, and operates a restaurant and butcher shop in Point Reyes Station and also in Oakland. It’s worth noting that the Marin Sun Petaluma abattoir is the only one in the Bay Area, and that ain’t no slaughterhouse jive. May the Marin Sun forever shine on your barbecue. marinsunfarms.com.

In scenic Tomales, Stemple Creek Ranch has been in the Poncia family for four generations. The beef here is certified organic, grass-fed and grass-finished. For hamburger lovers, gift boxes are ready for purchase online; premade patties supplemented with smoked maple bacon or, if you prefer to ground it yourself, various cuts can be shipped as well. For a face-to-face meat encounter, head to the website to find a list of retailers and farmers markets, many of them in Marin County. stemplecreek. com. Sebastopol’s Green Star Farm is just what you want it to be: a diversified, pasture-based operation on several rolling acres overseen by conscientious farmers Sarah Silva and Marc Felton. The pigs, goats, chicken and sheep live a good life, while a pair of on-point cattle dogs keep any of the critters from straying too far. Pasture-based means just that—the animals scratch, forage and root about as they were born to do. No cages here. You’ll find Green Star’s stuff at the Sebastopol farmers market and Andy’s Market; for extra convenience, there is Green Star meat subscription—a box of protein delivered to your door throughout California or available at five pick-up locations in Sonoma County. Feeding a crowd? Whole animal available for sale. Go whole hog! greenstarfarm.com.

and different pastries. While a good portion of its business is wholesale, the storefront supplies the customers with pillowy, soft hamburger buns that make perfect bookends for sophisticated hamburgers. There’s onion, seeded brioche, multi-seed and even whole wheat, plus your old-school plain. bordenavesbakery.com. Seems like no matter we go these days, Ray’s Delicatessen and Tavern in Petaluma keeps popping up as the place with the softinside, kind-ofcrunchy-outside rolls, baked on-site and, not coincidentally, known as a Ray’s Roll on the menu. Ray’s has been around since grandpa met Douglas MacArthur on a bomb-cratered Micronesian airstrip—which is to say it’s been in business since 1946. The joint has hole-in-the-wall appeal in Petaluma, and the menu is chocked with sandos loaded down with local ingredients and juicy meats—Reubens, Rachels, corned beef. You need a sturdy roll to stand up to a proper Reuben, and Ray’s has bragging rights. The funny thing about Ray’s is that the only burger on the menu is a veggie burger slathered with a pesto Aioli. Skip the sawdust patty, can we get a tub of that to go? rays-deli.com.

Live a little and float a frond on your buger.

Hamburger Buns

San Rafael’s Bordenave’s bakery celebrated its 100th anniversary this year, marking its 1918 inception by French immigrant Frank Bordenave. Originally, Bordenave was exclusively into French-style sourdough, but with the years, the bakery’s selection has grown to include hamburger and hot dog buns, croissants

Cheese Please

It’s hard not to appreciate the melting qualities and childhood memories inspired by a molten slice of Kraft cheese draped over a burger patty. But given that we live in a dairy dreamland of artisanal cheesemakers, it seems downright ungrateful to not reach for one of the North Bay’s great homegrown cheeses. We like the tang of a cheddar and blue cheese. First choice is St. Jorge cheese from Santa Rosa’s

Joe Matos Cheese Factory. It’s full-flavored and melts like a champ. Best is the trip out a dirt road to the no-frills creamery off Llano Road. This is real deal. facebook.com/Joe-Matos-CheeseFactory-1530291580548953. Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co. reigns supreme in the blue category. A generous crumble of the salty, funky goodness takes your burger to another level. Established in 2000, the farm and creamery is the heritage business of the Giacomini family, originally from Northern Italy. The cheese is made on a farm in West Marin, under the supervision of head cheesemaker Kuba Hemmerling, and is made with unpasteurized cow’s milk. For a punch of flavor, go for the Original Blue, the winner of many regional and nationwide awards. For a more delicate touch on your patty, opt for Bay Blue, a rustic, mildly moldy cheese reminiscent of Stilton. pointreyescheese.com.

Pick a Pickle Hey, we’re pretty much regular folks, just like the next red-blooded American on a fixed North Bay income, and we’re not the type to turn our noses up at adequate supermarket-aisle dill pickles, or humble yellow mustard out of the squeeze-bottle, for that matter. But there’s no getting around it: Sonoma Brinery does bring out our inner topping snob—it is priced to do so, after all—and, in a moment of culinary punk-rock reminiscent of the late Anthony Bourdain, the company has us reaching for a square tub of their probiotic sauerkraut, too. Tell us where it says you can’t put sauerkraut on a hamburger? We’re headed to parts unknown in your honor, Tony. sonomabrinery.com. Purists might claim that a quality patty needs no company, but we commoners know that condiments, pickles and additions just make a good hamburger better. At Pig in a Pickle, a fullflung barbecue spot in Corte Madera, condiments, barbecue sauces and pickles are made inhouse and available to be taken home for your grill party. Chef Damon Steinbrook is behind all of


Lettuce, Tomato, Onion As we plunder our burger for its local source code, ingredient hackers on alert for the freshest local toppings, let us turn our attention to greenery as rendered at Big Mesa Farm, which offers 10 acres of organic industriousness where one can at once glamp and spend some time in the fields picking lettuce. A typically crispy cornucopia from Big Mesa includes the classic red leaf, and wee heads of crunchy little gem. Live a little and float a frond of each on your burger. Big Mesa sells around the North Bay, and their produce is in use at Farm Burger in San Anselmo, in case there was any question about burger-friendliness when it comes to Big Mesa lettuce. bigmesafarm.com. Need more fresh goodness? Little Wing Farm is back in action after a devastating fire and now operates an honor-system farm stand in the shadow of Black Mountain along Pt. ReyesPetaluma Road. See if proprietor Molly Myerson has some seasonal tomatoes or onions to round out the trifecta of vegetative toppings. While it’s early in the season yet, be on the lookout for dryfarmed tomatoes from Santa Rosa’s Quetzal Farm. The stingy application of water means the tomatoes must dig deep

for hydration. The result is an uncommonly intense, umamiloaded, beefy tasting tomato that is fantastic on a burger or great all by itself. localharvest.org/quetzalfarm-M3969.

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June 20-24

Get Saucy A burger slopped with spicy baked beans sounds good right about now, especially if it’s topped with smoked bacon and a few splashes of the hyperlocal barbecue sauce Saucin’. This silky, tangy ’cue sauce is courtesy of Santa Rosan Matt Werle, who’s also a California highway patrolman, family man and Overseer of the Family Grill. This is a family recipe, produced by a family business, available at Pacific Market and elsewhere. saucinsauces.com. Now, for a no-nonsense, locally rendered hot sauce, any respectable grill-meister with an ear tuned to the diverse splendor of the North Bay has to go with Tia Lupita. The hot sauce is the labor of love of Tiburon’s Hector Salvidar, who named his sauce after his mother, and whose online business presence comes complete with the cheering hashtag #makehotsaucegreatagain. Salvidar, who hails from Sacramento by way of Mexico, offers his tongue-tickling tincture at Oliver’s Market and elsewhere around the region. tialupitahotsauce.com.

