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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | FEBRUARY 7-13, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.40

Love & Sex Issue

d e r e g Trig #Metoo Opens Old Wounds for Abuse Survivors p14

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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FIGHTING BACK While constant reports of sexual abuse in the media can be hard to hear, #MeToo is empowering survivors to process their fear and stress, p14.

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‘For Ravitch to say no, she’s not going to expunge anything, that’s typical. It’s important for her politically to not let those convictions go.’ T H E PA P E R P 8 Triggered by the #MeToo Movement COVE R STO RY P14

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Trippy Writer Nice to see Michael Pollan get some ink in the Bohemian (“A Writer’s Trip,” Dec. 31) For those not familiar with him, he is not only one of the best nonfiction writers working today, but the most entertaining as well. Most importantly, he has vital things to say about how we live in this world. The Omnivore’s Dilemma should be required reading for everyone in this country who happens to eat. You will never look at a Big Mac the same way again after learning the

story of corporate farming disasters, government subsidies and animal abuse that puts this alleged food item on your table (or car seat). The Botany of Desire tells the fascinating relationships we have developed with four different plants, one of which happens to be cannabis. Do yourself a favor—read this guy!

THIS MODERN WORLD

TIM ENGLERT Geyserville

Peace in the End One would be remiss to honor Dennis Peron and not mention Island Cafe in the Castro (Open Mic, Jan. 31). Dennis and the collective who ran it served great crêpes, fruit salad and wit with every meal. Many strategies, heated discussions and dreams for a new order where all were welcome, honored and respected took place at and around the tables. Peace in the end, Dennis!

T. BARNETT Sonoma

By Tom Tomorrow

Save It The wine grape growers won’t be happy until all the hillside forests are gone (“A Vine Mess,” Dec. 31). Unless there is some protection, clear-cutting and conversion will continue unabated. I hope this measure is allowed on the ballot, and that the voters put the environment ahead of money and booze.

DON SCOTT Via Bohemian

Editor’s Note: The Watershed and Oak Woodland Protection Initiative has qualified for the June ballot.

Coup d’état While the world focuses on Trump and his potty mouth, his administration is systemically dismantling the Department of Justice, the EPA, OSHA, the Department of Education and the Bureau of Land Management. Plus, they are unraveling healthcare, the internet, immigration programs and much more. Much of this goes unnoticed by the public, overshadowed by his pernicious personality. I don’t think many people get it. People assume that all will be well when Trump is booted out of office. I think there is a coup d’état occurring in America. Not the idiot liberal coup the Republicans are touting, but a real one, funded by the richest men in the history of the world, and implemented by their extremist lackeys in the Republican party, as well as others, including Putin and his oligarchs. The parallels between this coup and the Weimar Republic of Germany are shocking. America is entirely capable of a holocaust that could dwarf the efforts of the Nazis. They flat-out murdered 13 million people, including Jews, communists, homosexuals and “criminals”—the equivalent of our Mexicans, liberals, LGBTs and addicts. It can’t happen here, can it. Can it?

DAVID BARKER

Santa Rosa

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


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his past year, our country has witnessed the Iraq War phrase of “shock and awe” almost daily in the news. This is appropriate, given the war mentality reflected in the political maneuverings of Mr. Trump and his cronies, both in domestic and foreign policy, as they begin to shred the social/economic safety net many Americans rely on, and to remake a new world order. Quite an agenda!

Let’s see: passed tax “reform” legislation; repealed medical care; repealed environmental regulations; repealed banking regulations and consumer protections; questioned, repudiated and defunded evidence and science-based research; continued belligerent rhetoric toward foreign leaders, governments and foreign policies—and toward our own government and free press. Anything left out? Probably. But wait! Past progressive political legislation has shown that our government, with bipartisan, congressional support, can respond to our nation’s most pressing issues. The New Deal programs of the 1930s and ’40s brought Social Security and other government programs to address the plight of the poor and improve and safeguard working conditions. The Great Society’s mandates of the 1960s and ’70s, ushered in civil rights legislation, Medicare, Entitlement Acts in education, and environmental and consumerprotection laws. Both these eras of government assistance and involvement in the lives of its people had positive outcomes, despite the fact that wars were being fought concurrently as these programs were being implemented. Our isolation, division and fear have grown—both within the confines of our own borders, and beyond. We see through a glass darkly now. There is a Native American story of a grandfather talking with his grandson. The grandfather states he has “a terrible fight going on inside his heart between two wolves—one has anger, greed, resentment, lies, false pride, arrogance, superiority, ego; the other one has faith, generosity, hope, humility, kindness, joy and love. The grandson is quiet for a moment, then asks, “Which wolf will win?” The grandfather simply replies, “The one I feed.”

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E. G. Singer lives in Santa Rosa. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Rants

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Paper THE

DEBR IEFER On the Hunt Whatever happened to the Wing & Barrel Ranch, the 825.6-acre project that Sonoma power-broker Darius Anderson and his Kenwood Investments was working toward getting approved by Sonoma County last year? The one where Anderson took over a hunting club in the eco-sensitive Baylands and set out to build a three-story happy place for the region’s wealthiest skeet shooters and pheasant killers, complete with a Charlie Palmer menu? Well, a final vote on the proposal has been pushed off until a staff report for the county’s Permit & Resource Management Department (PRMD) is written. “The latest on Kenwood is we haven’t written the staff report,” says Blake Hillegas at the PRMD. Back in November, the county Board of Zoning Adjustments (BZA) voted 3–2 to quash an appeal of the proposal by opponents who took issue with project’s environmental and aesthetic impact. According to the PRMD, the proposal is subject to the supervisors approval because it involves a lot line adjustment which intersects with provisions of the Williamson Act, state legislation aimed at keeping land in open space or agriculture in exchange for property tax breaks.

NOT HAPPENING While Jill Ravitch, pictured here in Coffey Park last week, won’t follow San Francisco’s lead and

clear low-level cannabis convictions, she encouraged people to pursue the county’s do-it-yourself process.

