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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | MARCH 14-20, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.45

G S N I E S G I N A I STTHHEE PR W O L F R E E RK B D PA N A RT 133 C I NE I PP1 S MU ROH OTAT IN D C AN

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Byrne After Reading It is election season once again, and Congressman Jared Huffman allowed the Bohemian to follow him around for a few hours on the campaign trail (“On the Road With Jared,” March 7). Overall, Huffman’s political positions have much to commend—with the exception of his strong opposition to the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) movement, which is having a positive impact on Israeli oppression of the Palestinians

and deserves support. It’s an important topic that, sadly, did not make it into the story, which bordered on hagiography. Nor did the story report that Huffman’s largest campaign donor this season is Honeywell International—yes, that Honeywell, the multinational conglomerate that pollutes our natural resources drilling for oil and gas and has billions of dollars in war industry contracts. And in fourth place as a Huffman donor is CBRE Group, the real estate behemoth with billions on federal contracts that is owned by the family of Sen. Dianne Feinstein.

THIS MODERN WORLD

Is there a moral compass guiding Huffman’s career? Maybe, but as the Bohemian reported, his “childhood political hero” is Harry Truman, stalwart of the Kansas City Prendergast Machine, member of the Ku Klux Klan and the man who ordered the dropping of atom bombs on tens of thousands of Japanese children.

PETER BYRNE

Petaluma

By Tom Tomorrow

C Is for Conservation We are very happy that Napa County’s Watershed and Oak Woodlands Protection Initiative has been approved for inclusion as Measure C on the June ballot. We particularly like that this was named Measure C, as “C,” to us, stands for conservation, which we favor because our natural resources are not infinite. Those of us who have come together now have a name: Growers/Vintners for Responsible Agriculture. We want to communicate to the citizens of Napa County that there are many of us in the grower and vintner community who support this initiative. Our focus is on stewardship of our watershed, and we recognize that Measure C gives the voters the opportunity to ensure that our watershed is protected now and into the future. The Agricultural Preserve came into existence in 1968. Its 50th anniversary is being celebrated in many ways this year. Though it was considered very controversial and legally uncertain, it has weathered all tests and has protected Napa Valley for agriculture for the last half century. Measure C aims to offer protection to our agricultural watershed. Our watershed is the source of most of the water we use. We, as members of the vintner and grower community, understand how important a healthy watershed is to the citizens of Napa County, to our natural environment and to the perpetuation of sustainable agriculture. To the latter point, we know that we have a right to farm, but it is our obligation to farm responsibly. As with the Ag Preserve, the question to be asked is: Will the Napa Valley itself be better if this measure is passed? We strongly think so.

GROWERS/VINTNERS FOR RESPONSIBLE AGRICULTURE

Napa County

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


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ransportation remains the biggest challenge to clean air and climate protection in car-dependent California. Fortunately, Phil Ting, assemblyman from San Francisco, has proposed a game-changing piece of legislation, Assembly Bill 1745, also known as Clean Cars 2040.

Vehicles that run on fossil fuels are responsible for nearly 40 percent of California’s total greenhouse gas emissions, so electrification of transportation is crucial for the health of our people and the planet. Assembly Bill 1745 would unleash market forces by requiring that all new passenger vehicles registered in California would be zero-emission starting in 2040. The Center for Climate Protection is leading an all-out effort first to get AB 1745 voted into law. This will take a statewide effort. The campaign kicks off locally with a Call to Action meeting in Santa Rosa at the Glaser Center on March 22. The bill is in the Assembly Transportation Committee right now and is due to be voted on in mid-April. The top priority is to get eight yes votes from the transportation committee so that the bill advances to the Assembly floor. Cecilia Aguiar-Curry, who represents parts of Sonoma, Napa, Lake and Yolo counties, may be a swing vote on the committee. Her constituents need to let her know that they want her to vote yes on AB 1745. What else can you do? Show up and bring your friends to the launch and rally on March 22. We need everyone who supports clean air and climate protection to be there. You can also sign and share the Center for Climate Protection’s online petition in support of AB 1745 at climateprotection.org. To RSVP for the kick off meeting or for more information, contact jock@climateprotection.org. Jane Bender served on the Santa Rosa City Council for 10 years, including service as mayor from 2004–06. While in office, she championed the greenhouse gas emission targets, among other climate-protection initiatives. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

TRAUMATIC STRESS Alleged Veterans Home of California shooter and suicide victim Albert Wong had been

recently forced to leave a program for veterans with PTSD.

Now Yountville As legislators bicker over guns laws, tragedy strikes in Napa BY TOM GOGOLA

S

tate Sen. Bill Dodd was at a meeting in Napa County about wireless emergency alerts this past Friday morning when the emergency alert on his phone went off, along with those of Sonoma County Supervisor James Gore and District 4 Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry.

Dodd has sponsored a bill in Sacramento this year to address reported failings in the region’s early warning system after last year’s wildfires, but nobody could’ve warned the North Bay representative about what was happening Friday: U.S. Army veteran Albert Wong, a former infantryman, took three persons hostage and killed himself and the three women at a nonprofit residential unit run out of the

California Veterans Home in Yountville, located in Dodd’s district. When contacted last week, Dodd had just briefed a representative from Gov. Jerry Brown’s office. Early in the episode and while it was still an “active shooter” moment, he reported what’s now widely known about Wong: “This was a veteran who has PTSD that was in a program ) 10

DEBR IEFER Splitting the Difference The influential North Bay Labor Council has taken a stand on who it will endorse for Sonoma County Sheriff in 2018. Or rather, they’ve taken two stands. OK, they punted. Delegates at the NBLC, an arm of the AFL-CIO, couldn’t agree whether to endorse Santa Rosa city councilman and former city cop Ernesto Olivares, or former LAPD station commander John Mutz. So after taking a couple of votes where neither gained the requisite two-thirds to prompt a single endorsement, they announced a split endorsement on March 5. Mutz has emerged as a favorite among Sonoma County policeaccountability activists. Olivares is the lone Latino in the race after Windsor sheriff Carlos Basurto dropped out. A big driver pushing the “change” mantra in this race centers around fallout from the 2013 killing of Andy Lopez by a county cop. SCSO Captain Mark Essick is the sole remaining candidate who is currently an employee of SCSO. The candidates will square off in a June primary. The top two candidates will be the nominees in the first contested sheriff’s race in the county in decades. A NBLC press release on the split endorsement noted that Essick has been on the force for about 20 years. It remains to be seen whom the council will endorse if Mutz and Olivares emerge victorious in the primary. “We would go back again to the delegates and try it again,” says NBLC executive director Jack Buckhorn, who adds that the union had a choice: sit on the sidelines or go with the dual endorsement. “We felt very strongly that change is needed,” he says, adding that there’s not much daylight between Mutz and Olivares on the issues. “If you listen to ) 10 The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 14-20, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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and apparently terminated from that program, and came back with body armor and an automatic weapon.” Wong’s identity wasn’t released to the public until after law enforcement found him with the three women he reportedly shot after a tense day-long siege at the facility, one of the largest veterans homes in the country. Wong had been a recent resident at the Pathway Home on the grounds of the veterans center. The Pathway Home is licensed by the state to provide outsourced mentalhealth treatment for so-called 9/11 veterans who signed up for service after the 2001 terror attacks. The program is focused on returning Iraq and Afghanistan veterans; Wong served in Afghanistan around 2012–13 and returned to the states with a vicious bout of posttraumatic stress disorder. This latest episode of gun violence occurred just weeks after the Parkland, Fla., school shooting, and as the events in Yountville unfolded locally, other gun-related issues were simultaneously playing out, as if in split-screen. Even as Wong was engaged in a shootout with a Napa County sheriff, Florida Gov. Rick Scott was announcing a set of NRAunfriendly new gun laws in that state, none of which target or ban any specific weapon. The Parkland killer used an AR-15. Dispatch calls released by the Napa Sheriff’s Office indicate that Wong was armed with an M4 rifle. Civilian versions of that weapon, which is used widely by the U.S. Army, came on the domestic market in 2012, according to online gun magazines. The terror in Yountville unfolded as the Trump administration continues its push to fully privatize the Department of Veterans Affairs and as the president flip-flopped wildly on gun-control measures in recent days. And it occurred as

U.S. Rep. Mike Thompson has been promoting a putatively “bipartisan” bill in Congress that would enhance background checks while staying away from any discussion around banning assault weapons. “People across our nation are calling for meaningful action, and the White House is merely feigning in order to appease his base,” said Thompson in a statement as he teed off on Trump. “While I am disappointed, my resolve to force action is only strengthened. We have legislation that is widely supported by Democrats and Republicans that will strengthen and expand our background checks system and help keep guns out of the hands of dangerous individuals. We must take action to prevent gun violence and keep our schools, our communities and our nation safe.” Thompson is a lifetime gun owner and a Vietnam War veteran. Post-Parkland, he told a crowd in St. Helena that banning assault weapons isn’t the right approach to gun control, given that there are already so many of the military-style weapons in the hands of Americans. Tragically, one of those Americans was Albert Wong. Thompson, like Dodd, was on-scene all day following the Yountville shooting, which occurred in his Congressional district. As the tragedy unfolded, Thompson indicated that he’d had enough not only with Trump, but with the president’s supporters. In a remarkably testy Facebook moment, he lashed out at a Trump-supporting man from Brooklyn who jumped on Thompson’s page to slag on law enforcement in Napa County for pulling a Parkland and not engaging with the shooter. “How dare you troll on a post honoring these wonderful women who served our veterans,” Thompson shot back. “You have no idea about the situation and how law enforcement did or didn’t respond. Please refrain from these comments on a post honoring these selfless women.”