PETALUMA, CA

SONOMA-MARIN FAIR Pay-One-Price! Admission Includes Carnival & Concerts Concert Series

June 20 - En Vogue June 22 - 38 Special Petaluma Stage at 8:00 pm June 21 - Clay Walker June 23 - Smash Mouth

Fuel for the Fire Charcoal and gas are fine, but given that the North Bay is wine and apple country, why not add the very essence of those signature crops to your cookout? Apple wood is a superior fuel for grilling burgers and just about anything else. Apple-wood grilled salmon is sublime. Grape wood, gathered from vine cuttings or an uprooted vine, excels as a smoking wood but is best for grilling. As you serve an apple- or grapewood grilled burger, ask your guests if they can pick up the taste of the North Bay. Finding a farmer who will sell you some wood makes for a good gatherround-the-barby story.

Fiesta latina - June 24 Sprint Car Races North Bay Discovery Science Day Butterfly Experience Thrilling Carnival Entertainment Live Music & Wine Tasting Games & Contests Delicious Fair Food Barnyard Animals & More!

FA I R

Details at Sonoma-MarinFair.org

FA I R

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

the creations, from the rubs to the pickles, and you can trust his judgment: among the chef’s career stints are a grill cook at barbecue-centric One Market Restaurant in San Francisco and a sous chef position under Thomas Keller at the iconic French Laundry. At Pig in a Pickle, though, Steinbrook sticks to the basics and does it remarkably well. Start with the sauces, each inspired by a region from the South: there’s a Memphis-style sauce, a mustard sauce from South Carolina, a tangy North Carolina condiment and a habañero Alabama white sauce. Then, take home a few jars of pickles and maybe even a homemade kombucha to cool yourself down before the hot sauces hit the burger. piginapickle.com.


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Crush CULTURE

HEALDSBURG

The week’s events: a selective guide

Showcase Weekend

Benefiting the Healdsburg Center for the Arts, the threeday Healdsburg Art Food Wine event boasts all things artisanal, as local and international artists are displayed in several galleries with the best food and wine from the region on hand. From a kick-off cocktail party near the Healdsburg Plaza to art tours of Oliver Ranch and Chalk Hill Road wineries, and evening receptions at locales like Geyserville’s Dallas Saunders Gallery and downtown Healdsburg’s ÆRENA Galleries & Gardens, there’s something to satisfy art lovers of every taste. Thursday to Saturday, June 14–16, at several locations. Times and prices vary. healdsburgartfoodwine.com.

C O TAT I

New Tradition After 37 years of the Cotati Jazz Festival, the town and its chamber of commerce are updating their agenda and expanding on the concert concept with this summer’s inaugural Cotati Music Festival. Celebrating Cotati as a varied and vibrant musical hub, the new festival features performances from Sonoma County rock ’n’ roll, Americana and rockabilly acts like the John Courage Trio, Highway Poets, Danny Sorentino and Derek Irving. Local food, wine and beer will flow, and families are invited to spend a day grooving to the music on Saturday, June 16, at La Plaza Park in downtown Cotati. Noon to 6pm. Free admission. cotati.org.

R&B QUEENS Platinum-selling group En Vogue open the Sonoma-Marin Fair with a concert on June 20 in Petaluma. See Events, p24.

N A PA

Hop On The Wine Train has long been a popular tasting tour of the Napa Valley for wine aficionados, but the valley is branching out into the microbrew scene and the train is switching tracks for the new Hop Train weekly riding event. Think of it as a tap takeover on the rails, as Napa Palisades Beer Company hops aboard and brings a couple kegs with them to serve their Gold Rush Red, Loco IPA and other selections alongside small bites in an open-air car. Hop to it on Monday, June 18, 1275 McKinstry St., Napa. 5pm. $75. winetrain.com.

P E TA L U M A

Pedal Party Bicycling is an everyday activity in communities across the North Bay, and it’s thanks in part to the work of organizations like Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition, which promotes bicycling in and between local cities, and the Redwood Empire Mountain Bike Alliance, which focuses on bicycling in nature. These two groups host the debut Paths & Pavement Mixer, where bicycle advocates and lovers can come together to enjoy Lagunitas brews, catered food from Lombardi’s Gourmet Deli and BBQ, and live music from the Pulsators. Monday, June 18, at Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. 5:30pm. $20–$25. pathsandpavement. brownpapertickets.com.

—Charlie Swanson


MUSICAL CONNECTION Veteran musician Essence Goldman and novice songwriter Bernie Dalton

became close friends after Dalton’s diagnosis.

The Voice

Band plays on for aspiring songwriter struck down by ALS BY CHARLIE SWANSON

J

ust when Bernie Dalton was ready to sing, his voice was taken from him.

Dalton, a surf-crazed Santa Cruz native and single father who cleaned pools for a living, always had a passion for music. In January 2016, he responded to a Craigslist ad for vocal lessons from veteran San Francisco singer-songwriter Essence Goldman.

“When I met Bernie, he wanted to pursue his songwriting after having a lifelong dream,” Goldman says. For two months, Dalton drove from Santa Cruz into the city once a week and worked with Goldman on voice lessons while showing her his original song ideas. Then his voice mysteriously disappeared. “We didn’t know what it was,” Goldman says. Dalton still came for lessons

and continued to share his lyrics with Goldman, and the two connected not only over his music, but also as single parents. Goldman even began giving vocal lessons to Dalton’s teenage daughter, Nicole. “When you work with someone on their songs,” Goldman says, “you get to know them, and it’s a very personal experience.” Time passed, but Dalton was not getting better. In fact, he was

getting worse, having trouble swallowing, losing weight, drooling. He went to a doctor, and after a series of tests, was diagnosed in early 2017 with bulbar-onset ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The life expectancy for people with bulbar-onset ALS is one to three years. Dalton was 47 years old. “It was devastating to watch this happen to somebody so sweet, so down-to-earth, so generous in spirit,” Goldman says. Immediately, Goldman set out to help Dalton by setting up a GoFundMe page to raise money. Originally, Goldman planned it as a fundraiser to send Dalton and his daughter on a trip together, but Dalton wanted something else. He wanted to make an album, and he wanted Goldman to be his voice. “He started mailing me handwritten lyrics and asked me to put them to music,” says Goldman. At first, she hesitated, as she was already working on her own album. “I sat down and I did one song, and it poured right out,” says Goldman. “It was a very amazing moment. I channeled a different voice I had never used before—I felt like I was trying to share his voice.” Moved by the initial experience and an outpouring of GoFundMe support that totaled over $27,000, Goldman put her own project on hold and called her band members, guitarist Roger Rocha and drummer Daniel Berkman, to record a full album of Dalton’s lyrics. Dalton was on hand for the recording sessions, delivering input via a dry erase board and giving a thumbs up or thumbs down. The project became known as Bernie & the Believers, and the album, Connection, ) 18

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Arts Ideas

17


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

REALITY (ITSELF) IS ALWAYS ALREADY THE CASE A DVD presentation based on the Life, Teaching, and Living Spiritual Presence of Avatar Adi Da Samraj. Hosted by Prof. Joan Felt “a revelation of profound originality and force..a new perspective on reality and consciousness”

