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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.41

P10

GAV FOR GUV?

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom has his eyes on Sacramento’s top job P13 MOLE WITH LOVE P8 SOUTH PACIFIC P18 REV. SHAWN AMOS P19


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E X P E R I E N C E T H E U LT I M AT E

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2018 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photograph by Kristin Lam. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.


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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Dreamers Are Americans In my view, DACA recipients are Americans. Many were brought here quite young, before grade school. All their lives they’ve been American, educated and steeped in our American culture. Their functional language is English, many hold degrees, and a vast majority are employed and lead productive lives.

It wasn’t their decision to come here. They’ve played by the rules since they’ve been here, they pose no threat to anyone, and they’ve become an integral part of the workforce. They are every bit American in every sense of what that means as everyone else. Do we want to boot close to a million such people from this country, people that we grew up with, went to school with, work with and live next door to? What is their crime that they should be deported, ripped from their families, friends and the only lives they’ve ever

THIS MODERN WORLD

known? This is flat-out heartless cruelty compounded with rank stupidity. It smacks of the darkest days in Europe before WWII. This is Trump’s vision of “America first”—racist and xenophobic, and it’s echoed by a third of the voting public. We’re led by people who promulgate hatred and fear. These are dangerous times.

WILL SHONBRUN Sonoma

By Tom Tomorrow

What’s in a Name? Thank you so much for Dani Burlison’s article, “Triggered” (Feb. 7). As a psychotherapist and someone who has worked extensively with people who have experienced sexual assault and abuse, I observe how heightened media coverage of these topics is hard on those who have open wounds. I hope more seek help as a result of your article, and that more men join the movement toward a more equal society I do want to point out some language that was hurtful, though I’m sure unintentional. When you name “women and transgender women,” the implication is that transgender women aren’t women. They are—that’s the point. In the future, you could just say “women,” or if you have a reason to specify trans women, you might try “women, including transgender women” or “cis-women (non-trans women) and transgender women.” If anyone is interested in understanding more about transgender people, there is a conference coming up in April in Santa Rosa for non-trans people to learn how to empathize with, welcome and support trans people. Call 707.829.8293 if interested.

KRIS SPANGLER, MFT Sebastopol

Editor’s Note: Dani Burlison did use the term “cis” in her story, but the word was edited out in an attempt at clarity. Thank for you bringing the issue to light.

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


..

Uber LOVE

End the violence against the Lopez family BY SUSAN LAMONT

T

o the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors: You have the power to end the serial violence that has rained down on the Lopez family for four and a half years.

First, their son was needlessly killed by Sheriff’s Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Second, District Attorney Jill Ravitch perpetuated a fraud on that family and the citizens of this county by hiring an “independent” investigator, William Lewinski, who she knew always found in favor of law enforcement. Then, there was the demonizing of the Latino community, when its young people, including Andy’s friends, protested. There was the return of Gelhaus to the streets. There was the smearing of Lopez’s son’s memory and character by the sheriff’s office. There was your refusal, when creating a task force, to take a moral stand. You were content to hide behind your legal obligations and restrictions. Even the park, which the community happily accepts, is bittersweet, built as it is on two decades of foot dragging and over the body of a young boy. And now there is the long slog of a lawsuit, with your multiple attempts to have it dismissed, despite deposition testimony that makes it clearer and clearer that Andy did not have to die, that he should be alive and celebrating with us when the park opens on his birthday this June. You can stop this onslaught of violence against the Lopez family right now. You can turn to your attorney and the sheriff’s office and say, “No, it stops now.” You can manifest some of your claimed compassion and empathy and say, “We’re settling this case.” Attorneys are trained to ignore the harm they so often create. You are under no such obligation. You can say, “We refuse to continue inflicting pain on the Lopez family. We want this case settled.” Please, do it today.

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Susan Lamont is a member of the Police Brutality Coalition Sonoma County. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Dining CHOCOLATE IS FOR LOVERS And in mole, it’s for people who love good food.

Made with Love Cooking mole shows you care—or have a lot of free time BY ARI LEVAUX

I

t wasn’t Valentine’s Day when Tita de la Garza prepared turkey mole. Were Cupid running the show, that meal would have been for her and Pedro, who loved Tita as much as she loved him.

Tita, the heroine of Laura Esquivel’s 1992 novel Like Water for Chocolate, was denied the opportunity to marry by her domineering mother. Instead, she made her love in the kitchen, and the people she fed had a way

of responding emotionally to her cooking. Tita’s turkey mole recipe was no different. To help you get in the mood for Valentine’s Day, here is an extrapolated version of Tita’s mole.

Tita’s Mole • • • • •

1/2 c. almonds 1/2 c. walnuts 1/2 c. sesame seeds (raw or toasted) 1/2 c. pumpkin seeds (raw or toasted) 8 dried red chile pods,

• • • • • • • • •

as many varieties as you like (pasilla, ancho, poblano, guajillo, etc.) 2 tsp. coriander seeds 2 anise pods 2 tsp. black peppercorns 4 inches cinnamon stick 4 tbsp. chocolate powder, or substitute nibs in other form 5 cloves garlic, chopped 1 onion chopped 1 tortilla or old piece of bread olive oil, butter

Plus: • 1 turkey, or turkey parts • 3 chopped carrots • 2 celery stalks • 1 onion Bake turkey at 350 degrees until you can pull the bones out once it cools. Set the meat aside, and put the bones and skin in a pot of water, along with carrots, chopped celery and an onion, cut in half. Simmer for at least one hour. Clean the dried chiles, removing the stems, seeds and membranes. With a heavy pan on low, add the almonds and pecans, and slowly brown—so slowly that you can almost forget about them while you attend to a second pan, on medium heat, to which you add the coriander, black pepper, anise, cinnamon and chile seeds. Stir often until they start to brown and the coriander seeds pop. Remove the spices from the pan and add the cleaned chile, torn into inchsize pieces. Turn the pan down and lightly toast the chiles. When the nuts begin to brown, add the sesame and pumpkin seeds. When the sesame seeds start to brown, turn off the heat and let cool. Gather the nuts, spices, seeds and chile into a stone mortar and pestle, or a food processor. Add the chocolate, and let it rip. When the mole gets too thick, add turkey stock until the mole is the consistency of a milkshake. Add oil and butter to one of the pans and sauté garlic and onion, along with a pound or so of turkey meat and a crumbled roll or tortilla. Add broth as necessary to prevent burning. When the onion is translucent, add a half cup of mole and turkey stock, stirring together, and cover. Add more mole and stock if necessary. Season with salt. Tita’s secret ingredient, which she shares with a guest who asks for her mole recipe: “The secret is to make it with love.”


Gap Year The wind’s the thing in the Petaluma Gap BY JAMES KNIGHT

A

pproved in December and effective Jan. 8, the Petaluma Gap is the North Bay’s newest American Viticultural Area (AVA). The question now is, will wineries add this rookie appellation to their labels rather than sticking with the tried-andtrue Sonoma Coast AVA, out of which it was carved?

“We will do so with pretty much every wine we can,” says Tom Gendall, associate winemaker at Cline Family Cellars. Perhaps best known for its Zinfandel and Rhônestyle blends, Cline also makes cooler climate varietals from estate vineyards in Carneros and the southern Sonoma Coast, where the influence of ocean breeze and fog during grape ripening contributes to the quality of wine for which the

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Petaluma Gap is known. The key to the Gap is that its vineyards are first in line to get blasted by that wind and fog. According to Gendall, who completed wine studies in New Zealand and has worked with Gap vineyards for seven years, that means the “cool Carneros” is actually significantly warmer. At harvest, “Carneros is anywhere from to two to four weeks earlier than Petaluma Gap,” Gendall says. “And that translates to style.” Generally speaking, the style also contrasts to Pinot Noir from the Russian River Valley. “Russian River is very big and opulent, whereas I find Petaluma Gap has more restraint, more tannin, more mineral flavor and earthiness with that longer hang time,” says Gendall. While the fruit may not be as bright, it’s infused with notes of char, bramble and forest floor. “I definitely find that I prefer that extra characteristic—it’s still got that fruit there, but it’s got that extra complexity.” Cline’s 2016 Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir ($20) fits that description well, cloaking its fruit under earthy, woodsy spice, with ginger, coriander and clove suggesting a mulled wine character—but without the “cooked” note. Velour-textured tannins mark a satisfying, quite dry finish. This is a good value for Pinot Noir, which is grown on 75 percent of the new AVA’s 4,000 vineyard acres. Notably, Chardonnay is neck and neck with Syrah for second place, at 13 percent vs. 12 percent of grapes grown in the AVA, respectively, while Cline’s 2017 Sonoma Coast Pinot Gris ($15) hails from the paltry 1 percent of “other” grape varieties grown there. This quite young wine shows young wine aromatics of white grape press cake, a sort of nutty mélange of unsalted peanuts and white table grape crushed on Melba toast. Because it’s a fruity yet saline refresher without apparent barrel age, I’d rather call it a “Pinot Grigio”—but, like the Gap or the Coast, they’re also free to call it either way. Look for Cline’s upcoming single vineyard series wines from the Petaluma Gap.


SPOTLIGHT ON CALISTOGA

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Roadside Attraction Hidden behind a wall on Highway 128, just north of Calistoga near Bill’s Market, is an assortment of weathered trucks and farm equipment.


Rory McNamara

As spring comes to ground zero of the Tubbs fire, nearby winemakers count their blessings BY STETT HOLBROOK

F

or the winemakers near Tubbs Lane, the coming of spring is bittersweet.

While spring is more than a month away, the unseasonably warm weather seems to have left winter far behind. The sun beams down from azure skies, and white tree blossoms, green grass and yellow mustard flowers paint the landscape in bright swaths of color. The long run of warm weather has given way to early talk of bud break, the first green shoots on dormant grapevines.