DEBRIEFER

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the debates, there’s not much difference between what they are saying.”

Ravitch Reconsiders Just as Sonoma County cannabis lawyer Omar Figueroa was cogitating on Facebook about a potential run for district attorney last week, Jill Ravitch, the current Sonoma County DA, did a big ol’ reversal on pot and said she would review local misdemeanor cannabis convictions with an eye toward expungement of those cases. Late in January, San Francisco DA George Gascòn said his office would be reviewing similar cases in his jurisdiction, and the Bohemian followed up on that story by asking Ravitch whether she would take up the cudgel and review local cases. She said no, and that there was a petition process in place and that her office was sticking with the plan as detailed by Proposition 64. The new pot rules in California allow for people who were convicted of pot crimes that are no longer crimes to clear their records. A local daily newspaper followed up on the Bohemian’s reporting with additional reporting that quoted Ravitch as saying she didn’t have the staff or resources to expunge the minor pot charges. That was the same argument offered to the Bohemian by Marin DA Edward Berberian, who said in February he would not be taking up the Gascòn initiative. Berberian is not seeking re-election this year. He’s been the DA down yonder since 2005. Ravitch said she was inundated with requests for expungement and decided to heed the public’s call, and found the resources to expunge misdemeanor pot charges after all. Ravitch is seeking re-election this fall. —Tom Gogola


Brussels Sprout Salad • • • • • •

COLD HARVEST Brussels sprouts thrive along the cool, foggy coast between Monterey and Pacifica.

Winter Greens

Skip the hard tomatoes and embrace cold-weather vegetables BY ARI LEVAUX

T

en years ago, “locavore” was anointed the 2007 word of the year by the New Oxford American Dictionary.

Since then the idea of wanting to eat closer to home and in season has only gained traction, which has naturally invited skepticism. Number crunchers have found enough cases of it

being more carbon-friendly to purchase food from far away that, if saving the world is the goal, the locavore case could be sunk. Pierre Desrochers, co-author of Locavore’s Dilemma: In Praise of the 10,000-Mile Diet, argues that it’s more energy-efficient to ship a tomato thousands of miles in winter than to grow one in a heated greenhouse close to home. His calculations miss an important X-factor: few

locavores have much interest in a fresh tomato in the middle of winter. They tend to taste like red snowballs. Best to wait until July. But if it’s a salad you want, you don’t have to wait until summer for local produce. Once upon a time, a winter salad didn’t even contain leaves, much less tomatoes, and was made of shredded roots that had been squirreled away during warmer times. Such a meal was originally

1 yellow onion, thinly sliced 3/4 c. white balsamic vinegar 1/4 c. olive oil 1 clove garlic, minced salt and pepper 1 pound Brussels sprouts leaves torn from the sprouts • 1/2 c. toasted walnuts • 3 tbsp. finely grated pecorino Romano cheese • 3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil or to taste • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt • 1 tbsp. freshly ground black pepper or to taste • balsamic vinegar reduction • pomegranate seeds Marinate onions in 1/4 c. vinegar, olive oil, garlic and salt and pepper for at least 30 minutes. The inner core of the sprouts, which haven’t yet differentiated into leaves, can be thin-sliced. Coarsely grate the cheese. For the balsamic reduction, heat a half-cup of balsamic on low, allowing it to slowly thicken to about half the volume. Toss with pomegranate seeds and the onion dressing. It’s special. And local enough.

11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 14-20, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Dining

made possible by the advent of root cellars and other winter storage facilities that kept certain crops cool but not frozen. Today at grocery stores and winter markets, it’s easy to acquire a rainbow of tubers and greens. I just returned from the winter market with carrots, purple and white daikon radish, Brussels sprouts and onions. Nowadays, a winter salad can mean more than roots and cabbage. Greenhouse innovations have ushered in a winter-salad revolution on par with that brought on by the advent of root cellars. And in coastal California, Brussels sprouts are hitting their prime now in the waning days of winter. This recipe comes fron consummate gastronome Allen Broach of Greensboro, S.C.


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hile claims of unique wines from unique terroirs are nothing new to Napa and Sonoma County wine country, Hanna Winery has recently turned out something that’s truly, well, unique: a varietal wine made from Saint Macaire, a nearly extirpated French grape that’s finally getting a little respect in California soil. The story of Saint Macaire starts a bit like a trick question: What is the sixth member of the classic Bordeaux quintet of grapes? The usual suspects include Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, but in California the Meritage Alliance also allows the use of Carmenère, Gros Verdot (you knew there had to be a Gros Verdot, when there’s a Petit), and the even scarcer Saint Macaire, which is so rare as to be functionally

nonexistent in Bordeaux, according to Jeff Hinchliffe, winemaker at Hanna since 1998. An experimenter, Hinchliffe wanted to take the winery in new directions, while staying true to founder Dr. Elias Hanna’s favored Cabernet Sauvignon–based wines. “The idea was, we’ll stay in the Bordeaux box, but let’s explore the corners of that box,” says Hinchliffe. The first corner was planted with Malbec, and it was a success, yielding intensely red-fruited wine with soft tannin. Saint Macaire was harder to track down, but didn’t come out of nowhere: it was widely planted in Bordeaux prior to the phylloxera root louse that devastated French vineyards, and was grown in University of California trials in the 1880s and again in the 1940s. Ultimately it was deemed only suitable for the warmest of California growing regions. It was a different time, a different climate: Hinchliffe is betting that Saint Macaire’s attributes of color stability and higher acidity will help bolster their Bordeaux blends in the toastier times to come. Planted in 2012, Hanna’s half acre is half of California’s total Saint Macaire vineyard—over on Howell Mountain, O’Shaughnessy grows a bit to blend with its Cabernet, and it has been spotted in old vineyards amid misfit grapes like Pinot St. George and Béclan noir. Hanna’s 2015 Reserve Alexander Valley Saint Macaire ($68) fits somewhere in between Charbono and Petit Verdot: violets, burnt coffee beans and Syrah-like savoriness, with dried black olive and clove oil or spiced tea, suggest a big wine, but the finish lets up on the tannins and the wine easily sloughs off its 100 percent new oak. Some may object to the 16 percent alcohol by volume. Regulations permit wineries to label such a wine as low as 14.5 percent, Hinchliffe went the honest route. Perhaps another rarity in the wine world . Hanna Winery, Russian River Valley: 5353 Occidental Road, Santa Rosa. 707.575.3371. Alexander Valley: 9280 Hwy. 128, Healdsburg. 707.431.4310. Open daily, 10am–4pm. Tasting fee, $15.


13 NO RTH BAY B O H E MI A N | B O H E MI A N.COM

SQUEEZE BOX Cotati’s 28th annual accordion fest is Aug. 18–19.

SPOTLIGHT ON COTATI/ROHNERT PARK

ROHNERT PARK & COTATI


SPOTLIGHT ON COTATI/ROHNERT PARK

N ORTH BAY B O H E MI A N | B O H E MI A N.COM

Rory McNamara

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A TALL COLD ONE Five beer-loving friends opened Cotati’s Flagship Taproom in 2016.

Brew Towns

Craft-brew craze comes to Rohnert Park and Cotati BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

n a county that’s increasingly known for its craft-beer scene, a new crop of beer fanatics are making waves in Rohnert Park and Cotati that can be tasted in the towns’ recent outpouring of top-quality taprooms and award-winning microbreweries.