Expunge Factor District Attorney Jill Ravitch won’t wipe the slate for pot offenders BY TOM GOGOLA

S

onoma County District Attorney Jill Ravitch says she won’t act to proactively expunge cannabis convictions in the county. During a press conference on Feb. 2 in Coffey Park, Ravitch responded to questions

about the controversial move undertaken by San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón last week to clear nearly 40 years’ worth of misdemeanor cannabis possession convictions in that city. In a proactive gesture of mass expungement celebrated by everyone from cannabis offenders to Lt. Gov. Gavin

Newsom, the Democratic Gascón said his office would erase nearly 3,000 misdemeanor pot convictions dating back to 1975. He also pledged to take a look at reclassifying about 5,000 potrelated felony convictions as misdemeanors. Why 1975? Well, for one thing, 1975 was a big year in the annals of California cannabis

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In voting to quash the appeal, the BZA did add modifications to Anderson’s proposal to ensure that hunters of lesser means would be able to access the grounds, on Mondays and Tuesdays. The rest of the week, the facility would be given over to individuals who can afford the $75,000 annual membership. Corporations would cough up $145,000 annually. “It seems to be a particularly elite club,” says BZA commissioner Pamela Davis, who voted against it. —Tom Gogola

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


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A friend of mine convinced me to give a chiropractor a try. The adjustment didn’t hurt, it actually felt good. I got relief, and I soon was off all medication. It worked so well that I decided, then and there, to become a chiropractor myself. Now for my kids, Hayden and Henry. They have been under chiropractic care their entire lives. And, unlike most other kids in their class, they never get the “common” childhood illnesses like ear infections, asthma and allergies. In fact, they have never taken a drug in their lives. And they are now 19 and 21!

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Dear Friend, I wanted to let everyone know what happened while I was in college. It was a moment that changed my life forever. But before I tell you about my experience, I wanted to tell you my story from the start. Let me start by explaining the photo in this letter, I’m the guy in the middle, Dr. Taatjes. You know when I meet people in town and they usually say, “Oh yeah, I know you, you’re Dr. Taatjes. You’ve been in Petaluma for years…” Well, that’s me.


Ravitch ( 8

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history. That year the state passed SB 85, aka the Moscone Act, which took a big step toward total decriminalization when it reclassified cannabis possession of up to an ounce as a simple misdemeanor punishable by a $100 fine. Forty-plus years later, most news stories about the Gascón decision were larded with questions to the effect of, will other California counties take up the call? The answer in Sonoma County is no. Ravitch is sticking with the expungement process as set out in Proposition 64. “You know, at this point I’m not planning to follow the lead of Mr. Gascón,” says Ravitch, who is up for re-election this fall. “I think that there’s a petition process in place and if the voters had wanted us to take the affirmative action of recalling and dismissing all of those cases, it would have been part of the initiative. So I plan to follow within the confines of what the initiative requires. And so I’m working with the public defender and I know that we’ll be reviewing those petitions and we will be taking appropriate action.” Ravitch explained the process for self-expunging in Sonoma County, which allows people to do it themselves, without a lawyer. “It’s not an expensive endeavor and there’s not always a lawyer necessary,” she says, “so if individuals do want to have their matters expunged, they can actually go on the Sonoma County court website, get the paperwork, file it themselves, come into court themselves and we’ll address them just as we’d address any attorney.” Proposition 64 grants judicial latitude to expunge pot cases if the underlying crime that gave rise to the original charge is no longer a crime. For example, a person arrested in possession of an ounce of cannabis in 2015 was no longer a criminal as of 2016, and could set out to have the conviction expunged from his or her record. According to the state’s Judicial Branch online portal, as of Nov. 9, 2016, Proposition 64 authorizes

the “resentencing or dismissal and sealing of prior, eligible marijuana-related convictions.” Between November 2016 and December 2017, counties across the state had received 2,700 resentencing petitions and 1,820 redesignation petitions, on top of 365 petitions for relief involving juveniles. In that time, San Francisco received a total of 232 resentencing or redesignation petitions, according to the court portal. Alameda, Los Angeles, Riverside, Sacramento and San Diego counties also accepted hundreds of petitions over that time. Sonoma County fielded 24 adult petitions over the same period; Marin County fielded 19; Mendocino, zero. Napa County did not provide data to the court. Ravitch was in Coffey Park on separate business last week—a joint press conference held with the California Contractors State License Board (CSLB), where Ravitch announced that a big sting had been undertaken on a recent Saturday. The joint effort between CSLB and the local district attorney netted 13 unlicensed contractors who had advertised their services on Craigslist or elsewhere, and were trying to get work in fireravaged areas. Working without a contractor’s license is typically a misdemeanor, explained Ravitch on a warm morning in fire-scarred Coffey Park. But most of those charged earlier in February also got an enhanced charge for operating without a contractor’s license in a declared disaster zone, which is a felony. Despite the felony enhancements, none of those charged, said Ravitch, was booked into the Sonoma County Main Adult Detention Facility. And despite the felony charges, which bring a possible three-year prison term upon conviction, a spokesman for the CSLB said that even as it was catching them redhanded, the agency’s ambition is to help bring unlicensed contractors into compliance with state law. The tough-on-contractor charges announced by Ravitch had a familiar ring to them, given that, in another legal arena,

California’s cannabis-legalization protocols also allow for felony enhancements in certain cannabis-related crimes. According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, “felony enhancements may be charged in aggravated circumstances such as repeat or violent prior offenses, environmental offenses, involvement of minors. Also, prosecutors can charge violators with felony conspiracy to commit a misdemeanor if more than one person is involved in the crime.” But Proposition 64 also allows certain cannabis crimes that were felonies to be knocked back to misdemeanors. Those include, for example, the individual cultivation of more than six plants, possession-withintent charges and the sale or transportation of pot. Ravitch’s decision to stick with the Proposition 64 expunge-theconviction protocols rankled some in the county’s pro-pot community. Oaky Joe Munson, a grower in Forestville, says he’s not surprised that Ravitch won’t go along with the Gascón program. He says he doesn’t care that he has misdemeanor and felony charges on his jacket, but he recognizes it’s critically important issue to some people. “I don’t care if I have those on my record even though I’ve never been convicted of a felony,” says Munson, whose medical crop was confiscated by local law enforcement in 2015. “The damage is already done when the cops come” and destroy the plants, he says. Munson’s been providing medical cannabis to AIDS patients for years and says Gascón’s effort “is a step in the direction” that will help people who are trying, for example, to get a government job, or any job for that matter. “I’m glad to see a big metropolitan region go for it,” he says. “For Ravitch to say no, she’s not going to expunge anything, that’s typical. That means she’d have to give up all those [cannabis] convictions. It’s important for her politically to not let those convictions go.”


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The Choir will perform with the Marcus Shelby Orchestra on June 10 as part of the Healdsburg Jazz Festival. We’re now taking sign-ups for the Freedom Jazz Choir! Rehearsals start Feb. 17, one performance only on June 10 at the Healdsburg Jazz Festival. Whether you’re an alto or a tenor, soprano or bass, “lift every voice in song” this year. Learn more and sign up online . . .