—Paul E Muller-Ortega, Ph.D., Author,The Triad Heart of Shiva

TRA N SCEN D EN C E ’ S

“Realization of the Blessing-Grace of a Realizer is the great secret of the Great Tradition of humankind. That is the ancient secret tradition. It has always been so. —Avatar Adi Da Samraj IN SO NO M A VA LL EY

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Bernie Dalton ( 17 was released in February with a concert at Slim’s in San Francisco. “It was the most prolific creative collaboration I’ve ever been part of by far,” Goldman says. “It had a life force all its own. This is a real-life dramatic tale that has a soundtrack.” One of those in attendance at that show was Howard Sapper, a music-industry veteran whose credits include CEO of Global Pacific Records, the Harmony Festival and Extrordinaire Media. A longtime resident of Sonoma County, Sapper books music at the new Reel Fish Shop & Grill in town while also running his own nonprofit, Everybody Is a Star, which helps artists and musicians with special needs achieve their dreams of performing. “Essence was a client of mine years ago. I’m a big believer in her gifts,” Sapper says. “I went down to see the album release at Slim’s. It was very powerful. I started thinking to myself, this project needs to be seen and heard in a big way.” Dalton’s story has found an audience through features on NPR’s All Things Considered and in the San Francisco Chronicle, and Sapper recently reached out to the ALS Association Golden West Chapter, covering California and Hawaii, to organize a benefit concert featuring Goldman fronting Bernie & the Believers. The show takes place at Reel Fish June 15. While Dalton won’t be able to attend, his spirit will reverberate at the event. “Bernie, through this project, has had a lot of grace and a lot of reason to fight and stay alive,” Sapper says. “Every challenge has a blessing that comes with it, and the challenge of Bernie’s disorder came with the blessing of meeting Essence and being able to bring his gift as a songwriter forward.”

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Katie Kelley

RACE RELATIONS ‘Honky’ is funny,

infuriating, profane and profound, and a rarity on North Bay stages.

Black and White ‘Honky’ is a farce with a message BY HARRY DUKE

‘E

veryone’s a little bit racist” sing the puppets in the musical Avenue Q. Playwright Greg Kalleres takes that thought and runs with it in Honky, running now at Left Edge Theatre. It opens up with a commercial for Skymax 16, the latest craze in athletic footwear. It ends with the tagline “S’up now?” which we soon learn is the last thing said to a black teen before he’s killed for the shoes. Lights up on the office of Davis Tallison (Mike Pavone), the white president of a company that makes footwear “by black people for black people.” Thomas Hodge (Trey G. Riley) is there to unveil

‘Honky’ runs through July 1 at Left Edge Theatre. 50 Mark West Springs Road, Santa Rosa. Friday– Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $25–$40. 707.546.3600. leftedgetheatre.com.

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

his latest design and is aghast to learn that sales of the 16s have exploded in the white youth community since the shooting. Tallison announces the new 17s will now be marketed to them. Hodge is furious that something he created for “his people” has become bastardized, and seeks retribution. Enter Peter Trammel (Mark Bradbury), whose issues about the commercial’s impact have led him to a therapist (Liz RogersBeckley) with her own issues. In a coincidence that only occurs to writers, she happens to be Hodge’s brother. Credulity is further strained when Hodge runs into Peter’s fiancée (Lydia Revelos) and sees a way for some payback, but credulity really shouldn’t be an issue in a play with a subplot involving a new pharmaceutical cure for racism with side effects that lead to visions of a lusty Abraham Lincoln (Nick Christenson) and a foul-mouthed Frederick Douglass (Julius Rea). Part absurdist farce and part blistering social commentary, Honky will make you laugh and leave you uncomfortable. More about racial identity than racism, the play explores feelings of being “too white” or “not black enough” and deftly combines that with swipes at our consumerist society where discrimination is masked as “marketing” and stereotypes are just “demographics.” Director Argo Thompson has a terrific cast with Californianewcomer Riley outstanding as the conflicted Hodge. The opening scene with veteran Pavone crackles and sets the tone for the duration. It’s excellent work by all with an extra shout out to Rea and Jim Kaskey for their work as a variety of “urban” youth the other characters encounter. Funny, infuriating, profane and profound, shows like Honky don’t play on wine country stages that often. Catch it while you can. Rating (out of 5):


Film

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True Believer

Paul Schrader’s ‘First Reformed’ explores life of fanatics BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he impassioned qualities Paul Schrader brings to First Reformed are exactly what one hopes for in a religion: it’s compelling even when you don’t believe it.

Ernst Toller (Ethan Hawke) is a solitary pastor, a devotee of Kierkegaard and Thomas Merton in a working-class upstate New York wowed by charismatic churches. Toller leads the steepled, 250-year-old First Reformed church in Albany. It’s a bone thrown at him by Jeffers, the well-fed pastor of the Abundant Life megachurch (Cedric Kyles, aka Cedric the Entertainer). Toller’s pregnant parishioner Mary (Amanda Seyfried) approaches the pastor about her troubled husband, Michael (Philip Ettinger), tormented about bringing a baby into a world doomed by climate change. Mary finds evidence that Michael plans a terrorist act. His likely target: a billionaire climate-change denier (Michael Gaston), modeled after one of the Koch brothers, who is a major donor to Abundant Life and First Reformed. Torn by his own uncertainty, and convinced by Michael’s ecological activism, Toller wonders if he should make a martyr of himself. Seyfried is the sun in this wintry movie, warming it up; her long blonde hair falls like a curtain in front of the camera. And Hawke is very convincing as a wifeless, childless divine whose devotion to duty has almost destroyed him. If Toller is the type of Protestant scold who advertises his next sermon as “Will God Forgive Us?” he shows compassion when a class of visiting kids tour the holiest place in the church. It’s the trapdoor concealed under a pew, a leftover from when First Reformed was a stop on the Underground Railroad. Toller’s eagerness to make the kids understand is very touching. Every now and again, one glimpses Hawke measuring the effect of his own acting. And sometimes Schrader seems to turn Toller into his most famous character, Travis Bickle of Taxi Driver. Toller is part of Schrader’s career-long obsession with fanatics, and the director’s continuing question of how deeply into the woods one can follow a madman. ‘First Reformed’ is playing at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol,. 707.525.4840.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Cotati Music Festival

Formerly the Cotati Jazz Festival, the daylong party mixes food, fun and local acts like the John Courage Trio, Danny Sorentino and Highway Poets. Jun 16, 12pm. Free admission. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati. 707.795.5508.

Country Summer

The biggest country music event in the North Bay features headliners Florida Georgia Line, Little Big Town and Toby Keith. Jun 15-17, 1pm. $89 and up. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. countrysummer.com.

MARIN COUNTY Justin Furstenfeld

Texas-based artist of the band Blue October plays a special morning acoustic session. Jun 14, 10:30am. The Indie Alley, 69 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax. theindiealley.com.