Rohnert Park’s origins in the craft-beer movement can be traced back to an unassuming block of storefronts on Commerce Boulevard between Golf Course Drive and the Rohnert Park

Expressway. That’s where Beercraft, founded over five years ago by brothers Matt and JT Fenn, sells hundreds of hard-to-find beers from across the country and pours from over a dozen rotating taps in the taproom. “It was borne out of our love for beer,” says Matt Fenn. “We try to find the best beer we can on any given day. That’s pretty much all we do, all day, is keep our ear to the ground and pay attention to what people are excited about, and get that beer.” It’s not always easy to get their hands on the beers, which often come from micro- or nanobreweries not yet on the map, but

Fenn estimates the bottle shop receives 10 to 20 new beers a week. In bottle and on tap, Beercraft strives to have something for everyone. “We try to figure out what people are craving and go from there, but we try to keep a blend of everything,” Fenn says. “We take it seriously, but we don’t take it too serious and turn beer into something other than beer,” Fenn continues. “It’s lived in our society as something that brings people together and makes them happy. That’s the most important thing.” While Beercraft delivers a world of beer to Sonoma County, a local brewer is crafting homegrown

beers at Cotati’s first brewery, Grav South Brewing Company. Formed by award-winning brewer and Sonoma County native Greg Rasmussen, the name was inspired not only by the Gravenstein apples that Rasmussen grew up around on his grandfather’s farm, but for the brewery’s location along the Gravenstein Highway in Cotati, just west of Highway 101. Inside the taproom, several Grav South beers are available straight from the source, with classically balanced American ales and fresh IPAs. Another homegrown story in Cotati is Flagship Taproom, established in late 2016 by five local friends with a lifetime of food-service experience among them. They took advantage of an empty location, the site of the former Cotati Yacht Club, and turned it into a family-friendly taproom. “We all grew up in this area, we all have friends and family in this area, so we wanted to start this dream of ours and make our community even better than it has been,” says co-owner Matt Inlow. “We want to build relationships and have people want to come back tomorrow to continue the conversation we had today.” While Flagship offers a full menu and hosts events like trivia night to bring people in, Inlow says that craft beer is Flagship’s focus, and they host bimonthly tap takeovers with local brewers and constantly rotate their 20 taps with as wide a variety of beers as possible. Rohnert Park’s newest brewpub is actually from one of the county’s longest-running brewers. Bear Republic Brewing Company makes the most of its new taproom’s backdrop at Roberts Lake, next to the Foxtail Golf Club. Open since last summer, Bear Republic Lakeside features two bars, lots of restaurant seating and an outdoor area overlooking the water that’s perfect for parties. This month, curious connoisseurs can check out the taproom in a Brewer’s Dinner on Tuesday, March 20. Four courses of dining will pair with four Bear Republic beers, and the evening includes discussions led by a member of the brew team.


15

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PARTNERS IN MUSIC Michael McCullaugh, right, owns the Redwood Cafe

with partner Mustapha Jamal.

Local Knowledge

Redwood Cafe’s Michael McCullaugh shares his joy for Cotati and Rohnert Park

Where is your favorite place to eat and why? For me, I actually like to go to that little place across from Sonoma State University, Shangri-La Cafe & Grill, especially if we catch a show at Sonoma State. It’s a little mom-and-pop place and they do a great job. Of course, my partner also runs Cafe Salsa. That’s always wonderful. Where do you take first-time visitors? Going to Spreckels Performing Art Center is always great. I also love going to see shows at the Green Music Center—that’s wonderful. And I love supporting the SOMO Village when they have the summer shows out there by Sally Tomatoes. That’s a lot of fun. We also have a lot of natural beauty around here, from wetlands to mountains. I like to take people hiking on Sonoma Mountain, up in the hills. That’s a great place to bring children. Crane Canyon is also a lovely place to go to. What do you know about the area that others don't? I’m really happy with what Rohnert Park and Cotati have done recently as far as making bike paths and creek trails. I wish more kids would ride their bikes around town from the university and such. If you could change one thing about Rohnert Park/Cotati what would it be? You know, I’ve been in Cotati for 27 years and it’s a wonderful little gem, and it’s evolving really slowly. If there’s anything I would promote, it is creating the infrastructure where we can grow behind the strip on Old Redwood Highway, to grow a little more downtown area. I would love to see Rohnert Park and Cotati be more of a live music hub in Sonoma County. That’s one of the reasons why I got into the music scene with Redwood Cafe—to help promote that. I think the area could just blossom tremendously over the next few years.

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Describe your perfect day? Obviously, we live in a beautiful place—a perfect day would be the sun shining, people coming into downtown Cotati on bikes, some live music playing somewhere. I love the accordion festival that happens in the summer. It’s been a tribute to the town for years, and they’ve done an amazing job, especially the last five years.

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Crush CULTURE

R O H N E R T PA R K

Natural Drama

Created in 2014, the off-Broadway hit ‘By the Water’ tells the story of a tight-knit neighborhood on New York’s Staten Island that must choose to rebuild or relocate after being ravaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. For a North Bay currently recovering from wildfires and facing the same rebuilding dilemmas, the play could not be more timely. By the Water explores what it means to love a community when it opens on Friday, March 16, at Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 8pm. $28. 707.588.3400.

S A N TA R O S A

Pot O’ Gold There may not be a literal rainbow pointing to the Whiskey Tip in Santa Rosa this weekend, but those who come to the St Patrick's Day variety show with North Bay Cabaret will feel like they won the jackpot. The variety of entertainment includes burlesque performers, live music from Big Kitty and Oddjob Ensemble’s Kalei Yamanoha, standup comedy, fire performers, DJs spinning late into the night and more. There will also be St. Patrick’s Day drinks and dinner options, and a raffle will raise funds for North Bay fire relief. Saturday, March 17, at Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm. $20–$25. 707.843.5535.

R O H N E R T PA R K

Mozart for Kids Chicago-based nonprofit Classical Kids Music Education enriches the lives of children everywhere by collaborating with professional orchestras around the country in its Classical Kids Live concert series. This month, the series teams with the Santa Rosa Symphony for a kid-friendly classical journey into the life and works of the world’s most famous composer. ‘Mozart’s Magnificent Voyage’ is an all-ages appropriate program of Mozart’s most enduring works, such as The Magic Flute, and the afternoon performance includes a pre-show instrument petting zoo on Sunday, March 18, at Green Music Center’s Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 3pm. $12–$17. srsymphony.org.

HEALDSBURG

Dinner Jazz For the last two decades, the Healdsburg Jazz Festival has brought world-class music to local venues as well as into local schools with its far-reaching music-education programs. Those programs get a major boost this month at the eighth annual Jazz on the Menu fundraiser, which celebrates delectable dining and lively music. This year’s musical menu features the Dry Creek Trio, boasting Healdsburg Jazz Festival staples in guitarist Doug Lipton, bassist Chris Amberger and drummer Lorca Hart, paired with a menu prepared by Shed chef Perry Hoffman on Wednesday, March 21, at Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St., Healdsburg. 6pm. $100. 707.431.7433.

—Charlie Swanson

The week’s events: a selective guide

PEERLESS BLUES Iconic guitarist and bluesman Buddy Guy performs on Sunday, March 18, at Luther Burbank Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa. See Concerts, p21.


ON THE MAPP Rue Mapp founded Outdoor Afro to offer outings to urban-based communities

that don’t get to experience the great outdoors.

Resilient Hope Geography of Hope conference comes to West Marin BY JONAH RASKIN

‘H

arriet Tubman was a wilderness leader,” says Rue Mapp. “She traversed the wilds without a GPS.” Tubman, an abolitionist and spy for the Union Army, is a role model for Mapp, the founder of Outdoor Afro and one of the headliners at this year’s Geography of Hope (GOH) Conference, running

March 17–18 in Point Reyes Station. The theme is “Finding Resilience in Nature in Perilous Times.” If that sounds familiar, it should. North Bay survivors of last fall’s fires have been talking about nature and resilience for months. Still, the conference promises to deliver new insights and strategies. In 2016, just as the Black Lives Matter movement spread across the country, Mapp put her fledgling organization on the map when

she launched a series of outdoor events called “Healing Hikes” that resonated widely. “The hikes came along in tandem with Black Lives Matter,” says Mapp. “Synchronicity was at work. We need to lay our burdens down by the riverside. Streets are a hard landscape to find release from trauma.” The hikes have swelled the ranks of Outdoor Afro, which started as Mapp’s own personal blog. Now the

organization has members in 30 states with a hundred leaders who guide inner city residents through forests and meadows where they breathe clean air, identify medicinal plants and appreciate natural beauty. In spite of the group’s name, Mapp says, all races are welcome. Mapp aims to strengthen communities and make up for lost time. A rare opportunity slipped through the cracks of history in 1964, says Mapp, when the wilderness cause and the Civil Rights cause might have been linked and weren’t. That year witnessed the passage of the Wilderness Act and the Civil Rights Act, both of which President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law. In the half-decade that followed, African Americans moved toward “Black is beautiful” and black liberation, while whites moved toward Earth Day. “Unfortunately, we now have two siloed movements,” says Mapp. “One is for people, and the other is for land.” At the GOH conference, Mapp and fellow presenters will suggest ways to fuse them. The event is made to order for local environmentalists, community activists and citizens who crave a brave new vision of the world. Mapp will be joined at GOH by Peter Forbes, the founder of the Center for Whole Communities, and by Caleen Sisk, the Tribal Chief of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe based in Northern California. The event includes vocal improvisation led by David Worm, a founding member of Bobby McFerrin’s Voicestra. The conference wraps up with an outdoor restoration project with Peter Wohlleben, author of The Hidden Life of Trees. For more information go to gohconference.org

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Arts Ideas

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e • Black Panther ards Outside Missouri e Shape of Water

SHELL SHOCKED Jenna Rechsteiner,

left, plays Jenny, a veteran who meets a cast of fellow misfits.