Tubbs Lane is where the Tubbs fire got its name. But the deadly firestorm that started the night of Oct. 8 didn’t actually begin here. The wind-whipped inferno started a little farther up Highway 128, near Bennett Lane. But for those who live and work near Tubbs Lane, it was ground zero. Underneath the growing thicket of green on the hillsides that rise steeply from the valley floor are the black scars of the fire and the charred foundations of homes lost in the disaster. While green seems poised to overtake the black as the landscape heals, it will take those

who lived through the fire longer to recover. “It was bloody terrifying,” says Rachel Gondouin, associate winemaker at Bennett Lane Winery, just around the corner from Tubbs Lane. The tile-roofed winery survived the fire, but Gondouin says they had only harvested about 50 percent of their grapes when the disaster struck, and much of the crop was lost to smoke damage. But she’s looking to the future. “It’s such a beautiful time of year right now, with all of the mustards growing—it gives us a sense of

SPOTLIGHT ON CALISTOGA

Tubbs Renewal

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CYCLE OF LIFE Mustard flowers and cover crops grow between vines near Tubbs Lane, while fire scars still blacken the hills where the Tubbs fire started.

renewal into 2018,” she says. “We are excited for the promise the new vintage will bring.” After riding over Mount St. Helena on his motorcycle from Lake County the morning of Oct. 8, Envy Winery winemaker Banton Kirkendall stayed on site to protect the winery and his fermenting Cabernet Sauvignon. Half the winery’s crop was picked before the fire. The remainder does have a whiff of smoke taint, but Kirkendall says creative blending should take care of that. A former firefighter, Kirkendall appreciates the role fire plays in California. “The forest needs to burn to regenerate,” he says. Kirkendall wonders if there will be two Napa Valley 2017 vintages, pre-fire and post-fire. “We will find out,” he says. For now, Kirkendall’s watching the surrounding landscape change. “All that green and black,” he says. “It’s pretty amazing. Chateau Montelena is one of Tubbs Lane’s most celebrated wineries. Its 1973 Chardonnay beat out 11 other French and California white wines at the famous Judgment of Paris in 1976. The winery was founded by businessman Alfred Tubbs in 1888, the man for whom the road is named. The Tubbs fire didn’t damage the winery, but vineyard manager David Vella says 45 tons of grapes still on the vine were lost to smoke damage. The winery did not fare so well in 1964 when a wildfire destroyed the property’s stately mansion and farm building. “This was history almost repeating itself,” Vella says. Vella lives on the property and says if the winds had changed direction during the fire, the fate of the winery would have been very different. “It would have been ugly.” Every morning, Vella looks to the north at the fire-scarred hills and realizes how lucky he was. “It’s a blessing,” he says. “We feel very fortunate.” While the lack of rainfall has him worried, he takes some solace in the profusion of new growth t “This is renewal to a certain extent,” he says. “It’s soothing to see all the green.”


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It just clicks. Bohemian .com

Describe your perfect day in Calistoga? Sitting in my backyard drinking my morning coffee, reading the paper or a book, and waving to the hot air balloons as they fly over town. After that, I walk downtown to the Saturday Market for fresh fruit and vegetables, stopping in at Bella Bakery for a pastry, coffee and a chat with locals. Then I check out what’s new in the stores on Lincoln Avenue. Mid-afternoon would then lead me to one of the spas for a mineral or mud bath, massage and a swim in the mineral pool. The perfect day would end sharing dinner with family or friends. Where is your favorite place to eat in Calistoga and why? I enjoy all the various cuisines offered in the local restaurants, but if I have to choose one that stands out it’s Solbar located at Solage. Whether I am sitting outside by the pool looking at the Palisades mountains, or inside on a cold day by the fireplace, the tranquil atmosphere makes me feel like I am on vacation. Where do you take first-time visitors in Calistoga? I take first-time visitors to the Sharpsteen Museum of Calistoga History. It was founded by Ben Sharpsteen, who was an Academy Award–winning animator, producer and director for Walt Disney Studios. The memorabilia of Ben’s career and an Oscar are on display in the founder’s room of the museum. What do you know about Calistoga others don’t? I have only lived in Calistoga 36 years and am aware there are locals in their 90s that know more about Calistoga’s history. However, I did ask my husband, Ron, who was born and raised in Calistoga. Ron’s family property was located two miles south of Calistoga below Sterling Vineyards on Highway 29. He remembered there was a trail across from their property that was built by Chinese laborers. The trail ran north toward Diamond Mountain and Kortum Canyon just above Calistoga. The land is now covered by vineyards, houses and roads. If you could change one thing about Calistoga what would it be? The housing shortage. Family members of Calistogans, including my children, find it challenging to continue living in our community due to the shortage of apartments and the rising cost of real estate. Unless children inherit or take over running a family business, they tend to leave Calistoga and move somewhere more affordable.


13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 14-20, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom makes his case to be governor BY JENNIFER WADSWORTH

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (who just nabbed the endorsement of San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo), California State Treasurer John Chiang and Delaine Eastin, the former California state t. Gov. Gavin Newsom is running for governor of superintendent of public instruction and the only woman in California this year, and our colleague at our sister paper the race. The latest polls have Newsom and Villaraigosa the Metro in San Jose, Jennifer Wadsworth, caught up running neck and neck in advance of the nonpartisan June 5 with him at a recent event at the Laborers’ International primary. We interviewed Villaraigosa last month, and before Union in Silicon Valley, where Newsom talked about education, election day we’re aiming to give Mr. Chiang and Ms. Eastin the tech sector, income inequality, cannabis, affordable housing, the same opportunity to make their case to our ) 14 Trump and more. Will Gav be guv? He’s facing off against former readers.—Tom Gogola

L

Kristin Lam

The Gav Guv

FROM LT. GOV TO GOV?

Gavin Newsom faces a tight race for governor with former L.A. Mayor Antonio VIllaraigosa.


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Newsom ( 13 The Bohemian: Bay Area cities are ground zero for income inequality. How do you think we arrived at this point of extreme poverty in the shadow of plenty, and what steps would you take as governor to alleviate those problems—both on a structural level and in the shortterm?

Newsom: The only substantive way we’re going to address this issue is you’ve got to begin at the beginning. Our interventions come too late. We’re playing catch-up, we’re triaging it. At the end of the day, if we don’t focus on the first few precious years of a child’s life, we are making a huge mistake—and we’ve been doing that for a generation. The science is in, it’s overwhelming: billions and billions of neurons exploding at the same time; 85 percent of that brain is developed by the age of three. If you don’t capture a kid by the age of three, we’re going to be spending extraordinary amounts of money playing catch-up. So we have a huge focus on prenatal care, on nurse home visits, early intervention and those first three precious years. Obviously as mayor, I did universal preschool—fully implemented it. That’s profoundly important from a foundational perspective. But that’s, to me, my focus: the readiness gap, and not waiting for it to become an achievement gap. Do you think that’s something California could pull off without federal funding?

We can. We’d love to see the federal government recognize what all the experts already know, but the state can amplify better behavior at the local level. Local government needs to significantly increase its investment, counties need to increase their investment, and certainly the state needs to incentivize that. And that’s a big part of what we want to do, is incentivize better behavior at the local level. I think what’s happened in the past is governors have done— we’ve modestly invested in this space, but not to the degree that

I’m committed to. This is a very specific distinction between my campaign and the campaign of others, and between the status quo and what I hope to promote as the next governor. How do you fund something that ambitious?

It’s a question of priority. We did [universal] preschool in the middle of a recession as mayor. I did universal healthcare in the middle of a recession as mayor. So you’re advocating a bottom-up approach?

It’s the only way to address these issues. Otherwise, I’m just giving you platitudes, I’m just giving you political speak, I’m saying nothing meaningful, because all I would be offering is a strategy to fail more efficiently. And that’s, unfortunately, what we’re doing. And, you know, you just have to—there has to be a recognition and a reconciliation of the failure in our society to substantively address the importance of those critical early years. You garner a lot of support from the tech sector, and you’ve championed the tech industry as a way to solve some of the inequalities we’re grappling with. But in many ways, Silicon Valley has exacerbated these social ills. As governor, how would you hold the industry accountable to upholding its end of the social contract?

One of my closest friends, the godfather of my firstborn, Marc Benioff [CEO of Salesforce], is a shining example of someone who gets it and gets it done. Follow his example. He’s been an unbelievable leader. He’s walked his talk, on gender pay and pay equity and environmental stewardship. He just announced what they’re doing with the Salesforce Tower in terms of meeting LEED Platinum levels, and the incredible waterefficiency proposals that he’s advancing. My point being that on issue after issue, on homelessness, philanthropy contribution, on what businesses can do in real time—not waiting


Giving while living.

They need to be held to account. In our housing plan, we want to assign sanctions for those who aren’t meeting their housing element. We actually want to be punitive. You’ve got to be tough. How? By withholding transit dollars. It’s an amazing part of our proposal that no one has yet seemingly read. Because if they had read it, they would be critical.

Yeah, and also, you know, amplifying the workforce to do the same individually—not just as an institution. It’s a way of saying this: Look, I’m very close, as you know, with a lot of leaders in the community, and there’s an empathy gap, and that needs to be closed, and I’m committed to working in the valley to address those issues. I’d like to see the kind of ingenuity, the entrepreneurial spirit put to address the issues of social mobility as it is for pushing out products and new iterations of releases. And to see them repatriate their taxes?

Well, it’s also an opportunity— don’t think for a second that when I read Tim Cook’s announcement [to repatriate Apple’s overseas profits because of the GOP tax measure] that I didn’t think of many things that he could be doing in the state of California with those dollars to address those issues. By the way, one of the big ways is to deal with the housing crisis in this region. That’s an issue that should immediately galvanize the tech community, particularly when it comes to the missing middle, to workforce housing. We’ve got a $4 billion housing bond that’s on the ballot, but only $300 million is for people earning 60 to 120 percent of [the median income]. So there’s an opportunity to reach out to the corporate sector and address some revolving loans to make up for the gaps in financing, to make up for the gap in workforce housing. I think there’s a tremendous opportunity there to do this at scale—because with what we’re talking about, you can’t play in the margins, you can’t play small ball on affordability. And that’s

In that same vein, how do you plan to make sure local governments are building their share of affordable housing?

