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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | FEBRUARY 21-27, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.42

SCHULZ MUSEUM CELEBRATES FRANKLIN'S 50TH BIRTHDAY P10 JAPANESE TAPAS P8 TATTOOS & BLUES P16 BEATLES VS. STONES P19


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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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nb How ‘Peanuts’ made history in the historically horrible year of 1968, p10.

‘It’s like the invasion of Iraq all over again, with drums instead of drones.’ MUS IC P 19

Happy Trails, Mere Decades Away T H E PA P E R P 6

Perfect ‘Panther’ Lives Up to Hype FI LM P 18

6th Street’s Dark Horse STAGE P 17 Rhapsodies & Rants p4 The Paper p6 Dining p8 Swirl p9 Cover Feature p10

Culture Crush p15 Arts & Ideas p16 Stage p17 Film p18 Music p19

Clubs & Concerts p20 Arts & Events p23 The Nugget p26 Classified p27 Astrology p27

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YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, FRANKLIN ARMSTRONG


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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Smoked Out This is a great article (“Smoke Out,” Feb. 7). As someone with an addictive personality, my life has been vastly improved by attending meetings of Marijuana Anonymous. For many years I ended up smoking more than I wanted to, and I knew that I had a problem. I just didn’t know how to control my usage. The great thing about Marijuana Anonymous meetings is that we all

support each other in staying sober. There is no one in charge, nobody makes you do anything you don’t want to do, and it is fine for people to attend meetings and to not say anything if they don’t want to. I was very relieved to discover that Marijuana Anonymous has no connection to organized religion. Attending Marijuana Anonymous meetings has improved my life immensely. When I was smoking everyday I felt like I wasn’t accomplishing the things that I wanted to do with my life.

THIS MODERN WORLD

Now that I am sober, I have been able to do many of those things. I know that there are many people who can successfully use cannabis periodically. I often wish that I was someone who could smoke once in a while without feeling the desire to smoke everyday. Through the fellowship of Marijuana Anonymous and hanging out every week with other recovering Marijuana addicts, I have come to see that smoking once in a while is not an option for me. It

By Tom Tomorrow

has become very clear to me that I can either be sober or smoke everyday. With the support of my pals in Marijuana Anonymous, I have been able to live a sober life for many years and as a result I am much happier.

RICHARD SWEET Via Bohemian.com

All of us are potentially addicted to something: chocolate, fast cars, smartphones. Roughly 9 percent of all people who try cannabis will become addicted to it. If you think you’re a recreational user, but find yourself planning your day around your cannabis use, you might want to have a really honest conversation with the (nonusing) people around you about your use. Better yet, listen to former users at a typical low-key, non-judgmental MA meeting. Self-honesty is initially tough, but ultimately rewarding.

BILL B.

Via Bohemian.com

Not into Newsom Derived from your last answer, Lt. Governor (“Gav for Gov?” Feb. 13), what you “export that’s so uniquely California” is Californians—middle-class taxpayers who can no longer tolerate this state’s rapid descent into the identity politics of the far, far left; people are moving out of CA in droves because they can no longer bear to watch their once beloved and magnificent state decay into, well, a filthy, lower-class resident “s”-hole and proverbial safe space for perverse far left values and radically insane political opinions.

DAVID TICE ALLISON Via Bohemian.com

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Bullet Points Mike Thompson’s gun-control efforts fall short BY TOM GOGOLA

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.S. Rep. Mike Thompson hasn’t gotten a check from the National Rifle Association for about a decade, but did receive $4,000 from the organization over three congressional cycles leading up to the 2006 election. Thompson, a Democrat whose district encompasses Santa Rosa, has positioned himself as a reasonable gun owner in Congress and has offered a “bipartisan” bill that would enhance background checks. He’s been tweeting at Donald Trump about the bill since the school shooting in Florida last week, which left 17 dead. Thompson co-authored his bill with Republican U.S. Rep. Peter King, whose Long Island, N.Y., district is a Trump stronghold. Thompson may have shed the NRA money stain as he’s sought common ground on gun control—but that common ground of “bipartisanship” is a joke. His bill has 158 sponsors, and 155 of them are Democrats. The last person to sign on was Florida Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo. He’s been called out for taking money from the NRA and signed on to the Thompson bill two days after the shooting. Now contrast Thompson’s bill with the Trump-inspired bill in the House that would legalize conceal-carry nationally; that bill has more than 200 sponsors, and all but three are Republicans. It has the support of the Trumpian Californians—Mimi Rogers, Kevin McCarthy and that weird Nunes fellow, all of whom have taken the NRA’s money and hate California’s gun-control laws. Those heroic kids down in Florida are focused on the NRA money, which mostly goes to Republicans, but they know it’s not just about the money. They have directly engaged with a gun culture that the NRA has engendered with its no-compromise approach to any legislation, premised on the paranoid notion that they are coming for our guns. And yet, for all his good effort, Thompson won’t stop pandering to the paranoia. He sponsored a similar bill in 2015 with King and went to lengths to announce his fealty to the Second Amendment as he assured constituents that it wouldn’t ban any weapon, not even the AR-15s used in most school shootings. The time has come and gone for pols to stand up and pledge allegiance to the Second Amendment. We get it, congressman. Nobody’s coming for those guns of yours. Your soul, on the other hand . . . Tom Gogola is the news editor of the ‘Bohemian.’ Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

READY TO ROLL All these bikes want is a day on a nice trail with a happy rider smiling as they cycle town to town.

The Ride Stuff The brakes are off (sort of) on the long-desired West County bike trail BY ALEX T. RANDOLPH

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fter years of planning, Sonoma County Regional Parks has just come one step closer to starting work on a proposed 15-mile bike trail that would connect the cities of Petaluma and Sebastopol.

Sonoma County Regional Parks presented the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors with an extensive feasibility study on Feb. 6. The purpose of the study was to determine the safest and most feasible route for a currently unnamed pedestrian and bike trail between the two cities, and also to consider routes to connect

unincorporated areas of Sonoma County. The board accepted the findings and recommendations of the study on Feb. 13, allowing Regional Parks to receive final reimbursement and meet obligations of the grant used to pay for the study. According to a summary of the study, the ideal route for the

paved trail is the corridor next to Highway 12 and Stony Point Road. However, according to Fifth District Supervisor Linda Hopkins, there is some debate between those who want the trail to follow the highway and others who want it elsewhere. Hopkins says she enthusiastically approves of the bike trail. She says West County is already underserved by alternate transportation options, as the SMART train does not go to that area. Furthermore, West County is more rural than other parts of the county, and has no bike lanes in several areas, even as it boasts a vibrant bicycling community. Besides the safety of cyclists and pedestrians, Hopkins says there are matters of health and community as well that play into the push for additional options for cyclists. The report takes special note of the many advantages of alternate transportation routes around the county—ranging from encouraging exercise to creating more opportunities for recreation, to preserving and creating more open spaces. Regional Parks recommends further studies on the environment, boundary surveys, geotechnical investigations and detailed engineering and design further down the line before the project can truly get off the ground. “It’s good for the body,” Hopkins says, “and it’s good for the planet. What’s not to love?” For bike enthusiasts, what’s not to love is the delay in building the path. Actual construction is a long way off (decades, even). Hopkins says the study gave a basic primer to the best route, but that a lot more work and research is needed. She likens the eventual rollout of the bike path to reading a book, and this study is merely the prologue. According to Hopkins, Regional Parks has not yet seriously discussed the potential cost of the project, or where the funding will come from. Sonoma County


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‘It’s good for the body, and it’s good for the planet. What’s not to love?’ But such grants are incredibly competitive, Hopkins warns. Other options she suggests are passing a local measure to cover costs. According to the Sonoma County website, the trail is planned to be constructed in phases, depending on how much funding becomes available. The process of finding an ideal route included local officials seeking input from Petaluma and Sebastopol shareholders and representatives, as well as citizens of both areas. Regional Parks conducted three public meetings as an online survey to make sure the public’s voice was heard, and held several meetings with city authorities from Petaluma and Sebastopol. West County already has several bike trails that connect its disparate cities, such as the West County Regional Trail that connects Forestville, Graton and Sebastopol, and the Joe Rodota Trail that links downtown Santa Rosa to Sebastopol. But there’s

no trail that links Petaluma to Sebastopol. According to the summary, if and when the proposed trail is completed, it would contain links to these and other bicycle and pedestrian trails both existing and planned for the future, such as the Laguna de Santa Rosa Trail and the SMART multi-use pathway. The proposed bike trail was first conceived in 2010 as part of the Sonoma County Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan, and got its inspiration from the route taken by the former Petaluma Sebastopol Railroad. But much of the right-of-way for the railroad has either gone under private ownership or developed for other reasons. In 2015, the Bohemian reported on the feasibility study when it was first proposed in a news article that highlighted the difficulty in building a bike trail in areas with extensive residential development and unclear lines of property ownership along the rail-bed, and also noted the notinsignificant fact that part of the rail bed to be repurposed as a bike trail is currently buried under Highway 116. The study was introduced in the spring of 2016 to find a new route between the two cities while negotiating various issues (some bike enthusiasts have balked at having a bike trail run alongside a heavily trafficked highway), and was concluded last month at a cost of $248,000. A California Transit grant provided $209,436; the remaining $38,000 was paid by a local match from several sources, including the cities of Petaluma and Sebastopol, and the Sonoma County Bicycle Coalition. The study covered 13 miles of proposed trail in unincorporated areas of Sonoma County, as well as one mile each in the cities of Petaluma and Sebastopol. County residents can weigh in at sonomacounty.ca.gov/Parks/Planning/ Petaluma-Sebastopol-Trail/.

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estimates the total cost of the project at approximately $33.5 million. Hopkins says she hopes the local Sonoma County Transportation Authority and the California Department of Transportation will provide grants to build the trail when the time comes—as California Transit already did to pay for the study.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FE BR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Dining JAPANESE TAPAS Small, well-executed plates elevate Izakaya Kityaru.