Bitter Sweet What’s not to love about Cabernet, the bitterest of wines? BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

he real language of the love of wine— point-of-sale data from retail, that is—tells us that Cabernet Sauvignon, which is bitter in youth and weedy with age, is the bestloved wine in the world.

Raymond Vineyards 2014 Reserve Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($40) This bottle has winning looks and offers tactile pleasure before it is even opened: Raymond’s staid label design was gingered up with red velvet for the 40th anniversary edition, evoking the winery’s plushly furnished Red Room (currently closed for renovation), and perhaps enhancing its utility as an accompaniment to a romantic dinner. Anyway, it’s hard to resist just petting the bottle. Once in

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the glass, it’s conventional and well-behaved, showing discreet aromas of dusty spice rack and the Cabernet suite of oak, graphite and cassis. Supple and velvety, with red Cabernet fruit and a slightly tangy finish, it’s sure to add to a memorable meal. Frank Family Vineyards 2014 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($55) Accents of oiled oak, lava pumice and sandalwood provide a classy cover for this Cab’s generous rations of blackberry liqueur and dark chocolate aromas and flavors. Singularly focused, this darkfruited wine doesn’t punish the palate for its revels with too-gritty tannin. Silverado Vineyards 2013 Solo Stags Leap District Cabernet Sauvignon ($125) Set the table to impress with this pricey (but not really, for the neighborhood) number, which whispers, rather than shouts, of black olives and fresh, delicately scented raspberries. More sweetly fruited than its mate, the Geo below, it’s a convincing harmony of red-fruited Cab flavor and drying, yet like dried velvet, tannins. Benziger Winery 2014 Sonoma County Cabernet Sauvignon ($20) This initially weedy, kaleand-blackcurrant-jelly-scented wine won me over by degrees, so a decanting is recommended if possible. The winery’s sustainability ethos, noted on the label, may win over others. Flavors of mixed berry fruit and chocolate mint cool the palate, and chewy tannins let up on the finish before tedium sets in. Educated Guess 2015 Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon ($22) Some like it hot, some like it smokin’—the oak here is reminiscent of the hickory liquid smoke I’ve been using to jazz up stir fry, but if that sounds tempting, this delivers the tannic Cabernet goods for a good price, and a conversation-starting label, for chemistry geeks. Silverado Vineyards 2013 Geo Coombsville Cabernet Sauvignon ($75) Plainly intense, leaving an impression of iron and bitter ornamental berry, this quality yet closed up Cab says, let’s stay together long enough to enjoy the wine after a few years in the cellar.


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d e r e g g Tri For survivors of sexual assault, the #MeToo movement opens old wounds BY DANI BURLISON


Tarana Burke founded an activist organization fighting sexual assault called Me Too 12 years ago, but the hashtag erupted into 12 million social media posts in October after actress Alyssa Milano suggested survivors of assault or harassment amplify their voices during the early days of the Harvey Weinstein scandal. Between October and today, with recent allegations of the so-called less explicit sexual misconduct by comedian Aziz Ansari—and the countless op-eds supporting or decrying the movement—the internet is saturated with news of sexual trauma. And so we’re clear, yes, #MeToo is absolutely about challenging the patriarchal system that has allowed this type of behavior to continue. And, yes, it is also about holding sexual predators accountable, even, in Dylan Farrow’s words about her father Woody Allen, taking them down. “Why wouldn’t I want to take

being abused and stalked and minimized all over again.” The second trigger was learning that a man new to her neighborhood, who displayed increasingly suspicious behavior, had several violent sexual assaults on his record. “I have PTSD from domestic violence in the past, so it kind of created this environment, like a mental environment and a physical environment for me, that grew increasingly unbearable,” she says. “I would just get this immediate sick feeling in my stomach and was paralyzed with fear when I found the door unlocked. Every time [my husband] walked in the door, I was jumping through my skin. I was waking up in the middle of the night screaming.” Sarah reached out to the YWCA for cognitive-behavioral therapy and began taking anti-anxiety medication to help her get through her resurfacing trauma. Lauren, a Marin County resident and childhood sexual-abuse survivor, says her stress response manifested in the form of insomnia and burning sensations on her hands and feet. Concerned that she was experiencing a nerve problem, she made an appointment with her chiropractor, who found no physical reason for her symptoms. “I also started to feel like, ‘Am I losing my mind?’” says Lauren. Lauren had volunteered at a rape-crisis center in the past, where she educated people about the motivations and behaviors of predators. Yet it wasn’t until she saw her therapist that she made a connection between the endless news cycle of sexual harassment and the emotional and physical impact it was having on her. “The fires were happening too, but it was the #MeToo news that really strung me out more than anything,” Lauren says. “There was the constant news and having to see what we’d known and just how devastating it was.” Lauren’s therapist reassured her that her reaction was normal and that several clients had approached her to discuss the impact the sexual harassment stories had on them as well.

“It helped, too, that [my therapist] acknowledged that my past would make this a more difficult situation,” says Lauren. “At first, [#MeToo] was really inspiring and kind of exciting to have some of the stigma lifting a little and having this community coming around it—like, it is a movement. We are all in this together,” says Heather, another survivor. “But then as my social media feeds got more and more clogged up with people sharing their stories—and of course they have the right to share their stories—but some people shared a lot of details and I started to find myself getting triggered, getting a lot of anxiety, a lot of fear response stuff coming up for me.” Heather, who was already in therapy, began addressing childhood sexual trauma when the #MeToo stories flooded the internet in October. The 34-yearold Santa Rosa resident, who was also sexually assaulted in high school, says the combination of the news cycle and the work she’s doing in therapy has also affected her sex life with her husband. “We’re in this place right now where I mostly don’t want physical affection,” Heather says, “and it totally sucks and I miss it, and when we start heading into that direction, I’m like, ‘OK, stop, stop, stop.’ But, yes, my sex life definitely sucks right now. I just don’t want to share. This is my body.” arah, Lauren and Heather are far from alone in their experiences and reactions to the constant news. According to the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN), one in six women has experienced a completed or attempted sexual assault in (90 percent of rape survivors are women, with Native American women at the highest risk), and roughly 60,000 children are sexually abused each year. Men and boys are sexually abused, too, and they, along with transgender students, are at the highest risk for assault when they are in college. And these are just the reported cases. A Bureau of Justice Statistics report suggests that only 23 percent of sexual ) 16