I know the Metropolitan Transportation Commission has talked about that for a long time

Thank you. Yes, and we reference the MTC’s work in our plan. So we’re there. I was inspired by that, in fact. You’re the first person I’ve talked to who’s known that.

15

Degree

something I really look forward to engaging with the community on.

M.A. Film Studies Choose your path. Creative project, or masters thesis? Follow the path that means the most to you while getting the basics from both sides. Info Session Sunday, February 25 3:30 - 4:15 p.m. Ives Hall 101, SSU sonoma.edu/exed/film 707.664.3977 beth.warner@sonoma.edu

I interview a lot of wonky people about this kind of thing.

That’s great. Would you sign a bill to repeal CostaHawkins [the 1995 state law which limits locally written rent-control ordinances]?

I would promote amendments to Costa-Hawkins. I don’t know that I would come out with an outright repeal. I think the consequences of that could be pronounced, particularly on housing production and construction. I think it could have a chilling effect. That said, I take a back seat to no one on my strong support for rental protections, eviction protections, [the owner move-in] Ellis Act—you couldn’t be mayor of San Francisco unless you were raising the bar on those issues. I think there’s a real deal to be made with the advocates of that repeal, and some of the larger organizations, from the realtors and the [California] Apartment Association. So I would encourage that. ) 16

FEBRUARY 17-19, 2018

SEBASTOPOL • PETALUMA • HEALDSBURG • SANTA ROSA • NAPA CALISTOGA • SAN RAFAEL • NOVATO • COPPERFIELDSBOOKS.COM

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 14-20, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

until a massive amount of wealth is concentrated and then at the end of your life you redistribute it—he has marked, I think, the type of example that others should follow.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 14-20, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Let’s talk about cannabis. One of the complaints we’re hearing from consumers is about the high cost of compliance, the high cost of regulation under Proposition 64, which appears to be prompting people to turn back to the black market. What do you think the state can do to strike the right regulatory balance here, to prevent illegal sales and to keep the industry above board?

Look, I was the principal proponent, principal author of cannabis legalization. I spent three years organizing an effort to get it on the ballot, and to get it passed, and I feel, as a consequence, a great sense of responsibility to make sure it’s done right. I made this point on Election Day, but I’ll repeat it: Legalization is not an act that occurred on Election Day, November last year. It’s a process that will unfold over a course of years, and that’s why you’ve got to be open to argument, interested in the evidence, those kinds of concerns, and iterative in terms of those applications to the rules. As you know, in the initiative we allowed for a simple majority— or a modest majority, forgive me— to amend so we don’t have to go back in front of the voters. So we have the ability to address these issues in a way that won’t allow them to fester. I’m worried about the small growers—absolutely, unequivocally. I’m worried about the black market being stubborn and persistent because of the regulatory environment, and I want to be in tune and in touch with that and address those issues in real time. Speaking of which, can you comment on the lawsuit against the California Department of Food and Agriculture, which came after the agency lifted acreage limits designed to protect small growers? There’s a concern that the rescission of the limit will discourage small-time operators from even complying with the new regulations. Do you know why that acreage limit was lifted in the first place and do you think it was justified?

Well, the governor took the spirit of what he believed was

Proposition 64, and that was his framework for the first application of the rulemaking. But I completely appreciate the concern, because the spirit of what we were trying to achieve with the five-year prioritization was to protect those farmers. I went up there personally, in Humboldt, and made that case to everybody there. So I feel a great sense of responsibility to have the backs of those folks, and I’m equally concerned. Again, it’s one of those instances where there’s only so much—well, I’m not the governor. I’m not making excuses, by the way, but respecting what the Legislature and the governor just did. I can assure you that at this time next year there will be some amendments and adjustments.

Kristin Lam

16 Newsom ( 15

So do you disagree with the CDFA’s interpretation?

I get the spirit of it, I see the argument. God, I am so black and white in so many ways—because I am the guy who said yes to legalization, marry gays, go after the NRA, etc. On this, though, there are legitimate arguments from both perspectives. I want in real time to see the evidence of what actually occurs on the ground—not what people are asserting, not what people are suggesting. I want to actually see what happens over the next few months when the dust settles. And I will be very, very sensitive to those facts on the ground and the reality of the situation, not the promoted concerns. On clean energy, you said, “It’s a point of pride and a point of principle for the next governor to change the bar.” In what ways would you raise that bar and turn Gov. Brown’s memoranda of understanding on these issues into actionable steps?

If the governor doesn’t sign a bill to get to 100 percent [clean energy] by 2045, then I will. I want to eliminate diesel by 2030. We have to move forward with regionalizing our grid. We’ve got to focus on storage enhancements. I want to double all local efforts. Look, I’m the guy who did the

START YOUNG To address rising income inequality in California, gubernatorial

candidate Gavin Newsom says he would focus on preschool and early education.

plastic-bag ban, I was the one that presided over a city with the first composting requirements in the U.S. and the highest green building standards in the country. San Francisco was the national leader in low carbon green growth. Every year San Francisco is being called out as one of the greenest cities in the United States—if not literally the greenest. Portland, Ore., stubbornly, is right there with us. I’m passionate about these issues. Picking up where Gov. Brown left off is very exciting to me and enlivening, and so this is an area where no one has to convince me to maintain our leadership internationally, not just nationally. You mentioned in your speech earlier that it’s important to put out a positive, alternative narrative to the Trump administration. What would that “positive, alternative narrative”

look like in concrete terms over the coming few years?

All of the above. Everything we just said. From affordability, to healthcare, to the environment, to the issues of promoting our values and the diversity. The entire conversation is framed in terms of what we export that’s so uniquely California. We’re the innovation capital of the world, entrepreneurialism is running through our veins, research and development, diversity is celebrated not tolerated, environmental stewardship, issues associated with healthcare and taking some more aggressive and bold approaches to addressing the needs of our uninsured—all of these areas that I think would provide ample evidence of California’s dominance in terms of mind-share, in terms of economic growth, in terms of advancing our agenda for the future.


Crush

CLOVERDALE

O C C I D E N TA L

Sweet Weekend

Trio of Voices

It’s a bird . . . It’s a plane . . . It’s the Citrus Fair! For the annual Cloverdale Citrus Fair this President’s Day weekend, the longrunning community tradition adopts a superhero theme, flying high with live entertainment, exhibits, animal competitions and lots of family fun while packing a punch with events like the acclaimed wine competition and carnival rides. In addition to a fair atmosphere, the weekend features a parade through downtown Cloverdale on Feb. 17, theatrical performances from the Cabaret Players, and a pageant to crown the Citrus Fair Queen. Join the fun, Friday through Monday, Feb. 16–19, at the Cloverdale Fairgrounds, 1 Citrus Fair Drive, Cloverdale. $5–$8 general admission. cloverdalecitrusfair.org.

SA N R A FA E L

American Art Now in its 34th year, the American Indian Art Show is recognized as the West Coast’s largest celebration of antique works created by Native American populations from the pre-colonial era. Over a hundred dealers and artists will be on hand with an array of works including jewelry, textiles, woven baskets, pottery and beadwork in addition to paintings, photography and literary works. Whether you’re a seasoned collector or a firsttime observer, this show’s look at indigenous art is unparalleled. Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 17–18, at Marin Center Exhibit Hall, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. Saturday, 11am to 5pm; Sunday, 11am to 4pm; opening preview, Saturday at 9am. $18– $35. marinshow.com.

Not one, not two, but three local poets release newly published works at a book launch event this week. Donna Emerson’s first full-length poetry collection, The Place of Our Meeting, moves between coasts and generations in its exploration of human connectedness. Also a first, Phyllis Meshulam’s Land of My Father’s War follows her parent’s journey and separation in World War II. Jodi Hottel’s Voyeur is considered a work of ekphrastic poetry, which reacts to other forms of art through the written word. All three authors read, sell and sign their collections on Sunday, Feb. 18, at the Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Court, Occidental. 2pm. Donations welcomed. 707.874.9392.

HEALDSBURG

Local Star Santa Rosa native Julian Lage was already considered a musical child prodigy and accomplished guitar virtuoso when he formed the Julian Lage Trio with double bassist Scott Colley and drummer Kenny Wollesen. In the last two years, Lage has redefined his sound from a pre-bop jazz motif into an early rock ’n’ roll groove in the vein of Little Richard and Bo Diddley. This week, Lage is back in his North Bay and plays an album-release show to celebrate his new critically acclaimed record, Modern Love. Spend the evening with the Julian Lage Trio on Sunday, Feb. 18, at the Raven Theater, 115 North St., Healdsburg. 7:30pm. $30–$55. 707.433.3145.

—Charlie Swanson BIG MOUTH Top-selling standup performer Sebastian Maniscalco brings his outrageous comedy to Napa’s Uptown Theatre on Feb 16. See Comedy, p23.

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 14-20, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


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TROPICAL BREEZE William O’Neill, left, and Heather Buck go for laughs in ‘South Pacific.’