Rising Tongue Japanese pub grub is done right at Petaluma’s Izakaya Kityaru BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

W

hen an American Japanese restaurant calls itself an izakaya, it often alludes to the casual, informal atmosphere of the place, rather than the menu itself— crowd-pleasing standards like sushi rolls, ramen and udon will be offered. But the traditional premise of an izakaya is small dishes

showcasing the diversity of Japanese cuisine. Petaluma’s newish Izakaya Kitaru offers a range of dishes to justify the tag. And yet, from the outside, Kitaru seems like a middle-ofthe-road Japanese spot, and the interior is no surprise either. Dark wood dominates the space, and two large TVs cancel all hopes for escapism or intimacy. Stay away from the screens and start with the small plates. We ordered the eryngi tempura, deepfried king oyster mushrooms ($8)

and albacore carpaccio ($15). The tender and generous albacore tuna slices were swimming in a light ponzu sauce and adorned with crispy cucumbers and fresh jalapeno; the crunch and spice highlighted the texture of the fish. It wasn’t a memorable dish, but it did have a straightforward, no-frills execution—rare these days when it comes to crudo and carpaccio. The mushrooms were similarly simple, yet telling of the kitchen’s attention to detail. The choice

of king oysters resulted in a complexity of textures, as the chewy, meaty mushroom was enveloped in soft, golden tempura. We asked for a dipping sauce and were instead advised to dip the nuggets in the truffle salt they were served with. The umami flavor intensified, and the dish was elevated to the next level. The $10 beef tongue, from the kushiyaki (grilled-items) section, was a standout. Widely served cold in Russian cuisine and griddled in Mexican lengua tacos, the tongue was made new at Kitaru: sliced ultra-thin, grilled and topped with punchy garlic and herb purée. Again, a simple, well-prepared ingredient was complemented by a smart flavor kick. Next came unatama yakimeshi ($17), a dish of fried rice made with barbecued eel, egg and fried onion. The sizzling mixture resembled an airy souffle. The eel’s sweet, oily flesh and the whipped egg was layered with perfectly cooked rice and strings of caramelized onion. Finally, we were curious to see if Izakaya Kitaru’s genius extends to the well-traveled avenue of sushi rolls. The aburi saba ($14) and the Red Tiger ($16) rose above the other rolls on offer with interesting ingredient combinations. The aburi saba featured tempura scallion and avocado on the inside, and mackerel on the outside. The mackerel was lightly briny and pungent, not quite raw but pickled, and the daikon-hot sauce garnish added a fresh acidity to the plate. The Red Tiger went for a more traditional marriage of snow-crab salad, mango and fish eggs. The rolls balanced their sweet and salty components; the two sauces drizzled on top, teriyaki and spicy mayo, turned a humble roll into a festive, juicy affair. The same could be said of the restaurant itself: unassuming upon arrival, but brimming with flair and imagination. Izakaya Kitaru, 212 Western Ave., Petaluma. 707.789.9068.


Cutting Class Trimming the vine with care at Silverado Vineyards BY JAMES KNIGHT

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’d heard rumblings of a labor shortage in the vineyards, but I had no idea how dire it was until they started calling in the wine writers for help. Last week, Sonoma County Winegrowers cancelled their annual Pruning Championship, an event that’s intended to recognize some of the North Bay’s most valued vineyard workers, due to difficulties in getting vineyard managers to give up their best workers for the day. So I answered a request from Silverado Vineyards in Napa Valley to meet them in the vineyard on a recent Tuesday morning to see what I could do to help out.

Silverado Vineyards, 6121 Silverado Trail, Napa. Open daily, 10am–5pm. Tasting fee $35; $40 premier reds. 707.257.1770.

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Swirl

I hope the three Cabernet Sauvignon vines that I and another media guest trimmed down to “spurs” gives some hard-pressed worker a few minutes of R&R. But most of the hour was spent learning from Silverado Vineyards director of vineyard management Towle Merritt about why the winery was “cane pruning” its estate vineyards. The practice adds up to 20 percent more in cost to have the crew carefully select and tie up a few of last year’s crop of “canes,” instead of mowing those all down to short spurs with their pruning shears— which requires a canny eye and a practiced wrist in itself. But Merritt says the better yield and potentially longer life of the vineyard, which is expensive to replant and can suffer more disease after spur pruning, make up for it. It takes seven years to work up to a skilled pruning position at Silverado, according to Merritt, and the winery’s starting wage for pruning is about $16.50 per hour. On the other hand, half as many workers are needed for pruning as are need for vineyard operations later in the season. Founded in 1981 by Ron Miller and the late Diane Disney Miller, daughter of Walt Disney, Silverado Vineyards did indeed get a boost from the Mouse, but this winery, with its old-school style and long-tenured winemakers, does nothing to contribute to the “wine Disneyland” vibe about the valley. It’s a comfortably appointed joint with a great view and a fireplace, and for starters, the refined 2016 Miller Ranch Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc ($25) is a stony whisper of grapefruit pulp at a Napa-nice price. Fans of Jordan’s Alexander Valley Cab will surely relate favorably to the savory black olive and char-steeped Silverado Vineyards 2014 Estate Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($50), while the 2014 Solo Stags Leap District Cabernet Sauvignon ($125) allows mere hints of maple syrup and blackberry fruit to surface, teasingly, from the gravelly depths.

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Black Lines Matter Commemorating 50 years of Franklin

T

he adventures of T’Challa, king of Wakanda and hero of Marvel’s newest blockbuster, Black Panther, gives solace to those burned by the calamities of our day, the shootings and the political strife. Television anchorpersons are enthusiastically but incorrectly calling Black Panther the first black superhero movie ever, even after decades of movies about mighty African-American fighters

BY RICHARD VON BUSACK for justice that commenced in the 1970s wave of blaxplotiation films. What’s clear, though, is that this mammoth hit is a cultural event of some size, with an opening weekend box office of $235 million. By coincidence, on our own scene, a far smaller and less formidable African-American hero is being celebrated at the Charles M. Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, in an exhibit that runs through Aug. 5.


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“By the mid-’60s,” Farago says, “Peanuts was one of the most widely read newspaper comic strips in the world, and thanks to books, merchandise and animation, the characters’ audience and influence were growing exponentially.” Schulz, however, wrote back to Harriet Glickman saying he wasn’t sure he was up to the task of writing a “non-patronizing” black character. Nevertheless, says Farago, Schulz “introduced readers to Franklin on July 31, 1968. Franklin and Charlie Brown hit it off immediately, reaction from readers and newspaper editors was overwhelmingly positive, and by that fall, Franklin was a regular member of the Peanuts cast.” t is an emotional thing to see a museum dedicated to something that is so much a part of your childhood—and, hence, so much a part of the person you are now. The Schulz Museum gets 100,000 visitors annually. Though Charles Schulz died 18 years ago this month, his strip is still printed, in reruns,

I

in hundreds of papers, and could conceivably—since Schulz left behind nearly 18,000 daily and weekly comics—remain a feature up to the extinction of the newspaper. At the Schulz Museum are relics of the artist’s life: a re-creation of his studio and drawing board, and a childhood photo taken during the Great Depression of Schulz with the real Snoopy, a dog named Spike who was so ornery it ate glass. The museum’s largest piece is a huge mural of 3,500 strips printed on tiles. From a distance, they comprise the image of Lucy van Pelt pulling away the football as Charlie Brown goes straight for the pratfall. The whole history of comics offers little as funny as the glee disguised as guilessness on Lucy’s face. That waltz between grifter and sucker—it never gets old. “I was watching one of his last interviews, and Schulz was saying, ‘It makes me so sad that he never got to kick that football,’” says museum director Karen Johnson. Johnson’s office is crammed with memorabilia of the very early days of the strip—a rubberoid figure of the piano-playing Schroeder must be over 60 years

old. She shows me a notebook she kept from her teen years as a camp counselor some time ago. Linus was on the cover, offering the thought: “No problem is so big or so complicated that it can’t be run away from.” “Peanuts was part of my lexicon,” says Johnson. “It informed me, and it helped me form friendships.” On her desk are a couple of examples of the graphic marvel of Schulz. One four-panel comic has the miffed Snoopy slapshotting his empty dog bowl at his alleged master—two of the panels being nothing but speed lines as the bowl meets its goal at Charlie Brown’s feet. The other is a framed strip, showing a dance between the phenomenal dog and a falling leaf. This is Peanuts at its most haiku-like wistfulness: a bamboo flute solo amid the brass section of the comics page. Dedicating an exhibit to honor Franklin was a pretty simple decision to make, Johnson says. The museum’s staff considers anniversaries when figuring out displays, and the dates suggested the time was right. As for any controversy surrounding ) 12

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Charlie Brown’s friend Franklin Armstrong made his debut in Peanuts one half century ago this year. It happened in the summer of 1968, a distant mirror to our own times of violence and political division, in the weeks between the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy. And it started with a letter. A schoolteacher from Los Angeles, Harriet Glickman, wrote Santa Rosa’s Charles Schulz. It’s a fan’s note for several paragraphs— “We are a totally Peanuts-oriented family”—before getting to the matter at hand: It occurred to me today that the introduction of Negro children into the group of Schulz characters could happen with a minimum of impact. . . . I’m sure one doesn’t make radical changes in so important an institution without a lot of shock waves from syndicates, clients, etc. You have, however, a stature and reputation which can withstand a great deal. According to Andrew Farago, curator of San Francisco’s Cartoon Art Museum and author of The Complete Peanuts Family Album, the cultural reach of Peanuts was huge when Franklin debuted.


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Franklin ( 11 Franklin’s appearance, “there’s no evidence of that,” Johnson says. “It was all done without legislation, just correspondence between Schulz and a reader.” The Franklin exhibit includes reproductions of that correspondence between Schulz, Glickman and her friends. There are some selected strips with Franklin, as well as a passing mention of comedian Chris Rock’s comment that the black kid in Peanuts sure didn’t say much. On the contrary, he did. When first introduced, Franklin’s father was stationed in Vietnam, something not much discussed on the comics page. Like the color of Franklin’s skin, the mention of the war seemed to be enough for Peanuts: acknowledgement, but no stance-taking. In the strip’s final years, in the late 1990s, Franklin was a conduit for stories about his grandfather, including a dialogue about senior admissions at the aquarium, an unlikely springboard for a fine Carl Reiner–like punchline. (He’s only allowed to see the elderly fish.) My pleasure in finally visiting the museum was mingled with realization that Schulz’s work still has its freshness and snap. “It’s timeless,” Johnson says, “all about us and our friends and our families.” uring the strip’s pinnacle years of the 1960s, the children of a Peanutsmad nation had Charlie Brown as their spokesman, who gave them a word to describe their feelings: “I’m depressed.” Schulz’s strip was a stage for bemusement, isolation and failure, acute as often as it was cute. A friend says, “That strip was so sad.” Was Peanuts sad? Schulz, a staff sergeant in Normandy during WWII, in charge of a light machine gun outfit, was a man of almost violent contrasts. He was a teetotaling Sunday school teacher in Sebastopol, yet he was remorselessly hyper-competitive, and could be iron-cold under

D

that surface of “Minnesota nice” that he kept for life. He was superficially unaffectionate, but also wrote sugary love letters. He was also an early and shrewd licenser, but kept sharp watch against any commercial dilution of his work. He ensured that the animated holiday favorite A Charlie Brown Christmas wasn’t “sweetened,” as the term has it, with a laugh track, and he insisted on having Linus read a passage from the Gospel of Luke for an entire minute of animated time. Schulz’s miracle was that he made a fortune working with negative space and smallness in a mid-century America that cherished splash and impact. Yet he was, more than anything, an anhedonist’s anhedonist. Schulz biographer David Michaelis quotes the cartoonist: “How do you account for someone being so unhappy when he has nothing to be unhappy about?” The tension of his life is in his work. Hacks of every media tried to get Schulz to admit that he was, in fact, good ol’ Charlie Brown. They missed something— the ruthless, Germanic side of Schulz’s humor in the slapdown punchline. In Peanuts, mousetrap-quick punishment awaits those who dare to bare, or wallow, in their feelings, as when Charlie Brown’s “therapist,” Lucy, informs her patient: “You’ve got to stop all this silly worrying.” When Charlie Brown asks, “How do I stop?” Lucy responds with “That’s your worry! Five cents, please!” As a craftsman, Schulz deserves honor, too. That seemingly tentative line that drew Charlie Brown is boggling. Every kid of a certain age knows this—copy Charlie Brown’s head, and it’s like trying to outline a smooth tangerine, only to end up with a drawing of a rotten grapefruit. “We had the people from Blue Sky Studios here working on The Peanuts Movie,” Johnson says. “They were trying to render that round head and that Picassolike ear and nose in 3D. The simplicity of [Schulz’s] ) 14 drawing was not simple.”


