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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | MAY 9-15, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.51

EL PHANT E

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California GOP grapples with irrelevancy—and neo-nazism p11 BAN BRUNCH P8

DEMOCRACY’S DEMISE P16

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CEO/Executive Editor CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano Dan Pulcrano NORTHNORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating BAY BOHEMIAN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847at:Fifth on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located 847 Fifth 707.527.1200 ; fax: ; fax: St., Santa Rosa, Rosa, CA 95404. Phone:Phone: 707.527.1200 St., Santa CA 95404. 707.527.1288 ; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a Itlegally 707.527.1288 ; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. is a legally adjudicated publication of theof county of Sonoma by by adjudicated publication the county of Sonoma Superior Court Court of California decreedecree No. 119483. Member: Superior of California No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per (per Association, Verified Circulation. Subscriptions year):year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. ThirdSonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid atpaid Santa Rosa, Rosa, CA. FREE FREE DISTRIBUTION: class postage at Santa CA. DISTRIBUTION: is available free offree charge at numerous The BOHEMIAN is available of charge at numerous The BOHEMIAN locations, limitedlimited to onetocopy reader. Additional locations, oneper copy per reader. Additional copiescopies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in in may be purchased for one dollar, payable ’s office. The BOHEMIAN may may advance at TheatBOHEMIAN ’s office. The BOHEMIAN advance The BOHEMIAN be distributed only by its by authorized distributors. No No be distributed only its authorized distributors. personperson may, without permission of theof publisher, take take may, without permission the publisher, BOHEMIAN is more more than one each BOHEMIAN is thancopy oneof copy of issue.The each issue.The printed on 40on % 40 recycled paper.paper. printed % recycled

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Bad ‘Cops’ Still no signs of anything approaching enlightenment or intelligent life in law enforcement in the fascist USA. The militarism, arrogance and injustice of the “justice” system marches on unabated, amid the ignorance and apathy of the masses who will suffer their fates at the hands of the gladiators still clinging to their delusions of freedom and democracy. This U.S. culture is stunningly dumb and blind. Cops is for totalitarian apologists and thugs. Cops does not

serve and protect. Cops is bad for people and other living beings. Cops is yet another symptom of the deterioration of sensibility and compassion in a nation of violence and hate.

SARAMAGO’S TRUTH Via Facebook

Read All About It As the 2017 chair of the Napa Valley Vintners board of directors, I worked with other community members to develop

THIS MODERN WORLD

what has become Measure C.There is a lot of noise out there right now as people take sides and disseminate various arguments regarding development of the Napa Valley. There are those who believe that the future of the valley depends upon more growth, and others who wish to limit growth. In 1968, when the Agriculture Preserve was originally created, many people voted against their own economic selfinterest to protect the land and limit its exploitation. We are facing another such decision, and as a vintner and longtime

By Tom Tomorrow

resident, I am deeply concerned that a no vote on Measure C will erode decades of important protection. Measure C will not stop agriculture and, in fact, only pertains to certain specific areas in the agricultural watershed. Currently, there are thousands of acres that could be developed, as well as thousands more that are already entitled to development. I’m concerned that inaccurate information is being circulated as both sides of the argument fight for a win. I urge you to carefully read Measure C and try to disregard the slanted and misleading arguments. After understanding exactly what the measure will and will not do, I hope that you will also vote yes.

MICHAEL HONIG Rutherford

Up Is Down Well, with the brutal assault on our democracy, a little brutal comedy seemed appropriate (“Not Funny,” May 2). Some can dish it out, but not take it. Now the overly sensitive and politically correct types seem to be the Republicans. What next—will they start hugging trees?

JOHN W. COLEMAN JR. Via Facebook

Dept. of Corrections Tom Gogola was so mesmerized by D Street (“Drive On,’ May 2) that he incorrectly referred to it as Avenue D. We regret the error.

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Johnson’s beach

Tone Deaf

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DAVID LUNING

A

As a former post commander for the Los Angeles Police Department, I understand the imperative for our officers to feel appreciated and supported. Recognizing those who risk their lives to keep us safe is not just important, it’s essential. But it seems to me that inviting the nation to experience our community through such a negative lens, particularly at this time, profoundly misses every mark. It’s also unfathomable that the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office would choose Erick Gelhaus to be the liaison for this particular project. Gelhaus is the same deputy who, in 2013, shot young Andy Lopez seven times—killing him less than 17 seconds after the officers had arrived on the scene. How could anyone have thought that Gelhaus was an appropriate emissary? How could this decision be seen as anything other than blatant disregard for our community and a slap in the face to the Lopez family? The whole process demonstrates a shocking level of insensitivity, and highlights the profound separation between the sheriff’s office leadership and our community. I can’t imagine any community that would want to be nationally portrayed in a damaging way, but especially ours, which is still very much in a place of recovery and healing following multiple tragedies. Seeking recognition for our law enforcement, at the expense of our communities, seems extremely tone-deaf, insensitive and out-of-touch. Not one part of this project serves the interests of our communities. I emphatically urge both departments to revisit their decisions. John Mutz is a candidate for Sonoma County sheriff. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Participation with ‘Cops’ does not serve community interests BY JOHN MUTZ s reported in both the Bohemian (March 18 and May 2) and SFGate (March 20), the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, in cooperation with the Santa Rosa Police Department, has contracted with the nationally televised show Cops and invited a production crew to “ride along” with both agencies. This project has moved forward despite feedback to the sheriff’s office from community leaders who felt this would further damage the shattered trust between the sheriff’s office and the community.

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Dining

hollandaise sauce; panicked waiters; and the sickly sweet smell of maple syrup that seems to haunt your olfactory lobes for hours after you’d left the restaurant. Mother’s Day brunch was also a time for dark existential questions. Is this the best I can do with a graduate degree? Where did I go wrong? Why quit drinking now? Brunch is also an opportunity for restaurants to sling out hundreds of plates of overpriced food that you could have made yourself for a fraction of the cost in a sliver of the time you spent waiting for your $18 eggs Benedict and fruit cup. This is not what mothers deserve. You love your mother, don’t you? Of course you do. So here’s a better idea. Make breakfast for her instead. How about French toast and homemade sausage? Save her from brunch and she’ll love you back.

French Toast •

JUST LIKE MOM MAKES It is not a fact that all mothers want to be taken out to brunch on

Mother’s Day. Why not cook for her?

Ban Brunch Because moms deserve better

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hen did it start? When did people think their mother would enjoy waiting in line for overpriced, unremarkable food in the middle of the day with dozens of other suckers slurping bottomless mimosas made with cheap sparkling wine? I speak, of course, of the national delusion called Mother’s Day brunch.

BY STETT HOLBROOK

Brunch on any day of the week is a sign of our moral decay. It’s for people so lazy or ambivalent that they can’t decide whether they want to eat breakfast or lunch. In their sloth, they shuffle out the door, too inept to cook for themselves, and stand around wasting more of the day to eat overpriced eggs and toast. By the time it’s over, it’s mid-afternoon and the prime hours of your precious weekend are over—and you’re $40 poorer for it. Commit! Seize the day! Choose breakfast or lunch, run with it and

get on with your life while you still can. There’s another side to brunch diners don’t see. It’s the view from the kitchen. I was once a cook in an upscale San Francisco restaurant. As Mother’s Day drew near, a special kind of dread spread across the kitchen. Mother’s Day brunch was an interminable amateur hour filled with inane special requests like egg-white omelettes (we called them “beached whales” because they resembled dead sea mammal carcasses); gallons of oozing, mucilaginous

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Small Is Big Garagiste Wine Festival brings the revolution to Sonoma BY JAMES KNIGHT

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hy pay $40 to $50 a bottle for a wine nobody’s heard of? Douglas Minnick, maker of several such wines under the name Hoi Polloi and cofounder of the Garagiste Festival, acknowledges that the wine named for the masses isn’t sold at supermarket prices. Matter of fact, he says their tongue-in-cheek T-shirt bears the slogan, “Wine for the common man at premium prices.” The wines poured at the popular wine festival, which comes north to Sonoma for the first time May 12, may not be cheap, but they’re not cheaply made, either. “If you’re making wine in 10,000 gallon tanks,” says Minnick, economy of scale is on your side. “But you’re

going to make the wine in a different way.” The wines at Garagiste—the festival is limited to producers making less than 1,500 cases per year—are handmade by comparison. “It’s almost an entirely different product.” They’re also harder to find. “These are wines that are not on the wine country maps,” says Minnick. Some more facts about Garagiste, paired with a selection of wines, all of them less than $40: Lightning Wines 2016 CdP Blanc ($24) While winemaker Randy Hester can boast of working for some of the big names in Napa Cab, he chooses to make a blend of Grenache Blanc, Piquepoul, Marsanne and Roussanne on his own time. Not only an unusual find in Napa, this subtle, fleshy, white Rhone-style blend is harder to find hereabouts than in Fayetteville, Ark., according to Lightning’s restaurant list. Two Shepherds 2015 Bechthold Vineyard Lodi Cinsault ($32) Outlier among outliers, Two Shepherds is one of only about 10 percent of the wineries at the May 12 event that has a tasting room of its own (in Windsor’s Artisan Alley). Cinsault is itself an outlier, and it’s a wonder that this vineyard survived 130 years in production-oriented Lodi. Similar to but more successful than many a California Grenache, this crisp, red cherry quaffer is the ideal kind of “bistro” wine—uncomplicated, but quality. Halcón Vineyards Tierra Yorkville Highlands Petite Sirah ($32) I’m not sure what the story is on this winery, but that’s the point of Garagiste: tickets are not oversold, so you don’t have to wade through the elbow forest to talk to the winemakers themselves. This Petite Sirah, a popular companion planting to Zinfandel down in the Ukiah area, comes from a higher-elevation vineyard. There’s an herbal element of green peppercorns to this dense, plum sauce and chocolate fest. Get the rest of the story from these wineries at the VIP tasting and seminar ($115). The Garagiste Wine Festival, Saturday, May 12. Sonoma Veterans Memorial Hall, 126 First St. W., Sonoma. Grand tasting, 2–5pm ($65); early access, 1–5pm ($85). californiagaragistes.com.