Black Panther • Phantom Thread Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri I, Tonya • The Shape of Water Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

Cheery ‘South Pacific’ still relevant BY HARRY DUKE

W

orld War II didn’t seem like ancient history in 1949 when South Pacific made its Broadway premiere. Sadly, its warnings of the damage bigotry and prejudice can do aren’t ancient history now as it plays at the Spreckels Performing Arts Center. Based on James Michener’s Pulitzer Prize–winning Tales of the South Pacific, Rodgers and Hammerstein, with Joshua Logan, took a couple of the stories, softened some of the characters and created an immensely popular musical tale of wartime love. The play is set on two islands in the South Pacific during the war and centers on a pair of love stories. Navy nurse Nellie Forbush (Heather Buck) finds

herself falling in love with French expatriate plantation owner Emile de Becque (William O’Neill). M. de Becque has a mysterious past, which doesn’t seem to bother Nellie too much. Well, at least not as much as the fact that he has biracial children born of a youthful relationship with a Polynesian girl. Meanwhile, newly arrived Lt. Joe Cable (James Raasch) flips head over heels (in what seems like record time, even for a Broadway musical) for local girl Liat (Maya Babow). Liat’s mother, Bloody Mary (Elsa Fulton), is anxious to marry her off. Joe, however, just can’t imagine bringing her back to his Philadelphia family. Nellie and Joe end their relationships. Emile and Joe head off on a dangerous military mission, but will love be the ultimate casualty? Classic songs like “There Is Nothing Like a Dame,” “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair,” the enchanting “Bali Ha’i” and the beautiful “Some Enchanted Evening” fill out the story, with the daring-for-1949 “You’ve Got to Be Carefully Taught” driving home the source of people’s prejudices. Musical director Nancy Hayashibara and her 11-piece orchestra deliver the lush score, and Buck and O’Neill are in excellent voice and character with O’Neill’s operatic training put to good use here. Nice comedic support comes from William Thompson as Seabee entrepreneur Luther Billis and Jeff Coté as harried Captain Brackett. Elsa Fulton steals every scene in which Bloody Mary appears. Directors Jim Coleman and Sheri Lee Miller keep things moving at a good pace throughout the twohour, 45-minute running time, but there are some flat spots. Don’t dive too deeply in the waters and you’ll find yourself enjoying the music and appreciating the message of South Pacific. Rating (out of 5): ‘South Pacific’ runs Friday–Sunday through Feb. 25 at Spreckels Performing Arts Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Friday–Saturday, 8pm; 2pm matinee, Sunday; Thursday, Feb. 22, performance at 7:30pm. $16–$28. 707.588.3400.


Beth Herzhaft

THE GOOD WORD The Rev.

Shawn Amos’ new album draws from current events.

Break It Down The Rev. Shawn Amos finds new joy in the blues

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

T

he blues saved the Rev. Shawn Amos. Before he became “the Reverend,” the Los Angeles–based Amos was an Americana folk artist, but he walked away from the microphone for nearly a decade after releasing a gut-wrenching tribute to his mother, titled Thank you Shirl-ee May, in 2005.

“It was a brutal album to make. It was me publicly grieving in real time,” says Amos, whose mother committed suicide in 2003. “It took it out of me, so I stopped making music.” In 2013, he returned to the stage with a new outlook as the Rev. Shawn Amos and started playing a

The Reverend Shawn Amos performs on Friday, Feb. 16, at Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 8:30pm. $15–$18 (21 and over). 707.775.6048.

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 14-20, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

blend of stripped-down blues, rock, roots and soul. “‘The Reverend’ was born out of me rediscovering the blues and rediscovering playing that music,” Amos says. “I didn’t really think of performing music as something that could be joyful, cathartic or entertaining, and the blues introduced me to the idea of that.” This month, Amos releases his new album, The Reverend Shawn Amos Breaks It Down, which was inspired by politics as much as personal changes in his life throughout the last year. “This wasn’t the album I was intending to make,” he says. Rather than the Chicago-style blues of his previous two albums, the new record is connected to Civil Rights–era songs that Amos brings into the modern era. “The album is about 21st-century freedom songs, music that’s meant to bring us together and remind us about our humanity,” Amos says. “That’s why I love the music of the ’60s and ’70s: it was used primarily to provide sustenance when times are hard and remind us of what we have to gain when we come together.” The Reverend Shawn Amos Breaks It Down includes seven original songs and three inspired covers, and centers on the threetrack “Freedom Suite.” The suite comprises a stirring a cappella version of the traditional “Uncle Tom’s Prayer,” the introspectively groovy “Does My Life Matter,” that gives educator and author Booker T. Washington co-writing credit, and the Gospel-choir led “(We’ve Got to) Come Together.” While Amos didn’t exactly plan on the album coming out the same day he plays Petaluma, he’s happy to unveil these songs in the North Bay. “I love Northern California, and Petaluma in particular,” Amos says. “I hope people come ready to dance, hold hands, celebrate, and get some strength to keep fighting.”

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20 Registration is now open for the 2018 Freedom Jazz Choir! The Choir will perform with the Marcus Shelby Orchestra on June 10 as part of the Healdsburg Jazz Festival. We’re now taking sign-ups for the Freedom Jazz Choir! Rehearsals start Feb. 17, one performance only on June 10 at the Healdsburg Jazz Festival. Whether you’re an alto or a tenor, soprano or bass, “lift every voice in song” this year. Learn more and sign up online . . .

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Julian Lage Trio

Santa Rosa native and virtuosic jazz guitarist plays a quickwitted and upbeat set of music. Feb 18, 7:30pm. $30$55. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Parquet Courts

Brooklyn-based indie band grooves with a post-punk edge and art rock experimentalism. Feb 19, 6:30pm. $35. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Symphonic Surfin’ Safari

Beach Boys tribute band Papa Doo Run Run joins Michael Berkowitz and the Santa Rosa Symphony for a “Symphony Pops” performance of crowdpleasing classic rock. Feb 18, 3pm. $37-$80. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY The Blasters

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next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

THE ATOMIC PUNKS SAT, APR 7

JEAN GENIES A TRIBUTE TO

DAVID BOWIE W/SPECIAL GUEST SAT, APR 14

EV’S 40TH BIRTHDAY MEGA BASH! FEAT BILL DECKER BAND,

SWEET LEAF & FEATHERWITCH

SAT, MAY 12

AQUA NETT WITH SPECIAL GUEST JOYRIDE

HOUSE OF ROCK 3410 Industrial Drive SANTA ROSA 707.709.6039

TICKETS & INFO:

ROCKSTARUNIVERSITY.COM

Composed of founding vocalist-guitarist Phil Alvin, drummer Bill Bateman and bassist John Bazz with Keith Wyatt on guitar, the veteran band still rips with a hardwon edge. Feb 17, 8pm. $20. HopMonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Bomsori Kim & Drew Petersen

Mill Valley Chamber Music Society presents the only Bay Area concert performance from the violinist and pianist, both considered rising stars of classical music. Feb 18, 5pm. $35. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley. 415.381.4453.

Danny James

Enigmatic Oakland electro-pop auteur makes his way to West Marin for a show with support from Danny Vitali and DJ Sam Swig. Feb 17, 9pm. $15. Old Western Saloon, 11201 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1661.

NAPA COUNTY Nicolas Bearde

It’s not too late for Valentine’s

Day, as the renowned vocalist presents two sets of his “Jazz for Lovers” concert performance. Feb 15, 7:30 and 9:30pm. $15-$30. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Dave Davies

A founding member of British rock band the Kinks, the guitarist helped shape the sound of rock. Feb 17, 8pm. $40-$65. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

Feb 16, Riner Scivally. Feb 17, Jon Gonzales. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Aqus Cafe

Feb 14, Native Harrow. Feb 16, Sugar Moon. Feb 17, Riner Scivally Trio. Feb 18, 2pm, Kurt Huget. Feb 21, West Coast songwriters competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Feb 15, 6pm, jazz & coffee with Cabbagehead. Feb 16, One Grass, Two Grass and Cascade Crescendo. Feb 18, 6pm, folk jam. Tues, Didgeridoo Clinic. Wed, open mic. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Feb 14, Wednesday Night Big Band. Feb 15, Peter Estabrook with Riner Scivally Quartet. Feb 16, Citizen Flannel. Feb 17, Don Gallardo and the Battlefield. Feb 18, Dynamic jazz. Feb 20, Michelle Lambert and Furiosa. Feb 21, Haute Flash Quartet. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

The Block

Feb 17, 1pm, Jon Gonzales String Band. 20 Grey St, Petaluma. 707.775.6003.

Cellars of Sonoma

Feb 18, 2pm, Dustin Saylor. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Crooked Goat Brewing Feb 17, 3pm, John Courage. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Dry Creek Kitchen

Feb 19, Chris Amberger and

Randy Vincent Duo. Feb 20, Greg Hester and Jim Passarell Duo. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Elephant in the Room

Feb 16, Anthony Presti Trio. Feb 17, Danny Double Felix. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

First Congregational United Church of Christ Feb 18, 3pm, “Love Songs of the Celts” with Celeste Ray and friends. 2000 Humboldt St, Santa Rosa. 707.546.0998.

Flamingo Lounge

Feb 16, Project 4 Band. Feb 17, UB707. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

Feb 14, Bourbon & Burlesque Performance. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Feb 17, Sonoma Bach Organ Recital. Feb 18, 2pm, Navarro Trio. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Feb 16, Los Angeles Guitar Quartet. Feb 17, Peter Yarrow and Noel Paul Stookey. Feb 18, 3pm, Dorothea Röschmann and Malcolm Martineau. Feb 21, United States Navy Concert Band. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Feb 15, Chali 2Na with the House of Vibe Allstars and Pure Powers. Feb 16, “Mardi Gras Meltdown” with the Melt, Pulsators and Second Line. Feb 17-18, ALO with John Craigie. Feb 19, Monday Night Edutainment with Young Fyah. Feb 20, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Feb 16, Erica Sunshine Lee. Feb 17, Charley Paul. Wed, open mic. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Feb 17, “Songs of the Great Post Bop Pianists” with Lorca Hart Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Feb 17, the Grain with the Swamp Lights. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Feb 14, Two Lions. Feb 15, Matt Reischling and the Black Box. Feb 16, Michael Brown Trio. Feb 17, Mangobus. Feb 18, the


Shots. Feb 21, Cave Clove. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

21

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Feb 17, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Blues Band. 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Feb 15, Johnny Mathis. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Main Street Bistro

Feb 15, Willie Perez. Feb 16, Rhythm Drivers. Feb 17, the Fargo Brothers. Feb 18, Vernelle Anders. Feb 20, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Feb 16, DJ MGB. Feb 17, Barbara Olney & Doggone Ornery. Feb 19, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Feb 19, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Feb 15, Josh Heinrichs. Feb 16, the Reverend Shawn Amos. Feb 17, Wonder Bread 5. Feb 18, Igor & the Red Elvises. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Feb 17, 7pm, Cajun Mardi Gras dance party with Suzy Thompson & Aux Cajunals. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