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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

ltimately, Franklin was a good first step toward integration, and it showed black readers that Schulz knew they were out there. Steps like these lead to the future, says Johnson. “Obama—well, if he didn’t actually mention Franklin, he said that Christmas didn’t start until Malia played A Charlie Brown Christmas.” Reading Glickman’s letter at the museum, the last paragraph strikes me: I hope there will be more than one black child. . . . [L]et them be as adorable as the others . . . but please . . . allow them a Lucy! That, plainly and sadly, didn’t happen. Schulz couldn’t go there, even as television picked up the slack. “A black Lucy” makes one think immediately of LaWanda Page’s crabby Aunt Esther on Sanford and Son, wielding the Purse of Doom and the righteousness of Jesus with equal vigor. In support of her initial letter, Glickman included a note by one Kenneth C. Kelly, who as a black person added his support to Glickman. Kelly asked Schulz for “a Negro supernumerary” character. At first glance, “supernumerary” is the perfect word for Franklin: a character whose innocuous qualities are there from his debut. In the first strips, he passes through the strange world of the Peanuts kids, from the odd fantastic beagle to the lemonade/ psychiatrist stand, before going on his way. Inarguably, Franklin is what the museum called him, “A valued member of the Peanuts family.” But the South Park gang, who named their only black kid character “Token,” also had a point. Farago argues: “I’m reluctant to call Franklin a token, since Schulz wasn’t under any pressure from his syndicate to integrate the strip. Franklin’s introduction was potentially going to lose more newspapers than it was going to gain, and I’m sure that Schulz brought him into the strip

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because he knew it was the right thing to do. “There were literally millions of eyes upon Franklin every day when he was introduced in Peanuts,” Farago continues, “and as the first (and, ultimately, only) black character in the strip, I think Schulz felt the need to make sure that Franklin was a positive role model, almost to a fault. Unlike the other characters in the strip, Franklin was free of neuroses and hang-ups and personality defects, and was almost too well adjusted. Personally, I think Franklin is the kid that Charlie Brown might have been if he hadn’t been so wishy-washy: popular, content, reasonably confident in his own abilities.” A rival strip went further: “One of Charles Schulz’s good friends in Northern California was an African-American cartoonist name Morrie Turner,” Farrago says. “Morrie was dissatisfied with the lack of black characters on the comics page, and this was a frequent topic of conversation between him and Schulz. “With Schulz’s encouragement, Morrie launched his comic strip Wee Pals in 1965, the first nationally syndicated comic strip to feature an ethnically diverse cast of characters. I don’t think Morrie ever denied that his strip owed a lot to Schulz, but Peanuts was such a successful, gamechanging strip that it’s hard to find a strip launched after 1960 that wasn’t influenced by it.” It is possible to overlook the importance of small symbols in a time of anger and fracture, whether the annus horribilis is numbered 1968 or 2018. There seemed little comment last year when in Spider-Man: Homecoming, our hero uses his strength and webs to hold together a ferry called Spirit of America, split into left and right— well, port and starboard—halves. T’Challa is also the kind of figure who could bring us together again (see Film, p18). And Franklin Armstrong of Peanuts is another symbol of inclusiveness, evidence of the strength of something as little as lines on paper.


Crush

SEBASTOPOL

Spiritual Adventure

Author and one-time Sebastopol resident Dani Antman has traveled the globe in search of her spiritual path. From her Jewish upbringing in Queens, N.Y., to her current work as an internationally known energy healer and interfaith minister in Santa Barbara, Antman’s quest is chronicled in her new memoir, Wired for God: Adventures of a Jewish Yogi, that covers far-reaching topics like Kundalini and the esoteric traditions of Kabbalah. Antman reads from her memoir and talks about her journey on Thursday, Feb 22, at Many Rivers Books & Tea, 130 S Main St, Suite 101, Sebastopol. 7:30pm. $5. 707.829.8871.

HEALDSBURG

Above & Beyond

After working for large wineries and seeing consolidation and corporatization in the industry throughout Napa and Sonoma counties, Elizabeth Schneider, host of the award-winning wine podcast Wine for Normal People, and Laura Perret Fontana, daughter of a St. Helena mom-and-pop winery and marketing professional, decided to start Sonoma Underground as a way to highlight small, independent wineries in the region who are creating amazing wine under the radar. A benefit for the Active 20-30 Club of Sebastopol, Sonoma Underground welcomes 15 producers to bring their limited-release wines together for an inaugural tasting event on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Longboard Vineyards, 5 Fitch St., Healdsburg. 2pm. $49–$59. undergroundwineevents.com.

SONOMA

Give Me Moore

One of rock and roll’s most innovative noisemakers of the last 30 years, Thurston Moore first revolutionized punk in the early 1980s as the frontman for dissonant experimental outfit Sonic Youth. These days, the 59-year-old Moore continues to evolve the genre with solo albums, including 2017’s Rock n Roll Consciousness, widely regarded as some of his most expansive and memorable work to date. This week, Moore brings the noise to the North Bay when he performs with support from San Francisco band Heron Oblivion on Saturday, Feb. 24, at Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St., Sonoma. 6:30pm. $35. 707.938.5277.

S A N TA R O S A & S A N R A F A E L

Here Come the Songs

This Sunday, Feb. 25, would have been the 75th birthday of George Harrison. To mark the occasion, two North Bay movie theaters are presenting the 2002 film ‘Concert for George,’ which brought together Harrison’s Beatles bandmates Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr with classic-rock superstars like Eric Clapton, Tom Petty and others for a massive concert memorial. With a recently restored digital soundtrack, the film screens on Sunday, Feb. 25, at 1pm at Summerfield Cinemas in Santa Rosa (551 Summerfield Road; $9–$11; 707.525.8909) and at 4:15pm the Smith Rafael Film Center in San Rafael (1118 Fourth St.; $8.25–$11.50; 415.454.1222).

—Charlie Swanson

OUTLAW SON Raised on country rock, Shooter Jennings continues to carve his own musical path and performs on Saturday, Feb. 24, at the Mystic Theatre & Music Hall in Petaluma. See Clubs & Venues, p21.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 21-27, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

CULTURE

The week’s 15 events: a selective guide


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16

Arts Ideas GIRL WITH A LOT OF TATTOOS The 27th annual Tattoos and Blues festival will showcase

a who’s who of American tattoo artists.

Fresh Ink

On the verge of cancellation, new management revamps Santa Rosa’s Tattoos & Blues BY CHARLIE SWANSON

E

ver since Ukiahraised Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins began poking his fellow Navy men with an electric needle dipped in ink back in the 1930s, tattooing has become a time-honored form of expression for Americans who want to turn their bodies into living works of art. In the North Bay, tattooing’s

biggest stars have gathered every year since 1992 for the annual Santa Rosa Tattoos & Blues event, the longest continuously running tattoo expo on the West Coast. But that streak was almost broken this year when the event’s previous owner wasn’t able to commit financially to the show. That’s when longtime friends and third-generation Santa Rosa natives Daniel Dorsett, owner of Dorsett Speed Shop, and Daat Kraus, tattoo artist and owner of

Santa Rosa Tattoo, stepped in to run the show themselves. “We didn’t want to see it end,” Kraus says. “The history of the show in the tattoo industry is huge,” Dorsett says. “We’re trying to keep the tradition alive.” This weekend, Santa Rosa Tattoos & Blues returns for its 27th consecutive year, presenting three days of live music, topquality tattoo artists and new highlights.

Dorsett and Kraus have revamped every aspect of the show, starting with the roster of over 200 artists who will be on hand. “All the artists are big names in the industry today,” says Kraus. “They’re all the best, the ones on top of the game of tattooing.” Artists attending this year’s event include Theo Mindell, from San Rafael’s Spider Murphy’s Tattoo; Joe Leonard, who made his name in Santa Rosa when he opened Monkey Wrench Tattoo Shop in 1995; Reno-based artist Ron Rash; Sonoma’s Shotsie Gorman; and the event’s original founder Bert Rodriguez. Other artists on hand represent shops near and far, including Santa Rosa’s Faith Tattoo and Avenue Tattoo, Cotati Tattoo, Napa Valley Tattoo Company, San Jose’s State of Grace Tattoo Shop and Anaheim’s Good Time Charlie’s Tattooland. The three-day event is also mixing up the music. While local blues acts like the Aces and the North Bay Blues Rock All-Stars headline Friday and Sunday, Saturday hosts rockabilly bands like the RevTones to accompany the event’s car show, featuring dozens of classic hot rods from South of Heaven Filthies Car Club and North Bay Impalas Car Club. Sunday also includes a tattoo contest to recognize the best, most colorful or most unusual body art. “It’s going to grow, it’s going to get bigger, but we’ll never jeopardize the integrity of the show,” Dorsett says. Santa Rosa Tattoos & Blues takes place Friday–Sunday, Feb. 23–25, at the Flamingo Conference Resort & Spa, 2777 Fourth St., Santa Rosa. Doors open at noon each day. $15–$30. santarosatattoosandblues.com.


LOB_Boho_2CAST.pdf

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THOROUGHBRED Martin Gilbertson and Ryan Severt horse around in stunning new 6th Street production.