MAR 17-18 MARIN CENTER MAR 24-25 LUTHER BURBANK CENTER FOR THE ARTS

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BLACK PANTHER

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MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

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THE GIRL THE TATTOO (1:30 4:15) 6:45 PG-13 Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, No Thu PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat,9:15 No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu WAITRESS

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(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00) R (12:00) 9:50 9:10 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

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“Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (1:15) 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE GHOST WRITER (2:20 4:30) 7:00 Subtitled Kevin Jorgenson presents theNR California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

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PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK RED SPARROW Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 THE MOST (1:20 4:20)DANGEROuS 7:10 9:50 R SICKO MOVIES MORNING MANIN INTHE AMERICA

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Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! (1:456:50 4:40) 7:20 9:55 RTue 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 NR No7:30 6:50 Show or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 5:00 10:00 Tue/Wed: (4:00) 9:55 only Thu: (1:45 4:10) 9:55 onlyAM 10:15 VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING ★★★★★ “BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH IS A 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th! BLAZING FIVE-STAR HAMLET.” – Daily Telegraph

NT LIVE: HAMLET Don’t Miss The Encore Performance! Sat, Mar 17 10am

Damaged souls find common ground in SRJC play BY HARRY DUKE

W

hile time may heal all wounds, a little human kindness along the way doesn’t hurt. That’s the takeaway from the Santa Rosa Junior College production of Julie Marie Myatt’s Welcome Home, Jenny Sutter. Originally produced in 2008 at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, it was one of the first works to address the issues faced by returning veterans of the Iraq/ Afghanistan conflicts. Recently discharged Marine Jenny Sutter (Jenna Rechsteiner) has returned to California after being physically and emotionally wounded in the service of her country. Avoiding home for fear of her family’s reaction to her wounds, a happenstance meeting

at a bus station leads her to join Lou (Maureen O’Neill) on a trip to Slab City, Calif.—a place in the Sonoran Desert where squatters and campers have reclaimed an abandoned military base and turned it into a sort of off-the-grid commune. Jenny soon finds herself surrounded by people struggling with their own damaged lives. There’s Lou, who is dealing with addiction problems (gambling, smoking, sex); Buddy (Geoffrey Nixon), an abuse survivor who fancies himself a preacher (his ordainment came free with a credit check); and Donald (Dylan Kupper), an anti-social jeweler with anger issues. They are all looking for someone or something to believe in, but they—and especially Jenny—need to begin with themselves. With only six roles to fill from a school full of theater students, director Wendy Wisely has double-cast every role and has the two casts alternating performances. The opening night cast was fine, with particularly warm performances from O’Neill as Jenny’s guide to recovery and Nixon as the sermondelivering preacher. With the Burbank Auditorium under renovation, the somewhat lacking Newman Auditorium hosts this production, which translates to minimal set and lighting designs. That’s a shame because the story’s locale provides interesting opportunities for both, though lighting designer Vince Mothersbaugh does manage to do something with the limited resources. A slide presentation noting the military service of some of the cast, crew and SRJC staff precedes the show, and the program notes that there are over a thousand currently enrolled members of the student population who are active duty, reservists, veterans or their dependents. Welcome Home, Jenny Sutter is a nice salute to them and their families. Rating (out of 5): ‘Welcome Home, Jenny Sutter’ runs Wednesday–Sunday through March 18 at Santa Rosa Junior College’s Newman Auditorium. Wednesday– Saturday, 8pm; Saturday–Sunday, 2pm. $12–$18. 707.527.4343.


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MARCH 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17 AT 8PM MARCH 10, 11, 17, 18 AT 2PM NEWMAN AUDITORIUM, SANTA ROSA JUNIOR COLLEGE EMERITUS HALL, ELLIOTT AVENUE, SANTA ROSA CAMPUS STUDENT G

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GREENEST DAY McNear’s Saloon

celebrates its 31st St. Pat’s celebration with versatile North Bay ensemble.

Gather Round

Cularan blends Irish music with jigs, polka, waltzes BY CHARLIE SWANSON

W

ith St. Patrick’s Day upon us, the North Bay shows off its Irish side this weekend at several concerts and community events on March 17, and for fans of traditional Irish folk, new Sonoma County ensemble Cularan provide a perfect melodic pairing for several rounds of Guinness and gaiety. Formed last year by guitarist Megan McLaughlin, mandolin player Randall McNeill, violinist Rufus Gondardi and percussionist and flutist Christopher Dillingham, the band was born out of weekly Irish jam sessions at Berkeley pub the Starry Plough. In Ireland, a cúlarán is a wildflower, commonly known as a

pignut in Irish Gaelic. “The boys in the band wanted to call ourselves Pignut, and I said absolutely not,” laughs McLauglin. “So we came up with Cularan.” McLaughlin herself is a veteran songwriter, best known around the Bay Area as part of folk-rock band the Musers, and for her three solo albums. Last summer, McLaughlin moved from her longtime home of Oakland to Sebastopol. “I love it up here. I spent a wonderful 28 years in Oakland, but it was time to live out in the country,” says McLaughlin. “The musical community here is fantastic.” In Cularan, McLaughlin and her bandmates cover a wide swath of traditional Irish music, including jigs, polkas, waltzes and both rowdy and heartfelt folk jams. “The repertoire is huge,” says McLaughlin. “I started in on this music about 10 years ago. The more you listen, the more you pick up. It’s very much in the oral tradition where people just listen and learn by ear.” In addition to performing classic compositions, Cularan also plays some of McLaughlin’s originals mashed up with Irish tunes, and offers up three-part harmonies as well as intricate acoustic arrangements. While the group is planning on a new album, the only way to hear Cularan this week is to see them live. On March 15, the band gets the weekend off on the right foot with a set at Redwood Cafe in Cotati. On March 17, the group takes over McNear’s Saloon in Petaluma for the restaurant’s 31st annual St. Patrick’s Day Bash, performing their Irish folk amid pints of green beer and Irishinspired food. “Most often, we get people dancing,” says McLaughlin. “The Irish dance community has got their own ways of communicating, so we’ll show up and people will be ready to dance. It’s amazing to watch.” Cularan perform at 8pm on Thursday, March 15, at the Redwood Cafe (8240 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati; $10; 707.795.7868) and at 4pm on Saturday, March 17, at McNear’s Saloon (21 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma; 707.765.2121).


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Buddy Guy

At nearly 82 years old, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee is still a the top of the Blues genre. Mar 18, 7pm. $49-$89. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd.,, Santa Rosa.. 707.546.3600.

Jazz on the Menu

Eighth annual fundraiser for Healdsburg Jazz Festival’s music education programs features the Dry Creek Trio and a three-course dinner. Mar 21, 6pm. $100. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Sonoma County Philharmonic

Norman Gamboa conducts the orchestra and hosts Santa Rosa Symphonic Chorus, California Redwood Chorale, Santa Rosa Children’s Choral Academy and soloists for two concerts featuring Carmina Burana cantata and more. Mar 17, 7:30pm and Mar 18, 2pm. $15/students are free. SRHS Performing Arts Auditorium, 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 800.838.3006.

MARIN COUNTY The Ladies of Broadway

Transcendence Theatre Company celebrates the talents and tenacity of female Broadway professionals with performances by seven standout artists. Mar 17, 7:30pm and Mar 18, 2pm. $29 and up. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

Paul Kantner Birthday Celebration

Late guitarist and Jefferson Airplane co-founder is remembered in an all-star concert featuring a tribute to his 1970 concept album, “Blows Against the Empire.” Mar 17, 8pm. $42-$69. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

ZOFO Duet

Mill Valley Chamber Music Society presents solo pianists Keisuke Nakagoshi and

Eva-Maria Zimmermann performing side-by-side on a single piano. Mar 18, 5pm. $35/ Free for students and youth. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley. 415.381.4453.

NAPA COUNTY George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic

Dry Creek Kitchen

Mar 19, Steve Moon and Chris Pimentel. Mar 20, Carlos Henrique Pereira and Jim Passarell. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Elephant in the Room

Mar 16, Marshall House Project. Mar 17, St Patty’s Day with Levi Lloyd and Donny Mederos. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Platinum-selling funk legend and his longtime band get down on St Patrick’s Day. Mar 17, 8pm. $42-$75. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Flamingo Lounge

Low Strung Cellos

Mar 14, 2pm, Vocal Repertory Recital. Mar 15, Faculty Composers concert. Mar 18, 3pm, Robert Huw Morgan. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Largest all-cello rock band in the world is made up of classically trained players from Yale University. Mar 18, 7pm. $13-$18. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY

Mar 16, Groovy Judy. Mar 17, Midnight Sun Massive. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Mar 14, Jazz Orchestra. Mar 16, Yamato Drummers. Mar 17, Jennifer Koh and Shai Wosner. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Mar 15, Hype It Up with Spawnbreezie and Kaimi Hananoeau. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Aqus Cafe

HopMonk Sonoma

Mar 16, Bob & Brandon. Mar 17, the Tonewoods. Mar 18, 2pm, Gary Vogensen & the Ramble Band. Mar 21, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Mar 16, La Gente and WIldcard Bellydance. Mar 17, E Negative with the Dylan Black Project and Smoked. Mar 18, 6pm, folk jam. Tues, Didgeridoo Clinic. Wed, open mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Mar 14, Wednesday Night Big Band. Mar 15, Burnside and the Real Sarahs. Mar 16, Soulshine Blues Band. Mar 17, Sol Horizon. Mar 18, the Musers. Mar 20, the Buckeye Boys. Mar 21, Rockville Roadkill Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern Mar 14, Mike & Patrick. Mar