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ove it or hate it, the #MeToo movement isn’t going anywhere soon.

him down?” she said in a recent interview with CBS This Morning. “Why shouldn’t I be angry?” Some of the young women speaking out against—and directly to—Larry Nassar during his January sentencing for over 180 counts of sexual abuse told him how much they hated him. Who can blame them? Being unheard and dismissed for years can breed resentment. Yet as empowering as the #MeToo movement has been for the cause of amplifying and uniting women’s voices, the constant news cycle detailing violations against women and women’s bodies has also had an overwhelmingly painful impact on many survivors—an opening of old wounds, so to speak. And the re-traumatizing didn’t surface overnight last October with Rose McGowan and Ashley Judd outing Harvey Weinstein for sexual misconduct. The resurfacing of old traumas, for many, began with the detailed accounts of many of Bill Cosby’s 60 accusers growing increasingly vocal with their detailed testimony to the press. For others, it was the shock of former Stanford student Brock Turner being dealt a slap on the wrist for sexual assault during his 2016 trial (he served three months of his six-month sentence). For others, it was the election of Donald Trump, just weeks after his infamous audio tape bragging about his ability to sexually assault women and get away with it that pushed survivors into tailspins of anxiety and fear, painful memories of past assaults bubbling to the surface. This was the case for Sarah (all names of survivors have been changed in order to protect their identities). The Sonoma County–based sexual abuse and domestic violence survivor, had two simultaneously triggering incidents occur in the fall of 2016; the first was the election of Trump. “Just seeing this prick with a microphone in his hand and people listening to him, that he could be listened to and that he could be a fucking president,” says Sarah. “It’s like being raped all over again. It’s like


#MeToo ( 15

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assaults and abuses are reported to authorities. Of those documented cases, RAINN statistics show that a staggering 70 percent of victims experience some form of extreme distress from the incident, and even with adequate therapy, constant news or images of graphic assault in movies can induce a stress response. Looking at these stark numbers, it is fair to assume that if you haven’t been assaulted, you know someone who has. I have yet to meet a woman or transgender woman who has not been sexually harassed. Our entire culture bears the weight of sexual abuse and harassment, whether there is a conscious awareness of it or not. Chris Castillo, executive director of Verity, a Santa Rosa–based advocacy organization that works to both prevent sexual assault and to support survivors, says that on a personal level, she feels that the #MeToo movement is a positive one. The resurfacing trauma might be rippling out in ways that no one ever expected, but survivors and their loved ones have, and are reaching out for, support. “I see many doors opening for people who maybe thought they were closed,” says Castillo. “More people are speaking about it. Hopefully, it will become, not the taboo subject to talk about, but the subject that families talk about with each other, families inform one another about safety and protection and what is good and what is not OK to do.” Castillo says that the drop-in support group at Verity—just one of the many free bilingual supportive services the organization offers to survivors of any gender identification—has seen an increase in attendance since the #MeToo movement picked up speed in October. “They finally feel safe to talk about what’s happened to them,” she says. Tracy Lamb, executive director of NEWS Domestic Violence & Sexual Abuse Services in Napa and a board member with the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, agrees that, overall, #MeToo may have a longlasting positive impact.

“As someone who has been part of the movement of domestic violence and sexual abuse for my whole entire career, which has now been probably 25 years, there is a sense of hope and possibility that this could mean truly real change,” says Lamb. “I have always felt like it’s been an uphill battle for survivors to feel like they’re heard, they’re believed, knowing that involvement in the system is going to be a trial, not only against the perpetrator, but also [a system that] sometimes puts them on trial. And the idea that there’s accountability in ways that I haven’t seen gives me some hope. “And it does feel like there’s strength in numbers,” she adds. Verity and NEWS have been advocating on behalf of survivors for decades. Verity serves over a thousand individuals each year through legal advocacy, phone crisis intervention and individual or group counseling services; NEWS serves 1,300 people, 300 of whom sought services because of sexual assault. Both organizations have 24-hour crisis lines that Castillo and Lamb urge survivors to call when they need support. Both acknowledge that some people may just not be ready to make a phone call, though, and they recommend finding a healthy self-care routine to get through the stress of the bombardment of assault stories in the news. “Be in nature if that’s grounding for you. Find a safe community, whether it has anything to do with being a survivor or not,” says Lamb. “And [do] things like yoga, meditation.” It’s also crucial for loved ones to understand how to be a good support person, and the most important thing they can do, says Castillo, is to just be present. “Don’t press the person, don’t ask questions. Just be a presence for them, because oftentimes that’s what people want,” she says. “They need to feel heard, and to feel honored by the fact that they have come forward and spoken about this and brought it forward.”


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discussions more complex. “Honestly, with this whole Aziz Ansari story, it’s super disturbing that we don’t have the language to talk about the nuances that we need to talk about in order to suss out: what about that interaction was unfortunate and what about that interaction was sexual assault?” Lauren says. “In my opinion, both things happened in that interaction. And it’s not that anyone’s even thinking she’s lying. It’s just they’re thinking it was fine.” very woman I’ve spoken to feels the same. In 2018, it seems wildly bizarre (and enraging) that anything less than enthusiastic, consensual sexual interactions are acceptable. “There are a lot of hard things in life, but I think that being a woman who wants to be in a relationship with a man is hard. It brings a lot up on a super personal and interpersonal level,” says Lauren. “Even if some men haven’t behaved in those ways, they’ve probably been around it, colluded with it and when I think that how far-reaching it is, it is really depressing.” She’s surprised there hasn’t been a mobilization of men addressing issues of “toxic” or harmful masculinity, she says. The tired “boys will be boys” defense in cases of harassment gives all men a bad rap; we all know plenty of men who can keep their hands to themselves, yet there are no local or regional groups led by men to specifically address or prevent sexual harassment or assault. A Google search turns up roughly a dozen men-led organizations working to prevent assault, and most of them are on East Coast college campuses. It’s a start, at least, but our culture has a long way to go to tear apart the power dynamics that make this type of behavior OK and to really start believing survivors and their stories. “We live in a patriarchal society, and we’re trying to change that,” says Castillo. “And you know, some people are going to get a little uptight about it, but what they can do is be part of the support systems, that we’re all supporting one another in the healing.”