The Phoenix Theater

Feb 17, Alterbeast with Grindmother and the Kennedy Veil. Feb 18, Kiing Rod with Lil Sheik and Sneakk. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Feb 14, 6:30pm, Valentine’s Day with Alec Fuhrman. Feb 15, 6:30pm, Kevin Durkin. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Red Brick

Feb 16, Poyntlyss Sistars. Feb 17, Honey B & the Pollinators. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Redwood Cafe

Feb 15, Hoytus and People. Feb 16, Aki Kumar. Feb 18, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Feb 19, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Feb 21, singersongwriter competition. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill Feb 16, Lucky

) 22

thu feb 15 fri feb 16

hoytus and PeoPle

thu feb 22 fri feb 23 sat feb 24

soul ska

thu mar 1 fri mar 2 sat mar 3 thu mar 8

iRefuse

Out of the Garage Danny James gets weird in West Marin Born and raised in Oakland, musician and songwriter Danny James has always gone about making old-school music that pushes modern-day boundaries. From his proto-punk origins to his current ’70s-inspired glam-rock project, James’ voice stands out in the crowded Bay Area scene for his explosive musical presence and energetic arrangement of psychedelic-pop pastiches. James first turned heads locally in the late 1990s with garage punk band the Cuts. Through a string of well-received albums, the Cuts dialed the clock back to the heyday of acts like the Stooges, erupting onstage with hard-worn angst. After the Cuts disbanded in 2006, James spent several years looking to reinvent his sound, and ultimately landed back in the past with an R&B and funk aesthetic inspired by Bay Area icons like Sly and the Family Stone. In 2013, James released his debut album, PEAR, under his own name as a cassette on Burger Records. Recently reissued, PEAR is an epically brazen master class in the last 50 years of rock ’n’ roll. Some songs soar with psyche-rock acidity, some strut with synthesized electro-pop wizardry and others seem to spin like a disco ball, illuminating the unending dance party that goes on in James’ head. Danny James performs with Danny Vitali and DJ Sam Swig on Saturday, Feb. 17, at the Old Western Saloon, 11202 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes Station. 9pm. $15 (21 and over). 415.663.1661.—Charlie Swanson

8pm/$5

SAT, FEBRUARY 24

aki kuMaR

Jake Shimabukuro

8:30pm/$10

8pm/$12 Adv/$15 DOS

the hot licks

8:30pm/$15 Adv/$20 DOS/seated

WED, FEBRUARY 28

foxes in the henhouse

David Rawlings

7:30pm/Americana/$10

8pm/Dancing/$12 Adv / $15 DOS

PePPeRland

8:30pm/Dancing/$12

THU, MARCH 1

Joanne Rand band

Olivia Newton-John

8pm/$10 Adv / $12 DOS

coMMon knowledge 8pm/Dancing/$10

it’s a beautiful day

sat mar 10 daVid & linda laflaMMe 8:30pm/Dancing/$15 thu culaRan mar 15 8pm/Irish Music/$10 fri black uhuRu apr 27 Reggae Legends/$25 Adv/ $30 DOS RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

The Ladies of Broadway from Transcendence

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show Ou T ! Petty Theft Weekend S Ol D

Fri Feb 16 & Sat Feb 17

Feb 18 Lorin Rowan’s Caribbean Blue Sun

Ken Emerson, Eric McCann, Matt Willis 4:00 / No Cover

Jaffe Feb 23 Matt “Unplugged” 8:00 / No Cover Fri

Smith’s Feb 24 Lavay “Speakeasy Supper Club” Sat

Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30

Jones Gang Feb 25 The High Octane Americana 4:00 Sun

MARCH 24 - 25

CoMiNG iN MaRCH

Tommy Castro Weekend Fri Mar 2 & Sat Mar 3

Steve Lucky and the Rhumba Bums Mar 17 Jerry Hannan Band Mar 24 Shana Morrison Mar 31 Tom Rigney & Flambeau Mar 10

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

THURSDAY

JOSH HEINRICHS WITH

STEPPAS, WHITE GLOVE SERVICE FEB 15 THE REGGAE • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ FRIDAY

THE REVEREND SHAWN

SUNDAY

IGOR AND THE RED ELVISES

WITH MARTY SCHWARTZ FEB 16 AMOS BLUES • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

FEB 18 THURSDAY

FEB 22 FRIDAY

FEB 23 SATURDAY

FEB 24

WITH DOWN DIRTY SHAKE ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

YOUNG DUBLINERS

WITH CULANNʼS HOUNDS ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

LEE ANN WOMACK WITH EDDIE BERMAN ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SHOOTER JENNINGS WITH JADE JACKSON ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SUNDAY

MICKEY AVALON

FRIDAY

TAINTED LOVE

DIRT NASTY W/DJ ASPECT FEB 25 & ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ MAR 2

COVERS/TRIBUTE • DOORS 8PM • 21+

3/3 Greg Brown, 3/10 House of Floyd, 3/12 Carl Palmer's ELP Legacy - Emerson, Lake & Palmer Lives On, 3/13 The Psychedelic Furs, 3/16 Andre Nickatina, 3/17 Tazmanian Devils plus San Geronimo, 3/23 Martin Sexton, 3/24 Frankie Boots, 3/30 The Soul Section with DJ RISE, 3/31 Epic Beard Men (Sage Francis & B. Dolan)

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Julian Lage Trio Grammy Nominated • JAZZ ALL AGES • DOORS 6:30PM $30 Raven (Healdsburg) Sat Feb 24

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Sat Feb 24

Maury and Cheri + Friends

Wed 2⁄14 • Doors 7:30 ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages Tony Lindsay (Santana)

& Jimmy Dillon Love Songs (seated)

MONOPHONICS TWO DAY PASS $50 Fri 2⁄16 & Sat 2⁄17 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $30–$35 All Ages

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Fri + The Grease Traps Sat + The M-Tet Sun 2⁄18 • Doors 11:30am ⁄ FREE • All Ages

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We Banjo 3 + Ismay

Singer/Songwriter ALL AGES • Families Encouraged! 5:30–7:30pm FREE Admission Church of the Oaks (Cotati)

Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra

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Beatles vs. Stones

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HeartSpacePresents.com 707-800-9485 Presenting music that gives hearts the space to heal, connect and be happy!

Mon 2⁄19 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $38–$44 • 21+

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Music ( 21

Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. 415.256.9884.

Losers. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

19 Broadway Club

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Feb 15, 6pm, the Thugz. Feb 17, the Pulsators. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Feb 17, Court ‘n’ Disaster. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sebastopol Community Center Annex Feb 17, Misner & Smith. 425 Morris St, Sebastopol.

Sonoma Cider

Feb 16, the Gentlemen Soldiers. Feb 18, 5pm, “Dancing for Democracy” with the Pulsators. 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Sonoma Speakeasy

A Musical Showdown Fri 2⁄23 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25 • All Ages Melvin Seals with the China Cats

+ David Gans

Sat 2⁄24 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $19–$22 • All Ages

Noah Gundersen + Aaron Gillespie www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Feb 15, Plan Be. Feb 16, John Burdick Band. Feb 17, Sonoma Sound Syndicate. Feb 18, 5pm, Lynne O & the Riots. Feb 18, 8:30pm, Sonoma Blues Jam. Feb 20, R&B night. Feb 21, the Acrosonics. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

The Star

Feb 17, Living in the 90s. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.634.6390.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. CALENDAR THU FEB 15 • COUNTRY LINE DANCE EVERY 1ST AND 3RD THURSDAY 7PM / ALL AGES / $10 FRI FEB 16 • DIRTY RED BARN AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT FEB 17 • THE FABULOUS BIOTONES AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE MON FEB 19 • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM WITH SPECIAL GUEST TIA CARROLL 8PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Blue Woman by Catherine Daley

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 14-20, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Feb 16, Dirty Red Barn. Feb 17, the Fabulous Biotones. Feb 19, Blues Defenders with Tia Carroll. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Washoe House

Feb 17, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. 2840 Roblar Rd, Petaluma. 707.795.4544.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Feb 14, Valentine’s Day show with Top Shelf. Feb 15, Jeff Oster. Feb 16, Brown, Sturgis and Brown. Feb 17, Pilar. Feb 18, Greg Johnson & Glass Brick Boulevard. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

Feb 15, Fistful of Scandal with Jonesy and Harmonic Law. Feb 16, Brickhouse. Feb 18, Laura Love. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Feb 14, Jazzitude. Feb 21, Savannah Blu. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

L’Appart Resto

Feb 15, Todos Santos. 636 San

Feb 14, One Dollar Check with Honey B & the Cultivation. Feb 15, Ballard Brothers. Feb 16, Don Gallardo with the Battlefield. Feb 17, Niki J Crawford with Stymie & the PJLO. Feb 18, Sara Rodenburg and Amy Obenski. Feb 19, open mic. Feb 20, Late for the Train. Feb 21, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Feb 15, Michael LaMacchia Band. Feb 16, Michael Aragon Quartet. Feb 17, Fuzzy Slippers. Feb 18, Migrant Pickers. Feb 19, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Feb 20, open mic. Feb 21, Something About Fireflies. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Feb 14, Sulkary Valverde. Feb 15, Nathan Swedlow Trio. Feb 16, Ken Cook Trio. Feb 17, David Jeffrey’s Jazz Fourtet. Feb 18, Parker Grant Trio. Feb 20, Michael Fecskes. Feb 21, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Toque Tercero flamenco night. Feb 16, Reed Fromer Band. Feb 17, Freddy Clarke & Wobbly World. Feb 18, 4pm, Mazacote with Louie Romero. Feb 20, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Feb 15, Ed Masuga and Rainy Eyes. Feb 16, Marty O’Reilly. Feb 17, Highway Poets. Feb 18, the Crushing Spiral Ensemble. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Feb 14, 8pm, Valentine’s Day show with Tony Lindsay and Jimmy Dillon. Feb 15, Bill Frisell and Thomas Morgan. Feb 1617, Monophonics. Feb 18, We Banjo 3. Feb 18, 12pm, Roger McNamee solo acoustic. Feb 19, Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Feb 14, “Classic Country Love Songs” with Scott Law and friends. Feb 15, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Feb 17, Scott Law and friends. Feb 20, Colonel & the Mermaids. Feb 21, Koolerator. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre

Feb 15, Deborah Winters. Feb 20, Wanda Stafford. Feb 21, Audrey Moira Shimkas. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Feb 21, 12pm, Temescal String Quartet. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Papermill Creek Saloon

Andaz Napa

Feb 14, Judy Radiloff. Feb 16, 5pm, Sebastian Saint James. Feb 16, 9pm, OMEN. Feb 17, Caleb Ford. Feb 18, Papermill Gang. Feb 20, open mic. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Feb 15, Tom Finch Trio. Feb 16, Koolerator. Feb 17, the Crooked Stuff. Feb 18, Grateful Sundays. Feb 19, open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Feb 14, Le Jazz Hot. Feb 16-17, Petty Theft. Feb 18, 4pm, Lorin Rowan’s Caribbean Blue. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Feb 14, Lady D. Feb 20, SwingSet. Feb 21, Tracy Rose Trio. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Feb 15,

NAPA COUNTY Feb 14, John Vicino. Feb 17, Justin Diaz. Feb 21, Austin Hicks. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Blue Note Napa

Feb 14, “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” with Kellie Fuller and friends. Feb 16-17, Lee Ritenour. Feb 20, Three on a Match. Feb 21, “Four and More” with Mike Clark and friends. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Buster’s Southern Barbecue

Feb 18, 2pm, Paul Branin. 1207 Foothill Blvd, Calistoga. 707.942.5605.