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Elephant in the Room California GOP grapples with irrelevancy and a top-polling neo-Nazi challenger to Dianne Feinstein BY TOM GOGOLA

I

t’s been a couple of wild weeks for the California State Republican Party now that it’s been revealed that one of the highest polling Republicans in the state is a neo-Nazi who denies the Holocaust happened.

The party has been dealing with fallout from a recent statewide poll, which revealed that self-described “counterSemite” Patrick Little was leading all challengers, Democrat and Republican, in the race for

Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s seat. Feinstein is Jewish. The state GOP’s Little headache piled on to a set of grim statistics that keep mounting for a party whose support is cratering in the state since Donald Trump’s election as President. Only about 25 percent of registered voters in the state are Republicans, and the last time the party took a statewide race was in 2006, when immigrant Arnold Schwarzenegger took the governor’s race. This year, immigration hard-liners in the southern part of the state have

rallied around their antipathy for the state’s sanctuary law, while more moderate Republicans helplessly fret over Latinos’ wholesale abandonment of Republicanism in the Trump era. Enter Patrick Little. He tried to attend the state GOP spring convention in San Diego over the weekend. It didn’t go well, he said in a brief interview. Little was booted from the event when he attempted to register at the VIP table, despite his declaration to organizers, he notes, that he’s the top-polling Republican in the state. As a parting shot, he

stomped on an Israeli flag as he departed the convention. Little has taken a square aim at the powerful lobbying organization American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) in his campaign. The organization did not respond to requests for comment. In scanning leading state newspapers in the lead-up to the convention last weekend, a consensus view emerged in the various editorials and analyses which indicated that among California’s political and media class, ignoring Little ) 12


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GOP ( 11 seems to be the best strategy to make him go away. News stories about the convention barely mentioned Little, if they mentioned him at all, and focused on the party’s challenging work ahead in a state whose Democratic supermajority has dug in as the loyal opposition in the aftermath of Trump’s minority-vote victory in 2016. The state GOP has tried to gain traction with California voters this year with its initiative to repeal a new state gas tax—but it’s really hard to ignore the fact that the same party is fielding a candidate for U.S. Senate who doesn’t believe there were gas chambers at Auschwitz. Can Little be so easily dismissed? It’s a hard row to hoe for the GOP. The party wants voters to believe that Gov. Jerry Brown has bankrupted the state, even as last week California leapt over Great Britain to become the world’s fifth largest economy. hen the poll broke that showed Little’s surprising surge, national political outlets such as right-leaning The Hill were replete with stories from state GOP leaders of the “we’ve never heard of this horrible person before” variety. The Bohemian made numerous attempts to contact the state Republican Party to discuss the Little phenomenon, to no avail. They clearly want him to go away. The takeaway from state party leaders is that they are aghast that an unapologetic anti-Semite could lay claim to the mantle of the state GOP’s messaging with his 18 percent showing in the polls. Yet this is the same state GOP which supported a candidate for president in 2016 who refused to disavow an endorsement from American Nazi David Duke; who said there are “good people” among violent white supremacists; and whose “America First” platform is a throwback to anti-Semitic American isolationism prior to WWII, though wrapped in a

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proverbial “dog whistle”—coded language that appeals to a specific constituency while not rattling the mainstream. There’s no dog-whistling in Little’s campaign, where he calls for the deportation of Jews, among other “counter-Semitic” policy proposals. Meanwhile, the AntiDefamation League recently reported that incidences of antiSemitic violence have spiked since Trump’s election, including in California. The organization conducted a workshop on combating anti-Semitism recently in Silicon Valley. Trump visited the state in March. At that time, Kurt Bardella (a Republican messaging strategist and former staffer to retiring California Congressman Darrell Issa) wrote on CNN’s opinion page online that “the reality is Trump’s brand of xenophobia is toxic to what little is left of the Republican Party in California. . . . Instead of evolving with the changing demographics, Republicans in California have continued to embrace the fringe policies and rhetoric of the most extreme edges of the GOP.” Bardella did not respond to requests for an interview for this story. In the end, the state Republican Party did not endorse anyone at its weekend convention to run against Feinstein, who is both a deeply unpopular and unmovable force in California Democratic politics. Her would-be challenger from the left, State Sen. Kevin de León, crawled in at a meager 8 percent support in that same poll which found Little at 18 percent. The growing irrelevancy of the Golden State Republicans appears to have provided political space for a candidate such as Little to emerge, especially given that the fix is in on Feinstein’s reelection. The party hasn’t pushed out a favored candidate in what’s sure to be a losing race for her seat, and has struggled to find candidates to run at all this year. The big promised news going into the state GOP convention


13 His campaign slogan is: “Liberate the U.S. from the Jewish Oligarchy.” UC Berkeley has come under intense fire from the so-called alt-right for its security concerns, and cancellations of appearances by such hard-right Trump supporters Milo Yiannopoulos and Ann Coulter. Those episodes have called the university’s vigorous and historic embrace of free speech into question among critics on the right. Has the university now become a free-speech zone for antiSemitic students who support the likes of Little and are using university housing to promote his campaign? Gilmore sent along information about who may qualify to live in the University Village complex: full-time graduate or undergraduate university students, and their families. The university does have rules for its tenants, but does not restrict free speech or political activities. “University Village’s residential code of conduct prohibits use of the property for any for-profit activity,” says Gilmore in an email follow-up, “unless as part of a campus Residential and Student Service Programs–sponsored event. It does not prohibit a resident from engaging in political activity that any resident might choose to engage in from their own home. And, we are not aware of any University Village resident engaged in activity inconsistent with residential use.” Newsweek dug into a poll commissioned by KPIX 5SurveyUSA that found Little second behind Feinstein and reported on Little’s praise for Adolf Hitler and his call for Jews to be deported from the United States. KPIX, the San Francisco CBS affiliate, blew right past the part of the poll which identified Little’s surprise showing and instead gushed about how the poll indicated that voters were ramped up for an exciting campaign season. While neither KPIX or Newsweek made mention of it, the poll also showed he was running

DISTANT NEIGHBORS The East Bay is home to militant antifa marches and Patrick Little’s campaign headquarters.

with 30 percent support from California’s Asian-American population, which clearly contributed to his overall 18 percent support among those who were polled. Feinstein polled with 39 percent support among AsianAmericans. Little noted his support as he praised their intelligence in a Yahoo interview that ran last week as he engaged in a post-Newsweek round of online self-promotion of his views about the so-called Zionist Occupation Government. In his online postings, the ZOGophobe Little says he attended the tiki-lit white-power demonstration in Charlottesville last summer, where a young woman was murdered by a white supremacist who crashed his car into a crowd of protesters. If the polling numbers hold and are reflected in the primary vote on June 5, Little would face Feinstein in the general election in November. The next leading Republican candidate running against Feinstein is Rocky De La Fuente, a San Diego businessman and founder of the Delta Party who is also running for Rick Scott’s Senate seat this year in Florida. Fuente ran for president as a Democrat and says he’ll run again in 2020 in the Democratic primary.

Little also beat out Erin Cruz in the KPIX poll, a candidate who might charitably be said to occupy the “mainstream” Trump position in this race. Cruz has adopted the #Americafirst hashtag as her own and riffs off the reality-show president’s slogan when she says her aim is to Make California Golden Again. Her campaign materials indicate that she plans to do this by deporting undocumented immigrants. Cruz did not follow through on an interview scheduled by her staff for Monday. ate last week, I contacted Little at the email address he posts on his campaign website and he responded with an offer to do a live-stream interview. That’s not an option, I responded, but let’s talk. I sent him several questions about his campaign and asked if he could provide some further context about his support among Asian-Americans. Late Friday night, Little sent a series of quick emails from the road, saying he was headed to San Diego and the GOP convention, from whence he would be booted. Early this week, he called to set up an interview for a future date, he said, given that he ) 14 had lots of other media

L

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was over whether the party would endorse John Cox or Travis Allen in the governor’s race. It ended up endorsing neither man. Into this political vacuum enters Patrick Little. So who is he? The former Marine has filed campaign certification paperwork with the California Secretary of State that lists his address as an apartment located in a student housing complex owned by UC Berkeley. But he’s not a student there and has never been. Little confirms this in a phone interview and says, “That’s my campaign address.” The address under file with the Secretary of State is in the city of Albany, which is just north of Berkeley and where the university owns a sprawling apartment complex with various amenities, called University Village. The Bohemian is not printing the address given that, according to UC Berkeley, the person at the address has every right under university policy to allow Little to use the location as his campaign address. But it does raise a question about Little’s connection to the university, the site of numerous protests and tense stand-offs between Trump supporters and anti-fascist activists over the past couple of years. A university spokesperson says no person named Patrick Little is currently enrolled at Berkeley, nor has anyone ever been enrolled at the university who has that name. The spokesperson could not identify the person who lives at the Berkeley-owned apartment associated with Little’s campaign. “We didn’t find any name matching that name either now or in the past,” says spokeswoman Janet Gilmore, who added, “I can’t talk about who may or may not live there because of state privacy laws.” Little’s Twitter account says that he lives in Albany. He reported online that he was thrown off the social media site on April 29 over his denial of the Holocaust, and wrote that “Hitler saved more [J]ewish lives than any man in history.”