Mill Valley Music 10th Anniversary Show Local record store assembles all-star band featuring Austin DeLone, Cole Tate, Jesse Lee Kincaid and others to perform Bob Dylan’s “Blood on the Tracks.“ Jun 16, 7pm. $20-$30. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Summer Solstice Concert

Seventh annual event features the rhythms of Grove Valve Orchestra, food trucks, wines and more. Jun 16, 6pm. $45. Clif Family Winery, 709 Main St, St Helena. 707.968.0625.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

Jun 15, Levi Lloyd. Jun 16, Andy Graham. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe

Jun 13, Gregg Chorebanian. Jun 14, Chime Travelers. Jun 15, Long & Short. Jun 16, Two Smooth. Jun 17, 2pm, Kenneth Roy Berry. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Art Museum of Sonoma County

Jun 15, 5pm, “Museum Night Out” with Collaboration Jazz Band. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Barley & Hops Tavern Jun 15, JimBo Trout. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

The Big Easy

Geyser Peak Winery Jun 16, 12:30pm, Petty Theft. 2306 Magnolia Lane, Healdsburg. 707.857.2500.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

Jun 16, the Aqua Velvets. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Glaser Center

Jun 16, 4pm, the Unisurfalists. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Jun 16, 3pm, Santa Rosa Symphony Youth Orchestra’s Bon Voyage Concert. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Jun 13, Wednesday Night Big Band. Jun 14, Greg Johnson Funky Organ Quartet. Jun 15, Margo Cilker and the Cargo Milkers. Jun 16, the Dorian Mode. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Hood Mansion Lawn

Brew

Jun 14, Jordan T with CRSB and Johnny Luv. Jun 15, Best Of Open Mic. Jun 16, Foni Mitchell. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Jun 15, LGBTQ Latinx House Party. 555 Healdsburg Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.303.7372.

Brewsters Beer Garden Jun 14, Dusty Green Bones. Jun 15, Key Lime Pie. Jun 16, 2 and 6pm, Solid Air and the String Rays. Jun 17, 3pm, Flowtilla. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille Jun 15, DJ Willie. Jun 16, DJ Cal. 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Cellars of Sonoma

Jun 15, 5:30pm, Funky Fridays with the Blues Burners. 389 Casa Manana Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.833.6288. funkyfridays. info.

HopMonk Sebastopol

HopMonk Sonoma

Jun 15, Clay Bell. Jun 16, Dawn Angelosante and Tony Gibson. Jun 17, 1pm, Nate Lopez. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100. Jun 16, David Udolf Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, June 15 – Thu, June 21

D INE-IN CINE MA Bruschetta • Paninis • Soups • Salads • Appetizers Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd - Thu, June 28th

Cloverdale Plaza

Lagunitas Tap Room

Jun 16, 3pm, Craig Corona. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Elephant in the Room Jun 15, the Gentlemen Soldiers. Jun 16, Derek Irving & His Combo. Jun 17, 6pm, Mark Goldenberg. Jun 19, Youngblood & Co. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. elephantintheroompub.com.

Flamingo Lounge

Jun 15, the Zins. Jun 16, UB707.

Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance Foreign Language Film!Stone In Years!” – Box Office “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling PG Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 RR 7:30 2D: (1:15 4:15) 7:00 9:40 3D: (2:15) THE JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:00 7:20 9:45 (12:30) 2:40 4:50 7:10 9:20 NoAward 3D shows, (3:45) 2D 2 Wed: Academy Noms added Including BestRActor! Academy 8 Great Beers on Tap +Award Wine byNominee the Glass and Bottle

KRSH

Jun 14, 5:30pm, Achilles Wheel with Misner & Smith. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.0707.

Crooked Goat Brewing

®

Hotel Healdsburg

Jun 17, 2pm, Ricky Alan Ray. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826. Jun 15, 6:30pm, Friday Night Live at the Plaza with Tommy Castro & the Painkillers. 122 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.4410.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

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2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Jun 13, Critters. Jun 14, TV Mike & the Scarecrows. Jun 15, Michael Brown Band. Jun 16, Rock and Roll Rhythm Review. Jun 17, T-Luke & the Tight Suits. Jun 20, Ashleigh Flynn & the Riveters. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

INCREDIBLES 2

2 Academy Award Noms Including Best Actor!

Thu: No Throwback 3D shows, added 7:30Stylized, 2D “A Triumph!” – New York “A Glorious To The Observer More THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THE SECRET KELLS 10 (12:10 Academy Award Noms7:15 Including Best Picture! 2:30 4:50) 9:40 PG-13 (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This Believable (1:15) 7:10 9:40 R One of This 4:20) Year’s Best!” – Newsday 7:10 9:50 RChronicle If It Were(1:40 Fiction!” – San Francisco

OCEANS 8

HEREDITARY

ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including

FIRST REFORMED

PRODIGAL SONS R (1:00) 3:10 Best Picture, Best5:20 Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 NR5:00) No 9:10 Show 9:50 Tue or Thu (12:00 2:30 7:25 R MILK “Haunting and Hypnotic!” – Rolling Stone “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

RBG

THE (12:45 GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, No Show 3:00 5:10) 7:20 PG PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No 6:45 6:459:30 Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

THE RIDER

FROST/NIXON (12:00 4:50) 9:55 R

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” Wed: 9:15 only Thu:9:50 No (12:00) (12:00) – Slant5:00 Magazine R

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD “Deliciously unsettling!” – LA Times

JEWARS T’AIME SOLO: PARIS, A(11:45) STAR 4:45 9:50 R STORY

6/15–6/21

Honorable

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? – CC & AD PG13 10:30-12:45-3:15-4:15-6:00-8:15

The Seagull – CC & AD 10:30-1:00-3:30-6:15-8:30

PG13

Ocean’s 8 – CC & AD PG13 11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-9:00 First Reformed – CC R 10:45-3:45-8:45, Thursday 6/21 ONLY 10:45-3:45 Book Club – CC & AD 11:15-1:45-6:45-9:05

PG13

RBG – CC PG 1:15-6:15 Thursday 6/21 ONLY 1:15 Hearts Beat Loud – CC PG13 Sneak Preview Thurs 6/21: 7:00pm, Opens Friday 6/22! 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

THE presents GHOST Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of (1:15) 4:15 7:009:50 9:30 PG-13 R (1:00 4:00) 7:00

Local Barrel

Jun 17, 5pm, Kevin White. 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433.

Main Street Bistro

Jun 14, Susan Sutton. Jun 15, Wild Janie Roberts. Jun 16, Valtierra Latin Orchestra. Jun 17, Tumbleweed Soul. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. ) 707.869.0501.

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(2:15) 7:15 PG-13

PuRE: A BOuLDERING2FLICK DEADPOOL Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 THE MOST DANGEROuS (1:30 4:15) 7:10 9:45 R SICKO MOVIES MORNING MANIN INTHE AMERICA

BOOK CLUB

Starts Fri, June 29th! PG-13 Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! (12:00 2:15 4:30) 6:50 9:10 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 10:15 VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! AM 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING Live MARRIED Met Opera in HD Summer Encores HEY WATCH 2009 LIVE Wed, ACTION SHORTS Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING June 20(Fri/Mon 1 &THIS 6:30pm 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

MADAMA BUTTERFLY

GREAT STAGE ON SCREEN

OKLAHOMA!