River Terrace Inn

Feb 14, Craig Corona. Feb 16, Mark Harold. Feb 17, Smorgy. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Feb 16, AgapeSoul. Feb 17, Journey Revisited. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.


Galleries RECEPTIONS Feb 16

Artists,” get a look at seven diverse artists who are on the rise in the North Bay. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

La Crema Tasting Room, “The Flowing World,” exhibit features Wine Country inspired landscape paintings in oil by Sonoma County artist Clay Vajgrt. 4pm. 235 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.9400.

Through Feb 28, “Reflections,” exhibit tells the story of Petaluma’s black population since the 1800s as part of Black History Month. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Wise & Sassy,” non-juried, salon-style exhibition features works by artists over 60. 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Through Feb 28, “Heaven & Earth & the Space Between,” featuring paintings by Marilee Ford and Sharon Feissel. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Feb 17

Marin Center Exhibit Hall, “The American Indian Art Show,” showing and selling antique and contemporary Native American art works. 9am. $18-$35. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6400.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Feb 26, “Julia Pozsgai,” the Sonoma County artist shows her acrylic, clay, fiber and metal works of art. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

East West Cafe Through Feb 28, “Katie Kruzic Solo Show,” local artist displays landscapes and scenes large and small. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. Mon-Sat, 8am to 9pm; Sun, 8am to 8pm 707.829.2822.

Fulton Crossing Through Feb 28, “February Art Show,” several artists open their studios to the public to show their artistic or creative work. Reception, Feb 16 at 5pm. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm 707.536.3305.

Gallery One Through Feb 19, “Emerging

Riverfront Art Gallery

MARIN COUNTY Gallery Route One

Through Feb 25, “Road Maps,” Gallery Route One’s 33rd annual group show is juried by San Francisco art writer and curator DeWitt Cheng. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. WedMon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Art & Garden Center

Through Feb 25, “Presidio Tunnel Tops,” exhibition traces landscape architect Michael Painter’s Presidio Parkway, a nearly complete parkland that will reconnect the Presidio’s waterfront to its historic core. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

MarinMOCA

Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.384.8288.

Toby’s Feed Barn

Through Feb 28, “Unseen Point Reyes,” Richard Blair and Kathleen Goodwin exhibit photographs and paintings of West Marin’s most picturesque places off the beaten trails. 11250 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Mon-Sat, 9 to 5; Sun, 9:30 to 4. 415.663.1223.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Through Feb 28, “Luis Montoya & Leslie Ortiz,” the artists display their recent conceptual sculptures. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Workmix Cafe Lounge

Through Feb 18, “Venetian Bella Notte & Irish Sea Dancers,” Marissa Carlisle’s collection of images printed on metal and drawn patterns is on display. 950 Randolph St, Napa. Mon-Fri, 8am to 5pm; 7am to 5 for members; twilight hours, 5 to 7pm. 707.603.3986.

Comedy Improv Comedy Workshop

Learn the tricks to developing improvised sketches and skits. Mon, Feb 19, 7pm. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Improvisation for Adults

Through Feb 25, “InnerScapes” get a glimpse into several artists’ subconscious in this revealing show. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; SatSun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

Four-session class is lead by veteran performer and director Patricia de Jong. Space is limited. Feb 20, 7pm. $60. The Theater School, 19485 Sonoma Hwy, Sonoma, 917.821.6414.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Sebastian Maniscalco

Through Feb 22, “Flowers,” conceptual artist Eun Lee takes on the floral subject. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Considered one of the hottest comedians working today, the standup star appears in Napa as part of his “Stay Hungry” tour. Feb 16, 8pm. $75-$100. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Seager Gray Gallery

Tuesday Night Live

Through Feb 28, “Claudia Marseille: Urban Markings,” artist addresses urbanization and globalization in her raw, multicolored collages. 108

See standup comedians Bob Dubac, Brian Copeland, Carrie Snow, Grant Lyon and others. Feb 20, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142

Dance Alma del Tango Studio Tuesdays, Lindy Hop & East Coast Swing Dance. Wednesdays, Tango 1 & 2. 167 Tunstead Ave, San Anselmo 415.459.8966.

Monroe Dance Hall

Feb 16, North Bay Country Dance Society presents Swinging Chickens. Feb 17, DJ Steve Luther presents Stompy Jones. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa 707.529.5450.

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater

Feb 17, 7pm, Sleeping Beauty, production includes more than 30 distinguished dancers from the nationally acclaimed Atlantic City Ballet. $40-$55. 100 California Dr, Yountville 707.944.9900.

Events Chinese New Year Celebration Fundraiser

Annual event includes buffet dinner, silent auction and entertainment like a 250 footlong dragon and martial arts demonstrations. Feb 18, 5pm. $10-$25. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.576.0533.

Chinese New Year Open House at Apricot Forest Acupuncture

Stop by for refreshments, mooncake, gift certificates and information on acupuncture. Feb 16, 4pm. Apricot Forest Acupuncture, 244 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 510.927.8480.

Cloverdale Citrus Fair

Founded in 1892, this familyfriendly fair boasts a parade, citrus sculpture exhibits, livestock activities, rides and live entertainment. Feb 16-19. $5-$8. Cloverdale Fairgrounds, 1 Citrus Fair Dr, Cloverdale, cloverdalecitrusfair.org.

Doctors with a Heart

New chiropractic patients can receive certain services free of charge for the month of February as part of the national movement. Through Feb 28. Maher Chiropractic, 101 Golf Course Dr, C5, Rohnert Park. 707.792.0202.

How to Measure the Cosmos

Travel through space from the comfort of your seat in this planetarium presentation that discovers how far certain celestial objects are from Earth. Fri-Sat through Mar 17. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.521.6914.

Love Out Loud at Marin Country Mart

Evening includes dancing, dinner, cocktails, poetry readings and romance. Feb 14, 7pm. $25. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

Mardi Gras Celebration at Evangeline

Walk-around, festival-style event features bacchanal feast and live music by Wild Catahoulas. Feb 17, 5pm. $30. Evangeline, 1226 Washington St, Calistoga. 707.341.3131.

Mr Healdsburg Pageant

Local lads vie for the crown in this final annual fundraiser for the Raven. Feb 16-17, 7:30pm. $45-$65. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

Peace in Process

Relax deeply with a morning spiritual event. Sun, 9:30am. By donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Phoenix Pro Wrestling

Professional wrestlers compete for the championship belt with family-friendly excitement. Feb 16, 8pm. $2-$10. The Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Wine Country Affordable Housing Raffle

Hawks Wine holds several online raffles for vacation and travel experiences, private dinners and more to support victims of October’s wildfires. Through Mar 10. Hawkes Tasting Room, 6738 Hwy 128, Healdsburg, winecountryhousing.org.

Meet at the Sonoma County Water Agency property on the northern edge of the Napa-Sonoma Marshes. Feb 17, 8:30am. Hudeman Slough, 25687 Ramal Rd, Sonoma. 707.583.3115.

Hiking & History at Healdsburg Ridge

Join author and Healdsburg Literary Guild president Ted Calvert for an informative hike. Feb 20, 10am. Healdsburg Ridge, Arabian Way, Healdsburg.

Laguna Watershed Perspectives

Experience a leisurely walk through Taylor Mountain regional park with Laguna Foundation staff. Preregistration required. Feb 18, 9am. $10. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Landscape in Transition

Habitat restoration day is open to families Feb 17, 9am. Lake Lagunitas, Sky Oaks Rd, Fairfax, marinwater.org.

Pug Sundays

A gathering of pugs, pug owners and pug lovers. Third Sun of every month, 9am. Mill Valley Dog Park, Bayfront Park, Mill Valley.

Film CinemaBites

See the new film, “Soul,” about different ways of understanding cuisine, and enjoy food from Napa’s chef Curtis de Fede of Miminashi. Feb 19, 5pm. $45. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

David Hockney at the Royal Academy of Arts Exhibition on Screen Series screens the documentary on the popular British artist with in-depth and intimate interviews. Tues, Feb 20, 1pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

The Insult

Field Trips Bird Walk at Hudeman Slough

Walk out on the levees surrounding ponds to view waterbirds, hawks and more.

Alexander Valley Film Society screens the 2018 Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film from Lebanon. Feb 19, 7pm. Clover Theater, 121 East First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.6347.

Just Eat It: A Food Waste Story The City of Novato and event partners

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Arts Events

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Welcome Year of the Dog!

Join the Schulz Museum, February 16 & 17 to kick-off the Year of the Dog with everyone’s favorite dog... Snoopy!