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GOP ( 13

Struggling in the Aftermath of the Fire? Recovery counseling is available for YOUTH and ADULTS affected by the North Bay fires. Supportive counselors are ready to provide care for grief, depression, anxiety, trauma.

Call for an appointment: 707.579.0465 ext. 227

Lomi Psychotherapy Clinic, serving our community for 30 years. Funding provided in part by the Redwood Valley and Santa Rosa Community Recovery Fund.

Psychotherapy Clinic 534 B Street, Santa Rosa | 707.579.0465 ext 227

LOCAL

Financial Good Guys

housing & Community serviCes

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LOTTERY FORMS AVAILABLE AT SANTA ROSA PUBLIC LIBRARIES: Central, Rincon Valley, and Northwest at Coddingtown

IN OUR OFFICE AND ON OUR WEBSITE AT: City Hall Annex 90 Santa Rosa Avenue Santa Rosa, CA 95404 www.srcity.org/section8 For more information call the Section 8 Waiting List Information line: (707) 543-3324 TO QUALIFY APPLICANTS’ ANNUAL GROSS INCOME MUST BE LESS THAN:

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requests to sift through. I asked him about his support among Asians, and about the Berkeley student housing address, and inquired after who lives there. “I think you could take a few good guesses,” he responded. “I think you can put two and two together.” Albany Assistant City Manager Isabelle Leduc declined to comment on the specter of a Holocaust-denying anti-Semite in their midst. “We really don’t know where that person lives,” she says. It’s not known what Little’s actual connection to the Berkeley address is, beyond that he listed it on a state form as his address and confirms that it’s where his campaign is located. There’s nothing illegal about that. A spokesman at the Federal Election Commission says that candidates for higher office don’t have to reveal their home addresses, and only need to provide a mailing address to the FEC. “The FEC has no jurisdiction over any residency requirements (i.e., a candidate running from a particular state or congressional district within a state),” says Myles Martin, public affairs specialist at the commission. “The Statement of Candidacy that a candidate files with the [FEC] requires that a candidate provide a ‘mailing address,’ but this need not be their actual residence address.” Little has not filed a Statement of Candidacy, or any other disclosure reports with the FEC, says Martin. He may not need to. The FEC only requires financial disclosures from candidates who have eclipsed a $5,000 threshold in contributions, or expenditures related to the campaign. The FEC has assigned a candidate identification number to him, says Martin, which it may do if a candidate “is qualified for the ballot in a state but has not filed a Statement of Candidacy with the FEC.” Little told the Yahoo interviewer that he’s cautioned supporters to not contribute any money to his campaign, given that those

contributions, and who made them, could ultimately be subject to public scrutiny. He also noted that he’s gotten some volunteers to help out with the campaign. The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has been tracking Little’s campaign, and in 2014 released a report on anti-Semitism around the world, which, surprisingly, found that there’s quite a bit of anti-Semitic sentiment among various Asian populations. For example, the survey found that some 53 percent of South Koreans answered “probably true” to a majority of anti-Semitic stereotypes, says the ADL’s Joanna Mendelson, the league’s senior investigative researcher and director of special projects. “If you look at the Asians supporting Little, there is no specific indication that he will be the knight in shining armor to the Asian community,” she says. “The optimist in me just hopes that individuals are just not totally educated on the divisive nature of his platform, and that they become educated.” She says of Little, “He is not nuanced in his anti-Semitism, and outright condemns any ‘dog whistle’ references [to Jews] in favor of his hate.” The Maine native’s blatant anti-Semitism is on display on his campaign platform. Among other promises, he says he’ll “introduce a bill to the U.S. Senate making it illegal to raise funds for any foundation related to the perpetuating of propaganda related to a ‘holocaust,’ formally making US’s stance on the holocaust to be that it is a Jewish war atrocity propaganda hoax that never happened.” He also calls for Twitter, Google and Facebook to be nationalized. Little’s least controversial campaign pledge is his plan to crash asteroids into the Mars atmosphere to make it more amenable to future humans who may travel there. That’s how far out things have become for the California Republican Party.


The week’s events: a selective guide N A PA & S O N O M A

Words of Wisdom

When illustrator Hallie Bateman had the realization as a young adult that her mom, writer Suzy Hopkins, would not be around forever, she decided to make a record of her mother’s wit and wisdom. Together, mother and daughter collaborated on ‘What to Do When I’m Gone,’ an illustrated stepby-step guide of sorts that offers insights into both pragmatic and poignant issues that are lovingly illustrated. Hopkins and Bateman appear with the book on Wednesday, May 9, at 7pm at Napa Bookmine (964 Pearl St., Napa; 707.733.3199) and Thursday, May 10, at 7pm at Readers’ Books (130 E. Napa St., Sonoma; 707.939.1779).

S A N TA R O S A

Pump It Up

This Mother’s Day weekend, the whole family can add some sporty fun to the brunch-heavy schedule by checking out the Ironman Santa Rosa triathlon and getting a glimpse of the many iron men and women partaking in the running, swimming and bicycling challenge that acts as a qualifying race for October’s Ironman World Championship in Hawaii. For locals, the best place to see the action is at the Ironman Village, where the athletes will be crossing the finish line throughout the day on Saturday, May 12, at Courthouse Square, Fourth Street and Mendocino Avenue in downtown Santa Rosa. ironman.com.

N A PA

Toast to Moms

With Mother’s Day food and wine events everywhere, the CIA at Copia is flipping the script on the culinary offerings with a weekend of interactive events. On Saturday, May 12, celebrate “Moms Who Make Wine” in a 21-and-over tasting event that pours selections from several local matronly winemakers. On Sunday, May 13, the CIA’s family fun day gets the Mother’s Day treatment with a “Brunch Batters” cooking class that teaches you and the kids, ages four and up, how to make pancakes and waffles with creative flair. CIA at Copia is located at 500 First St., Napa. Times and costs vary. 707.967.2530.

SEBASTOPOL

Empowering Pageantry

Veterans returning from duty can have trouble adjusting back to civilian life, women as much as men. In Lysa Heslov's documentary, ‘Served Like a Girl,’ several American women who were wounded in action after serving in Iraq and Afghanistan try to adapt to emotional, social and economic challenges in the United States. The film also highlights the Ms. Veteran America Competition, founded to help women veterans regain identities they lost in the war. “Served Like a Girl” screens as part of the Indie Lens Pop-Up series on Monday, May 14, at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 1pm and 7pm. Free. 707.525.4840.

—Charlie Swanson

GONE COUNTRY Superstar Carrie Underwood is one of many performers slated to appear when Live in the Vineyard Goes Country in Napa Valley, May 15–17. See Clubs & Venues, p21.

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Crush CULTURE

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Arts Ideas THINGS FALL APART Occidental native Daniel Ziblatt, right, and Steven Levitsky compare the authoritarian drift of the United States under Trump with failed democracies around the world in their new book.

Timely Lessons Daniel Ziblatt takes a page from history in ‘How Democracies Die’ BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

f the old saying is true, then those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.

Occidental native and Harvard professor of government Daniel Ziblatt knows his history, and he has made a career of studying political systems around the world. He is an expert in how political democracies form and how they fail, and offers a stark

history lesson in his bestselling book How Democracies Die, coauthored with fellow Harvard professor Steven Levitsky. Ziblatt returns to his hometown May 18 to give a reading and talk about his book at the Occidental Center for the Arts. Ziblatt began examining politics while attending a German boarding school as part of a high school exchange program in 1990. “This was the year of

German unification,” Ziblatt says. “That was an exciting year to be in Germany, after the fall of the Berlin Wall.” In college, Ziblatt studied German history, literature and European politics. As a professor at Harvard, Ziblatt specializes in those subjects with an emphasis on democratization and state building. He has authored two books on the topic, 2006’s Structuring the State and 2017’s

Conservative Parties and the Birth of Democracy. While Ziblatt was examining Europe, How Democracies Die co-author Levitsky studied Latin American politics. The two have previously co-instructed classes on democratic crises around the world, though never on the U.S. “During the primary season of the [2016 presidential] election, we started talking about U.S. politics and how we were seeing echoes of things we had studied in other countries,” Ziblatt says. Candidate Donald Trump threatened to lock up his rival, called the press the enemy of the people and accused the government of rigging elections. “[Democracies] don’t die the way they used to,” says Ziblatt. “They used to die through military coups, men with guns.” Since the collapse of communism in the 20th century, Ziblatt says that democracies have begun to die at the ballot box, with presidents and prime ministers being elected to office and then dismantling democracy from within. “We started to realize there were some useful lessons to be learned,” says Ziblatt. “Just having elections is no guarantee of democracy.” For those discouraged by the polarized political atmosphere, Ziblatt and Levitsky offer steps that both Republicans and Democrats can take to save our democracy. “As much as we disagree with or are frightened by our political opponent, it’s important to continue to abide by and act in a way that reinforces democratic norms,” Ziblatt says. Daniel Ziblatt reads from ‘How Democracies Die’ on Friday, May 18, at the Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Court. 7pm. $5. 707.874.9392.


Jeff Thomas

SHADOW SEEKER Sarah Wintermeyer is great in the title role of ‘Peter Pan.’