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nother survivor, Niki, who lives in San Francisco, says taking a self-defense class helped her process some of her resurfacing fear and stress. “I’ve been a victim of harassment, assault and rape. Taking a selfdefense class made me feel empowered in ways I never expected,” she says. Santa Rosa resident Jade de la Cruz has been teaching selfdefense classes for women for 25 years, and says there is definitely a correlation between the news cycle and the number of women seeking classes to protect themselves. “Unfortunately, when there’s a higher level of fear and vulnerability, that’s when women reach out and start to seek self-defense classes,” says de la Cruz. Aside from counseling, taking selfdefense classes, avoiding abuserelated headlines and leaning on supportive family or friends, many female survivors wonder why men aren’t more active in speaking out against assault, why women are still responsible for their own safety and how the #MeToo movement might help survivors who aren’t celebrities. “Reese Witherspoon can share her story and she’s fancy and famous. Women in that industry can show they are all beautiful and white and magical unicorns, but if one of the administrators at my [work] slapped me on the ass, then who the fuck cares?” says Heather. “And why should I have to revisit memories of rape over and over and over so that somebody somewhere believes the accusers of Danny Masterson and Harvey Weinstein, and does it mean that anyone will believe me? Why are women responsible for gender equality? Why are women responsible for ending assault? Don’t we carry enough already?” Although the Time’s Up call to action sprang up in response to questions about everyday people like Heather, #MeToo has brought forth a rush of vital discussions about sexuality, race, class, privilege, consent, power dynamics and, unfortunately, some very defensive and dismissive men. And the wide spectrum of what defines sexual assault or abuse has made these crucial


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Crush CULTURE

YOUNTVILLE

The week’s events: a selective guide

Getaway With Films

Yountville pairs great food with films from around the world in the inaugural Yountville International Short Film Festival. Popping up at locations like Bardessono restaurant and V Marketplace, this curated week of screenings, dinners, winetasting and filmmaker events presents more than a hundred short films in 20 thematic blocks like “Life, Interrupted” and “The Road Less Traveled” that gather films representing all kinds of genres. In addition, special VIP events like the Art House Short Film Series at Jessup Cellars put the art in artisanal. Make a week of it, Thursday, Feb. 8, to Sunday, Feb. 11. Downtown Yountville. $25–$59; VIP pass, $249. yisff.com.

S A N TA R O S A

Time to Heal

Cleanup is still happening throughout the North Bay after the destruction of last October’s wildfires. Slowly but surely, the healing process has begun. Several local artists, including Jain Sibert, Linda Dove Pierson and Simmon Factor, are donating new works to the ‘Healing by Art: After the Fires’ exhibit. Sponsored by the Santa Rosa Arts Center, the show includes painting, sculpture and photography created in the aftermath of the fires and/ or created from salvaged materials. The exhibit opens with an artists’ reception on Friday, Feb. 9, at Chroma Gallery, 312 South A St., Santa Rosa. 5pm. Free admission. santarosaartscenter.org.

GEYSERVILLE

Perfect 10

The largest celebration of its kind in California, the 10th annual Lake Sonoma Steelhead Festival marks the start of the steelhead trout spawning season, taking place in streams and hatcheries throughout the West Coast. Hosted by the Friends of Lake Sonoma, the festival is a family-friendly day of activities for all ages, with food trucks, drinks, silent auctions, exhibits and more. This year, the fest is also offering free bus transportation, leaving from the Dollar Tree in Santa Rosa’s Roseland neighborhood. The fish fun happens Saturday, Feb. 10, at Lake Sonoma’s Milt Brandt Visitor Center, Skaggs Springs Road, Geyserville. 10am to 4pm. Free admission. lakesonoma.org.

N A PA

Bitter Ends

Valentine’s Day is upon us, with its chocolates, flowers and other romantic goodies. Thankfully, for millions of partner-less people, Feb. 14 is also Singles Awareness Day (SAD), an anti-Valentine’s affair that does away with all that mushy stuff. This year, the bitter masses can enjoy the Don’t Be Bitter(s) tasting event in Napa, featuring an array of the best bitter liqueurs from Italy. Once you find your favorite bitter, you can turn it into a mini cocktail and toast to singlehood on Wednesday, Feb. 14, at the Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St., Napa. 6pm. $35. 707.967.2530.

—Charlie Swanson

STAND OUT Superstar comedian Carlos Mencia returns to the stage at Sally Tomatoes in Rohnert Park for the first time since 2014 on Saturday, Feb. 10. See Comedy, p27.


I HEART ART Several North Bay artists contributed to the San Francisco General Hospital’s

heart-themed public art project.

Share the Love North Bay artists take their hearts to San Francisco BY CHARLIE SWANSON

F

or over 50 years, San Francisco has been synonymous with the heart, thanks to a certain Tony Bennett song. In 2004, the San Francisco General Hospital Foundation first used an image of a heart for a fundraising public art project, Hearts in San Francisco, in which Bay Area artists created works on blank three-dimensional sculptures of varying sizes. Many of these heart sculptures can be seen throughout the city, and each year the foundation commissions new artists to

participate in the annual program that culminates in a Heroes & Hearts luncheon, this year scheduled for Feb. 15 at AT&T Park. Thirty-six new sculptures by 23 Bay Area artists will be displayed and auctioned at the luncheon, including works from several North Bay artists. Proceeds from the sale of the pieces go to life-saving programs at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital. Currently living in San Francisco, Santa Rosa native Angelina Duckett’s tiled mosaic art can be seen throughout Sonoma County in her work with educational program ArtStart

and in large-scale projects like the Spring Lake Park Children’s Memorial bench mosaics. “Over the past several years, I’ve been seeing these hearts all over San Francisco, and just thought they were the coolest things,” says Duckett. “Once I found out they were a way to create funds for the hospital, I decided I absolutely wanted to be involved.” Duckett’s table-top-sized heart sculpture (shown, at left), titled I<3 California, is decorated in her signature mosaic style. Its depiction of a quail running through poppies was inspired by a childhood memory.