Horse Play

Saddle up for latest take on ‘Equus’ BY HARRY DUKE

W

hy? It’s a question we ask ourselves daily as we wake up to news of the latest national tragedy or act of incomprehensible behavior. That too-oft-asked question with the most elusive of answers is at the heart of Peter Shaffer’s Equus. Psychiatrist Martin Dysart (Craig Miller) is asked to take on the case of Alan Strang (Ryan Severt), a 17-year-old boy who has committed a horrific act of animal cruelty. Alan, a quiet boy, has taken a chance equestrian encounter in his youth and developed it into a personal theology. His devotion, passion for and submission to his God “Equus” (Latin for “horse”) makes his brutal and inhumane act of blinding horses in his care with

‘Equus’ runs Thursday–Sunday through Feb. 25 at the 6th Street Playhouse Studio Theatre, 52 W. Sixth St., Santa Rosa. Thursday–Saturday, 7:30pm; Saturday–Sunday, 2pm. $18–$28. 707.523.4185.

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Stage

a metal spike all the more difficult to fathom. Dysart must find out why. Was it the conflict inherent in being brought up by a devout mother (Juliet Noonan) and atheist father (John Shillington)? Was it confusion over his burgeoning sexuality that’s been awakened by his co-worker Jill (Chandler Parrott-Thomas)? Or is it—in the play’s most disturbing point as expressed by Alan’s mother in her own search for answers—that evil simply exists? Dysart’s search for the answer leads him to question his own state in life. His career is in a state of “professional menopause,” and he’s married to a woman he hasn’t kissed in years. He envies Alan’s passion and begins to ponder whether it’s right to “cure” him and damn him to a life of normalcy. Dysart’s psychological quest finally leads to Alan’s confession and a recreation of the event, but is the initial question answered? Director Lennie Dean balances the play’s innate theatricality with genuine human emotion, which is all the more commendable considering four of the cast spend a good deal of time portraying horses. It’s a visually striking production, aided in good measure by original 1970s costume pieces courtesy of the American Conservatory Theater and an effective lighting design by April George. Miller is excellent as the psychiatrist grappling with his own demons. Severt bares Alan’s soul (and body, as does ParrottThomas in the crucial climax) and gives a gut-wrenching performance. Superb work is done by the entire cast as they move in and out of the story as multiple characters. An almost perfect combination of script, design, direction and performance, 6th Street Playhouse’s Equus is not an easy play to sit through. It is also not to be missed. Rating (out of 5):

1


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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

CHEER OF A BLACK PLANET Marvel’s ‘Black Panther’ is more than another

pulp-to-screen superhero. It’s a cultural moment.

Believe the Hype

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Phantom Thread R 10:00-12:45-6:15 Call Me By Your Name R 12:30 Darkest Hour PG13 10:15-3:45 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri R 1:00-6:30-9:00 The Shape of Water R 3:30-9:00 Lady Bird R 10:15-3:15 I, Tonya R 6:00-8:45 Concert for George Sunday 2/25 @1pm! 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

Black Panther • Phantom Thread Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri Game Night • The Shape of Water Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

W

e previously met Black Panther’s King T’Challa (the startlingly handsome Chadwick Boseman) in Captain America: Civil War. T’Challa, whose father was assassinated by a vengeful terrorist, is not just king, but the hereditary guardian of the African Shangri-La known as Wakanda, a fantastically advanced civilization disguised as one more poor and remote landlocked country. Costumed in a black supersuit made of vibranium—the same substance used in Captain America’s shield—T’Challa was sucked into the civil war between Earth’s mightiest heroes, the Avengers. But this stand-alone film by Oakland-bred Ryan Coogler leaves the matter there and tells of T’Challa’s war to retain his crown. The king is threatened by the Afrikaner villain Klaue, pronounced “claw” (Andy Serkis, made up to look like a roadie for the band Die Antwoord), as well as Erik (Michael B. Jordan), an African-American war vet with a strong personal connection to the royal family. Splitting the villainy is smart. One, Klaue, is a giggling monster, who gives a nasty yet logical reason for shooting a fleeing man in the back, while Jordan’s Erik, aka the mercenary Killmonger, has well-written reasons for his grudge. When T’Challa goes to Korea to recapture some stolen vibranium, he enters a casino dressed in a tuxedo, like 007. Coogler decides this dashing man can be king, hero and spy at once, and he’s right. The car chase afterwards through the hilly, neon-lit port city of Busan is thrilling. The production design and costumes are dazzling, a panAfrican symphony of masks, gowns, scarification and headdresses— you rarely get such a level of visual density in a film this fun. Black Panther shows some spine in the way it illustrates conflict in an anti-colonialist’s head. Erik is an armed revolutionary confronting a liberal king, and at first you can’t say he’s wrong in his charges against T’Challa. It’s not going too far to suggest that Coogler is restaging the debate between Martin Luther King and Malcolm X as a superhero adventure. ‘Black Panther’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.


THERE WILL BE AN ANSWER, LET IT BLEED It’s probably OK with Mick

if Stones fans listen to the Beatles too.

Gimme Skelter

Battle royale at Sweetwater this week BY TOM GOGOLA

A

t long last, one of the most divisive issues of our time will be resolved this week at the Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley. No, it’s not a forum on gun control, and no, Sammy Hagar won’t be there to give a TED Talk about how he’s the superior Van Halen frontman. It’s a musical showdown for the ages, folks. It’s the Beatles vs. the Stones. It’s like the invasion of Iraq all over again, with drums instead of drones. Two cover bands will be on hand to make their rocking case about the relative merits of both bands. The beer will flow, the blood will spill, and the ghost of the great Phil Lynott will stand in judgment. So where does this writer stand on this most provocative of showdowns, as backed-by-theU.S.S.R. troll-bots flood North Bay

Beatles vs. Stones: A Musical Showdown, Thursday, Feb. 22, 8pm (7pm door). $22–$27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 21-27, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

social media sites with outrageous slurs against both bands, to sow divisiveness among susceptible Americans? This long-running Beatles vs. Stones debate has always seemed a little forced and silly, and reminds me of that old saying that “hugs are better than drugs.” Maybe so, but hugs and drugs together can be kind of cool, too. Why can’t we have both, in reasonable and healthy doses? Over the years I’ve come to appreciate the idea of the Beatles— what they represented, how they helped shape and shift the culture—more than the music of the Beatles. I love the music of the Stones, even as they rode in on the British invasion inspired by the Beatles and stole half their ideas. However silly the conceit of an either-or dynamic between the two bands, the debate has managed to prompt some serious cognitive dissonance when I’ve put any thought to it. The Beatles were workingclass lads from Liverpool who, by the time of Sgt. Pepper, had evolved into a group of art-rock shoegazers. The Rolling Stones, meanwhile, were middle-class artschool poseurs who made some of the greatest workingman’s rock music ever (and continue to do so, having nabbed a Grammy this year for their killer throwback platter, Blue and Lonesome). So it’s a tough call in the end, this Beatles vs. Stones deal. “Gimme Shelter” or “Within You Without You”? Do we really have to pick one over the other? The former is the greatest rock song ever written; the latter is considered the first piece of psychedelic music ever recorded. I’m so glad to report that the divisiveness has ended! The allages show will conclude with the bands, Abbey Road and Satisfaction, playing together in a moment of joyful unity under the Flag of Rock. It’s not exactly Ted Nugent linking arms with Eminem, but it’s something.

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Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY

THIS WEEKEND!

The English Beat

British ska revival group formed 40 years ago is more popular than ever. Feb 23-24, 8:30pm. $32-$36. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Thurston Moore

Sonic Youth frontman and prolific noise-punk pioneer performs an intimate solo show in the historic redwood barn. Feb 24, 6:30pm. $35. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

David Rawlings

S AT UR DAY, F E B R UA RY 2 4

707.546.3600 | lutherburbankcenter.org

Acclaimed songwriter and guitarist performs with a full band comprising longtime compatriot Gillian Welch, Paul Kowert of the Punch Brothers, Willie Watson and Brittany Haas. Feb 28, 8pm. $35. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY Earthless

AND THE CASH & KING BAND

San Diego heavy psych-rock outfit hits the North Bay with support from Los Angeles experimental-rock group Jjuujjuu. Feb 28, 8pm. $25. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

SAT, MAR 31

Matt Jaffe

SAT, MAR 17 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI FRI FEB 23 & SAT 24 2 NIGHTS!!

BOB MARLEY TRIBUTE + SOL HORIZON

+ SUBTLE MIND, CIVILIANSOUND! $17–20/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

MON FEB 26

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

AFROBEAT 101 W/ DJ SLIM

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

FRI MAR 2

DIRTY RED BARN

$10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SAT MAR 3

YAK ATTACK

$10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

MON MAR 5

THE WBLK DANCEHALL MASSIVE

GREEN LION CREW MEETS MR WILLIAMZ (LIVE DUB MIXING) $10–15/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED MAR 7

SCIENCE BUZZ CAFE $5/DOORS-SHOW 7/ALL AGES

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

GAMMA

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

HARRY’S BIG ROCK REVIVAL SAT, MAR 24

CASH & KING STEVEN KENT THE ATOMIC PUNKS

WITH SPECIAL GUEST ADD/C

SAT, APR 7

JEAN GENIES A TRIBUTE TO

DAVID BOWIE W/SPECIAL GUEST SAT, APR 14

EV’S 40TH BIRTHDAY MEGA BASH!