Young at Heart ‘Peter Pan’ soars in Spreckels production BY HARRY DUKE

P

eter Pan has been seen onstage in one form or another for well over a hundred years. The J. M. Barrie classic survived being Disney-fied and even Christopher Walken–ized in a disastrous live television spectacle. The most popular adaptation is the 1954 musical starring Mary Martin. It’s that version that takes flight in a wellmounted production running at

‘Peter Pan’ runs Friday–Sunday through May 20 at Spreckels Performing Arts Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Friday–Saturday, 7pm; Saturday–Sunday matinee, 1pm; Thursday, May 17, 7pm. $16–$28. 707.588.3400.

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Stage

the Spreckels Performing Arts Center through May 20. Peter Pan (a winsome Sarah Wintermeyer) has lost his shadow while eavesdropping on story time at the Darling household. While retrieving it late one night, he awakens eldest child Wendy Darling (Lucy London), and after a quick flight demonstration, Peter convinces Wendy and her brothers to join him in Neverland. They’ll soon cross paths with some warriors and the dastardly Captain Hook (David Yen) and his scurvy pirate crew. Director Sheri Lee Miller and her team get almost everything right here, from casting to costumes and sets, from choreography to musical direction. Yen must be on a low-fiber diet, as he doesn’t really chew up the scenery as much as one would expect with such a role. Still terrifically entertaining, his decision to go small with some things puts the bits in danger of being lost on the large Spreckels stage. Nice supporting work is done by Craig Bainbridge as Hook’s right-hand man, Smee, Morgan Harrington as Mrs. Darling and the entire cast as Wendy’s siblings, various warriors, pirates and Lost Boys. Honorable mention goes to the backstage “flight crew” and to Andy Templeton who spends the show costumed as either Nana the dog or a tick-tocking crocodile, but manages to get some of the biggest audience reactions. Miller handles the problematic parts of Barrie’s script—its depiction of Native Americans— by transmogrifying them from an “Indian” tribe to nonspecific “warriors” and costuming them in a patchwork of styles and designs. It helps, but some dialogue (“Let’s smoke a peace pipe!”) and lyrics are still a bit cringe-worthy. Nevertheless, Peter Pan makes for a great evening of family entertainment. Rating (out of 5):


Film

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STOLEN MOMENTS Rachel Weisz, left, and Rachel McAdams have secrets to keep in Sebastián Lelio’s new London-set film.

Black Sheep

Rachel Weisz hits her stride in ‘Disobedience’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T ® BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, May 11 – Thu, May 17

D IN E - I N C I N E M A Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule for Fri, Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for Fri, April –– Thu, April 22nd

Schedule• for Fri, June 22nd• Salads - Thu, June 28th Bruschetta Paninis •Award Soups • Appetizers Academy “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance 8 Great Beers on Tap + Wine by the Glass and Bottle

Foreign Language Film!Stone In Years!” – Box Office “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling

Moore David Duchovny (12:45 3:00 5:15) 7:30 9:40 PG WALTZ WITH BASHIR RBG Demi A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 7:00 R JONESES (12:30) 2:453:00 5:00 5:10) 7:20 9:15 9:45 (12:50 7:20 R9:30 R TULLY (12:30) 2:40 4:50 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award Noms Including BestRActor! R Stylized, “A DISOBEDIENCE Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More THE WRESTLER

(1:15 4:10) 7:10 9:40 Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 7:30 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS PG-13 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR (12:30 2:45 5:15) 7:35 9:50 SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This Believable (1:15) 7:10 9:40 R One of This Year’s Best!” – Newsday NR If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

LIFE OF THE PARTY

RACER AND THE JAILBIRD ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including (1:30 4:15) 7:05 9:45

PRODIGAL SONS R (1:00) 3:10 5:20 Best Picture, Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 ShowPG-13 Tue or Thu MILK – Rolling “Haunting and Hypnotic!” Stone (12:30 2:45 7:15 R9:30 “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly – Newsweek (1:30) 4:105:00) 6:45 Funny!” 9:30

ISLE OF DOGS

THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR

(1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms PG-13 No Including Passes “★★★1/2! An unexpected Gem!” – USA Today FROST/NIXON

(1:00 FROST/NIXON 4:00) 7:00 3D: 9:55 (2:15) 7:20 R

GREENBERG (2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00) R – Slant5:00 Magazine THEREVOLuTIONARY DEATH OF9:50 STALIN ROAD

R “Deliciously unsettling!” (2:50) 7:25 Mon: (2:50) PARIS, JE(3:30) T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50–Thu: RLA Times

Honorable 5/11–5/17 Tully R 10:45-1:30-3:45-6:45-9:00

Thursday 5/17 Only: 1:30-3:45-6:45-9:00 RBG PG 10:30-12:45-3:00-6:00-8:15 Disobedience R 10:15-1:00-3:30-6:15-8:50 Lives Well Lived NR 11:00-1:15-3:156:30-8:30, Thursday 5/17 Only: 11:00-1:15-3:15 Isle of Dogs PG13 6:15pm No show times Wed 5/16 and Thur 5/17! Lean on Pete R 1:15pm

Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story NR 10:15am Oh Lucy! NR 4:00-8:40 Wed 5/16 Only: 4:00pm, No show times Thur 5/17!

Book Club PG13 Sneak previews Thur 5/17 @5:00 and 7:30, Opens Fri 5/18!

Pope Francis: A Man of His Word PG Sneak Preview Thur 5/17 @7pm, Opens Fri5/18!

551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

THE presents GHOST Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of (1:15) 4:15 7:00 9:30 R

YOU WERE NEVER (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK R HERE Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 THEREALLY MOST DANGEROuS (12:50 5:20) 9:50 Mon: 9:30 Thu (12:50) SICKO MOVIES MORNING MANIN INTHE AMERICA

I FEEL PRETTY

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON MonPG-13 PAPERS DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! (12:00 4:30) 6:50 9:00 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 2:15 6:50 No7:30 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! R 10:15 AM 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa Redgrave Meryl Streep CloseAM Advance Show Thu,CHONG’S May Glenn 17 10:40 7:45 CHEECH AND RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) EVENING R 10:45 AM 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS (Sun Only) Starts Fri,Thu, June 29th! Advance Show May 17 (5:15)

DEADPOOL 2 BOOK CLUB

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE

MACBETH Sat, May 19 10am

Life of the Party • Tully Avengers: Infinity War No Passes Isle of Dogs • Deadpool 2 Solo: A Star Wars Story Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

here used to be a class of filmmakers known as “women’s directors,” a phrase that sounds like a putdown.

Chile’s Sebastián Lelio (Gloria, A Fantastic Woman) exemplifies the best talents of a women’s director: the empathy, the ability to dramatize without soaking in cheap emotion and the expert use of the close-up shot. Lelio’s star in his new film, Disobedience, is Rachel Weisz. In earlier years, Weisz was choked a bit by her beauty—she was nervous, slightly self-apologetic. As she’s matured, she’s improved. It’s as if she’s finally gotten used to being in her own skin. Disobedience is one of Weisz’s best movies. It’s a love story set against a gray-brown North London. Weisz’s Ronnie Krushka, born Ronit, is the daughter of an esteemed Orthodox rabbi. She turned her back on her heritage and became a photographer in New York. Her first scene tells us everything about how she’s transgressed: she’s doing a portrait of a man covered with tattoos, specifically forbidden by Leviticus. When Ronnie’s father dies, she returns for the funeral and to find out about her inheritance. We can tell what the congregation thinks of Ronnie; she’s such a black sheep, they practically baa in her face. The woman she once loved, Esti Kuperman (Rachel McAdams), has since dutifully married. Esti’s husband, Dovid (Alessandro Nivola, sort of a more discreet version of Joaquin Phoenix), had once been Ronnie’s intended. Lelio balances the erotic tensions and the fear between the two women. He builds to a remarkable love scene that neither strips the actresses bare nor looks too vanilla-frosted. The problem is that there’s no way to resolve this affair to the satisfaction of either romantics or realists, so the ending frays into a series of tentative scenes that make it look like Lelio wanted it both ways. In this romance between a weak person who submitted to a loveless marriage, and a strong person who walked away, McAdams isn’t as fascinating as Weisz. But Disobedience is quality all around. ‘Disobedience’ opens Friday at Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.


LOUD AND PROUD Vocal Alchemy

choir member Riley Borges lends her voice to the Inclusive Festival.

Music for All

New fest celebrates our differences BY CHARLIE SWANSON

S

anta Rosa’s Arlene Francis Center has seen all manner of music festivals in its time, though nothing quite like the Inclusion Festival, which debuts May 12. The event is the brainchild of special-needs educator Emily Parker, a Sonoma County native currently working at a private preschool with a model of “full inclusion.” Rather than placing students with disabilities in separate classrooms, the practice of inclusion integrates those students into a regular class setting. “Full inclusion is a great model for everybody to show their strengths and participate in all aspects of education and community life,” Parker says. Beyond the classroom, Parker

is also interested in designing networks of resources for individuals with special needs, and says the idea of inclusion can and should spread to community events as well. “We have a diverse ‘neurotypical’ community,” she says. “People who need different things to feel comfortable at a concert, for example.” After learning about a music festival in Europe that catered to individuals with special needs, Parker was inspired to create the Inclusion Festival to give the local community a day of creative fun with all the necessary sensory accommodations. The Inclusion Festival will offer a full day of live music and dancing, with interactive art projects, group drumming and a sensory buffet packed with tactile experiences, fidget toys and ear protection for patrons to use. The main stage lineup includes a variety of performers, including Polynesian dancers, Vocal Alchemy special-needs choir, Bay Area indie-jazz outfit Nassab and the Sheep, and Santa Rosa–based Americana songwriter Karen Shook. On the patio, a silent disco will feature several local DJs spinning music that’s wirelessly tapped directly into special headphones. The venue’s classroom space will host an expressive art experience led by local nonprofit Alchemia, which specializes in art-based therapy for adults with developmental disabilities. Food, beer and wine will be available, and the event will have volunteers on hand to help guide patrons through the day. “I’m hoping that everyone can come and have something that speaks to them,” Parker says. “We’re keeping it inclusive.” The Inclusion Festival takes place on Saturday, May 12, at Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 3–9pm. $10–$25 sliding scale. 707.528.3009.