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. CALENDAR THU MAR 15 • COUNTRY LINE DANCE EVERY 1ST AND 3RD THURSDAY 7PM / ALL AGES / $10 FRI MAR 16 • SECOND LINE AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT MAR 17 • LUCKY OL’ BONES ST PADDY’S DAY CELEBRATION 8PM / 21+ / FREE MON MAR 19 • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM W/ SPECIAL GUEST AKI KUMAR 7:30PM / 21+ / $10 THU MAR 22 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

FRIDAY

MAR 16 SATURDAY

MAR 17 FRIDAY

MAR 23 SATURDAY

ANDRE NICKATINA WITH SIX

FIF & REL MONEY

RAP & HIP/HOP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

TAZMANIAN DEVILS PLUS SAN

GERONIMO

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

MARTIN SEXTON WITH CHRIS

TRAPPER

AMERICANA• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

FRANKIE BOOTS WITH EASY

DUO, T-LUKE & THE TIGHT MAR 24 LEAVES SUITS AMERICANA• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ FRIDAY

MAR 30 SATURDAY

THE SOUL SECTION WITH DJ

RISE

FUNK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

EPIC BEARD MEN

(SAGE FRANCIS & B. DOLAN) MAR 31 HIP-HOP• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SUNDAY

TROUT STEAK REVIVAL

WITH DUSTY GREEN BONES APR 1 BAND BLUEGRASS• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SATURDAY

APR 7

SUPER DIAMOND ROCK• DOORS 8PM • 21+

4/12 Alborosie, 4/18 Devin The Dude, 4/21 Bebel Gilberto, 4/24 Kinky Friedman, 4/25 La Santa Cecilia, 4/27 The Hots with The Grain, 4/29 Mipso, 5/6 Erika Wennerstrom (of Heartless Bastards), 5/12 Mike Love, 5/19 Petty Theft - Tribute to Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, 5/20 Against Me!, 5/25 Trevor Hall

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

HopMonk Sebastopol Mar 16, IrieFuse and Sol Seed. Mar 17, Tempest. Mar 19, Monday Night Edutainment with Ras Rican. Mar 20, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave.,, Sebastopol.. 707.829.7300.

Annie O’s Music Hall

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Mar 16, Matt Bradford. Mar 17, Josh Field. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Mar 14, Nathan Hinojosa. Mar 15, Fly by Train. Mar 16, the String Rays. Mar 17, the Grain. Mar 18, Divided Heaven. Mar 21, Rivertown Trio. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Bistro

Mar 15, Willie Perez. Mar 16, Wild Janie Roberts. Mar 17, Greg Hester birthday jam. Mar 20, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Monroe Dance Hall

Mar 17, 6:30pm, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Mar 16, Andre Nickatina. Mar 17, Tazmanian Devils plus San Geronimo. 23 )

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Wed 3⁄14 • Ukekeke Workshop 7pm⁄ Concert 8:30pm $ 14–$25 • All Ages

Kanekoa

Ukulele Powered Hawaiian Reggae Folk Rock Thu 3⁄15 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–$22 • All Ages

Painted Mandolin and Achilles Wheel

Fri 3⁄16 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$25 • All Ages

California Kind

feat Rob Barraco ( Dark Star Orchestra), Barry Sless ( David Nelson Band), John Molo ( Bruce Hornsby, Phil & Friends), Pete Sears (Jefferson Starship, Hot Tuna) & Katie Skene Sat 3⁄17 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $45–$69 • All Ages

Paul Kantner Birthday Celebration with The Airplane Family, LIVE DEAD &

RIDERS '69 + Special Tribute to " Blows Against The Empire" Sun 3⁄18 • Doors 11am ⁄ FREE • All Ages Roger McNamee of Moonalice (solo) Sun 3⁄18 • Doors 6:30pm ⁄ $15–$17 • All Ages

Rainy Eyes, Phoebe Hunt & Paper Wings

Thu 3⁄22 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$24 • All Ages Grammy Nominated Americana Band Della Mae + The Good Bad Fri 3⁄23 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $35–$40 • 21+ Mason Jennings + Sarah Summer www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

thu culaRan mar 15 8pm/Dancing⁄Irish Music/$10

JeffRey halfoRd &

fri mar 16 the healeRs 8:30pm/Irish Music/$15 Adv⁄$20 DOS sat st PatRick’s celebRation mar 17 Dancing/Live Music/No Cover/5–10pm Special Menu: corn beef & cabbage

PRide celebRation

fri mar 23 feat stePhanie teel band 8pm/Dancing/$10

waVy GRaVy, steVe kiMock

sat mar 24 and RaMblin’ Jack elliott 8pm/SOLD OUT thu mar 29 fri mar 30

MidniGht sun 8pm/Dancing/$10

dylan black PRoJect 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

sat soul fuse mar 31 8:30pm/Dancing/ $10

lacy J. dalton &

fri the dalton GanG apr 13 7:30pm⁄$20 Adv/ $25 DOS (seated Show) RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 14-20, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

16, Jimmy Roberts. Mar 17, the Jam. Mar 20, Michael Hantman. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.


Music ( 21

22 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | MAR C H 14-20, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Mar 16, the Black Brothers Band. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Paul Mahder Gallery

Mar 14, Telegraph Quartet. Mar 20, 1:30pm, Opera a la Carte Fundraiser with Morgan Harrington. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

The Phoenix Theater Mar 16, Philthy Rich with Prezi and Pooh Hefner. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap

Mar 15, 6:30pm, Elizabeth Boaz. Mar 17, 8:30pm, St Patty’s Day with Frank O’Connor. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Redwood Cafe

Mar 15, Cularan. Mar 16, Jeffrey Halford & the Healers. Mar 17, St Patrick’s Day Celebration. Mar 18, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Mar 19, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Mar 21, singersongwriter competition. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI FRI MAR 16

IRIEFUSE + SOL SEED

$12–15/DOORS 8/SHOW 9:30/21+

SAT MAR 17

TEMPEST

SPECIAL ST. PATRICKS DAY CELEBRATION ! $15/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

SUN MAR 18

COMEDY OPEN MIC (EVERY 3RD SUNDAY)

FREE/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/18+

MON MAR 19

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

RAS RICAN (KULCHA LATINO)

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

FRI MAR 23

WALTER TROUT

$25–40/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

SAT MAR 24

Din n er & A Show Mar 16 with Julie Bernard

Fabulous Harmonies 8:00 / No Cover Sat St. Patrick’s Day Party! 17 Mar Jerry Hannan Band Special Food and Drinks 8:30

Santos Mar 18 Todos Featuring Wendy Fitz Sun

Cantina Americana 5:00 / No Cover Rock & Roll Party! Beer Scouts 8:00 / No Cover Sat Diva Singer/ Songwriter Mar 24 Shana Morrison 8:30 Sun 25 Boogie Woogie Queen Fri

Mar 23

Mar

Wendy DeWitt with Guest Lady Bianca 5:00 / No Cover Fri Mar 30 Lowatters

High Lonesome Twang to Lowdown Dirty Roots 8:00 / No Cover e Sat Dancty! Tom Rigney & 31 Mar Par Flambeau Cajun Orkestra 8:30

Join us for our A nnuAl

Easter Sunday Buffet

+ FORTY FEET TALL, LUNGS AND LIMBS

A pr 1, 10Am–4pm Reservations Advised

$15/DOORS 8/SHOW 8:30/21+

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

SKA 101 W/ ROCKER-T (JAH WARRIOR SHELTER)

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

Rivertown Trio

Fri

KINGSBOROUGH

MON MAR 26

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Sat

Apr 7

Chuck Prophet and the Mission Express 8:30 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Mar 16, David Lindley. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Rock Star University House of Rock Mar 17, GAMMA with Davey Pattison. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Mar 14, the Acrosonics. Mar 15, Plan Be. Mar 17, Scarlett Letters. Mar 18, 5pm, Lynne O & the Riots. Mar 18, 8:30pm, Sonoma blues jam. Mar 20, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Mar 16, Second Line. Mar 17, Lucky Ol’ Bones. Mar 19, the Blues Defenders pro jam with Aki Kumar. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip

Mar 16, August Sun. Mar 17, St Patrick’s Day variety show with North Bay Cabaret. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Mar 16, tribute to Frankie Beverly with Lionel Burns. Mar

17, the Overcommitments. Mar 18, Sasquatch Prototype and the Spyralites. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

Mar 15, RadioActive with MND and friends. Mar 16, Robbie Fulks and Anthony Da Costa. Mar 17, IrieFuse and Sol Seed. Wed, open mic. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Mar 14, Aaron Redner and friends. Mar 21, Fog Holler. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club