On Oct. 8 last year, Duckett had her then-half-finished heart sculpture with her while visiting family in Santa Rosa. In the fires that broke out that night, her brother lost his home and her family was evacuated from her parent’s house for over a week. “It was a really awful thing,” says Duckett. “But it was also heartwarming to see how much our community came together and supported each other. “The original inspiration for my heart was the gratitude I have for being raised in such a beautiful place,” Duckett continues. “It ended up meaning so much more—all my love for my home, Santa Rosa and California as a whole.” Guerneville-based metalworker John Haines also found new meaning in his heart sculpture, the only work in the project that doesn’t actually use the blank heart. Rather, Haines crafted a skeletal metal frame over a sculpted wooden heart suspended in air. Titled Where the Heart Is, the piece (shown, at right) balances in a space between constructive and organic. “I’m trying to take a handful of expressionism, full of something beautiful and fluid,” says Haines, “and then a handful of something that feels raw and indigenous.” Haines was set to begin a much different-looking sculpture at the beginning of October, but the emotional heaviness of the wildfires moved him to create the piece in its current form. “I kept thinking, ‘When everything else is burned away, what is really at the center of what’s left?’” Marin County–based painter and art educator Barbara LibbySteinmann’s entry into the project is a triptych of mini-hearts painted to depict San Francisco’s wild parrots of Telegraph Hill. The playful work reflects ) 20

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Hearts ( 19 Libby-Steinmann’s work as an art teacher at Bacich Elementary School in Kentfield. Last year, Libby-Steinmann was named Marin Teacher of the Year, and with the Hearts in San Francisco project, she got her students involved. Once she was chosen to participate in the project, she took it to her classrooms and showed her students the process of designing and painting the three hearts. Libby-Steinmann also convinced the foundation to have her students collaborate on 25 two-dimensional paintings that will be online for purchase as part of the fundraiser. “It’s a full circle of my work,” says LibbySteinmann.

‘The intent is simple to create joyful, colorful work.’ Also based in Marin, artist John Kraft was chosen to create one of this year’s six largest sculptures. Measuring five feet tall and six feet wide, Kraft’s highly colorful heart involves hand-cut illustrations of flowers assembled as vines, leaves and other floral patterns set over a bright-red acrylic-painted background. “The intent is simply to create joyful, colorful work,” says Kraft. The hand-cut illustrations that make up the flower elements in Kraft’s piece are drawn from his own illustrations of San Francisco. “There are many layers of love of the city,” says Kraft. “Hearts in San Francisco is always a mix of celebrating the arts, the people and community of San Francisco, and celebrating the spirit of giving.” For tickets to the Heroes & Hearts Luncheon in San Francisco, and to see a gallery of the Hearts in San Francisco, visit sfghf.org.


LOB_Boho_1EB.pdf

Eric Chazankin

HARD ROW TO HOE Vince (Sam

Coughlin) plays a key role in Main Stage West’s excellent ‘Buried Child.’

Hard Calls Two great shows trod life’s rough roads BY HARRY DUKE

T

he choices in life that haunt you take center stage in two terrific local productions.

Sebastopol’s Main Stage West is presenting Sam Shepard’s Buried Child, while Petaluma’s Cinnabar Theater has David LindsayAbaire’s Good People. Shepard’s forty-year-old, Pulitzer Prize– winning look at the implosion of the American nuclear family is as fresh as ever, with a very strong cast bringing Shepard’s oft macabre cast to life. John Craven (in a perfect melding of actor to role) plays Dodge, the family patriarch. Once a successful farmer, he’s been reduced to being the cuckold of his domineering wife Halie (Laura Jorgensen) and often finds himself at the mercy of his sons, Bradley (Eric Burke), an amputee who shaves Dodge’s head while he’s

Good People, seen locally two years ago as the premiere production of Left Edge Theatre, is the tale of Margie (Sarah McKereghan), a down-on-herluck Boston “Southie” who some would say has made a string of bad choices in life, though Margie herself might say she never had any to make. At the encouragement of her friend Jean (Liz Jahren), she attempts to reconnect with her old boyfriend Mike (Nick Sholley), now a doctor who long ago abandoned the projects of South Boston. Margie, for whom the term “pushy” is an understatement, wrangles an invitation to a birthday party for Mike being thrown by his wife (Liz RogersBeckley, reprising the role from the Left Edge production), where she hopes to connect with someone who can offer her a job, but then the party is canceled. Or is it? Margie’s gonna find out. It does not go well. Funny, bleak and utterly real, Good People will have you nodding your head in recognition. ‘Buried Child’ runs through Feb. 25 at Main Stage West, 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Thu–Sat, 8pm; Sunday at 5pm. $15–$30. 707.823.0177. ‘Good People’ runs through Feb. 18 at Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Friday–Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $15–$55. 707.763.8920.

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sleeping, and Tilden (Keith Baker), back home after getting in some trouble in New Mexico. Tilden now spends his time carting in vegetables from a farm that hasn’t seen a seedling in decades. The family’s decline can be traced to an event that is occasionally hinted at but never revealed—that is, until the arrival of grandson Vince (Sam Coughlin) and his girlfriend, Shelly (Ivy Rose Miller), who set in motion a chain of events through which the devastating secret is revealed and the family, perhaps, regenerated. Rooted in realism yet often surreal, Buried Child is dark, funny, heartbreaking, disturbing, and great theater. Rating (out of 5):

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Julian Lage Trio Grammy Nominated • JAZZ ALL AGES • DOORS 6:30PM $30 Raven (Healdsburg)

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI THU FEB 8

ED GERHARD

FULLY SEATED SHOW !!!

$20–25/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:30/ALL AGES

FRI FEB 9

Sat Feb 24

English Beat SKA • ALL AGES DOORS 7:30PM $35 ADV/$38 DOS Raven (Healdsburg)

LUTAN FYAH & THE RIDDIM REBELS

+ DJ SIZZLAK, DJ PAPA JOE $20/DOORS-SHOW 9/21+

SAT FEB 10 Sat Feb 24

Maury and Cheri + Friends Singer/Songwriter ALL AGES • Families Encouraged! 5:30–7:30pm FREE Admission Church of the Oaks (Cotati)

WHOLE LOTTA LOVE

BURLESQUE VALENTINE TO LED ZEPPELIN

$20/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SUN FEB 11

COMEDY OPEN MIC

(EVERY 3RD SUNDAY) (MOVED FROM FEB 18 THIS MONTH ONLY)

FREE/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/18+

Fri Mar 9

MON FEB 12

Afrolicious + Marshall House Project

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

DOORS 7:30pm $15 ADV/$18 DOS Arlene Francis Center (Santa Rosa)

HeartSpacePresents.com 707-800-9485 Presenting music that gives hearts the space to heal, connect and be happy!