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Jill Newman

Music

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Music 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI FRI MAY 11

CHARLES LLOYD

80TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION WITH

ZAKIR HUSSAIN BILL FRISELL & MORE FRED HERSCH TRIO TRIO DA PAZ WITH ANAT COHEN CELEBRATING GERI ALLEN WITH

RAVI COLTRANE DAVE HOLLAND AND TERRI LYNE CARRINGTON GEORGE CABLES TRIO FESTIVAL ALL-STARS WITH BOBBY WATSON AZAR LAWRENCE DAVID WEISS CHICO FREEMAN AND BILLY HART MARC CARY TRIO DR. MICHAEL WHITE’S ORIGINAL LIBERTY JAZZ BAND ADAM THEIS WITH THE COSA NOSTRA STRINGS

GRATEFUL BLUEGRASS BOYS

North Bay Sinfonietta

AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS !! $20–25/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

MON MAY 14

LENNY ROOTS

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

SAT MAY 19

SHARKMOUTH

+ CAITLIN JEMMA AND THE GOODNESS, MISS MOONSHINE $10–15/DOORS 7:30/SHOW 8/21+

MON MAY 21

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

DJ SMOKY

(1-BLOOD/KING OF KINGS)

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED MAY 23

MAKING MOVIES + ALEX CUBA

$10–13/DOORS 7/SHOW 7/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

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CO U

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SAT, MAY 12

AQUA NETT

THIS AY! SATURD

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

EMPTY SPACES PINK FLOYD

The Soul of Mantra Live

SAT, JUN 16

THE AMERICAN TRIBUTE TO

SAT, JUN 30

UNION JACK AND THE RIPPERS SAT, JUL 7

healdsburgjazz.org or phone 24/7: 800-838-3006 Also available at Levin and Cº.

Tribute to Neil Young features Sean Leahy, James Nash, Grahame Lesh, Steve Pile, Mark Karan and many others. May 11, 8pm. $20-$22. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773. Spend Mother’s Day with the Grammy-nominated singer, DJ, songwriter, actress, entrepreneur, educator and humanitarian. May 13, 8pm. $20-$25. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

REPUBLIC

ON SALE NOW

Longtime indie-rock outfit headed by Zach Rogue performs their 2007 album “Asleep at Heaven’s Gate” in its entirety. May 12, 6:30pm. $35. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Sister Carol

IA

A G R I C U LT U R E INDUSTRY R E C R E AT I O N

Rogue Wave

Guitarmageddon

Y

CALIFORN

Chamber orchestra presents their final concert of the season under the direction of its founder and conductor Cynthia Weichel. May 11, 8pm. $10. Church of the Incarnation, 550 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2604.

MARIN COUNTY

DANNY DASH ANDREWS

secondary logo for all uses 1.25” width and smaller

Inclusion Festival

(GERMANY/JAMAICA)

THE ROCK COLLECTION

MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE FEATURING HEALDSBURG TOURISM IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

SONOMA COUNTY

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

$10–13/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

SAT MAY 12

SAT, MAY 26 primary logo for all uses above 1.25” width

Concerts Music festival for people with special needs and their families, friends and allies features DJs, group drumming, dancing, creative art and more. May 12, 3pm. $10-$25. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

JOYRIDE

AND MORE!

SO

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 9 -1 5, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

ROSAPALOOZA!

WITH

ALICE IN THE GARDEN AND PLUSH

HOUSE OF ROCK 3410 Industrial Drive SANTA ROSA 707.709.6039

TICKETS & INFO:

ROCKSTARUNIVERSITY.COM

Chant masters Deva Premal & Miten, accompanied by Nepalese bansuri maestro Manose and others, offer an evening of meditation and song. May 12, 7:30pm. $35 and up. Marin Center Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

NAPA COUNTY Ken Peplowski & Diego Figueiredo Duo Napa Valley Jazz Society

Flamingo Lounge

May 11, Konsept Party Band. May 12, Salsa Night. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

presents the acclaimed clarinetist and guitarist in an intimate afternoon show. May 13, 4pm. $25-$45. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

Rufus Wainwright

Glaser Center

Pianist, vocalist, composer, pop songwriter and celebrated prima donna takes the stage in Napa as part of a West Coast tour. May 12, 8pm. $50-$75. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

May 11, Organix. May 12, Collaboration with David Scott. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe

May 9, Stephen Inglis. May 10, Michael Menager. May 11, Steve Wolf and Mason Holcomb. May 12, Dictator Tots. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

May 10, Midnight Sun massive with Common Knowledge and Maya Leon. May 11, Billy Kemp and Wayne Haught. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Brewsters Beer Garden May 10, Kevin Russell & His So Called Friends. May 11, the Soulshine Band. May 12, 2 and 6pm, the Stu Tails and Matt Reischling & the Black Box. May 13, 3pm, Ain’t Misbehavin’. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

May 11, Sharkmouth. May 12, Mr December. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036. May 13, 3pm, Occidental Community Choir Spring Concert. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

May 12, 3pm, “Schubert’s Legacy” with musicians from the Valley of the Moon Music Festival. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

May 11, Grateful Bluegrass Boys. May 12, the Rock Collection. May 14, Selecta Lenny Roots. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

May 11, Aki Kumar and Jon Lawton. May 12, Wendy DeWitt. May 13, 1pm, Shelby, Texas. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Jackson Theater

May 11, 7:30pm, “Voyagers & Dreamers” with the SRJC Concert Choir & Chamber Singers. May 12, 7:30pm, “Metamorphosis” with Santa Rosa Junior College music department. Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

Lagunitas Tap Room

May 12, 5:30pm, Vintner’s Chamber Orchestra. 18000 Old Winery Rd, Sonoma. 800.926.1266.

May 9, Jason Bodlovich. May 10, Blue Radio. May 11, Rhythm Rangers. May 12, Big Blu Soul Revue. May 13, Parts & Labor. May 14, KWMR birthday bash with Marble Party and West Marin School Gospel Singers and Rock Band. May 16, Jon Gonzales Stringband. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Cellars of Sonoma

Main Street Bistro

Buena Vista Winery

May 13, 2pm, Simon Kinsman. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Crooked Goat Brewing

May 12, 3pm, Sean Carscadden. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Elephant in the Room

May 11, John Courage Trio. May 12, Awesome Hot Cakes. May 13, 6pm, Paul Riley and friends. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

May 11, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. May 12, Levi Lloyd Blues Band. May 13, Barbara Olney. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Murphy’s Irish Pub & Restaurant May 11, Sonoma Sound Syndicate. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall May 12, Mike Love. 23


Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Newman Auditorium

Occidental Center for the Arts

May 11-12, Occidental Community Choir Spring Concert. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

The Phoenix Theater

May 11, Mestis with Hyvmine and Sloth & Turtle. May 12, Undocufund benefit with Sabertooth Zombie and Hash Gordon. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Redwood Cafe

May 10, Funk ‘n’ Roll. May 11, Irie Rockerz. May 12, the Pulsators. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

MARIN COUNTY Ali Akbar College of Music

May 13, 5pm, Dhrupad with Uday Bhawalkar. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6372.

Fenix

May 13, 11am, Mother’s Day Brunch with Eric Wiley. May 13, 6:30pm, Big Wide Grin. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

May 10, Country Line Dancing. May 11, Aerocksmith and Cruella. May 12, Sunhunter with Lender and Charley Peach. May 13, 1pm, Natural Gas Jazz Band. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Marin Center Showcase Theatre

May 11, Joe Craven & the Sometimers. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

May 11, 8pm and , May 12, 2:30pm, “Showtime! A Tribute to Broadway” with Mayflower Chorus. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

19 Broadway Club

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

May 12, Clean River Alliance Fundraiser with Sol Horizon. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Sonoma Speakeasy

May 10, King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. May 11, the Gentlemen Soldiers. May 12, Atomic Cocktail. May 13, 5pm, Lynne O & the Riots. May 13, 8:30pm, Sonoma blues jam. May 15, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. May 16, the Acrosonics. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Sonoma Valley Woman’s Club

May 12, 7:30pm, Vox Populi spring concert. 574 First St East, Sonoma. 707.373.0700.