Mar 14, Jordan Kirk. Mar 15, Koolwhip. Mar 16, Diego’s Umbrella and Junk Parlor. Mar 17, 5pm, Staggerwing. Mar 17, 9pm, My Guilty Pleasure with Luvplanet. Mar 18, 4pm, Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Mar 18, 8pm, Nitecap Blues Band. Mar 19, open mic. Mar 20, Agents of Change. Mar 21, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Mar 15, Michael LaMacchia Band. Mar 16, Michael Aragon Quartet. Mar 17, Crossroads Music School concert. Mar 18, Migrant Pickers. Mar 19, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Mar 20, open mic. Mar 21, Deer Head Fridge. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Mar 14, Jonathan Poretz. Mar 15, Passion Habanera. Mar 16, Eric Markowitz Trio. Mar 17, Malcolm Campbell Duo. Mar 18, Parker Grant Trio. Mar 20, Adam Shulman Duo. Mar 21, Brian Moran Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Mar 14, jKev. Mar 15, Deborah Winters. Mar 20, Wanda Stafford. Mar 21, Vardo. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Papermill Creek Saloon

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Mar 14, Audrey Shimkas. Mar 20, SwingSet. Mar 21, Tracy Rose Trio. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Mar 15, Kanekoa and ukulele workshop. Mar 16, Talley Up. Mar 17, Koolerator. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Mar 14, Kanekoa. Mar 15, Painted Mandolin and Achilles Wheel. Mar 16, California Kind. Mar 18, Rainy Eyes with Phoebe Hunt & Paper Wings. Mar 19, 5:30pm, Crossroads Music School concert. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Mar 15, Magic in the Other. Mar 16, Led Zeppelin night with Stu Allen and friends. Mar 17, 12:30pm, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Mar 18, Johnny “Mojo” Flores and friends. Mar 19, Grateful Mondays with Stu Allen. Mar 20, the Casual Coalition. Mar 21, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Mar 14, 12pm, Liz Prior and Miles Graber. Mar 21, 12pm, the Liberty Street Trio. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Mar 14, One Eye’d Reilly. Mar 16-17, the Rippingtons. Mar 20, Full Chizel. Mar 21, Kanekoa. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue

Mar 18, 2pm, Rob Watson and Groovality with Paul Branin. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Mar 17, Matt Bradford. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Mar 15, Breeze Kinsey. Mar 16, Just Friends. Mar 17, Ned Endless & the Allnighters. Mar 18, Papermill Gang. Mar 21, OMEN. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Silo’s

Mar 15, the Shams. Mar 16, Noelle Glory & the Guarantees. Mar 17, the Sam Chase. Mar 18, Grateful Sundays. Mar 19, open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Mar 17, St Patrick’s Day with the Sorry Lot. Mar 18, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St.,, Napa.. 707.258.2337.

Mar 15, Don Bassey and friends. Mar 16, the Boys of Summer. Mar 17, Rudy Colombini & the Unauthorized Rolling Stones. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.


Arts Events Mar 16

Caldwell Snyder Gallery, “Joshua Jensen Nagle Solo Show,” contemporary photographer captures scenes of leisure from a distance, often from high above, in largescale works. 5:30pm. 1328 Main St, St Helena. 415.531.6755.

Mar 17

Alchemia Gallery, “By Hand,” collection of recycled and upcycled art works features several emerging artists working individually and collaboratively. 4pm. 111 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.775.3794. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, “Sculpture: Refuge + Precipice,” works of sculpture explore these ideas in a juried exhibit. 5pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970. Upstairs Art Gallery, “Birds’ Eye View,” watercolor paintings by Ron Sumner show Sonoma County vistas from a bird’s’ perspective. 2pm. 306 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.431.4214.

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Agrella Art Gallery Through Mar 15, “The Farthest Shore,” six prominent women printmaking artists are featured in an immersive installation. SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 4; Sat, 1 to 4. 707.527.4298.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Mar 31, “Dreams & Whimsy,” escape from the everyday and step into a world of weird, wonderful and surreal art. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery

Through Mar 17, “Gallery Group Show,” featuring Calabi Gallery’s contemporary artists and selections from its vintage collection. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Mar 17-Sep 16, “My Favorite Peanuts: Reflections of Family & Friends,” learn how those close to Charles Schulz relate to their favorite “Peanuts” stories, and how the stories are reflections of their own lives. 2301 Hardies Lane,, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; SatSun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Chroma Gallery

Through Mar 25, “Healing By Art: After the Fires,” exhibition of art, sculpture and photography reflects the aftermath of October’s wildfires and features many works created from salvaged materials. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Dallas A Saunders Artisan Textiles

Through Mar 17, “Contemporary Jacquard Tapestry Exhibition,” internationally recognized artists April Gornik, Chuck Close, Kiki Smith, Rupert Garcia and others display. 275 Hwy 128, Geyserville. Fri-Sun, 11am to 6pm. 707.708.9065.

Finley Community Center

Through Mar 23, “National Arts Program Exhibit,” annual show provides local artists of all ages with a forum to showcase their artistic accomplishments. 2060 W College Ave.,, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 6; Sat, 9 to 11am. 707.543.3737.

Fulton Crossing

Through Mar 31, March Show at Fulton Crossing,” this month’s featured artist is Jeff Sidlow, who creates stunning mandalas through digital art. Reception, Mar 16 at 5pm. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm 707.536.3305.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Mar 31, “Art Moura,” Sebastopol artist shows works from his massive assemblage works inspired by African

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 14-20, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

RECEPTIONS

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Masks. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

La Crema Tasting Room Through Mar 31, “The Flowing World,” exhibit features Wine Country inspired landscape paintings in oil by Sonoma County artist Clay Vajgrt. 235 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Daily, 10:30am–5:30pm 707.431.9400.

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Mar 24, “Power of Ten: Scaling Up,” Petaluma Arts Center celebrates a decade of art with 10 artists exploring scale and interconnectedness in paintings, sculpture, and other media. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Through Mar 31, “Women and the Search for Wisdom,” exhibit celebrates Women’s History Month. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Petaluma Library

Through Mar 30, “Petaluma Arts Association Spring Show,” show honors, in memoriam, longtime PAA members Mary Bales and Darold Graves, whose work displays with other members’ paintings and sculpture. 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Mar 25, “Imagine This,” includes close to 1000 drawings, paintings and sculptures by young artists from local elementary schools, with a theme of “creatures.” Reception, Mar 9 at 6pm. 282 S High St.,, Sebastopol. TuesFri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery

Through Mar 25, “The Essence of Spirit,” jeweler Michelle Hoting and artist Susan St Thomas are featured for the months of February and March. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Steele Lane Community Center

Through Mar 25, “Grace Fong: Viewpoints,” local

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THE DRIVE’S “CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY” Award winning radio segment Nominated in 3 categories for the 9th Annual National Taste Awards! WEDNESDAYS AT 5:00 KSRO 1350 AM & 103.5 FM THE DRIVE WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS 3 TO 6 To become a Drive sponsor contact Cathy Ratto at cathy.ratto@yahoo.com /JAXONDRIVE


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | MAR C H 14-20, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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artist who discovered painting later in life shows her latest works. 415 Steele Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Museum

Through Apr 1, “The Art of Chocolate,” Napa Valley’s finest chocolatiers take inspiration from Julia Child to create delicious works of art. Through May 20, “France Is a Feast,” world-premiere exhibit is a photographic journey of Paul and Julia Child with rarely seen images from Paris in the mid20th century. 55 Presidents Circle.,, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

Comedy As You Are

Improvisational sketch show celebrates the wonder of people in our community, hosted by the charming Brooks Palmer. Wed, Mar 14, 7pm. Free. Sebastopol Library, 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Rory Scovel: The Tethered Hilarious comedian and actor returns to the North Bay on a new tour, with Healdsburg native Cory Loykasek opening. Mar 16, 9pm. $25. Sonoma Cider, 44-F Mill St,., Healdsburg.. 707.723.7018.

Dance Life & Art of Isadora Duncan

Director and dancer Lois Flood brings the iconic dancer and feminist to life with Duncan’s original choreography and classical costumes. Mar 18, 4pm. $15-$18. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Events Finders & Makers Market

Enjoy an outdoor display of curated vintage collectors and local makers, plus refreshments and tours of the new femalefocused co-working space. Sat, Mar 17, 11am. The Indie Alley, 69 Bolinas Rd, Fairfax, theindiealley.com.

Geography of Hope Conference

An inspiring weekend of readings, discussions, and activities deepen an understanding of the relationships between people and place. Mar 17-18. $175 and up. Point Reyes Station, various locations, Point Reyes Station, gohconference.org.

Local Author Panel

Event celebrating local women in literature features Amy S Peele, Janna Barkin, Betsy Graziani Fasbinder and Karen Lynch. Mar 16, 7pm. Novato Copperfield’s Books, 999 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.763.3052.

St Paddy’s Day on the Square

Irish faire, food and drinks, live music and more. Mar 17, 12pm. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

St Patrick’s Day Celebration at Toad in the Hole

Enjoy live music, bagpipes, dancing, a beer garden and plenty of Guinness. Mar 17, 12pm. Toad in the Hole Pub, 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Ugly Tattoo Contest

Show off your regrettable ink and win prizes. With live music and tasty food. Mar 18, 7pm. B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille, 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Yountville Live

Annual wine, food and music celebration features entertainment from several musical artists with the valley’s finest restaurants and vintners providing intimate culinary experiences. Mar 15-18. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa, yountvillelive.com.