Sustainable Novato, ExtraFood and Recology present the second film in the 2018 Green Film Series. Feb 15, 6:30pm. Novato City Hall, 901 Sherman Ave, Novato. 415.899.8900. Nonprofit Final Passages continues its monthly series with the Albert Brooks comedy “Defending Your Life” followed by a discussion. Feb 14, 6:30pm. $5-$15. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Continue the celebration on the 3rd Saturday of every month, March through December. Each month will have a different Snoopy-themed craft and commemorative button. n

( 23

Let’s Talk About Death

Enjoy crafts, photo ops, and receive a special commemorative Snoopy button.

February 16 and 17 All Day February’s Theme: Dog Lips!

A E

A Matter of Life & Death

Look for the monthly themes on the Museum’s website and Facebook page.

2301 Hardies Lane Santa Rosa, CA 95403 (707) 579-4452 schulzmuseum.org Coming in March: The Easter Beagle

Originally released in the US as “Stairway to Heaven,” this newly restored 1946 British romantic fantasy gets a special Valentine’s Day screening. Feb 14, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

NY Dog & Cat Film Festival

Fundraiser for Marin Humane celebrates the bonds between people and their pets in short films, both documentary and narrative. Feb 18-19, 1pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

Petaluma Cinema Series

Petaluma Film Alliance presents significant classic and modern films with guests, lectures and discussions. This week, Oscar-nominated indie hit “Lady Bird” screens. Feb 21, 6pm. $6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, petalumafilmalliance.org.

Silver Scream Festival

Wine Country’s premiere horror and sci-fi film event boasts a lineup of independent features, short films and special screenings with celebrity guests and special VIP events. Feb 16-18. $29 and up. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

Food & Drink S AT UR DAY, F E B R UA RY 2 4

707.546.3600 | lutherburbankcenter.org

Chocolate & Wine Pairing

Taste pairings like Rosé with strawberry-infused white chocolate ganache and Port with coffee-infused dark

chocolate ganache. Wed, Feb 14. $25. Kendall-Jackson Wine Center, 5007 Fulton Rd, Fulton. 707.576.3810.

optional wine pairing. Feb 14. $115 and up. Goose & Gander, 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Complimentary Valentine’s Day Flight

Valentine’s Day at Left Bank

Don’t Be Bitter(s)

Valentine’s Day Wine Train

‘Made with Love’ Tastemakers Event

For Kids

Taste four single vineyard wines, including an exclusive Wine Club-only Willamette Valley Brut Rose. Feb 14. Free. La Crema Estate at Saralee’s Vineyard, 3575 Slusser Rd, Windsor. 707.525.6200.

Alternative to Valentine’s Day includes a walk-around tasting of bitter liqueurs (amaros) from regions throughout Italy. Feb 14, 6pm. $35. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Invite that special someone for an intimate conversation with a winemaking couple that features winetasting and family-style plates. Feb 14, 5pm. $75. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Off the Grid Food Trucks Eat your way through the largest gathering of mobile food trucks in Marin, listen to live music and take in great views. Sun, 11am. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

Pliny the Younger Release

Get in line for the annual limited release of triple IPA some call “the best beer in the world.” Through Feb 15. Russian River Brewing Company, 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.2337.

Romantic Valentine’s Day Dinner

Bring your someone special for an elegant three-course dinner, complete with a rose. Feb 14. $40 per person. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Valentine’s Dinner at Fog Crest Vineyard

Celebrate love with a candlelit evening featuring an exquisite menu prepared by chef Barbara Hom. Feb 14. $200. Fog Crest Vineyard, 7602 Occidental Rd, Sebastopol. 707.829.2006.

Valentine’s Day at Goose & Gander

A special menu made exclusively for the holiday includes four courses and

Offering brunch, lunch and dinner menus plus à la carte dinner specials in the spirit of the occasion. Feb 14. $65. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Lunch and dinner reservations on the touring train is a perfect gift for loved ones. Feb 14. $149 and up. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa. 800.427.4124.

A Celebration of American Music & Family Dance Party

Fun, positive party is an homage to American music traditions in honor of Black History Month. Feb 15, 3:30pm. Sebastopol Library, 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691. Fun, positive party is an homage to American music traditions in honor of Black History Month. Feb 17, 12pm. Roseland Community Library, 779 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa.

Family Yoga

A fun, high-energy class. Fri, Feb 16, 11am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Maker Studio Aluminum Etching with Lindsay Hunter Make art on metal using a safe-for-kids chemical reaction. Feb 17, 11am. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Museum Mondays

Enjoy stories, arts and craft activities and movement games Mon, Feb 19, 10am. $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Lectures Backyard Bee Keeping Introductory discussion covers the best way to buy honey bees, resources, equipment and more. Feb


17, 2pm. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004. Move forward in 2018 by cleaning up the clutter. Feb 21, 6:30pm. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Dynamic Emergence

Personal dowsing event includes live music and a brief guided meditation. Feb 17, 2pm. Town Center Corte Madera, 770 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera. 415.897.4011.

The Economics & Psychology of Sexual Harassment & Assault

Praxis Peace Institute hosts a talk that explores the cultural patterns that have made such behavior acceptable in certain circles, and addresses to deal with this abuse of power. Feb 15, 7pm. $10-$20. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, praxispeace.org.

Expressive Arts for Self-Care

Session provides education and support cancer survivors need to renew the body, mind and spirit after treatment. Feb 20, 11:30am. Marin General Hospital, 250 Bon Air Rd, Greenbrae. 415.925.7000.

Facilitated Women’s Support Group Explore what is holding you back from having the life you desire. Thurs, 6:30pm. Empowering Change, 130 Petaluma Ave, Ste 2C, Sebastopol. 707.494.3216.

Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous

Twelve-step recovery program for anyone suffering from food obsession, overeating, undereating or bulimia. Sat, 8am. All Saints Lutheran Church, 2 San Marin Dr, Novato, 781.932.6300.

Gardening for Butterflies

Learn how to attract butterflies to your garden. Feb 14, 7pm. $5. Hamilton Community Center, 503 B South Palm Dr, Novato.

Madrone Audubon Society Meeting

Includes a talk on songbirds, with a focus on migration, identification and natural history. Feb 19, 7pm. Free. First United Methodist Church, 1551 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3863.

Making Whole Decisions

Explore the added value of

Meal Plan Your Heart Out

“Lunch-n-Learn” series serves up information to help manage diabetes. Feb 14, 11:30am. Marin General Hospital, 250 Bon Air Rd, Greenbrae. 415.925.7000.

Michelle Slatalla

The former “New York Times” style columnist speaks on creating outdoor living spaces. Feb 15, 1pm. Free. Outdoor Art Club, 1 W Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2582.

Montoype: The Painterly Print

Four-week class introduces the methods of momtype print making. Feb 20, 1pm. $175 plus materials. Napa Valley College, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Refuge Recovery

Join a Buddhist-based recovery group. Sat, 9:30am. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Rocks, Minerals & Folks

Geologist Jane Nielson talks rocks and how the Earth’s minerals drive natural weather forces and influence man made buildings. Preregistration required. Feb 15, 7pm. $12. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Want to Self-Publish? David Kudler and Ruth Schwartz of the Bay Area Independent Publishers Association offer a wealth of practical advice. Feb 20, 7pm. Corte Madera Library. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Readings Analy High School

Feb 21, 7pm, “A Mind at Home with Itself” with Byron Katie, includes a copy of the book. $32. 6950 Analy Ave, Sebastopol 707.824.2300.

Book Passage

Feb 15, 7pm, “In Full Flight” with John Heminway. Feb 17, 11am, “The Chinese Emperor’s New Clothes” with Ying Compestine. Feb 17, 4pm,

“Conversations with Mary” with Anna Raimondi. Feb 18, 1pm, “Welcome to Kimmensville” with Lisa Church. Feb 18, 4pm, “Nom de Guerre: Ivan” with Quentin Guerlain. Feb 20, 7pm, “Without Precedent” with Joel Paul. Feb 21, 7pm, “Poison” with John Lescroart. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

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Book Passage By-theBay Feb 15, 6pm, “It Happened in Marin” with Jim Holden. Feb 17, 4pm, “Earthbound: David Bowie & the Man Who Fell to Earth” with Susan Compo. Feb 20, 6pm, “The Plea” with Steve Cavanagh. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Falkirk Cultural Center Feb 15, 7:30pm, Marin Poetry Center’s Third Thursday, featuring poets John Murillo and Nicole Sealey. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael 415.485.3438.

‘HILL FLOW WITH LAVENDER CURVE’ Best known for his superhero paintings, Sonoma County artist Clay Vajgrt unveils a collection of landscapes in a new exhibit opening Feb. 16 at La Crema Tasting Room in Healdsburg. See Receptions, p23.

Moshin Vineyards

Feb 19, 6pm, “Self Portrait with Boy” with Rachel Lyon, hosted by Copperfield’s Books. 10295 Westside Rd, Healdsburg 707.433.5499.

Theater

Napa Bookmine

Buried Child

Feb 20, 7pm, “God at the Edge” and “Gonzo Judaism” with Rabbi Niles Goldstein. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Napa Main Library

Feb 17, 2pm, “What’s Making Our Children Sick?” with Dr Vincanne Adams and Dr Michelle Perro, hosted by Napa Bookmine. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Feb 18, 2pm, Book Launch series with Donna Emerson, Jodi Hottel and Phyllis Meshulam. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Feb 16, 7pm, “Raising Healthy Parents” with Sid GarzaHillman. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Readers’ Books

Feb 15, 7pm, “Count of Buena Vista” with George Webber. Feb 21, 7pm, “Luminous Life: How the Science of Light Unlocks the Art of Living” with Jacob Israel Liberman. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

The Sitting Room

Third Wednesday of every month, 2pm, Sitting Room book club. 2025 Curtis Dr, Penngrove 707.778.3972.

Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Pulitzer Prize-winning drama written by Sam Shepard is a gothic tale of family secrets and lost inheritance in the tradition of epic Greek drama and Shakespeare tragedies. Through Feb 25. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Equus

Birdbath Theatre presents William Shakespeare’s epic. Through Feb 18. $20-$24. Key Tea, 921 C St, San Rafael. 415.426.0269.