FEAT FEATHERWITCH, SWEET LEAF AND BILL DECKER BAND

SAT, MAY 12

AQUA NETT WITH SPECIAL GUEST JOYRIDE SAT, MAY 26

MICHAEL JACKSON IMPERSONATOR

HOUSE OF ROCK 3410 Industrial Drive SANTA ROSA 707.709.6039

TICKETS & INFO:

ROCKSTARUNIVERSITY.COM

Young and talented San Francisco rock and roll bandleader performs an unplugged solo show. Feb 23, 8pm. Free. Rancho Nicasio, 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

La Leche & Honey

New project from California Honeydrops lead singer, guitarist and trumpeter Lech Wierzynski is a return to the performer’s acoustic busking roots. Feb 28, 8pm. $15-$18. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY The Bumper Jacksons Americana outfit playfully creates folk originals and

reimagine roots music with power and tenderness. Feb 23, 7pm. $22. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Oaktown Funk Drum virtuoso Mike Clark, who gained worldwide recognition while playing with Herbie Hancock in the 1970s, leads this all-star band. Feb 25, 7pm. $20-$25. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra German-born acoustic guitar master and his long running band perform three nights of meditative, melodic flamenco instrumentals. Feb 22-24, 7:30 and 9:30pm. $25-$45. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters Feb 23, Solid Air. Feb 24, Dawn & Tony. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Annie O’s Music Hall Feb 22, Hype It Up with DJ Beset. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Aqus Cafe Feb 22, David Landon. Feb 23, the Rivertown Trio. Feb 24, the Rains. Feb 25, 2pm, the jKev Experience. Feb 28, bluegrass and old time music jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Feb 23, the Syllables with eNegative and Buck-Thrifty. Feb 24, Starlight Mikka with GLO and DJ Broken Record. Tues, Didgeridoo Clinic. Wed, open mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Block

Feb 24, 1pm, the Incubators. 20 Grey St, Petaluma. 707.775.6003.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Feb 23, Terri-Anne & Lane. Feb 24, Rowdy River Special. Feb 27, Michael Hantman. Feb 28, Mike & Patrick. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Cellars of Sonoma

Feb 25, 2pm, Ricky Alan Ray. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Crooked Goat Brewing Feb 24, 3pm, Dan Martin. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Dry Creek Kitchen

Feb 26, Dick Conte and Steve Webber Duo. Feb 27, Carlos Henrique Pereira and Christian Foley-Beining Duo. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Elephant in the Room

Feb 23, Skip Heller and Spike Sikes. Feb 25, 6pm, the Quitters. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

Feb 24, Skip Heller and Spike Sikes with Awesome Hotcakes. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Feb 21, United States Navy Concert Band. Feb 25, 3pm, Takács Quartet with MarcAndré Hamelin. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Feb 23-24, tribute to Bob Marley with Sol Horizon. Feb 26, Monday Night Edutainment with DJay Slim. Feb 27, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Feb 23, Aaron Redner. Feb 24, Dirty Red Barn. Feb 25, Happy Traum and Adam Traum. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

The Big Easy

Hotel Healdsburg

Feb 21, Haute Flash Quartet. Feb 22, Skip Heller and Spike Sikes with Awesome Hotcakes. Feb 23, Timothy O’Neil Band. Feb 24, Trace Repeat. Feb 25, One Grass, Two Grass. Feb 27, Obsidian Son. Feb 28, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Feb 24, “Herbie Hancock’s Blue Note Years” with Anne Sajdera Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800. Feb 21, Cave Clove. Feb 22, Flowtilla. Feb 23, New Copasetics. Feb 24, the Tahoes. Feb 25, the Bitter Diamonds. Feb 28, Whitherward. 1280


Alysse Gafkjen

21

it’s a beautiful day

AMERICANA ALMANACK Acclaimed songwriter and guitarist David Rawlings

sat daVid & linda laflaMMe mar 10 8:30pm/Dancing/$15 thu culaRan mar 15 8pm/Irish Music/$10

performs with Gillian Welch and others on Wednesday, Feb. 28, at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa. See Concerts, adjacent page.

st patRick’s celebRation

N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

The Laugh Cellar

Feb 23, Just DANCE with DJ Lori Z. 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Feb 24, Jake Shimabukuro. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Main Street Bistro

Feb 22, Susan Sutton. Feb 23, Bruce Halbohm. Feb 24, Barbara Olney. Feb 25, Willie Perez. Feb 27, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Feb 23, DJ MGB. Feb 24, George Heagerty. Feb 26, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Feb 26, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Feb 22, Young Dubliners. Feb 23, Lee Ann Womack. Feb 24, Shooter Jennings. Feb 25, Mickey Avalon & Dirt Nasty. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Paul Mahder Gallery

Feb 25, 4:30pm, “Water” with North Star Vocal Artists. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Feb 22, 6:30pm, the Buzz. Feb 24, 8:30pm, Frank O’Connor. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Quincy’s

Feb 23, Pacific Soundrise and Silas Fermoy. 6590 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park. 707.585.1079.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Feb 23, 6pm, Lisa Stano & the Gang. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Red Brick

sat mar 17 Dancing/Live Music/No Cover/5–10pm Special Menu: corn beef & cabbage fri black uhuRu apr 27 Reggae Legends/$25 Adv/ $30 DOS

Sebastopol Community Center Feb 24, Joni Mitchell night with Allyson Paige. Feb 25, Lunasa with Tim O’Brien. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

Feb 23, 5pm, dinner show with the Highway Poets. 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Sonoma Speakeasy Feb 21, the Acrosonics. Feb 24, Three on a Match. Feb 25, Blue Moon Reunion Jam. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Fri

Redwood Cafe

The Star

Sat

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Feb 23, Junior Reid. Feb 24, Kevin Russell & Some Friends. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Feb 24, Tumbleweed Soul. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Feb 24, Crow’s Landing. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

David Rawlings

THU, MARCH 1

Olivia Newton-John

SUN, MARCH 4

Celebrating David Bowie Mike Garson, Earl Slick, Gerry Leonard, Carmine Rojas, Bernard Fowler, Gaby Moreno, special guest Mr. Hudson!

SUN, MARCH 18

Buddy Guy

Sonoma Cider

Feb 23, Hot Grubb. Feb 24, Jami Jamison Band. Feb 25, Johnny Bones Trio. Feb 27, Ron Lacey Trio. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567. Feb 22, Soul Ska. Feb 23, the Hot Licks. Feb 24, 3pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Feb 24, 7:30pm, Foxes in the Henhouse. Feb 25, 3pm, old time fiddle jam. Feb 25, 6pm, Irish jam session. Feb 27, Pop-Up Jazz Jam with Debra Anderson. Feb 28, singersongwriter competition. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

WED, FEBRUARY 28

Feb 25, Coyote Slim. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.6390.

Starling Bar Feb 23, the Bumblin’ Bones and Kalei Yamanoha. 19380 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.938.7442.

The Tradewinds Bar Feb 25, 6pm, the Killer Dueling Pianos. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Din n er & A Show

Jaffe Feb 23 Matt “Unplugged” 8:00 / No Cover

Whiskey Tip Feb 23, 80s Are for Lovers. Feb 24, Charley Peach. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535. )

22

MARCH 24 - 25

The Ladies of Broadway from Transcendence

Smith’s Feb 24 Lavay “Speakeasy Supper Club”

Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30

Jones Gang Feb 25 The High Octane Americana 4:00 Sun

Tommy Castro Weekend Fri Mar 2 & Sat Mar 3

Sun

Mar 4

Paul Olguin & Loralee Christensen

Soulful, Powerful Songs 5:00 / No Cover

WED, APRIL 4

I’m With Her

See You Around Tour Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O’Donovan

Steve Lucky and the Mar 10 Sat

Rhumba Bums featuring Miss Carmen Getit

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Feb 22, Levi’s Workshop with Levi Lloyd. Feb 23, Well Known Strangers. Feb 24, Dusty Green Bones Band. Feb 26, the Blues Defenders pro jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Sun

Guitar and Vocals 8:30 Welcome Back!

Sat

Amazing Troubador 5:00 / No Cover St. Patrick’s Day Party!

Mar 11

Doug Adamz

Mar 17 Jerry Hannan Band Sat

Mavis Staples

Special Food and Drinks 8:30

Diva Singer/ Songwriter Mar 24 Sat

FRI, APRIL 27

Shana Morrison

8:30

e Dancty! Par Flambeau Cajun Orkestra 8:30

Mar 31 Tom Rigney &

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 21-27, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

thu soul ska feb 22 8pm/$12 Adv/$15 DOS fri the hot licks feb 23 8:30pm/$15 Adv/$20 DOS/seated sat foxes in the henhouse feb 24 7:30pm/Americana/$10 thu iRiefuse mar 1 8pm/Dancing/$12 Adv / $15 DOS fri peppeRland mar 2 8:30pm/Dancing/$12 sat Joanne Rand band mar 3 8pm/$10 Adv / $12 DOS thu coMMon knowledge mar 8 8pm/Dancing/$10 fri hoytus and people mar 9 8:30pm/Dancing/$10


22

Music ( 21

THURSDAY

FEB 22 FRIDAY

FEB 23 SATURDAY

FEB 24

YOUNG DUBLINERS

WITH CULANNʼS HOUNDS CELTIC ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

LEE ANN WOMACK WITH EDDIE BERMAN

COUNTRY • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SHOOTER JENNINGS WITH JADE JACKSON

COUNTRY • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

MICKEY AVALON DIRT NASTY W/DJ ASPECT FEB 25 & RAP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ SUNDAY FRIDAY

MAR 2 SATURDAY

MAR 3 SATURDAY

MAR 10 MONDAY

TAINTED LOVE

COVERS/TRIBUTE • DOORS 8PM • 21+

GREG BROWN FOLK • DOORS 7PM • 21+

HOUSE OF FLOYD ROCK • DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

CARL PALMER'S ELP LEGACY

LAKE & PALMER MAR 12 EMERSON, LIVES ON ROCK • DOORS 8:30PM • 21+ 3/16 Andre Nickatina, 3/17 Tazmanian Devils plus San Geronimo, 3/23 Martin Sexton, 3/24 Frankie Boots, 3/30 The Soul Section with DJ RISE, 3/31 Epic Beard Men (Sage Francis & B. Dolan), 4/1 Trout Steak Revival, 4/8 Ross The Boss, 4/12 Alborosie, 4/18 Devin The Dude, 4/21 Bebel Gilberto, 4/24 Kinky Friedman

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Thu 2⁄22 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages

Beatles vs. Stones

A Musical Showdown Fri 2⁄23 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25 • All Ages Melvin Seals with the China Cats

+ David Gans

Sat 2⁄24 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $19–$22 • All Ages

Noah Gundersen + Aaron Gillespie Wed 2⁄28 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$18 • All Ages

La Leche and Honey

feat Lech Wierzynski from The California Honeydrops & many others Thu 3⁄1 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $14–$17 • All Ages Jerry Joseph and

The Jackmormons + Wilderado Fri 3⁄2 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $20–$25 • All Ages

Prezident Brown

with The Reggae Angels Sun 3⁄4 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$20 • All Ages Students for NorCal Fire Relief feat

Caroline Sky, Marin Academy Student Band & Footsteps

Mon 3⁄5 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$25 • All Ages

Gaby Moreno + Rosby

Thu 3⁄8 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $12–$15 • All Ages The Nth Power with Special Guests

+ The Crooked Stuff

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Ali Akbar College of Music

Feb 24, an evening of Bansuri and Viola with Rachel Unterseher and William Rossel. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6372.

Dance Palace

Feb 24, Celtic Harp with Patrick Ball. 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Fenix

Feb 23, tribute to Amy Winehouse with Victoria Wasserman. Feb 24, the Sun Kings. Feb 25, Tomi Jenkins. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church

Feb 23, 8pm, “Water” with North Star Vocal Artists. 1180 Linwood Dr, Novato. 415.897.2123.