Film DreambodyEarthbody

Experimental documentary video by Paratheatre director Antero Alli screens with Q&A. Mar 21, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Sebastopol Masonic Lodge, 373 N Main St, Sebastopol.

Falling Apart

Watch the first episode of the much anticipated web series from North Bay filmmaker Morgan Hamilton-Lee. Mar 18, 8pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

4 Wheel Bob

Bay Area filmmaker Tal Skloot

and film subject Bob Coomber screen and discuss the film about Coomber wheelchair hike in the Sierra Nevadas. Mar 18, 4:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Generation Zapped

EMF Safety Network hosts a screening of the new documentary about the health risks of wireless technology with a discussion. Mar 21, 7pm. Free. First Presbyterian Church of San Rafael, 1510 Fifth St, San Rafael, emfsafetynetwork.org.

In the Fade

Golden Globe winner for Best Foreign Film, this 2017 German drama explores a woman bent on justice after a terrorist bombing. Mar 17, 4 and 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Israeli Film Festival

Four-week screening series continues with 2016’s “Past Life,” a thriller that tracks the 1977 trans-European odyssey of two sisters. Mar 20, 1 and 7:30pm. $11-$14. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St.,, Sebastopol.. 707.525.4840.

Let’s Play Two

Rock-doc chronicles Pearl Jam’s legendary performances at Wrigley Field during the Chicago Cubs historic 2016 season. Mar 20, 7pm. JaM Cellars, 1460 First St, Napa. 707.265.7577.

Petaluma Cinema Series

Petaluma Film Alliance presents significant classic and modern films with guests, lectures and discussions. This week, Brazilian crime epic “City of God” screens. Mar 14, 6pm. $6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, petalumafilmalliance.org.

Sonoma International Film Festival

Celebrating its 21st year, the festival features a slew of upcoming A-list and independent films from around the globe screening at venues within walking distance, with Sonoma chefs and gala dinner events. Mar 21-25. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, sonomafilmfest.org.

Food & Drink Beers for Queers

Fun happy hour event supports

TEE’D OFF Comedian and actor Rory Scovel presents a night of untethered laughs

on Friday, March 16, at Sonoma Cider in Healdsburg. See Comedy, this page.

LGBTQ Connection’s work with local youth and community. Mar 15, 4pm. Fogbelt Brewing, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.978.3400.

Celts & Vikings Corned Beef & Cabbage Fundraiser A program titled “Swords & Silver: Trading with the Vikings” accompanies a corned beef and cabbage dinner. Mar 17, 5pm. $8$25. Sons of Norway Hall, 617 W Ninth St, Santa Rosa. 800.838.3006.

Miminashi Tiki Night

Polynesian-themed night features tropical cocktails, eclectic cuisine and laid back vibes. Reservations recommended. Mar 21, 5:30pm. Miminashi, 821 Coombs St, Napa. 707.254.9464.

Pigs & Pinot

For Kids The Easter Beagle Is Coming!

Easter egg pop-up crafting. Mar 17, 10am. $5-$12. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane,, Santa Rosa.. 707.579.4452.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Family-friendly performance is presented by Marin Shakespeare Company. Mar 18, 11:30am. $5-$15. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8081.

Mozart’s Magnificent Voyage

Classical Kids Live presents an orchestral afternoon. Mar 18, 3pm. $12-$17. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Celebratory weekend offers a series of intimate dining and educational events hosted by chef Charlie Palmer. Mar 16-17. Sold-out. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St.,, Healdsburg.. 707.431.2800.

Sprite & Fairy House Craft

St Patrick’s Day at Sally Tomatoes

Lectures

All-you-can eat buffet featuring all of the Irish classics is back. Mar 17, 11:30am. $13. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Mar 17, 10:30am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

History of Sicily

Six-week lecture series uncovers the Sicily of Homer’s “Odyssey,” who taught

civilization to the Romans, and later helped to ignite the Renaissance. Mar 20, 10am. $95. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, healdsburg-ca. aauw.net.

History of Women at SRJC Santa Rosa Junior College director of institutional research KC Greaney presents the college’s 100-year history of women as students, instructors, administrators, trustees and more. Mar 14, 12:30pm. Frank P Doyle Library, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4614.

Readings Angelico Hall Mar 14, 7pm, “I’ve Been Thinking” with Maria Shriver. $40. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael 415.457.4440.

Book Passage Mar 15, 7pm, “Ten Poems for Difficult Times” with Roger Housden. Mar 16, 7pm, “Awakening Your Power of Self-Healing” with Meir Schneider. Mar 17, 4pm, “Down by the River” with Andy Weiner and April Chu. Mar 17, 5pm, “Young Lincoln” with Jan Jacobi. Mar 17, 7pm, Flunk. Start.: Reclaiming My


Book Passage By-the-Bay

Mar 15, 6pm, “When Cancer Calls” with Danielle O’Doherty. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Kevin Sands and James Riley. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Readers’ Books

Mar 15, 6:30pm, “The Secret Life of Mrs London” with Rebecca Rosenberg. Mar 16, 5:30pm, “Cork Dork” with Bianca Bosker. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

The Language of Flowers

Mar 15, 7pm, “The Ides of March” poetry reading with Sonoma Writers Workshop. 521 Broadway, Ste A, Sonoma 707.228.9214.

Calistoga Copperfield’s Books

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Mar 15, 7pm, “Napa at Last Light: America’s Eden in an Age of Calamity” with James Conaway. 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga 707.942.1616.

Mar 16, 7pm, “The New Wild West” with Blaire Briody. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Carole L Ellis Auditorium

Theater

Mar 18, 4pm, “A Capitalist’s Lament” with Leland Faust, presented by Copperfield’s Books and LiteracyWorks. $28 includes two passes and a copy of the book. 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma 415.392.5225.

CIA at Copia

Mar 15, 6pm, “Cuban Flavor” with Liza Gershman, includes art and cocktail reception. $25. 500 First St, Napa 707.967.2530.

Moshin Vineyards

Mar 19, 3:30pm, “American English, Italian Chocolate” with Rick Bailey, Reading Between the Vines event includes wine and nibbles. 10295 Westside Rd, Healdsburg 707.433.5499.

Napa Bookmine

Mar 17, 6pm, “Crossing California” with Sam McManis. Mar 18, 3pm, “Accidental Jesus Freak” with Amber Lea Starfire. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Mar 14, 4pm, “Samantha Spinner & the Super-Secret Plans” with Russell Ginns. Mar 16, 7pm, “The Best Little Grammar Collection Ever” with Arlene Miller. Mar 21, 7pm, fantasy authors Brandon Mull,

In the Heights

Mar 18, 2pm, “Missing Persons: A Memoir” and “Still Time” with Gayle Green and Jean Hegland. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Mar 15, 7pm, Dark Land, Dark Mirror” and “Heed the Apocalypse” with Jonah Raskin and Waights Taylor Jr. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Bump Wine Cellars

Justin-Siena’s award-winning theatre program returns with the classical gangster musical. Mar 16-25. $25. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900. Throckmorton Youth Performers present Lin Manuel Miranda’s debut musical about New York City’s Washington Heights neighborhood. Mar 1625. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

A Broadway Songbook

Novato Theater Company hosts a night of song and community. Mar 17, 7pm. $75. The Key Room, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato. 415.382.3363, ext 215.

David Copperfield

College of Marin Drama Program presents a staged version of the Charles Dickens’ novel. Through Mar 18. $15$20. College of Marin James Dunn Theatre, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9385.

Dead Man’s Cell Phone

Ross Valley Players present a new comedy about how we memorialize the dead and our need to connect in a technologically obsessed world. Through Mar 25. $15-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. rossvalleyplayers.com.

The Government Inspector

Conservatory Theatre Ensemble presents the timely government satire about mistaken identities and set in a small corrupt Russian town. Through Mar 17. $5-$12. Caldwell Theatre, Tamalpais High School, 700 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. ctetam.org.

25

Guys & Dolls

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAR C H 14-20, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Decade Lost in Scientology” with Sands Hall. Mar 18, 11am, “Shooting from the Hip” with Scott Strazzante. Mar 18, 1pm, “Passion Projects for Smart People” with Michael Wing. Mar 18, 4pm, “How a Mountain Was Made” with Greg Sarris. Mar 19, 7pm, “A Reckoning” with Linda Spalding. Mar 21, 7pm, “This Messy Magnificent Life” with Geneen Roth. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Curtain Call Theatre presents the California premiere of the intriguing mystery from celebrated playwright Gary Kayner. Includes mature content. Through Mar 24. $15-$20. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.524.8739.

The Realistic Joneses Left Edge Theatre presents the wonderfully weird comedy about two suburban couples with intertwining identities. Through Mar 25. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd.,, Santa Rosa.. 707.546.3600.

Sister Act The Tony-nominated uplifting musical is directed by Michael Ross, former Napa Valley Playhouse artistic director. Through Mar 18. $10-$25. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy.,, Napa.. 707.256.7500.