Spancky’s Bar

May 11, People of Earth. May 12, Blithedale Canyon. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

The Star

May 10, Redwood Soul with Brycon the DJ. May 13, Coyote Slim. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.6390.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

May 11, the Musers. May 12, Jeff Ray and friends. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip

May 11, the Bloodstones. 1910

May 10, Revenant with Jonesy. May 11, Lucky Drive with Kool Whip. May 12, Longview and Marigold. May 13, 4pm, Relatively Dead. May 13, 8pm, Cascade Canyon Band. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

May 9, Kris Bullock and friends. May 10, SlimJim. May 11, Michael Aragon Quartet. May 12, KC Filson Trio. May 13, Doug Nichols and friends. May 14, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. May 16, Humdinger Band. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

May 10, Dan Zemelman Duo. May 11, Nicholas Culp Trio. May 12, Ian McArdle Trio. May 13, Aaron Hipschman Trio. May 15, Adam Shulman Duo. May 16, Noa Levy. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Sausalito Seahorse

May 10, Pilar’s Musical Play Shop. May 11, Cole Tate student showcase. May 12, the Marinfidels. May 13, 4pm, Avance. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Sweetwater Music Hall

May 10, Sallie Ford and Mike Coykendall. May 11, Tainted Love. May 12, the Coffis Brothers & the Mountain Men with David Luning. 19

Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

21

Terrapin Crossroads May 9, Magic in the Other. May 10, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. May 11, Top 40 Friday with the Rowan Brothers. May 12, Turning into a Butterfly. May 13, 3:30pm, Margaritaville Mother’s Day with Midnight North. May 15, Lake Charlatans. May 16, Colonel & the Mermaids. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa May 9, John Vicino. May 12, Austin Hicks. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Blue Note Napa May 9, John Courage. May 12, Cecil Ramirez. May 13, Mother’s Day brunch with Kellie and Alex Fuller. May 15, Analog Us and Cabbagehead. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue May 13, 3pm, Rob Watson and Groovality with Paul Branin. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Ca’ Momi Osteria May 11, the Singer and the Songwriter. May 12, Nate Lopez. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards May 12, Michael McNevin. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC

Wed 5⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $50–$60 • All Ages

Music Heals International

5th Anniversary feat David Nelson, Steve Kimock, DJ Logic, J. Lane, R. Sylvester, Melvin Seals, Dan "Lebo" Lebowitz, Jason Crosby, Dave Ellis, Sunshine Becker, J. Pehrson + Special guests Thu 5⁄10 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $13–$18 • All Ages

Sallie Ford, Willy Tea Taylor, Mike Coykendall Sat 5⁄12 • Doors 1pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

The Well Known Strangers FREE SHOW

Sat 5⁄12 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $12–$15 • All Ages

GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. CALENDAR FRI MAY 11 • THE MUSERS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE

The Coffis Brothers & The Mountain Men

SAT MAY 12 • JEFF RAY AND FRIENDS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE

Sun 5⁄13 • Doors 11:30am ⁄ FREE • All Ages

WED MAY 16 • HONKY TONK NIGHT WITH THE TWIN OAKS GEAR JAMMERS EVERY 1ST AND 3RD WEDNESDAY 7:30PM / ALL AGES / FREE

+ David Luning FREE SHow with

Roger McNamee of Moonalice (solo)

Sun 5⁄13 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$25 • All Ages

Celebrate Mother's Day with "Mother Culture" Grammy Nominated Jamaican Reggae Legend

Sister Carol + IrieFuse, Lee Tafari Thu 5⁄19 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $17–$22 • All Ages

Maggie Rose + Simon Lunche

THU MAY 17 • COUNTRY LINE DANCE EVERY 1ST AND 3RD THURSDAY 7PM / ALL AGES / $10 CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Ambrosia at Silos Napa, May 19

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant May 12, Jinx Jones & the King Tones. May 13, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Napa Valley May 15-17, Live in the Vineyard Goes Country with Carrie Underwood and others. RSVP required. various locations, Napa, liveinthevineyardgoescountry. com.

Silo’s May 10, Julius Melendez & Conjunto Seis de Montuno. May 11, Neon Velvet. May 12, the Cripple Creek Band. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Rare opportunity to see this band LIVE in a small venue. Meet and Greet included with 7pm show. 70’s hits include: How Much I Feel and Biggest Part of Me Adv: $100 and $75

Uptown Theatre May 10, Stephen Stills and Judy Collins. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Yao Family Wines May 11, 5pm, Ken Teel jazz & bossa nova guitar. 929 Main St, St Helena. 707.986.5874.

530 Main Street, Napa 707.251.5833 | silosnapa.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 9 -1 5, 20 1 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

May 9, Mads Tolling with the Santa Rosa Junior College Jazz Combos. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 9 -1 5, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

Outdoor Dining Sat & Sun Brunch 11–3 FRIDAY

MOVIE SHOWING:

LEANING INTO THE WIND MAY 11 MOVIE• DOORS 7:30PM • ALL AGES SATURDAY MIKE LOVE

MAY 12

WITH SEBASTIAN ST. JAMES

FRIDAY

ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL

MAY 18 SATURDAY

MAY 19

COVERS/TRIBUTE• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

AGAINST ME! WITH CHRIS

TUESDAY

RODNEY ATKINS

MAY 25 WEDNESDAY

Songs of James Taylor and Carole King 8:30

Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet

COUNTRY• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SUNDAY

FRIDAY

Funky Dance Grooves 8:00 / No Cover

May 12 King James Sat

WITH WILLY TEA TAYLOR

& SHARP/SHOCK MAY 20 FARREN PUNK• DOORS 6:30PM • 21+

MAY 22

Din n er & A Show

May 11 Tom Finch Trio Fri

REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

PETTY THEFT TRIBUTE TO TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS

WITH MARK MACKAY

COUNTRY• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

TREVOR HALL

REGGAE• DOORS 7PM • 21+

AN EVENING WITH

JON ROTH JUN 13 ULI ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

6⁄14 The Kingston Trio, 6⁄16 Soul Ska & Sol Horizon, 6⁄17 Buckethead, 6⁄23 Charley Peach & One Armed Joey, 6⁄27 SEVA's 40th Anniversary — Dark Star Orchestra, 6⁄30 Slum Village, 7⁄8 Katchafire, 7⁄13 Saved By The 90's, 7⁄14 Steelin' Dan – The Music of Steely Dan, 7⁄17 Stephen Malkmus & The Jicks, 7⁄27 Booker T. Jones

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Lunch & Dinner 7 Days a Week

Join us May 13th / 10am–3pm

Mother’s Day Dinner 5-8pm

Sampson Band May 19 Annie Rock, Blues, R&B 8:30 Sat

Fri

May 25 Sat

Illeagles Weekend

Bay Area’s Premier Eagles Tribute Band

May 26 8:30

BBQs on the Lawn are Back! Memorial Day Weekend

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

May 27 Pablo Cruise Sun

Mon

May 28

+ Burrows and Dilbeck

Wonderbread 5

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Sun

Jun 17 Father’s Day Elvin Bishop Sun Jun 24 Annual Beatle Q with The Sun Kings Sun

Jul 1

Stoned Soul Picnic

Blues Broads / Sons of the Soul Revivers Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Arts Events Gallery Openings SONOMA COUNTY Graton Gallery

May 9-Jun 10, “Feathers & Fur,” animals are the focus of art works by Mylette Welch, Lauri Luck, Suki Diamond and others. Reception, May 12 at 2pm. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center May 10-Aug 29, “Microcosms,” Lucy Martin’s botanical paintings zoom in on the mysterious beauty of mushrooms and lichens found in forests. Reception, May 12 at 3pm. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Moshin Vineyards

May 12-Jul 12, “Thomas Burgard Art Show,” see what the Sonoma Coast resident and landscape painter has been up to. Reception, May 12 at 5:30pm. 10295 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. Daily, 11am to 4:30pm 707.433.5499.

Riverfront Art Gallery

wed may 9 thu may 10 fri may 11 sat may 12 thu may 17 fri may 18 sat may 19 thu may 24 fri may 25 thu may 31 fri jun 1 sat jun 2

MusiC by bob ANd bRANdoN 8pm⁄No Cover

fuNkNRoLL

8pm⁄Dancing/$10

iRiE RoCkERz

8:30pm⁄Dancing/$12

ThE PuLsAToRs 8:30pm⁄Dancing⁄$10

dANGERMuffiN

8:30pm⁄ Folk/Jam/Grass⁄Dance/$10

ToM RiGNEy & fLAMbEAu 8:30pm⁄ Dance/$15 Adv/$20 DOS

MisNER & sMiTh

8:30pm⁄Americana/$10

CouRT ‘N’ disAsTER 8pm⁄Dancing/$10

CRAiG CAffALL bANd 8:30pm⁄Dancing/$10

MikE sALiANi bANd 8pm⁄Dancing/$10

LAuRiE MoRVAN bANd 8:30/Blues⁄Dancing/$10

ThE hoTs

8:30/Dancing/$10

Gallery of Art on Walls: “ART & PLACE”

Featuring Jamal Russell Black/Photography, Robert Cormack/Linocuts, Brian Shears/ Palette Knife, Painting, Pulchritude NoW ThRu MAy 15

VisiT ouR WEbsiTE, REdWoodCAfE.CoM 8240 oLd REdWood hWy, CoTATi 707.795.7868

May 10-Jul 8, “There’s No Place Like Home,” show highlights Dan Melville’s sculptural lamps created from found metal, Anne Monk’s assemblage mirrors, Ed Price’s wildlife paintings and Lucia Antonelli’s conceptual abstract art. Reception, May 12 at 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown

May 9-Jun 1, “After Nature,” exhibit explores how nature is captured and evaluated in art and photography. Reception, May 11 at 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Desta Art & Tea Gallery

May 9-Jun 15, “Passage of Time,” solo show presenting works by Katheryn Holt runs concurrently with “Embracing it All,” showing works by Holly

Van Hart. Reception, May 11 at 6pm. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6. 415.524.8932.

massive triathlon. May 12. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa, ironman.com.