DJ GREEN B

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

THU FEB 15

CHALI 2NA

+ THE HOUSE OF VIBE ALLSTARS $15/DOORS-SHOW 9/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

® BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, February 9 - Thu, February 15

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd•- Salads Thu, June Bruschetta • Paninis • Soups • 28th Appetizers

Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling ® WITH Demi Moore DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 (12:30) 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:00 7:20 9:15 9:45 RR R (12:30) 2:40 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 R 2 Academy Award (12:00Noms 3:45) 7:30 Best Actor! “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER No9:45 Passes Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13PG (12:00 2:15 4:30) 6:45 9:00 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday R If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

8 Great BeersBest on Tap + Wine by theFilm! Glass and Bottle Foreign Language

OSCAR NOMINATED DOCUMENTARY SHORTS PETER RABBIT

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI ONCE 8(11:50 Academy Award Noms Including 2:15 4:40) 7:10 9:35 PRODIGAL SONS

(1:00) 3:10 R Best Picture, Best5:20 Actor7:30 & Thu: Best9:40 Director! Wed: No (4:40) No (2:20) 9:10 NR or No7:10 9:10 Show Tue7:10 or Thu MILK “Haunting and Hypnotic!” – Rolling Stone “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, Show Thu Please Note: No No 1:30 Show Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 ShowR Thu (1:00 3:50) 6:45 9:20 WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR No (1:00) Mon/Thu: 6:45 (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R No 5 Mon/Wed/Thu: Academy Award Noms Including Picture! “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today FROST/NIXON THE POST

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00 2:35 5:00) 7:30 PG-13 (12:00) 9:509:55 R – Slant5:00 Magazine Sat: (12:00) at (12:15) REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

“Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13 (1:20 4:15) 7:00 9:35 R

2/9–2/15

Honorable

2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts – Animation NR 10:45-3:00-7:15 2018 Oscar Nominated Shorts – Live Action NR 12:45-5:00-9:15 Phantom Thread R 10:00-12:45-3:30-6:30-9:20

Call Me By Your Name R 1:15 Darkest Hour PG13 10:30-6:15 Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool R 10:30-1:30-4:00 The Shape of Water R 10:15-1:00-3:45-6:45-9:30

Lady Bird R 4:00-9:00 I, Tonya R 6:30-9:10 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

THE SHAPE OF WATER PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK Michael Moore’s

THE MOST DANGEROuS Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 (1:30 4:15) 7:15 9:45 R I, TONYA SICKO MOVIES IN MORNING MAN INTHE AMERICA Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun & Mon PHANTOM THREAD DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PENTAGON PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15

(1:15 6:50 9:40 PG-13 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 4:00) 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! (2:45) 7:25 9:30 10:20RAM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED 10:45 AM HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) (12:10 4:50) PG-13 EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Starts Fri,(Sun JuneOnly) 29th!

LADY BIRD

DARKEST HOUR BLACK PANTHER

PG-13 No Passes ADVANCE SHOW! Thu, Feb 15th 7:15

RAVENFILMCENTER.COM HEALDSBURG Bistro Menu Items Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

FOR SHOWTIMES: 707.525.8909

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION One of this year’s standout short documentaries is ‘Heroin(e),’ a film about West Virginia’s opioid epidemic.

Small Packages

Rialto presents short documentary contenders BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he less big-name awards on the upcoming Oscar lists provide some of the most interesting topics.

Among the best documentary shorts is Knife Skills by Thomas Lennon. The film profiles Edwins, a culinary school and French restaurant in Cleveland’s Shaker Heights. Students are recruited from the ranks of some of the 650,000 convicts released every year in the United States. The program isn’t for everyone—the graduation rate of one class was about 35 out of 120. The equation that hard work builds selfesteem always has some variables in it. Lennon is honest about the problems that impede the aspiring cooks and servers, even while working in a commercial-grade style of filmmaking. Despite the knife in the title, the short has little cutting edge. Heaven Is a Traffic Jam on the 405 gives us the privilege of meeting Los Angeles artist Mindy Alper, whose ink drawings and papier-mâché sculptures astonish, even more so when we hear her terrible struggle with a series of mental illnesses. The one to beat at the Oscars is Netflix’s Heroin(e), a knockout short funded by the Center for Investigative Reporting. It’s set in the town of Huntington, W.V., a post-industrial port on the Ohio River, where the overdose rate is 10 times what it is in the rest of America. It profiles three people fighting against the crisis, all women: Necia Freeman, a volunteer bringing food to the street prostitutes trying to earn money for junk; Judge Patricia Keller, whose drug court is as much Narcotics Anonymous meeting as place for punishment; and Jan Rader, a compassionate fire chief who makes history in her state. Director and co-producer Elaine McMillion Sheldon, a local, was extended a great deal of trust. But she has far too many good interviews here to write off this short film as the work of a lucky observer who was in the right place at the right time.

Rialto Cinemas presentation of documentary shorts opens Feb. 9, 6868 McKinley Ave., Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.


Carlos Chavez

MAD CAT Big Kitty’s style combines

folk, pop and crooning.

Here Kitty

Clark Williams wants to amuse you BY CHARLIE SWANSON

T

here’s something captivating in the weirdness of Big Kitty. Like a surreal Sinatra, or an absurdist Elvis, Big Kitty’s folk-pop moves between the boundaries of silly and sentimental.

On Feb. 11, Big Kitty (the stage name of Clark Williams) unveils a new musical performance piece in a benefit to help Santa Rosa theater collective the Imaginists buy their building (see “Called Home,” Dec. 20, 2017). Born in Maryville, Tenn., Williams was raised on country and the “sacred harp” music of his grandparents, while older siblings introduced him to British rock bands like the Beatles and Queen. Once Williams moved to Chattanooga after high school, he delved deep into the folk scene

Big Kitty performs on Sunday, Feb. 11, at the Imaginists, 461 Sebastopol Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $20–$50. Reserve a seat at theimaginists.org.

23 FREE, FUN & FANTASTIC!

Lake Sonoma Steelhead Festival Saturday, February 10 10 am–4 pm

RAIN OR SHINE!

Milt Brandt Visitors Center at Lake Sonoma, 3288 Skaggs Springs Rd.; 10 minutes west of Healdsburg on Dry Creek Rd.