HopMonk Novato

Feb 22, Country Line Dancing. Feb 23, Mustache Harbor. Feb 24, Melvin Seals & JGB. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Feb 21, Savannah Blu. Feb 28, Festival Speed. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

L’Appart Resto

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. CALENDAR THU FEB 22 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / ALL AGES / FREE FRI FEB 23 • WELL KNOWN STRANGERS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT FEB 24 • DUSTY GREEN BONES BAND AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE MON FEB 26 • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM 8PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Abstraction by Karl Benjamin, 1953

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

MARIN COUNTY

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

Feb 22, Donna Spietzer. 636 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.256.9884.

Marin Country Mart

Feb 25, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with Moonlight Rodeo. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

19 Broadway Club

Feb 21, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. Feb 22, Ed Masuga. Feb 23, Lutan Fyh & the Riddem Rebels. Feb 24, April Grisman’s birthday bash. Feb 25, Harrison Lee presents Double O hip-hop shop. Feb 26, open mic. Feb 27, Eddie Neon blues jam. Feb 28, Soulbillies. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Feb 21, Something About Fireflies. Feb 22, Well Known Strangers. Feb 23, Michael Aragon Quartet. Feb 24, Del Sol. Feb 25, Jon Blach and friends. Feb 26, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Feb 21, Jonathan Poretz.

Feb 22, Noah Frank Trio. Feb 23, Walter Earl Duo. Feb 24, Marcos Sainz Trio. Feb 25, Yacht Club of Paris. Feb 27, Passion Habanera. Feb 28, Deborah Winters. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Feb 21, Audrey Moira Shimkas. Feb 22, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Feb 27, Ricki Rush. Feb 28, Lorin Rowan. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Papermill Creek Saloon Feb 23, 5pm, Danny Montana. Feb 23, 9pm, the Weissmen. Feb 24, 5pm, Michelle Lambert. Feb 24, 9pm, the Sky Blue Band. Feb 25, Thunderjazz. Feb 27, Agents of Change. Feb 28, OMEN. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Feb 22, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Feb 23, Michael Skinner & the Final Touch. Feb 24, Beso Negro. Feb 25, Chrissy Lynne and friends. Feb 26, open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Feb 24, Lavay Smith’s Speakeasy Supper Club. Feb 25, 4pm, the Jones Gang. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Feb 21, Tracy Rose Trio. Feb 27, Chime Travelers. Feb 28, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

Feb 23, 6pm, Gaea Schell Trio. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.524.2800.

Sausalito Seahorse

mic with Austin DeLone. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Feb 21, Koolerator. Feb 22, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Feb 24, Stu Allen and friends. Feb 27, Rattlebox. Feb 28, Colonel & the Mermaids. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Feb 21, 12pm, Temescal String Quartet. Feb 23, Juke Joint. Feb 25, 5pm, Kimrea’s Pro Showcase with Kurt Huget. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Feb 23, Factor 11. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Feb 21, Austin Hicks. Feb 24, John Vicino. Feb 28, David Ronconi. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Blue Note Napa

Feb 21, “Four and More” with Mike Clark and friends. Feb 28, the Oakland Crush. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue

Feb 25, 2pm, Rob Watson and friends featuring Vernon Black. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Feb 23, Pat Hull. Feb 24, Cave Clove. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Feb 24, Jon Shannon Williams. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Feb 22, Marlanna & Jazz Caliente. Feb 23, Pride & Joy. Feb 24, the Flaming O’s. Feb 25, 4pm, Edgardo y Candela with DJ Jose Ruiz. Feb 27, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Feb 22, Langhorne Slim with Twain. Feb 23, Mondo Cozmo. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Feb 22, Sean Rowe. Feb 23, Burning Curtains and Quinn Deveaux. Feb 24, Tom Finch Trio. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Feb 22, Beatles vs Stones musical showdown. Feb 23, Melvin Seals & the China Cats. Feb 24, Noah Gundersen with Aaron Gillespie. Feb 25, Shovels & Rope. Sold-out. Feb 26, open

Feb 22, Johnny Smith. Feb 23, Dr Mojo. Feb 24, Walter Hand & the Blue Hand Band. Feb 25, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre

River Terrace Inn

Feb 23, Douglas Houser. Feb 24, Syria T Berry. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Feb 22, Delphi Freeman. Feb 23, the Tuneriders. Feb 24, Total Recall 90s. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.


Galleries

Alley, South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.888.1026.

Calabi Gallery

RECEPTIONS Feb 22

Agrella Art Gallery, “The Farthest Shore,” six prominent women printmaking artists are featured in an immersive installation. 4pm. SRJC, Doyle Library, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4298. Jesse Peter Multicultural Museum, “Cultural Alchemy: From Minerals to Masterpieces,” explore the history of SRJC’s museum as part of the junior college’s 100-year anniversary. 1:30pm. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4479.

SONOMA COUNTY Art Museum of Sonoma County

Through Apr 15, “3 Friends,” North Coast contemporary artists Robert Hudson, Jack Stuppin and Richard Shaw display their steel, canvas and clay works together for the first time ever. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Feb 26, “Julia Pozsgai,” the Sonoma County artist shows her acrylic, clay, fiber and metal works of art. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

The Back House Gallery at Heebe Jeebe Through Mar 12, “Foiled!,” St Valentine’s-themed group art show utilizes the versatile and ubiquitous material. 46 Kentucky St, Petaluma. MonSat: 10 to 6; Sun 10:30 to 5. 707.773.3222.

Blasted Art Gallery

Through Mar 2, “Arminée Chahbazian & Ben Lastufka,” two Sonoma County artists exhibit innovative sculpture and paintings respectively. Art

Through Mar 3, “Gallery Group Show,” featuring Calabi Gallery’s contemporary artists and selections from its vintage collection. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Through Aug 5, “50 Years of Franklin,” celebrate the poignant “Peanuts” comicstrip character Franklin, a cultural benchmark inspired by a correspondence between Charles Schulz and schoolteacher Harriet Glickman in 1968. Through May 21, “AAUGH! The Language of Peanuts,” explore the familiar expressions and catchphrases found throughout “Peanuts.”. Through Mar 11, “Mud Pies & Jelly Beans: The Flavor of Peanuts,” new exhibit covers the culinary side of the famous comic strip. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Chroma Gallery

Through Mar 25, “Healing By Art: After the Fires,” exhibition of art, sculpture and photography reflects the aftermath of October’s wildfires and features many works created from salvaged materials. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Downtown Cloverdale Through May 3, “Cloverdale Sculpture Trail,” year-round exhibit of sculptures by local artists includes self-guided audio tours. 101sculpturetrail. com. Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. All day.

East West Cafe

Through Feb 28, “Katie Kruzic Solo Show,” local artist displays landscapes and scenes large and small. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. Mon-Sat, 8am to 9pm; Sun, 8am to 8pm 707.829.2822.

Fulton Crossing

Through Feb 28, “February Art Show,” several artists open their studios to the public to show their artistic or creative work. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm 707.536.3305.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Mar 31, “Art Moura,” Sebastopol artist shows works from his massive assemblage works inspired by African Masks. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts Through Mar 11, “Young Artists Show,” students from ten Sonoma County schools share their latest artworks. Reception, Feb 23 at 4pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Healdsburg Museum

Through Apr 15, “She Persisted,” exhibition highlights notable women in Sonoma County’s local history. 221 Matheson St, Healdsburg. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.431.3325.

History Museum of Sonoma County

Through Apr 1, “Bear in Mind,” traveling exhibition examines the history of the grizzly bear in California and how it can to represent the state. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

La Crema Tasting Room

Through Mar 31, “The Flowing World,” exhibit features Wine Country inspired landscape paintings in oil by Sonoma County artist Clay Vajgrt. 235 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Daily, 10:30am–5:30pm 707.431.9400.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center

Through May 1, “Naturally,” prints and paintings by west Sonoma County artist Rik Olson are inspired by the North Bay’s natural environment. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Mar 24, “Power of Ten: Scaling Up,” Petaluma Arts Center celebrates a decade of art with 10 artists exploring scale and interconnectedness in paintings, sculpture, and other media. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Through Feb 28, “Reflections,” exhibit tells the story of

Redwood Cafe

Through Mar 13, “Redwood Cafe Art Show,” exhibit includes multimedia works from Sonoma County artists Kari Manwiller, Barbara Jacobs, Becki Willman and Pamela Heck. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Open daily. 707.795.7868.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Feb 28, “Heaven & Earth & the Space Between,” featuring paintings by Marilee Ford and Sharon Feissel. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Black History Month comedy show features several Bay Area talents. Feb 24, 8pm. $18-$23. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art

Greg Proops

Through May 27, “Be Not Still: Living in Uncertain Times,” exhibit addresses the present social and political climate through a radical model of experimentation. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10 to 6. 707.226.5991.

Napa Valley Museum

Through Mar 4, “Wise & Sassy,” non-juried, salon-style exhibition features works by artists over 60. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery

Sharpsteen Museum

Through Mar 25, “The Essence of Spirit,” jeweler Michelle Hoting and artist Susan St Thomas are featured for the months of February and March. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Through Apr 15, “An Eye for Adventure,” photographs by author and world traveler Jack London are displayed alongside “Libros de Artista,” featuring books created by Latin American artists. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. Wed-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

Steele Lane Community Center

Through Mar 25, “Grace Fong: Viewpoints,” local artist who discovered painting later in life shows her latest works. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

West County Museum

Through Apr 1, “Sebastopol Depot Centennial,” Western Sonoma County Historical Society celebrate 100 years since the construction of the depot that served the P&SR Railroad and is now the society’s headquarters. 261 S Main St, Sebastopol. Thurs-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.6711.

The Power of Laughter

Through Feb 28, “Luis Montoya & Leslie Ortiz,” the artists display their recent conceptual sculptures. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Through Apr 1, “The Art of Chocolate,” Napa Valley’s finest chocolatiers take inspiration from Julia Child to create delicious works of art. Through May 20, “France Is a Feast,” world-premiere exhibit is a photographic journey of Paul and Julia Child with rarely seen images from Paris in the mid20th century. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Through Apr 30, “Out of the Attic,” see privately collected antiques, dolls and figurines, vintage photographs and other memorabilia ranging from 1937 to present. 1311 Washington St, Calistoga. Daily, 11 to 4. 707.942.5911.

Comedy The Book of Moron

Fast-paced, hilarious production helmed by actor, writer and director Robert Dubac combines satire and theater. Feb 23, 8pm and Feb 24, 4 and 8pm. $60. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Comedy Night at D’Argenzio Winery

Standup lineup includes Myles Weber, Chris Ferdinandson, Jon Lehre and host Brian Thomas. Reservations required. Feb 23, 8pm. $12. D’Argenzio Winery, 1301 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.280.4658.