Cow Pie Bingo

Good People

Award-winning playwright Larissa FastHorse’s drama, about four socially awkward humans and a cow navigating an increasingly immoral world while staying true to a moral compass, makes its world premiere. Through Feb 18. AlterTheater Storefront, 1344 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.2787.

Award-winning play about a psychiatrist’s journey into the mind of a 17-year-old is performed in an intimate setting. Includes mature content. Through Feb 25. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185. Set in south Boston, this humorous work explores everyday struggles and unshakable hopes of living down and out in America. Through Feb 18. $15-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The Gumshoe Murders

Playwright Arthur Miller’s drama about an aging salesman and his family is a tense examination of the American Dream. Through Feb 18. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Get a Clue Productions presents a new murdermystery dinner theater show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception. Reservations required. Sat, Feb 17, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. getaclueproductions.com.

Disgraced

November

Death of a Salesman

Left Edge Theatre presents the social drama about a PakistaniAmerican lawyer and his wife caught in an escalating dinner party argument. Through Feb 18. $25-$40. Luther Burbank

David Mamet’s Oval Office satire depicts one day in the life of a beleaguered American commander-in-chief. Through Feb 17. $12-$25. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209

Richard II

Skeleton Crew The third of Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit cycle trilogy is a tense drama about an auto plant at the start of the Great Recession. Through Feb 18. $10-$37. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

South Pacific Set in an island paradise during World War II, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s popular musical mixes romance, duty and prejudice in a classic story that still rings true today. Through Feb 25. $28. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 14-20, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Clutter Busting

whole decision making to what arises from knowledge and experience. Feb 15, 7:30pm. $5. Many Rivers Books & Tea, 130 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871.


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Peace and Pot

Veteran Christopher Roe is on a CBD mission BY TOM GOGOLA



NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FEBR UARY 14-20, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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all and rangy and bursting with energy, military veteran Christopher Roe has a bit of the Abe Lincoln look about him. But Lincoln never had the opportunity to enjoy the therapeutic value of cannabidiol.

I met up with the Santa Rosa resident at the Marlow Road outpost of Mary’s Pizza Shack to talk about his relentlessly upbeat push to get cannabidiol (CBD) vape pens and other delivery systems into the hands of U.S. military veterans. Roe, 57, served six years in the military during the peacetime years of 1978 through 1986 and, like Lincoln before him, is committed to raising an army—a big army, a really huge army—drawn from the millions of American veterans now on the homefront, some struggling

more than others from war-borne trauma. His goal: to free cannabis from the shackles of a federal scheduling policy which holds that the plant has no medical use—and use it to help vets heal. Through his nonprofit organization, the Veterans Cannabis Advocacy Group, Roe is on a mission to bring hope and healing to as many veterans as he can. Part of this involves applying firm but friendly pressure on a Department of Veterans Affairs—which he likens to a lumbering oil tanker wallowing in familiar waters—that has yet to embrace CBD as legit therapy. Roe has been using CBD for various medical issues, he says, after years during which he was “never able to find the right medicine.” He had a revelation about his path forward, he says, at the Emerald Cup in Santa Rosa in 2016 when he saw a young veteran with a CBD vaporizer take a couple of puffs and totally mellow out. Roe’s mother, who lives in Menlo Park, is a retired nurse who helped start methadone programs, and his brother, Michael, served in Vietnam and passed away just a year ago. “Vietnam totally fragmented him,” Roe says. “He was never the same after it.” Roe is grounded in science and a passion for peace, and offers a “moonshot” of his own when he throws down unabashedly for a world without weapons, and invokes Elon Musk and SpaceX with a sweep of his arms: “Send it all to Mars,” he says—and send all the toxic pharma that’s pumped into vets, too. In the meantime, Roe has gotten himself a marijuana microbusiness license from the state and plans over the next year to push out into the American veteran community and offer CBD delivery systems at a discount. “Seventy to 80 percent of vets want this,” he says.


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) At 12,388 feet, Mount Fuji is Japan’s highest peak. If you’re in good shape, you can reach the top in seven hours. The return trip can be done in half the time—if you’re cautious. The loose rocks on the steep trail are more likely to knock you off your feet on the way down than on the way up. I suspect this is an apt metaphor for you in the coming weeks, Aries. Your necessary descent may be deceptively challenging. So make haste slowly! Your power animals are the rabbit and the snail. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

In 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright made a few short jaunts through the air in a flying machine they called the Flyer. It was a germinal step in a process that ultimately led to your ability to travel 600 miles per hour while sitting in a chair 30,000 feet above the earth. Less than 66 years after the Wright brothers’ breakthrough, American astronauts landed a space capsule on the moon. They had with them a patch of fabric from the left wing of the Flyer. I expect that during the coming weeks, you will be climaxing a long-running process that deserves a comparable ritual. Revisit the early stages of the work that enabled you to be where you are now.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

In 2006, 5 percent of the world’s astronomers gathered at an international conference and voted to demote Pluto from a planet to a “dwarf planet.” Much of the world agreed to honor their declaration. Since then, though, there has arisen a campaign by equally authoritative astronomers to restore Pluto to full planet status. The crux of the issue is this: How shall we define the nature of a planet? But for the people of New Mexico, the question has been resolved. State legislators there formally voted to regard Pluto as a planet. They didn’t accept the demotion. I encourage you to be inspired by their example, Gemini. Whenever there are good arguments from opposing sides about important matters, trust your gut feelings. Stand up for your preferred version of the story.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) Ray Bradbury’s dystopian bestseller Fahrenheit 451 was among the most successful of the 27 novels he wrote. It won numerous awards and has been adopted into films, plays and graphic novels. Bradbury wrote the original version of the story in nine days, using a typewriter he rented for 20 cents per hour. When his publisher urged him to double the manuscript’s length, he spent another nine days doing so. According to my reading of the planetary configurations, you Cancerians now have a similar potential to be surprisingly efficient and economical as you work on an interesting creation or breakthrough—especially if you mix a lot of play and delight into your labors. LEO (July 23–August 22) Poet Louise Glück has characterized herself as “afflicted with longing yet incapable of forming durable attachments.” If there is anything in you that even partially fits that description, I have good news: In the coming weeks, you’re likely to feel blessed by longing rather than afflicted by it. The foreseeable future will also be prime time for you to increase your motivation and capacity to form durable attachments. Take full advantage of this fertile grace period!

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VIRGO (August 23–September 22) In 2004, a man named Jerry Lynn tied a battery-operated alarm clock to a string and dangled it down a vent in his house. He was hoping that when the alarm sounded, he would get a sense of the best place to drill a hole in his wall to run a wire for his TV. But the knot he’d made wasn’t perfect, and the clock slipped off and plunged into an inaccessible spot behind the wall. Then, every night for 13 years, the alarm rang for a minute. The battery was unusually strong! A few months ago, Lynn decided to end the mild but constant irritation. Calling on the help of duct specialists, he retrieved the persistent clock. With this story as your inspiration, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you Virgos to finally put an end to your equivalent of the maddening alarm clock. (Read the story: tinyurl.com/ alarmclockmadness.) LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Was Napoléon Bonaparte an oppressor or liberator? The answer is

BY ROB BREZSNY

both. His work in the world hurt a lot of people and helped a lot of people. One of his more magnanimous escapades transpired in June 1798, when he and his naval forces invaded the island of Malta. During his six-day stay, he released political prisoners, abolished slavery, granted religious freedom to Jews, opened 15 schools, established the right to free speech and shut down the Inquisition. What do his heroics have to do with you? I don’t want to exaggerate, but I expect that you, too, now have the power to unleash a blizzard of benevolence in your sphere. Do it in your own style, of course, not Napoléon’s.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“Trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit,” said French playwright Molière. I’m going to make that your motto for now, Scorpio. You have pursued a gradual, steady approach to ripening, and soon it will pay off in the form of big bright blooms. Congratulations on having the faith to keep plugging away in the dark! I applaud your determination to be dogged and persistent about following your intuition even though few people have appreciated what you were doing.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) The growth you can and should foster in the coming weeks will be stimulated by quirky and unexpected prods. To get you started, here are a few such prods. 1. What’s your hidden or dormant talent, and what could you do to awaken and mobilize it? 2. What’s something you’re afraid of but might be able to turn into a resource? 3. If you were a different gender for a week, what would you do and what would your life be like? 4. Visualize a dream you’d like to have while you’re asleep tonight. 5. If you could transform anything about yourself, what would it be? 6. Imagine you’ve won a free vacation to anywhere you want. Where would you go?

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) You may think you have uncovered the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth. But according to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re just a bit more than halfway there. In order to get the rest of the goods, you’ll have to ignore your itch to be done with the search. You’ll have to be unattached to being right and smart and authoritative. So please cultivate patience. Be expansive and magnanimous as you dig deeper. For best results, align yourself with poet Richard Siken’s definition: “The truth is complicated. It’s two-toned, multi-vocal, bittersweet.” AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) The posh magazine Tatler came up with a list of fashionable new names for parents who want to ensure their babies get a swanky start in life. Since you Aquarians are in a phase when you can generate good fortune by rebranding yourself or remaking your image, I figure you might be interested in using one of these monikers as a nickname or alias. At the very least, hearing them could whet your imagination to come up with your own ideas. Here are Tatler’s chic avant-garde names for girls: Czar-Czar, Debonaire, Estonia, Figgy, Gethsemane, Power, Queenie. Here are some boys’ names: Barclay, Euripides, Gustav, Innsbruck, Ra, Uxorious, Wigbert, Zebedee. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Now that you have finally paid off one of your debts to the past, you can start window-shopping for the future’s best offers. The coming days will be a transition time as you vacate the power spot you’ve outgrown and ramble out to reconnoiter potential new power spots. So bid your crisp farewells to waning traditions, lost causes, ghostly temptations and the deadweight of people’s expectations. Then start preparing a vigorous first impression to present to promising allies out there in the frontier.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

FE BR UARY 14-20, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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February 14-20, 2018

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February 14-20, 2018