Thu, June 21 1:00pm

The Incredibles 2 CC & AD Ocean's 8 CC & AD • Tag CC & AD Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom CC & AD Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG


Music ( 21

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Montgomery Village Shopping Center

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. CALENDAR THU JUN 14 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY 8PM / 21+ / $10 FRI JUN 15 • THE FABULOUS BIOTONES AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT JUN 16 • DON FORBES AND RECKLESS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SUN JUN 17 • TWIN OAKS BACKYARD BBQ SERIES, CULANN’S HOUNDS SPECIAL FATHER’S DAY EVENT! $20 SHOW + BBQ / $10 SHOW ONLY MON JUN 18 • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM 7:30PM / ALL AGES / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Jun 16, 12pm, Wonder Bread 5. Jun 17, 12pm, Paperback Writer. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844. Wed MusiC by jun 13 brian FranCis baudOin 8pm/Seated show, no cover charge thu spike’s awesOMe jun 14 HOtCakes! 8pm⁄Dancing/$10 fri tHe Mad Hannans jun 15 Featuring Jerry Hannan 8:30pm/$10 sat Zulu spear jun 16 8pm⁄Dancing/$12 Adv/$15 DOS thu tOMMy tHOMsen jun 21 Western Swing Hall of Fame 8pm/ $10 Adv $12 DOS fri sOul Fuse jun 22 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 Wed HOlus bOlus jun 27 8pm/no cover charge fri aFrOFunk experienCe jun 29 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

pride CelebratiOn Feat

sat sang MatiZ + MOre! jun 30 7pm/ $12 Adv $15 DOS

Capturing reality Photography May 14–July 17...Stan Angel, Kenneth

Bradley,Michael Riley, Cathy Thomas. reCeptiOn: Tues, June 12, 6–9pm *Music by: French Oak Gypsy Band w/Stella Heath Free with Nosh & Libations.

Visit Our website, redwOOdCaFe.COM 8240 Old redwOOd Hwy, COtati 707.795.7868

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Jun 13, Uli Jon Roth. Jun 14, the Kingston Trio. Jun 16, Sol Ska and Sol Horizon. Jun 17, Buckethead. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Penngrove Pub

Jun 16, Captain Paisley. 10005 Main St, Penngrove. 707.664.8018.

The Phoenix Theater

Jun 15, the Sanctions with Silas Fermoy and the Honey Toads. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Quincy’s

Jun 15, Thought Vomit with the Publiquors and Arm the Valkyrie. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Redwood Cafe

Jun 13, Brian Baudoin. Jun 14, Awesome Hotcakes. Jun 15, the Mad Hannans. Jun 16, Zulu Spear. Jun 17, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Jun 15, Essence with Bernie & the Believers. Jun 16, Synrgy. Jun 17, Kimock. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

River Theater

2018 LIN

Jun 16, Papa Mail Trio featuring Bobby Vega and Jay Lane. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.8022.

E UP

Jun 21 • ZEPPARELLA

The All-Female Zeppelin Powerhouse

Whiskey Tip

Jun 15, the Happy’s. Jun 16, Family Room Silent Disco. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Windsor Town Green Jun 14, 6pm, Dirty Cello. 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor. townofwindsor.com.

MARIN COUNTY Ali Akbar College of Music

Jun 16, Samarth Nagarkar and Josh Feinberg. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6372.

Fenix

Jun 13, Rubi Ate the Fig. Jun 15, Revolver. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

First Presbyterian Church of San Anselmo

Jun 17, 7:30pm, “Nostalgia” with ECHO Chamber Orchestra. 72 Kensington Rd, San Anselmo. 415.456.3713.

Gabrielson Park

Jun 15, 6:30pm, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. Anchor St, Sausalito. 415.289.4152.

Marin Country Mart

Jun 15, 6pm, Friday Night Jazz with Bill Belasco’s Aguabella. Jun 17, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with Mads Tolling and friends. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

19 Broadway Club

Jun 14, Midnight Sun Massive. Jun 15, “Dance to the Beatles” with the Quarry Persons. Jun 16, HackJammers with Ann Halen. Jun 17, Lulu & the Rent Party. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Jul 5 • THE EVERLY BROTHERS EXPERIENCE Featuring the Zmed Brothers Jul 19 • MARLEEN VALENTE AND INVASION LATINA

Rock Star University House of Rock

Jun 16, Pink Floyd tribute with Empty Spaces. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Jun 14, Jesse Lee Kincaid Band. Jun 15, Michael Aragon Quartet. Jun 16, Chris Saunders Band. Jun 17, Wabi Sabi and friends. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Aug 2 • LUVPLANET American Rock n Roll Aug 16 • SAN FRANCISCO AIRSHIP

Spancky’s Bar

Novato Civic Green

Nonstop Cumbia, Salsa & Bachata from LA

Jefferson Airplane Evolution

Aug 30 • COCO MONTOYA Blistering Contemporary Blues

Sep 13 • MIDNIGHT SUN

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Afribean Soul, Rhythm & Roll

RockinThe

R i ve r .

Jun 16, Immortallica with Tempest and MSG. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

us

Jun 14, Levi’s Workshop. Jun 15, the Fabulous BioTones. Jun 16, Don Forbes and Reckless. Jun 17, 5pm, Backyard BBQ with Culann’s Hounds. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Viansa Winery

Jun 16, 11am, Justin Brown. Jun 17, 11am, Jay Messer. 25200 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.935.4700.

Jun 16, 5pm, “Concerts on the Green” with Pamela Parker’s Fantastic Machine. De Long Ave & Sherman Ave, Novato.

Rancho Nicasio

Jun 16, the Big Fit. Jun 17, 4pm, BBQ on the Lawn with Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun Trio. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Jun 13, Green Leaf Rustlers. Jun 14, “FulaMuse” with MaMuse and Fula Brothers. Jun 1516, Kimock and friends. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Jun 13, One Big Guitar. Jun 14, Mihali. Jun 15, Midnight North and friends. Jun 16, Moonalice and Cubensis. Jun 17, Sunday night mashup with members of Midnight North, Twiddle and Scott Law. Jun 19, Rattlebox. Jun 20, Incubators. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Jun 14, “Lib Live!” with Jimmy Dillon and Paul Liberatore. Jun 20, noon concert with Ayaka Isono. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Jun 13, Austin Hicks. Jun 16, David Ronconi. Jun 20, Vince Costanza. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Blue Note Napa

Jun 13, SIMO. Jun 14, Alpha Rhythm Kings. Jun 15, Acoustic Alchemy. Jun 16, Mojo Green. Jun 19, Mix It Up open jam. Jun 20, Mark Goldenberg. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue

Jun 17, 3pm, Rob Watson with Vernon Black. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Jun 15, Latin Nights with DJ Jose Miguel. Jun 16, Travis Hayes. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Jun 16, Terry Family Trio. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

The Runway by Patrick

Jun 16, Road Eleven. 2044 Airport Rd, Napa. 707.258.6115.