Headlands Center for the Arts

JaM Cellars Second Birthday

May 13-31, “Headlands Graduate Fellows Exhibition,” see works from the year-long studio program for recent MFA graduates. Reception, May 13 at 2pm. 944 Fort Barry, Sausalito. Sun-Fri, noon to 4. 415.331.2787.

Comedy Aidan Park

Actor, producer and standup star takes the stage with openers Karen McCarthy and Stacy Martinelli. May 12, 7pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

David Sedaris

One of America’s top humor writers delivers sardonic wit and incisive social critiques. May 11, 8pm. $59. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

wellRED: From Dixie with Love

Comedy trio of Trae Crowder (the Liberal Redneck), Drew Morgan and Corey Ryan Forrester celebrate what’s great about the South with a focus on compassion and tolerance. May 10-11. $29-$59. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Dance Confidential

All-new dance tour from the stars of ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars,” Maksim Chmerkovskiy, Valentin Chmerkovskiy and Peta Murgatroyd. $55 and up. May 14, 8pm. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Events IRONMAN Santa Rosa Top athletes compete in a

Enjoy an all-day birthday playlist of music, chances to win BottleRock passes, giveaways and wine. May 12. Free admission. JaM Cellars, 1460 First St, Napa. 707.265.7577.

Mother’s Day Shopping Event

Guests can purchase special gift packages and promotions while moms enjoy treats from the chef and a complimentary splash of wine. May 12-13, 11am. McEvoy Ranch, 5935 Red Hill Rd, Petaluma. 707.769.4138.

Tiny Pit Bull Adoption Event

Support the Tiny Pitbull dog rescue, with adoptable dogs, raffles, giveaways and a whole lot of fun on hand. May 12, 12pm. Jamison’s Roaring Donkey, 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Roller Derby

The local Resurrection Roller Girls go head-to-head with the Peninsula Roller Girls in a rolling bout of action. May 12, 6:30pm. $5-$12. Cal Skate, 6100 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park.

Stewart Cellars Spring Soiree

Seasonal party includes new wine, live music, baked goods by Monday Bakery, flowers by Monkey Group, a farm fresh cart of local produce and custom shaved ice creations. May 12, 2:30pm. $55. Stewart Cellars, 6752 Washington St, Yountville. 707.963.9160.

Film Chinatown

Vintage Film Series encourages guests to dress in the theme of the movie. May 14, 7pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Freaky Friday

A mother and daughter switch personality for a day in this 1976 classic comedy, screening just in time for Mother’s Day. May 12, 5pm. Free. CIA


Leaning into the Wind

Let’s Talk About Death Final Passages continues its monthly series with a screening of “Captain Fantastic,” starring Viggo Mortensen, followed by discussion. May 9, 6:30pm. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Nothing to Declare

French film about a Francophobe customs officer forced to team up with a Frenchman during the elimination of the FranceBelgium borders in the ‘90s. May 12, 4 and 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Served Like a Girl

Indie Lens Pop-Up series presents Lysa Heslov’s documentary about several American women who were wounded in action and are transitioning from soldier to civilian. May 14, 1 and 7pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Wonder Woman

Mother’s Day screening of the superheroine film features wine reception and Q&A with Diane Nelson from Warner Bros. May 13, 1pm. $10. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Food & Drink Friday Nights at the Museum: Breakfast & Brews

Drink and draw with samplings of Seismic Brewing Company’s new beers and breakfast from the Kendall-Jackson Culinary Team. RSVP required. May 11, 6pm. $30. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Calistoga Food & Wine Event

Three-day epicurean adventure features MichelinStar cuisine from invited and local culinary talent, paired with over 30 premier Calistoga wineries. May 10-12. $65 and

Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Garagiste Festival

Mother’s Day Brunch at Spoonbar

Get ahead of the crowds and discover several premium micro-wineries under one roof. May 12, 1pm. $55-$85. Sonoma Veterans Memorial Hall, 126 First St W, Sonoma, garagistefestival.com.

Italian Producer Tasting

Italian wine fans, and their mothers, are treated to an afternoon with four of the best Italian winemakers under one roof. May 13, 3pm. Free. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Moms Who Make Wine

All-inclusive, walk-around wine tasting event features wine made by women winemakers. May 12, 2pm. $35. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Mother’s Day at Benovia Treat Mom to a memorable tasting in the vineyard. May 12-13. $45. Benovia Winery, 3339 Hartman Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.526.4441.

Mother’s Day at Carneros

Family-style brunch and flower market features the region’s finest seasonal ingredients in a beautifully appointed setting. May 13, 9am. $85. Carneros Resort & Spa, 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Barndiva

Treat mom to a special brunch menu, with french toast for the kids. May 13. $55. Barndiva, 231 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.0100.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Dry Creek Kitchen

Chef Scott Romano prepares a three-course meal and offers a dessert menu. May 13, 11am. $55. Dry Creek Kitchen, 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Rio Nido Roadhouse

Annual brunch buffet is the perfect way to kick off mom’s special day. May 13, 9am. Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Sally Tomatoes Full-service brunch includes fresh carved meats, eggs Benedict, unlimited Champagne and a dessert pastry station. May 13, 10am.

Festive dining experience features bottomless mimosas and bellini bar, and decadent desserts. May 13. $15-$49 and up. Spoonbar, 219 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.7222.

Mother’s Day Celebration at the Hess Collection

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Enjoy an offering of four limited-release wines accompanied by petite seasonal pairings created by executive chef Chad Hendrickson. May 13, 11am. $65. Hess Collection Winery, 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa. 707.255.1144.

Mother’s Day on the Wine Train

Memorable afternoon features a multi-course gourmet lunch, with wine tastings and a journey through Wine Country. May 13, 11:30am. $166 and up. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa. 800.427.4124.

Rosés for Mom

Give mom what she wants this Mother’s Day: Rosé. May 13, 10am. Meadowcroft Wines, 23574 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.934.4090.

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Cali Calmécac first through fourth grade students don colorful costumes and perform folkloric and modern dances from Mexico, South America, the Caribbean and Africa. May 16, 6:30pm. $6. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

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Mother’s Day stroll features bites and wines as you celebrate the favorite ladies in your life. May 13, 11am. $45-$110. Brasswood Estate, 3111 St Helena Hwy, St Helena. 707.968.5434.

Enjoy several spirits and mixed drinks with great cocktails, guided by the Napa Valley Distillery. May 10, 7pm. $35. Robert Louis Stevenson Museum, 1490 Library Lane, St. Helena. 707.963.3757.

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Kids ages 7 to 10 are invited to write and produce a radio play that will air on KPCA the next day. May 12, 9:30am. $30$40. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.

Lectures A Scot Abroad in Napa Valley

Experience Napa of 1880 through the eyes of poet Robert Louis Stevenson. May 10, 6pm. St Helena Library, 1492 Library Lane, St Helena. 707.963.5244.

Readings Book Passage

May 9, 7pm, “The Girl Who Smiled Beads” with Clemantine Wamariya. May 10, 1:30pm, “Al Capone Throws Me a Curve” with Gennifer Choldenko. May 10, 7pm, “Tuning In” with Richard Roberts. May 11, 1pm, “Love & Ruin” with Paula McLain, includes signed book. $32. May 11, 7pm, “What to Do When I’m Gone” with Suzy Hopkins and Hallie Bateman. May 12, 7pm, “Shu Wei’s Revenge” with Jackson Fahnestock. May 14, 7pm, “Love & Trouble” with Claire Dederer. May 15, 7pm, “Yak Girl” with Dorje Dolma. May 16, 7pm, “Shadow Child” with Rahna Reiko Rizzuto. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Charles M Schulz Museum

May 12, 1pm, “Pashmina” with Nidhi Chanani. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa 707.579.4452.

Many Rivers Books & Tea

May 10, 7:30pm, “Yoga and Psyche” with Mariana Caplan. $5. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.8871.

Napa Bookmine

May 9, 7pm, “What to Do When I’m Gone” with Suzy Hopkins and Hallie Bateman. May 11, 6pm, “Client Earth” with James Thornton. May 15, 7pm, “The Electric Woman” with Tessa Fontaine. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

La Cage Aux Folles

May 11, 7pm, “Real Magic” with Dean Radin. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Hilarity erupts when two men partnered for better or worse get a bit of both after their son announces his marriage to the daughter of a bigoted, right-wing politician. Through May 20. $22-$35. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Readers’ Books

The Lone Ranger

May 12, 12pm, “Undead Girl Gang” with Lily Anderson. 610 First St, Shop 4, Napa. 707.726.6575.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

May 9, 7pm, “To Play Again” with Carol Rosenberger. May 10, 7pm, “What to Do When I’m Gone” with Suzy Hopkins and Hallie Bateman. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

May 11, 7pm, “Lone Rider” with Elspeth Beard. Free. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido 707.869.0821.

Sanglier Cellars

May 12, 2pm, “Windows on Provence” with Georgeanne Brennan, includes wine, conversation and book signing. 422 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg 707.433.6104.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

May 11, 7pm, “The California Field Atlas” with Obi Kaufmann. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

May 12, 7pm, “The Girl Who Smiled Beads” with Clemantine Wamariya, in conversation with Peter Coyote. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Sonoma Community Center

May 12, 2pm, “My Sonoma: Valley of the Moon” with Bill Lynch.. $5. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.938.4626.

Eurydice

Playwright Sarah Ruhl’s reimagining of the classic myth of Orpheus features contemporary characters taking a fresh look at a timeless love story. May 11-Jun 2. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Jeeves Intervenes

Sonoma Arts Live presents the British comedy about two 1920’s high-society playboys duping their relatives to escape an unwanted marriage and unwanted employment. May 11-27. $22-$37. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Aloha Spirit!