Eddie Izzard

British comedy star’s “Believe Me” Tour, based on his book of the same name, is a funny and emotional reveal of the man behind the standup. Feb 23, 8pm. $75-$115. Uptown

Star of “Whose Live Anyway?” brings his award-seeking podcast, The Smartest Man in the World, to the stage. Feb 28, 7:30pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Dusty York

Scathing and absurdly funny standup records his comedy album at the club with openers Lydia Manning and Karen McCarthy. Feb 24, 7pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Dance Stepping Out

Dublin Irish Dancers and allstar cast brings to life the epic tale of Celtic culture, carrying its traditional melodies and steps to the New World. Feb 23, 7:30pm. $35. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park 866.955.6040.

Events African American Popup Museum

Exhibit concludes SRJC’s series of insightful discussions, film screenings and art in celebration of Black History Month. Feb 28, 11am. Free. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4011.

After Hours Beauty Night

Join a fun night with makeup lessons to achieve a different hollywood looks tailored to your skin tone, with treat bar and photos. Feb 23, 6:30pm. $45. Mad Mod Shop, 6780 McKinley St #140, Sebastopol. 707.329.6113.

Doctors with a Heart

New chiropractic patients can receive certain services free of charge for the month of February as part of the national movement. Through Feb 28. Maher

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Arts Events

Petaluma’s black population since the 1800s as part of Black History Month. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | FEBR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Chiropractic, 101 Golf Course Dr, C5, Rohnert Park. 707.792.0202.

Family Purim Carnival

Celebrate the festive Jewish holiday with food, games, crafts, music and a costume contest. Feb 25, 10:30am. donations welcome. Congregation B’nai Israel, 740 Western Ave, Petaluma.

How to Measure the Cosmos

Travel through space from the comfort of your seat in this planetarium presentation that discovers how far certain celestial objects are from Earth. Fri-Sat through Mar 17. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.521.6914.

Luminarias

Healdsburg Literary Guild event series welcomes Healdsburg author John van der Zee for an insightful conversation, with wine and bites included. Feb 22, 7pm. $15. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Lunchtime Gallery Tour at the Art Museum of Sonoma County Artist and ceramicist Richard Shaw gives a personal 30-minute tour of his artwork, now showing at the museum. Feb 23, 12:30pm. Free with admission. Art Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Mental Health Resiliency Forum

Sonoma County Board of Supervisors members, Shirlee Zane and Lynda Hopkins, with Congressman Mike Thompson invite the public to learn about resources and hear from experts. Feb 22, 6pm. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Peace in Process

Relax deeply with a morning spiritual event. Sun, 9:30am. By donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Santa Rosa Tattoos & Blues

Twenty-seventh annual festival features three days of live bands, world-renowned tattoo artists, a hot rod show and more. Feb 23-25. $15-$30. Flamingo Resort Hotel, 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Wine Country Wineries Boot Camp Luxury Marketing Council

welcomes marketing, sales and hospitality managers and operating staff for networking and a program of content to address today’s business environment. Feb 28, 9am. $54-$60. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Field Trips Fishing in the City

Join Santa Rosa Rec & Parks and Santa Rosa Firefighters at Lake Ralphine for a morning of fishing. Licenses required for ages 16 and older. Feb 24, 9am. Free. Howarth Park, 630 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3298.

Stewardship Overnight Trip

Give nature a hand and enjoy camping in a weekend of stewardship, communitybuilding, exercise and fun. Registration required. Feb 2425. Free / donations accepted. Riddell Preserve, 550 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. landpaths.org.

Tidepool Volunteer Field Training

Become a volunteer to advise the public on how to safely navigate the intertidal zone and resources. Feb 26, 1:45pm. Free. North Salmon Creek & Miwok Beach, 3095 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay, stewardscr.org.

Turtle Observer Training Learn how to monitor and record behavior of the native Western Pond Turtle on Mt Tamalpais. Feb 24, 9am. Marin Water District Office, 220 Nellen Ave, Corte Madera, marinwater.org.

Film The Bail Trap: American Ransom

Acclaimed documentary on the devastation in American society caused by the money bail system continues the 2018 “Social Action Goes to the Movies” film series, with panel discussion following the film. Feb 24, 7pm. Free. Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.5519.

Big Sonia

See the inspiring and poignant documentary on Holocaust

survivor and tailor Sonia Warshawski and meet the directors, Leah Warshawski and Todd Soliday. Feb 25, 2pm. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

The Black Family

Film screening and discussion with Dr Khalid White. Feb 27, 12pm. Free. Bertolini Student Center, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4011.

Concert for George

Legendary 2002 concert film that paid tribute to Beatles guitarist George Harrison screens on what would be his 75th birthday. Feb 25, 1pm. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.528.4222. 4:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

LIVING IN AMERICA Bi-racial author Julie Lythcott-Haims pulls no punches in

her memoir, ‘Real American,’ which she reads from on Friday, Feb. 23, at Copperfield’s Books in Santa Rosa. See Readings, adjacent page.

I Am Not Your Negro

Documentary film based on James Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript is part of SRJC’s Black History Month events series. Feb 23, 4pm. Free. SRJC Petaluma Campus, 680 Sonoma Mtn Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.778.3974.

Petaluma Cinema Series

Petaluma Film Alliance presents significant classic and modern films with guests, lectures and discussions. This week, sci-fi fantasy “The Shape of Water” screens. Feb 28, 6pm. $6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, petalumafilmalliance.org.

Sip, Snack & Cinema

Film series turns the winery’s cave grotto into an intimate dining and viewing setting. Feb 23, 7pm. $65. Rutherford Hill Winery, 200 Rutherford Hill Rd, Rutherford. 707.963.1871.

Food & Drink Cafe of Paris

21 and over. Feb 24, 5pm. $60. Friedman Center, 4675 Mayette Ave, Santa Rosa, jacklondon. pousd.org.

learning. Feb 25, 2pm. $20. MacRostie Winery & Vineyards, 4605 Westside Rd, Healdsburg. 707.473.9303.

Eighth Street Wineries Annual Open House

Pop-Up Paella

Stroll through the cellars of some of Sonoma Counties premier local artisan wineries. Feb 24, 12pm. $10-$40. Eighth Street Wineries, 21481 Eighth St E, Sonoma. 707.939.3930.

The History of Napa Valley in 8 Glasses

Taste your way through the wines of notable Napa Valley pioneers. Feb 23, 6pm. $60. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

How to Taste Wine in 90 Seconds

Taste wines and learn to appreciate, record, and remember the wines you prefer. Feb 24, 3:30pm. $35. CIA at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Knife Skills Workshop Chop to it in this hands-on class. Feb 24, 1pm. $35. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Two-day, hands-on cooking class lets you make the dough and bake Croissants, sweet and savory Danishes and more. Feb 23-24. $125. Napa Valley Cooking School, 1088 College Ave, St Helena. napavalleycookingschool.org.

Mary Poppins Etiquette Tea

Jack London Families Crab Feed Fundraiser & Auction

Perfect Pairing: Wisdom & Wine

Jack London Families Elementary School and the Sonoma County Family YMCA host their annual benefit feast.

Special guest Mary Poppins offers tea and entertainment for all ages. Reservations are required. Feb 25, 12pm. $49. Tudor Rose Tea, 733 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Organized by Congregation Ner Shalom and the Jewish Concierge of Sonoma County and open to all, the event pairs delicious wine and Jewish

Fabulous culinary experience features authentic paella prepared right in front of you. Advance tickets required. Thurs, Feb 22, 6pm. $35. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Sonoma Underground Inaugural winetasting event showcases small, independent producers in Sonoma County. Feb 24, 2pm. $49. Longboard Vineyards, 5 Fitch St, Healdsburg, undergroundwineevents.com.

Winter Wine Maker Dinner

Take a culinary tour of Italy with outstanding wines made from Trione’s estate vineyards. Feb 24, 5pm. $175. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.8100.

‘Wise & Sassy’ Art & Wine Party

In conjunction with Sebastopol Center for the Arts’ current exhibit, the evening includes a printmaking workshop with artist Rik Olson and wine from Old World Winery. Feb 22, 5pm. $35. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

For Kids African Village Celebration with Onye Onyemaechi Feb 24, 11am. Guerneville

Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

A Celebration of American Music & Family Dance Party

Fun, positive party is an homage to American music traditions in honor of Black History Month. Feb 24, 11am. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Fairy Tale Ball

Whimsical event is sure to delight children ages 4-12 and their adult chaperone with dancing, crafts and other activities. Advance tickets required. Feb 24, 5pm. $30 per couple. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Fishing Derby

Kis ages 15 and under are invited to a fun-filled morning of fishing at Lake Ralphine. Parent or guardians and gear required. Prizes awarded for different age groups. Feb 25, 7:30am. $3. Howarth Park, 630 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3425.

Kid’s Night at the Museum

Drop your kids off for afterhours fun, including pizza, games, art and crafts. Advance reservations required. Feb 24, 5pm. $25$32. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardie

Museum Mondays

Enjoy stories, arts and craft activities and movement games Mon, Feb 26, 10am. $5. Charles M Schulz Museum,


2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Pete the Cat

Lectures Dragonflies: Eagles of the Insect World

Get an introduction to the bizarre and colorful world of dragonflies with Laguna’s executive director Kevin Munroe. Pre-registration required. Feb 22, 7pm. $12. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Interview with Jacqueline Lawrence

Santa Rosa native and author, actress, talk show host and founder of Legacy Showcases shares her insight in an event honoring Black History Month. Feb 22, 6:30pm. $10-$15. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Refuge Recovery

Join a Buddhist-based recovery group. Sat, 9:30am. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Readings Analy High School

Feb 21, 7pm, “A Mind at Home with Itself” with Byron Katie, includes a copy of the book. $32. 6950 Analy Ave, Sebastopol 707.824.2300.

Book Passage

Feb 21, 7pm, “Poison” with John Lescroart. Feb 22, 7pm, “Yoga & Psyche” with Mariana Caplan. Feb 24, 1pm, “Whole Therapist, Whole Patient” with Dr Patricia Frisch. Feb 24, 4pm, “Betty’s Burgled Bakery” with Travis Nichols. Feb 25, 4pm, “At Peace” with Dr Samuel Harrington. Feb 26, 7pm, “Down the River Unto the Sea” with Walter Mosley. Feb 27, 7pm, “Strangers In Their Own Land: Anger & Mourning of the American Right” with Arlie Russell Hochschild, a launch party for One Book One Marin. Feb 28, 7pm, “The Heart is a Shifting Sea” with Elizabeth Flock. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Grease

Many Rivers Books & Tea

The Gumshoe Murders

Feb 25, 1pm, “Hilo Book 4: Waking the Monsters” with Judd Winick. Free admission. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa 707.579.4452.