Silo’s

Jun 14, New West Guitar Group. Jun 15, Julius Melendez & Conjunto Seis de Montuno. Jun 16, the Boombox. Jun 17, 6pm, “MANCINI: the Songs of Henry Mancini” with Katy Stephan. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Susie’s Bar

Jun 16, Attila Viola and the Bakersfield Boys. 1365 Lincoln St, Calistoga. 707.942.6710.

Veterans Memorial Park

Jun 15, 6:30pm, Napa City Nights with Tommy Odetto and B & the Hive. 850 Main St, Napa. napacitynights.com.


Arts Events Company presents its popular open mic. Jun 20, 6pm. Free. Little Vineyards Family Winery, 15188 Sonoma Hwy, Glen Ellen. 707.996.2750.

Roy Zimmerman: ReZist!

SONOMA COUNTY Fulton Crossing

Jun 15-30, “Magical Botanicals,” featured artist Lucy Liew displays captivating florals. Reception, Jun 15 at 5pm. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm. 707.536.3305.

Graton Gallery

Jun 14-Jul 16, “What We See,” printmakers, painters and pastel artists show their created versions of the landscape art. Reception, Jun 16 at 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Musician and political satirist performs hilarious original songs responding to the age of Trump. Jun 16, 8pm. $20$25. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Dance JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre

Jun 16, 8pm, Drag Queens of the Valley, dance party features the hottest drag queens from San Francisco. $20-$55. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Scenic Knoll Ranch

Jun 16-Jul 15, “The Ladies,” exhibition features life-sized female figures depicted in imaginary scenes. Reception, Jun 16 at 4pm. 4760 Bloomfield Rd, Petaluma. Sun-Mon, Wed-Thurs & Sat, 1 to 5pm. 707.795.2007.

Terra Firma Gallery

Jun 13-Jul 6, “Together Apart: Of the Earth,” exhibition features new drawings and paintings by Gloria Matuszewski. Reception, Jun 20 at 4pm. 452 First St E, Ste A, Sonoma. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.938.2200.

Comedy Steve Bruner

Sharp-witted standup star appears in the North Bay, featuring Sacramento comedian Alfonso Portela and opener Matt Joseph. Jun 16, 7pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Irene Tu

Comedian has made KQED’s “Women to Watch” list and more. Jun 15, 8pm. $20. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Skits Under the Stars Transcendence Theatre

doghouses that will display through September and be auctioned to raise money for families displaced by the Sonoma County wildfires. Jun 16, 10am. Free with admission. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Father’s Day on the Green

Bring dad and grandpa for a hearty pancake breakfast, tractor show and more. Jun 17. Windsor Town Green, 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor. townofwindsor.com.

Father’s Day ‘Show & Shine’ Car Show

Dads will love the collection of hot rods, trucks, low riders and other classic cars on display, with food, drinks, live music and more. Jun 17. Free. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. srcity.org.

Finraiser

Events Carter & Co Open Studios & Sale

Event features over a dozen designers and makers showcasing a mix of ceramics, jewelry, textiles and artisanal foods from Napa, Sonoma and the Bay Area. Jun 16-17. Carter & Co, 1570 Ink Grade Rd, Pope Valley. 707.965.2383.

Checkerbloom Gala

Enjoy a 1940s-style supper club, with live music by Dirty Cello, to benefit the restoration of the Kenwood Wetlands and the preservation of the endangered Kenwood Marsh Checkerbloom. Jun 16, 6pm. $125. Deerfield Ranch Winery, 10200 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.833.2270.

Community Peace Picnic

Families are invited to a fun-filled afternoon with international foods, music, folk dancing and art projects for all ages. Sponsored by the Baha’is of Sonoma County. Jun 16, 2-6pm. Free. Redwood Forest Friends Meeting House, 1647 Guerneville Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.799.3660.

Doghouse Days of Summer

Watch local artists paint and decorate a variety of real

Friends of Fife Creek hosts a family-friendly pool show and public swim, with food and drinks, live music, silent auction and more. Jun 17, 12pm. Free admission. West Sonoma Inn & Spa, 14100 Brookside, Guerneville. 707.869.2470.

Healdsburg Art-Food-Wine

North Bay, national and international artists are showcased in upscale galleries through Healdsburg, combined with creative culinary and vintner experiences. Jun 14-16, noon. Downtown Healdsburg, Plaza St, Healdsburg.

Juneteenth Festival

Celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States feature live entertainment and a scholarship presentation. Jun 16, 10am. Free. Martin Luther King Park, 1671 Hendley St, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3770.

Olate Dogs

American dog act featuring father-and-son trainers Richard and Nicholas Olate won the 2012 season of “America’s Got Talent.” Jun 16, 2pm. $30-$50. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Paths & Pavement Mixer Sonoma County

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Bicycle Coalition and Redwood Empire Mountain Bike Alliance host a fun evening of dinner, brews and live music from the Pulsators. Jun 18, 5:30pm. $20$30. Lagunitas Tap Room, 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Santa Rosa Moose Lodge Hawaiian Night Dinner and dance party features island cuisine and local bands. Jun 15, 6pm. $15$25. Santa Rosa Moose Lodge, 3559 Airway Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.546.0637.

Food & Drink

Museum dedicated to writer Robert Louis Stevenson stays open late and serves up refreshments to give the community a chance to experience its offerings. Fri, Jun 15, 5pm. Free admission. Robert Louis Stevenson Museum, 1490 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.3757.

Ready to complete your degree? Learn how a Business Administration degree can work for you. Join us at an info session - talk to the faculty about the program & meet your peers.

Field Trips

Info Session

Solar Viewing & Public Star Party

6:15 - 7pm Academic Center Room #245, College of Marin - Kentfield Interested? Contact Susie McFeeters: 707.664.2601 sonoma.edu/exed/bus-dcp

Summer Movie Nights in Healdsburg Plaza

Sonoma-Marin Fair

Summer Nights at RLSM

Tuesday, June 26

John Waters narrates the true story of a Baltimore socialite who aided police with dollhouses depicting scenes of crime. Jun 14, 7:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Small Hands Big Heart Auction

Annual county-crossing fair features headlining concerts from En Vogue, Clay Walker, 38 Special and others, with fair food, carnival rides, ugliest dog contest, livestock and more. Jun 20-24. $10-$18 / kids under four are free. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma.

Sonoma State Business Degree, now at College of Marin

Of Dolls & Murder

Alexander Valley Film Society brings family-friendly movies to the plaza, screening “Sing” after dark. Jun 19. Free. Healdsburg Plaza, 217 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301.

Wine reception, dinner and live auction raises funds for Hearts and Hands Preschool. Jun 16, 4:30pm. $75. Casa Nuestra Winery, 3451 Silverado Trail N, St Helena. 707.963.5783.

#chooseSSU

Palestine screens two films on Israel’s treatment of Palestinian children, with discussion. Jun 14, 7pm. Free. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

View stars near and far with the observatory’s telescopes and experts on hand. Solar viewing is free and star party is $3, plus parking. Sat, Jun 16, 11am and 8pm. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood. 707.833.6979.