Israeli Film Festival 2018 March 6 - March 27

Welcome Home, Jenny Sutter A US Marine veteran visits a misfit desert community to heal from post-war stress in this character-driven drama, presented as part of SRJC’s Women’s History Month. Through Mar 18. $12-$18. Newman Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

In Between

Mar 6, 1:00 & 7:30 p.m.

Hill Start

Mar 13, 1:00 & 7:30 p.m.

Past Life

Mar 20, 1:00 & 7:30 p.m.

Maktub

Mar 27, 1:00 & 7:30 p.m.

Tickets and Information

WWW.JCCSOCO.ORG or call (707) 528-4222

SCREENINGS: Rialto Cinemas®

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It’s time to reclaim the pot industry BY ‘OAKY JOE’ MUNSON

T

his is an open letter to the so-called cannabis community, a community that is unable to stand together and express any political power; that is unable to see that the regulatory regime isn’t really about cannabis, but rather economic control, blind ideology and loss of civil liberties; and that pretends to have the moral high ground, but lacks the moral courage to claim it.

There are a lot of good people in the cannabis industry and there are some responsible businesses and corporations, but there is no cannabis community. There are a few brave (or foolhardy?) souls and marginal organizations fighting the battle for crumbs, that nevertheless don’t engage in political freedom and cultural integrity. There are also a lot of self-righteous, identity-politics “victims” unable to look beyond their narcissistic neediness. People who really care about the free and creative use of cannabis as a social health and safety benefit have two albatrosses around their

necks: the oppressive, arrogant and treacherous government apparatus, and the passive, frightened and atomized cannabis community itself. We face two ongoing struggles. The first is a running series of skirmishes to claw back rights lost to corporate behemoths that own the control-fraud rackets (and the governments administering them); the second is a decades-long cultural-values war as medical facts supplant the reefer hokum ideologies and the overall structure of suppression and regulation. Truly, cannabis acceptance advances one funeral at a time. We must engage both simultaneously and continuously with some dynamic combination of soul-numbing bureaucratic confrontation and high-integrity civil disobedience against the hypocrisy, extortion and abuse of process by our “leaders” and their owners. Cannabis growers and suppliers have decades of experience working with integrity outside the law, which will continue in a black market made inevitable by the regulatory excesses. Both the content battles and the acceptance war will advance with a series of test cases in the courts, combined with a general refusal to play the regulatory game designed from the beginning to destroy the existing cannabis culture and violate our natural human right to maintain our health and sanity. I challenge, invite and encourage all people who have any stake in this matter and the financial wherewithal to fund the skirmishes and the war itself. Decide what’s really important to you and which side you are on, and whom you really serve. Enroll your peers in the community to step up their engagement and build political power through weight of aligned numbers. Finally, put your time, money and personal energy where your mouth is. ‘Oaky Joe’ Munson is a Forestville cannabis grower.


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BY ROB BREZSNY

Having absolutely nothing to do with Mercury being Retrograde, a renegade lunar eclipse, or any other stew of heavenly omens, we mistakenly published last week’s Free Will Astrology column a week early. Rob Brezsny knows which week is which; we just had a small karmic conundrum. We sincerely hope you can forgive us. This week we’re publishing the column we skipped. We will be back on track next week!

ARIES (March 21–April 19) The men who work on offshore oil rigs perform demanding, dangerous tasks on a regular basis. If they make mistakes, they may get injured or befoul the sea with petroleum. As you might guess, the culture on these rigs has traditionally been macho, stoic and hard-driving. But in recent years, that has changed at one company. Shell Oil’s workers in the U.S. were trained by Holocaust survivor Claire Nuer to talk about their feelings, be willing to admit errors and soften their attitudes. As a result, the company’s safety record has improved dramatically. If macho dudes toiling on oil rigs can become more vulnerable and open and tenderly expressive, so can you, Aries. And now would be a propitious time to do it. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

How will you celebrate your upcoming climax and culmination, Taurus? With a howl of triumph, a fist pump and three cartwheels? With a humble speech thanking everyone who helped you along the way? With a bottle of Champagne, a gourmet feast and spectacular sex? However you choose to mark this transition from one chapter of your life story to the next chapter, I suggest that you include an action that will help the next chapter get off to a rousing start. In your ritual of completion, plant seeds for the future.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) On April 23, 1516, the Germanic duchy of Bavaria issued a decree. From that day forward, all beer produced had to use just three ingredients: water, barley and hops. Ever since then, for the last 500-plus years, this edict has had an enduring influence on how German beer is manufactured. In accordance with astrological factors, I suggest that you proclaim three equally potent and systemic directives of your own. It’s an opportune time to be clear and forceful about how you want your story to unfold in the coming years. CANCER (June 21–July 22) What’s your most frustrating flaw? During the next seven weeks, you will have enhanced power to diminish its grip on you. It’s even possible you will partially correct it or outgrow it. To take maximum advantage of this opportunity, rise above any covert tendency you might have to cling to your familiar pain. Rebel against the attitude described by novelist Stephen King: “It’s hard to let go. Even when what you’re holding onto is full of thorns, it’s hard to let go. Maybe especially then.” LEO (July 23–August 22) In his book Whistling in the Dark, author Frederick Buechner writes that the ancient druids took “a special interest in in-between things like mistletoe, which is neither quite a plant nor quite a tree, and mist, which is neither quite rain nor quite air, and dreams, which are neither quite waking nor quite sleep.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, in-between phenomena will be your specialty in the coming weeks. You will also thrive in relationship to anything that lives in two worlds or that has paradoxical qualities. I hope you’ll exult in the educational delights that come from your willingness to be teased and mystified. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) The English word “velleity” refers to an empty wish that has no power behind it. If you feel a longing to make a pilgrimage to a holy site, but can’t summon the motivation to actually do so, you are under the spell of velleity. Your fantasy of communicating with more flair and candor is a velleity if you never initiate the practical steps to accomplish that goal. Most of us suffer from this weakness at one time or another. But the good news, Virgo, is that you are primed to overcome your version of it during the next six weeks. Life will conspire to assist you if you resolve to turn your wishy-washy wishes into potent action plans—and then actually carry out those plans. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) In the 2002 film Spiderman, there’s a scene where the character Mary Jane slips on a spilled drink as she carries a tray

full of food through a cafeteria. Spiderman, disguised as his alter ego Peter Parker, makes a miraculous save. He jumps up from his chair and catches Mary Jane before she falls. Meanwhile, he grabs her tray and uses it to gracefully capture her apple, sandwich, carton of milk and bowl of jello before they hit the floor. The filmmakers say they didn’t use CGI to render this scene. The lead actor, Tobey Maguire, allegedly accomplished it in real life—although it took 156 takes before he finally mastered it. I hope you have that level of patient determination in the coming weeks, Libra. You, too, can perform a small miracle if you do.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Scorpio mathematician Benoit Mandelbrot was a connoisseur of “the art of roughness” and “the uncontrolled element in life.” He liked to locate and study the hidden order in seemingly chaotic and messy things. “My life seemed to be a series of events and accidents,” he said. “Yet when I look back, I see a pattern.” I bring his perspective to your attention, Scorpio, because you are entering a phase when the hidden order and secret meanings of your life will emerge into view. Be alert for surprising hints of coherence.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

I suspect that in July and August you will be invited to commune with rousing opportunities and exciting escapades. But right now I’m advising you to channel your intelligence into well-contained opportunities and sensible adventures. In fact, my projections suggest that your ability to capitalize fully on the future’s rousing opportunities and exciting escapades will depend on how well you master the current crop of well-contained opportunities and sensible adventures. Making the most of today’s small pleasures will qualify you to harvest bigger pleasures later.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) If you saw the animated film The Lion King, you may have been impressed with the authenticity of the lions’ roars and snarls. Did the producers place microphones in the vicinity of actual lions? No. Voice actor Frank Welker produced the sounds by growling and yelling into a metal garbage can. I propose this as a useful metaphor for you in the coming days. First, I hope it inspires you to generate a compelling and creative illusion of your own—an illusion that serves a good purpose. Second, I hope it alerts you to the possibility that other people will be offering you compelling and creative illusions—illusions that you should engage with only if they serve a good purpose. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) I do a lot of self-editing before I publish what I write. My horoscopes go through at least three drafts before I unleash them on the world. While polishing the manuscript of my first novel, I threw away over a thousand pages of stuff that I had worked on very hard. In contrast to my approach, science fiction writer Harlan Ellison dashed off one of his award-winning stories in a single night, and published it without making any changes to the first draft. As you work in your own chosen field, Aquarius, I suspect that for the next three weeks you will produce the best results by being more like me than Ellison. Beginning about three weeks from now, an Ellison-style strategy might be more warranted. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

According to my assessment of the astrological omens, you’re in a favorable phase to gain more power over your fears. You can reduce your susceptibility to chronic anxieties. You can draw on the help and insight necessary to dissipate insidious doubts that are rooted in habit but not based on objective evidence. I don’t want to sound too melodramatic, my dear Pisces, but THIS IS AN AMAZING OPPORTUNITY! YOU ARE POTENTIALLY ON THE VERGE OF AN UNPRECEDENTED BREAKTHROUGH! In my opinion, nothing is more important for you to accomplish in the coming weeks than this inner conquest.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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