Silver Moon Theatre performs two episodes of the classic television show, complete with songs, commercials, sound effects and more, in this dinner theatre experience. May 13-14, 6pm. $35. Murphy’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

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A small town full of eccentric characters is the setting for this funny and compassionate production about family rivalries and dreams of stardom. Through May 13. $22$32. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Peter Pan

The classic story of the boy who didn’t grow up and his adventures in Neverland comes to life with high-flying action. Through May 20. $16-$30. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Water by the Spoonful

Heartfelt meditation on humanity follows a war veteran returning from Iraq and struggling to find his place in the world. Through May 13. $10-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Women in Jeopardy!

Theater

Show Mom the

Left Edge Theatre presents the comedy about two divorcées who are suspicious of their friend’s new boyfriend. Through May 27. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Inclusion of events in the print edition is at the editor’s discretion. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Retail cannabis lounges proposed in Santa Rosa BY STETT HOLBROOK

S

anta Rosa may soon join a small number of California cities that permit “cannabis lounges,” retail businesses with on-site cannabis consumption. While the regulatory hurdles for such businesses are high, the city’s permissive policies may usher in a new era of legal cannabis use in the city.

“This is a new aspect of the retail world that we’re willing to consider,” says Clare Hartman, Santa Rosa deputy planning director. Santa Rosa opened the application period for new cannabis businesses on April 9. Because of the anticipated demand, the window for applicants was just two weeks, to give a planning department still reeling from last year’s fire time to process applications. The city received 38 applications for retail businesses of various kinds, most of them dispensaries with delivery services. The city currently has three retail cannabis businesses.

There is no cap on additional permits. Hartman says the city will accept more applications once staff works through this new batch. A review of the applications revealed at least two businesses planning on-site consumption: Humanity Wellness, at 3791 Cleveland Ave., and Sustainable Growth Systems, at 2463 Bluebell Drive. Public consumption of cannabis is illegal in California, but under the Medicinal and AdultUse Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act, cities and counties may authorize on-site consumption to licensed retailers and businesses as long as they abide by age restrictions, prohibit alcohol sales and ensure consumption is not visible to the public. While on-site consumption is rare statewide, notable exceptions include West Hollywood, Oakland, San Francisco and Palm Springs. Sonoma County and Sebastopol both prohibit on-site consumption. Hartman does not expect a flood of cannabis lounges because of the city’s restrictive smoking laws (Vaping falls under the ordinance). But the next round of applications may yield more. Perhaps there will be lounges just for edibles? Of the 38 applicants, most are clustered around Yolanda Avenue and the northwestern section of the city, but provisions limit over-concentration of businesses. Proposed businesses within 300 feet of residential areas must hold a community meeting. Thirty-two of the applicants fall under that requirement. Hartman notes that some applicants want to locate near what she sees as like-minded businesses that celebrate Sonoma County lifestyle products. Solful, a new dispensary in Sebastopol, is applying to open a second location behind Trail House, a mountain bike shop/ beer lounge/cafe. There are also two businesses proposed on Briggs Avenue, near Vintner’s Square. “It’s interesting how cannabis is creeping into the culture we’ve been trying to encourage,” she says.


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Born under the sign of Taurus, Edmund Wilson was a renowned 20thcentury author and critic who wrote more than 30 books. He also served as editor for Vanity Fair and The New Republic, and influenced the work of at least seven major American novelists. When he was growing up, he spent most of his free time reading books: 16 hours a day during summer vacations. His parents, worried about his obsessive passion, bought him a baseball uniform, hoping to encourage him to diversify his interests. His response was to wear the uniform while reading books 16 hours a day. I trust you will be equally dedicated to your own holy cause or noble pursuit in the coming weeks, Taurus. You have cosmic clearance to be single-minded about doing what you love.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) It’s possible you could pass for normal in the next three weeks; you might be able to fool a lot of people into thinking you’re an average, ordinary contributor to the dull routine. But it will be far healthier for your relationship with yourself if you don’t do such a thing. It will also be a gift to your less daring associates, who in my opinion would benefit from having to engage with your creative agitation and fertile chaos. So my advice is to reveal yourself as an imperfect work-in-progress who’s experimenting with novel approaches to the game of life. Recognize your rough and raw features as potential building blocks for future achievements. CANCER (June 21–July 22) “Paradise is scattered over the whole earth,” wrote the scientific poet Novalis, “and that is why it has become so unrecognizable.” Luckily for you, Cancerian, quite a few fragments of paradise are gathering in your vicinity. It’ll be like a big happy reunion of tiny miracles all coalescing to create a substantial dose of sublimity. Will you be ready to deal with this much radiance? Will you be receptive to so much relaxing freedom? I hope and pray you won’t make a cowardly retreat into the trendy cynicism that so many people mistake for intelligence. (Because in that case, paradise might remain invisible.) Here’s my judicious advice: Be insistent on pleasure! Be voracious for joy! Be focused on the quest for beautiful truths! LEO (July 23–August 22) These days, your friends and allies and loved ones want even more from you than they usually do. They crave more of your attention, more of your approval, more of your feedback. And that’s not all. Your friends and allies and loved ones also hope you will give more love to yourself. They will be excited and they will feel blessed if you express an even bigger, brighter version of your big, bright soul. They will draw inspiration from your efforts to push harder and stronger to fulfill your purpose here on Planet Earth. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) One of the advantages you get from reading my horoscopes is that I offer confidential information about the gods’ caprices and leanings. For example, I can tell you that Saturn— also known as Father Time—is now willing to allot you a more luxurious relationship with time than usual, on one condition: that you don’t squander the gift on trivial pursuits. So I encourage you to be discerning and disciplined about nourishing your soul’s craving for interesting freedom. If you demonstrate to Saturn how constructively you can use his blessing, he’ll be inclined to provide more dispensations in the future. LIBRA (September 23–October 22)

Vincent van Gogh’s painting The Starry Night hangs on a wall in New York’s Museum of Modern Art. He created it in 1889 while living in a French asylum. Around that same time, 129 years ago, a sheepherder in Wyoming created a sourdough starter that is still fresh today. A

BY ROB BREZSNY

cook named Lucille Clarke Dumbrill regularly pulls this frothy mass of yeast out of her refrigerator and uses it to make pancakes. In the coming weeks, Libra, I’d love to see you be equally resourceful in drawing on an old resource. The past will have offerings that could benefit your future.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Love everyone twice as much and twice as purely as you ever have before. Your mental health requires it! Your future dreams demand it! And please especially intensify your love for people you allegedly already love but sometimes don’t treat as well as you could because you take them for granted. Keep this Bible verse in mind, as well: “Don’t neglect to show kindness to strangers; for, in this way, some, without knowing it, have had angels as their guests.”

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December

21) After meditating on your astrological aspects for an hour, I dozed off. As I napped, I had a dream in which an androgynous angel came to me and said, “Please inform your Sagittarius readers that they should be callipygian in the next two weeks.” Taken back, my dreaming self said to the angel, “You mean ‘callipygian’ as in ‘having beautiful buttocks’?” “Yes, sir,” the angel replied. “Bootylicious. Bumtastic. Rumpalicious.” I was puzzled. “You mean like in a metaphorical way?” I asked. “You mean Sagittarians should somehow cultivate the symbolic equivalent of having beautiful buttocks?” “Yes,” the angel said. “Sagittarians should be elegantly well-grounded. Flaunt their exquisite foundation. Get to the bottom of things with flair. Be sexy badasses as they focus on the basics.” “OK!” I said.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Now is a favorable time to discuss in elegant detail the semi-secret things that are rarely or never talked about. It’s also a perfect moment to bring deep feelings and brave tenderness into situations that have been suffering from half-truths and pretense. Be aggressively sensitive, my dear Capricorn. Take a bold stand in behalf of compassionate candor. And as you go about these holy tasks, be entertaining as well as profound. The cosmos has authorized you to be a winsome agent of change. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In his 1931 painting The Persistence of Memory, Salvador Dali shows three clocks that seem to be partially liquefied, as if in the process of melting. His biographer Meredith Etherington-Smith speculated that he was inspired to create this surrealistic scene when he saw a slab of warm Camembert cheese melting on a dinner table. I foresee the possibility of a comparable development in your life, Aquarius. Be alert for creative inspiration that strikes you in the midst of seemingly mundane circumstances. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“My whole life is messed up with people falling in love with me,” said Piscean poet Edna St. Vincent Millay. She spoke the truth. She inspired a lot of adoration, and it stirred up more chaos than she was capable of managing. Luckily, you will have fewer problems with the attention coming your way, Pisces. I bet you’ll be skilled at gathering the benefits and you’ll be unflummoxed by the pitfalls. But you’ll still have to work hard at these tasks. Here’s some help. Tip #1: Stay in close touch with how you really feel about the people who express their interest in you. Tip #2: Don’t accept gifts with strings attached. Tip #3: Just because you’re honored or flattered that someone finds you attractive doesn’t mean you should unquestioningly blend your energies with them.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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ARIES (March 21–April 19) The Torah is a primary sacred text of the Jewish religion. It consists of exactly 304,805 letters. When specially trained scribes make handwritten copies for ritual purposes, they must not make a single error in their transcription. The work may take as long as 18 months. Your attention to detail in the coming weeks doesn’t have to be quite so painstaking, Aries, but I hope you’ll make a strenuous effort to be as diligent as you can possibly be.

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