Film No Way to Treat a Child North Coast Coalition for

Chef’s Tour of Napa Valley

Chef John Ash leads a private tour through local vineyards and farms. Space is limited. Jun 20, 10am. $475. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

The Dad Abides

Father’s Day barbecue features live music, activities and a screening of “The Big Lebowski.” Jun 17, 1pm. $35. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Experience Rosé

Enjoy award-winning wines with gourmet cuisine created, prepared and presented by teams of culinary students led by Chef Lars Kronmark. Jun 16, 11am. $85-$125. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Father’s Day at Korbel Dads can get an up-close look at cars from Korbel’s racing team, with specials on food and bubbly. Jun 17. Free admission. Korbel Champagne Cellars, 13250 River Rd, Guerneville. 707.824.7000.

Father’s Day Bubbles, Brews & BBQ

Treat dad to delicious slow cooked BBQ, cold beer, awardwinning wines and live music. Jun 17, 12pm. $65. Gloria Ferrer Caves & Vineyards, 23555 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.996.7256.

Father’s Day Picnic at Charles Krug Bring the whole family for some outdoor grilling paired with lots of wine under the oaks. Jun 17. Charles Krug Winery, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.3993.

Lobster Fest at Hess Collection

Enjoy steaming lobster, prawns, corn-on-the-cob, and more poured from huge cooking pots down on butcherpaper covered tables. Jun 16, 6pm. $150. Hess Collection Winery, 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. 707.255.1144.

Summer Lovin’ at Simoncini Vinyards

Enjoy good vibrations as Zinfandel and barrel samples are paired with savory bites. Jun 15-16. $35. Simoncini Vineyards, 2303 West Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg. 707.433.8811.

Taste & Evaluate Wine Like a Pro

Find the wine that suits your taste and learn the importance of color, aromas and flavors. Pre-registration required. Jun 13, 5pm. $100. Napa Valley College Upper Valley Campus Library, 1088 College Ave, St Helena. 707.967.2900.

Taste of Howell Mountain

Over 40 wineries from Howell Mountain region pour their finest with food pairings, live music, silent auctions and more. Jun 16, 12pm. $150. Charles Krug Winery, 2800 Main St, St Helena. 707.967.3993.

Trione Food + Wine Dinner Series

Intimate evening is hosted by Trione winemaker Scot Covington. Jun 16, 6pm. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.8100.

Father’s Day BBQ & Wine Pairing

Celebrate dad with tasting flights of four wines paired with four different BBQ sauces served with grilled sausages. Jun 16. $20 per flight. Meadowcroft Wines, 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.4090.

For Kids Benedettiville Summer Art Camps Creative husband-wife group Benedettiville lead a weeklong radio camp where kids


Family Fun Night

Children’s Museum stays open until 7pm with interactive exhibits and pizza. Fri, Jun 15. $12. Children’s Museum of Sonoma County, 1835 W Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4069.

New World Ballet Summer Arts Camp

World-class guest artists offer courses in various dance styles, percussion and more to kids ages three and up. Scholarship programs available. Through Jun 28. New World Ballet, 905 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.536.9523.

Readings Book Passage

Jun 13, 7pm, “The Boatbuilder” with Daniel Gumbiner. Jun 14, 7pm, “The Map of Salt and Stars” with Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar. Jun 15, 7pm, “Circe” with Madeline Miller. Jun 16, 4pm, “There There” with Tommy Orange. Jun 17, 7pm, “Us Against You” with Fredrik Backman, in conversation with Bill Petrocelli. Ticket includes signed book. $30. Jun 18, 12pm, “Florida” with Lauren Groff, literary luncheon includes meal and book. $55. Jun 18, 7pm, “Murder on the Left Bank” with Cara Black. Jun 19, 7pm, “The Emperor of Shoes” with Spencer Wise. Jun 20, 7pm, “Fare Thee Well” with Joel Selvin. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Calistoga Copperfield’s Books

Jun 16, 1pm, “Tasting the Past” with Kevin Begos. 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga 707.942.1616.

Forest to the Sea Nature Store

Jun 16, 2pm, “Three Jewels” with Laura Morgan. Free. 16215 Main St #1, Guerneville 707.604.7116.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Jun 15, 7pm, “Geoffrey Doover” and “Travel Sketching” with Patrick Fanning. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Jun 15, 7pm, “A Wilder Time” with William E Glassley.

140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Santa Rosa Central Library

Jun 16, 2pm, “California Motel: A Pictorial History of the Motel in the Golden State” with Heather M David. 211 E St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.0831.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Jun 15-16, 8pm, “Crossroads” with Off the Page Readers Theater, featuring live readings of works by 10 local writers. $10-$15. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Jun 15, 7pm, “The Road to Dawn” with Jared Brock, includes screening of documentary “Josiah” and Q&A. Jun 16, 7pm, “Grow What You Love” with Emily Murphy. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Thumbprint Cellars

Jun 14, 6:30pm, “Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine” with Gail Honeyman, includes winetasting, co-hosted by Copperfield’s Books. 102 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.433.2393.

Theater Broadway Under the Stars

Transcendence Theatre Company’s annual outdoor song and dance performance series kicks off with “Stairway to Paradise,” featuring songs from Broadway and beyond. Pre-show picnics available. Jun 15-Jul 1, 5pm. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. transcendencetheatre.org.

Bullshot Crummond

Curtain Call Theatre performs the audacious, steampunkinspired comedy of the dashing WWI ace up against a dastardly count. Through Jun 23. $20. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.524.8739.

The Fantasticks

Timeless musical is lovingly produced in memory of late Cinnabar performer Stephen Walsh. Through Jun 24. $25$45. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The Gumshoe Murders

Murder-mystery dinner theater show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception.

25

Reservations required. Sat, Jun 16, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. getaclueproductions.com.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 1 3-19, 20 1 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

ages 7 to 12 can create and perform their own show. Jun 18-21. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Hands on a Hardbody

Ten contestants try to outlast each other to win a new truck by keeping at least one hand on it as long as they can in this play based on true events. Through Jun 17. $28-$39. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Honky

Left Edge Theater presents the dark comedy about race, rhetoric and basketball shoes. Through Jul 1. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Illyria

Modern musical take on Shakespeare’s “Twelfth Night” mixes mistaken identities and clever melodies for a romantic tale of hijinks. Jun 15-Jul 8. $22-$38. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Mamma Mia!

Mountain Play presents the ABBA-fueled musical in a unique outdoor setting. Sun, 2pm. through Jun 17. Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, 3801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley. 415.383.1100.

Mary Shelley’s Body

Sheri Lee Miller performs a live reading of David Templeton’s one-woman play honoring the 200th anniversary of “Frankenstein.” Reservations recommended. Jun 16, 7pm. Free. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Shakespeare’s Will

Spirited and sensual imagining of the inner life of Anne Hathaway, Shakespeare’s wife, stars Elena Wright. Jun 14-Jul 8. $12-$38. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael. marinshakespeare.org.