Feb 22, 7:30pm, “Wired for God” with Dani Antman. $5. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.8871.

Napa Bookmine

Feb 24, 6pm, poetry reading with Susan Kolodny and Susanne Dyckman. Feb 25, 2pm, “Fortnight on Maxwell Street” with David Kerns. 964 Pearl St, Napa. 707.733.3199.

Napa Main Library

Feb 28, 7pm, “A Wilder Time” with William E Glassley. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Feb 23, 7pm, “The Disaster Artist” with Greg Sestero. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Readers’ Books

Feb 21, 7pm, “Luminous Life: How the Science of Light Unlocks the Art of Living” with Jacob Israel Liberman. Feb 22, 7pm, “The Springs: Resort Towns of Sonoma Valley” with Michael Acker, presented by Sonoma League for Historic Preservation. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Feb 23, 7pm, “Real American: A Memoir” with Julie LythcottHaims. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Theater Buried Child

Pulitzer Prize-winning drama written by Sam Shepard is a gothic tale of family secrets and lost inheritance in the tradition of epic Greek drama and Shakespeare tragedies. Through Feb 25. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Equus

Award-winning play about a psychiatrist’s journey into the mind of a 17-year-old is performed in an intimate setting. Includes mature content. Through Feb 25. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The students of Music to My Ears perform the musical onstage at the Phoenix. Feb 2324, 8pm. $22-$24. The Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565. Get a Clue Productions presents a new murder-mystery dinner theater show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception. Reservations required. Sat, Feb 24, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. getaclueproductions. com.

Last of the Red Hot Tenants

Lois Pearlman presents a funny one woman play about rent-control struggle with Manhattan high-rise developers in the 1980s. Feb 23-24, 7:30pm. $10. Blue Door Gallery, 16359 Main St, Guerveville. 707.865.9878.

Not a Genuine Black Man

Brian Copeland presents his funny and heartfelt solo play that became a Bay Area sensation. Feb 24, 7:30pm. $40. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

South Pacific

Set in an island paradise during World War II, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s popular musical mixes romance, duty and prejudice in a classic story that still rings true today. Through Feb 25. $28. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Tenderly: The Rosemary Clooney Musical

Twentieth-century film, television and radio icon is explored in this jukebox musical about her successful career and personal struggles. Feb 23-Mar 11. $28-$39. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 21-27, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Musical stage show is based on the popular children’s book series. Feb 25, 3pm. $12-$17. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Charles M Schulz Museum


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26 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 21-27, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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’m not normally outspoken about politics,” says Tai Olesky, 41, a California Growers Alliance board member. “But now’s not the time to bury your head in the sand. The people who have been in this culture for decades need a break before the whole industry is controlled by the Walmarts and the Amazons of the world. “When Proposition 64 passed,” he continues, “there was to be a limit on big, commercial grows. [But] the regulations released last November didn’t include a cap. Nor were caps in place when recreational sales began the first of this year.” Olesky, a Humboldt County native who grew up in Sonoma County, thinks that the fallout will be disastrous, not only for small and medium-sized growers but for the whole region. “If the

state doesn’t create limits on big operations, the impacts will be catastrophic,” he says. “The whole North Coast economy will suffer and a whole culture will be destroyed. “What are people going to do?” he asks. “Go back to logging and fishing? Marijuana is all that’s left.” Almost everywhere he looks, he sees tragedy. “In Oregon, the state cares about taxes, not about the growers who are going bankrupt,” he says. “In the city of Santa Rosa, it’s a money grab, with exorbitant fees and taxes.” As a citizen who leans toward the libertarian viewpoint, Olesky doesn’t think taxes and fees are the answer to the cannabis conundrum, though he doesn’t have a game plan. “The whole cannabis issue will end up in the courts,” he said. “Meanwhile, there’s a race to bottom. People in the industry are eating each other up.” After a lifetime in and around cannabis in Northern California, Olesky says almost everyone he knows is involved in the marijuana business on some level. For years, he owned and operated Mosaic, an upscale restaurant in Forestville. But when the economy crashed in 2008, he lost 50 percent of his business and had to close. Now he runs Biologic Crop Solutions, where he makes and sells soil for marijuana growers, farmers and winegrowers. “I don’t think I’ll suffer economically if and when the small growers go under,” he says. “The big growers want organic soil for their plants. I think I’m in good shape.” But small-scale growers will not fare so well, he says. “Not to have protections for small growers is a real travesty of what voters wanted when they approved Proposition 64.” Jonah Raskin is a frequent contributor to the ‘Bohemian’ and the author of ‘Marijuanaland: Dispatches from an American War.’


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For the week of February 21

ARIES (March 21–April 19) When you’re playing poker, a wild card refers to a card that can be used as any card the cardholder wants it to be. If the two of hearts is deemed wild before the game begins, it can be used as an ace of diamonds, jack of clubs, queen of spades or anything else. That’s always a good thing! In the game of life, a wild card is the arrival of an unforeseen element that affects the flow of events unpredictably. It might derail your plans or alter them in ways that are at first inconvenient but ultimately beneficial. It may even cause them to succeed in an even more interesting fashion than you imagined they could. I bring this up, Aries, because I suspect that you’ll be in the Wild Card Season during the next four weeks. Any and all of the above definitions may apply. Be alert for unusual luck. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

If you gorge on 10 pounds of chocolate in the next 24 hours, you will get sick. Please don’t do that. Limit your intake to no more than a pound. Follow a similar policy with any other pleasurable activity. Feel emboldened to surpass your normal dosage, yes, but avoid ridiculous overindulgence. Now is one of the rare times when visionary artist William Blake’s maxim is applicable: “The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom.” So is his corollary, “You never know what is enough until you know what is more than enough.” But keep in mind that Blake didn’t say, “The road of foolish, reckless exorbitance leads to the palace of wisdom.”

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Have you ever had a rousing insight about an action that would improve your life, but then you failed to summon the willpower to actually take that action? Have you resolved to embark on some new behavior that would be good for you, but then found yourself unable to carry it out? Most of us have experienced these frustrations. The ancient Greeks had a word for it: akrasia. I bring it up, Gemini, because I suspect you may be less susceptible to akrasia in the next four weeks than you have ever been. I bet you will consistently have the courage and command to actually follow through on what your intuition tells you is in your best interests. CANCER (June 21–July 22) “There is no such thing as a failed experiment,” said inventor Buckminster Fuller, “only experiments with unexpected outcomes.” That’s an excellent guideline for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks. You’re entering a phase of your astrological cycle when questions are more important than answers, when explorations are more essential than discoveries, and when curiosity is more useful than knowledge. There will be minimal value in formulating a definitive concept of success and then trying to achieve it. You will have more fun and you will learn more by continually redefining success as you wander and ramble. LEO (July 23–August 22) During World War II, British code-breakers regularly intercepted and deciphered top-secret radio messages that high-ranking German soldiers sent to each other. Historians have concluded that these heroes shortened the war by at least two years. I bring this to your attention, Leo, in the hope that it will inspire you. I believe your own metaphorical code-breaking skills will be acute in the coming weeks. You’ll be able to decrypt messages that have different meanings from what they appear to mean. You won’t get fooled by deception and misdirection. This knack will enable you to home in on the elusive truths that are circulating—thus saving you from unnecessary and irrelevant turmoil. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) In April 1972, three American astronauts climbed into a spacecraft and took a trip to the moon and back. On the second day of the 11-day jaunt, pilot Ken Mattingly removed and misplaced his wedding ring. In the zero-gravity conditions, it drifted off and disappeared somewhere in the cabin. Nine days later, on the way home, Mattingly and Charlie Duke did a space walk. When they opened the hatch and slipped outside, they found the wedding ring floating in the blackness of space. Duke was able to grab it and bring it in. I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will recover a lost or missing item in an

BY ROB BREZSNY

equally unlikely location, Virgo. Or perhaps your retrieval will be of a more metaphorical kind: a dream, a friendship, an opportunity.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) According to British philosopher Alain de Botton, “Maturity begins with the capacity to sense and, in good time and without defensiveness, admit to our own craziness.” He says that our humble willingness to be embarrassed by our confusion and mistakes and doubts is key to understanding ourselves. I believe these meditations will be especially useful for you in the coming weeks, Libra. They could lead you to learn and make use of robust new secrets of self-mastery. SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

During the next four weeks, there are three activities I suspect you should indulge in at an elevated rate: laughter, dancing and sex. The astrological omens suggest that these pursuits will bring you even more health benefits than usual. They will not only give your body, mind and soul the precise exercise they need most; they will also make you smarter and kinder and wilder. Fortunately, the astrological omens also suggest that laughter, dancing and sex will be even more easily available to you than they normally are.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

The little voices in your head may have laryngitis, but they’re still spouting their cracked advice. Here’s another curiosity: You are extra-attuned to the feelings and thoughts of other people. I’m tempted to speculate that you’re at least temporarily telepathic. There’s a third factor contributing to the riot in your head: People you were close to earlier in your life are showing up to kibitz you in your nightly dreams. In response, I bid you to bark “Enough!” at all these meddlers. You have astrological permission to tell them to pipe down so you can hear yourself think.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Paleontologist Jack Horner says that developmental biologists are halfway toward being able to create a chickenosaurus—a creature that is genetically a blend of a chicken and a dinosaur. This project is conceivable because there’s an evolutionary link between the ancient reptile and the modern bird. Now is a favorable time for you to contemplate metaphorically similar juxtapositions and combinations, Capricorn. For the foreseeable future, you’ll have extra skill and savvy in the art of amalgamation. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “Be stubborn about your goals but flexible about your methods.” That’s the message I saw on a woman’s T-shirt today. It’s the best possible advice for you to hear right now. To further drive home the point, I’ll add a quote from productivity consultant David Allen: “Patience is the calm acceptance that things can happen in a different order than the one you have in mind.” Are you willing to be loyal and true to your high standards, Aquarius, even as you improvise to uphold and fulfill them? PISCES (February 19–March 20)

In her novel The Round House, writer Louise Erdrich reminisces about how hard it was, earlier in her life, to yank out the trees whose roots had grown into the foundation of her family’s house. “How funny, strange, that a thing can grow so powerful even when planted in the wrong place,” she says. Then she adds, “ideas, too.” Your first assignment in the coming weeks, my dear Pisces, is to make sure that nothing gets planted in the wrong place. Your second assignment is to focus all your intelligence and love on locating the right places for new seeds to be planted.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

FE BR UARY 21-27, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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