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Red Baraat + Maggie Belle Band The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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cannabis cultivation from one end of the state to the other.” Of the 600 bills that came before the California State Legislature this session, 60 were about cannabis: cannabis delivery services, cannabis dispensaries, cannabis for pets, cannabis and employment, and the removal of felony cannabis convictions from criminal records in California. According to Gieringer, there are 100,000 felony convictions on the books for cannabis in California. Senate Bill 1793, which was introduced in January 2018 by Rob Bonta, would make the expungement process the responsibility of the state attorney general, not county district attorneys. Most of all, Gieringer explained, NORML wants civil rights for cannabis users, including no obligatory drug testing by employers, plus the opportunity to use cannabis to help end addictions to opioids. The Service Employees International Union thinks that workers ought to have the legal right to smoke marijuana on their own time, away from work, in much the same way that people enjoy a cocktail or a glass of wine. Matt Hummell, the chair of the Cannabis Regulatory Commission in Oakland, explained that the marijuana black market is thriving in Oakland because rents are so steep that many wanna-be dispensary owners can’t afford to enter the legitimate cannabis business. “It’s a struggle to get a permit,” Hummell said. “At the same time, big money for the cannabis industry has flooded the city.” One longtime Sonoma County cannabis cultivator called himself “disgruntled” and added that he wasn’t going to apply for a permit. “I’m willing to take a chance,” he said. “It’s an act of civil disobedience.” Jonah Raskin is the author of ‘Marijuanaland: Dispatches from an American War.’


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ARIES (March 21-April 19) My Aries acquaintance Tatiana decided to eliminate sugar from her diet. She drew up a plan to avoid it completely for 30 days, hoping to permanently break its hold over her. I was surprised to learn that she began the project by making a dessert altar in her bedroom, where she placed a chocolate cake and five kinds of candy. She testified that it compelled her willpower to work even harder and become even stronger than if she had excluded all sweet treats from her sight. Do you think this strenuous trick might work for you as you battle your own personal equivalent of a sugar addiction? If not, devise an equally potent strategy. You’re on the verge of forever escaping a temptation that’s no good for you. Or you’re close to vanquishing an influence that has undermined you. Or both. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) You have caressed

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and finessed the Problem. You have tickled and teased and tinkered with it. Now I suggest you let it alone for a while. Give it breathing room. Allow it to evolve under the influence of the tweaks you have instigated. Although you may need to return and do further work in a few weeks, my guess is that the Problem’s knots are now destined to metamorphose into seeds. The awkwardness you massaged with your love and care will eventually yield a useful magic.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “Whether you love what you love or live in divided ceaseless revolt against it, what you love is your fate.” Gemini poet Frank Bidart wrote that in his poem “Guilty of Dust,” and now I offer it to you. Why? Because it’s an excellent time to be honest with yourself as you identify whom and what you love. It’s also a favorable phase to assess whether you are in any sense at odds with whom and what you love; and if you find you are, to figure out how to be in more harmonic alignment with whom and what you love. Finally, dear Gemini, now is a key moment to vividly register the fact that the story of your life in the coming years will pivot around your relationship with whom and what you love. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Congratulations on the work you’ve done to cleanse the psychic toxins from your soul, Cancerian. I love how brave you’ve been as you’ve jettisoned outworn shticks, inadequate theories and irrelevant worries. It makes my heart sing to have seen you summon the self-respect necessary to stick up for your dreams in the face of so many confusing signals. I do feel a tinge of sadness that your heroism hasn’t been better appreciated by those around you. Is there anything you can do to compensate? Like maybe intensify the appreciation you give yourself? LEO (July 23–August 22) I hope you’re reaching the final stages of your year-long project to make yourself as solid and steady as possible. I trust you have been building a stable foundation that will serve you well for at least the next five years. I pray you have been creating a rich sense of community and establishing vital new traditions and surrounding yourself with environments that bring out the best in you. If there’s any more work to be done in these sacred tasks, intensify your efforts in the coming weeks. If you’re behind schedule, please make up for lost time. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) “Necessity is the mother of invention,” says an old proverb. In other words, when your need for some correction or improvement becomes overwhelming, you may be driven to get creative. Engineer Allen Dale put a different spin on the issue. He said that “if necessity is the mother of invention, then laziness is the father.” Sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein agreed, asserting that “progress is made by lazy men looking for easier ways to do things.” I’m not sure if necessity or laziness will be your motivation, Virgo, but I suspect that the coming weeks could be a golden age of invention for you. What practical innovations might you launch? What useful improvements can you finagle? (P.S.: Philosopher Alfred North Whitehead attributed the primary drive for innovative ideas and gizmos to “pleasurable intellectual curiosity.”) LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

Would

you have turned out wiser and wealthier if you had dropped out of school in third grade? Would it have been better to apprentice yourself to a family of wolves or coyotes rather than trusting your educational fate to institutions whose job it was to acclimate you to society’s madness? I’m happy to let you know that you’re entering a phase when you’ll find it easier than usual to unlearn any old conditioning that might be suppressing your ability to fulfill your rich potentials. I urge you to seek out opportunities to unleash your skills and enhance your intelligence.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) The

temptation to overdramatize is strong. Going through with a splashy but messy conclusion may have a perverse appeal. But why not wrap things up with an elegant whisper instead of a garish bang? Rather than impressing everyone with how amazingly complicated your crazy life is, why not quietly lay the foundations for a low-key resolution that will set the stage for a productive sequel? Taking the latter route will be much easier on your karma, and in my opinion will make for just as interesting a story.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Each of us harbors rough, vulnerable, controversial or unhoned facets of our identity. And every one of us periodically reaches turning points when it becomes problematic to keep those qualities buried or immature. We need to make them more visible and develop their potential. I suspect you have arrived at such a turning point. So on behalf of the cosmos, I hereby invite you to enjoy a period of ripening and self-revelation. And I do mean “enjoy.” Find a way to have fun.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) For the next two-plus weeks, an unusual rule will be in effect: The more you lose, the more you gain. That means you will have an aptitude for eliminating hassles, banishing stress and shedding defense mechanisms. You’ll be able to purge emotional congestion that has been preventing clarity. You’ll have good intuitions about how to separate yourself from influences that have made you weak or angry. I’m excited for you, Capricorn! A load of old, moldy karma could dissolve and disperse in what seems like a twinkling. If all goes well, you’ll be traveling much lighter by July 1. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) I suggest you avoid starting a flirtatious correspondence with a convict who’ll be in jail for another 28 years. OK? And don’t snack on fugu, the Japanese delicacy that can poison you if the cook isn’t careful about preparing it. Please? And don’t participate in a séance where the medium summons the spirits of psychotic ancestors or diabolical celebrities with whom you imagine it might be interesting to converse. Got that? I understand you might be in the mood for high adventure and out-of-the-ordinary escapades. And that will be fine and healthy as long as you also exert a modicum of caution and discernment. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

I suggest that you pat yourself on the back with both hands as you sing your own praises and admire your own willful beauty in three mirrors simultaneously. You have won stirring victories over not just your own personal version of the devil, but also over your own inertia and sadness. From what I can determine, you have corralled what remains of the forces of darkness into a comfy holding cell, sealing off those forces from your future. They won’t bother you for a very long time, maybe never again. Right now you would benefit from a sabbatical—a vacation from all this high-powered character-building. May I suggest you pay a restorative visit to the Land of Sweet Nonsense?

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June 13-19, 2018

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June 13-19, 2018