Wildlife & Conservation Exhibits Fishing • Hatchery Tours • Wine Food Trucks • Beer • Art Projects Live Performances by Third Rail Sponsors:

Bear Republic Brewing, Sonoma County Airport Express, Winegrowers of Dry Creek Valley American AgCredit, Sonoma County Winegrape Commission The Belli Corp., The Bohemian, Bowland Vineyard Management, Brandt Insurance, Exchange Bank, Lake Sonoma Marina, Russian River Watershed Association, Sonoma County Board of Supervisors, Vineyard Industry Products

lakesonoma.org

707 431-4533

LakeSonomaSteelheadFestival

NO DOGS

Note: Event admission and activities are free, but food and beverages must be purchased.

we’re here to help you help yourself. We provide treatment for: Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone. • • • •

Subutex/Suboxone available Providing Treatment since 1984 Confidentiality assured MediCal accepted

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • www.srtp.net

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 7-1 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

and adopted the moniker Big Kitty, named for an actual cat. “It’s a name I chose so long ago that it’s just become like my own name,” says Williams. After meeting and marrying a woman with North Bay ties, Williams moved to Sebastopol two years ago with his wife and daughter, and Big Kitty came along too. “In Chattanooga, my main job was playing music, so I’m trying to make that happen here,” says Williams, who is a regular feature at several clubs in Sonoma County, playing the last Sunday every month at the Toad in the Hole in Santa Rosa and sitting in at spots like Occidental’s Barley & Hops Tavern. Last year, Big Kitty recorded and released the full-length album Excelsior Breeze Catchers, which melds his wide range of influences into a showcase of songs with whimsical melodies and quirky lyrics. “It’s very British-sounding,” laughs Williams. “It’s a mixture of Britain, Tennessee and California.” Throughout the record, the sounds of choir bells, brassy trumpets, Hammond organs and the occasional howling coyote accompany Williams’ wistful drawl as he sings about cleaning the Queen Mary and other fantasies. “All my colorfulness is really just following a muse,” says Williams. “I have tried to write more normal songs, with more standard country imagery, but I find it very difficult to do that and make it interesting to myself.” For the last three years, Williams has been adapting his music into a dramatic presentation that combines his songs with monologues and dancing. For the upcoming benefit show, Williams is presenting both his original piece and a never-before-seen work. “I’m really excited about it, and so flattered that the Imaginists want me to do it in their space,” says Williams. “I’m really happy to help them.”


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 7-1 3 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24 FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC

THE REVEREND SHAWN

GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS.

SATURDAY

AN EVENING WITH

WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM

FEB 18

WITH DOWN DIRTY SHAKE

THURSDAY

YOUNG DUBLINERS

WEDNESDAY

FEB 7 FRIDAY

FEB 9 THURSDAY

THE EXPENDABLES

WITH THROUGH THE ROOTS REGGAE • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

PRIDE & JOY

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

JOSH HEINRICHS WITH

STEPPAS, WHITE GLOVE SERVICE FEB 15 THE REGGAE • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ FRIDAY

WITH MARTY SCHWARTZ FEB 16 AMOS BLUES • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

BREAD 5 FEB 17 WONDER ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+ SUNDAY IGOR AND THE RED ELVISES FEB 22 FRIDAY

FEB 23

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

WITH CULANNʼS HOUNDS ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

LEE ANN WOMACK WITH EDDIE BERMAN ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

2/24 Shooter Jennings, 2/25 Mickey Avalon & Dirt Nasty with DJ Aspect, 3/2 Tainted Love, 3/3 Greg Brown, 3/10 House of Floyd, 3/12 Carl Palmer's ELP Legacy - Emerson, Lake & Palmer Lives On, 3/13 The Psychedelic Furs, 3/16 Andre Nickatina, 3/17 Tazmanian Devils plus San Geronimo

CALENDAR THU FEB 8 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP VOLKER STRIFLER EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY 8PM / 21+ / $10 FRI FEB 9 • LOOSE WITH THE TRUTH AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT FEB 10 • ATTILA VIOLA & THE BAKERSFIELD BOYS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Radney Foster Texas singer-songwriter and author celebrates the release of his new album/book combo “For You to See the Stars.” Feb 10, 8pm. $22-$25. Sebastopol Community Center Annex, 425 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.824.1858.

Santa Rosa Symphony Guest conductor Michael Christie leads the symphony and pianist Anna Fedorova in a program, “Enter the New World,” that boasts contemporary melodies from Leonard Bernstein and others. Feb 10-12. $10-$29 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Ty Segall Prolific indie-punk songwriter performs a benefit show for those impacted by last year’s North Bay wildfires. Feb 11, 7pm. $16. Sold-out. The Refuge Fellowship, 791 Lombardi Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.521.9145.

23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

MARIN COUNTY Thu 2⁄8 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–$20 • All Ages

IrieFuse & Sol Horizon

Bob Marley Birthday Celebration thu seth walkeR feb 8 8pm/Dancing/Americana/$20

second line —

fri feb 9 PRe-MaRdi GRas PaRty! 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 sat Rockin’ Johnny buRGin feb 10 8:30pm/Dancing/Blues/$10

GatoR nation — tue feb 13 MaRdi GRas PaRty! 7pm/Dancing/$15

thu hoytus and PeoPle feb 15 8pm/$5 fri aki kuMaR feb 16 8:30pm/$10 thu soul ska feb 22 8pm/$12 Adv/$15 DOS fri the hot licks feb 23 8:30pm/$15 Adv/$20 DOS/seated sat foxes in the henhouse feb 24 8pm/Americana/$10 thu iRefuse mar 1 8pm/Dancing/$12 Adv / $15 DOS fri PePPeRland mar 2 8:30pm/Dancing/$12 RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

Sun 2⁄11 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $25–$30 • All Ages Junior Reid ( Black Uhuru) and the One Blood Band with Juju Reid and Yung JR + Lee Tafari - Acoustic To Vinyl Tue 2⁄13 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages FREE Mardi Gras Fat Tuesday Party with Cajun Cuisine Dinner Specials from Chef Gordon Drysdale and Music From Atta Kid Wed 2⁄14 • Doors 7:30 ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages Tony Lindsay (Santana)

& Jimmy

Dillon Love Songs (seated)

Thu 2⁄15 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $40–$50 • 21+

Bill Frisell & Thomas Morgan MONOPHONICS TWO DAY PASS $50 Fri 2⁄16 & Sat 2⁄17 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $30–$35 All Ages

Monophonics

Fri + The Grease Traps Sat + The M-Tet Sun 2⁄18 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22 • All Ages

We Banjo 3

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

A Mill Valley Philharmonic Valentine Romantic classical music, Champagne, chocolates and a live auction all come together for a Valentine’sthemed concert. Feb 11, 4pm. Mill Valley Community Center, 180 Camino Alto, Mill Valley, millvalleyphilharmonic.org.

Missing Persons Los Angeles-based New Wave outfit brings their biggest hits to the North Bay for two nights with support from the Hormones, an all-girl tribute to the Ramones. VIP experience available. Feb 9-10, 9pm. $25-$75. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Sweethearts of the Radio KWMR presents an evening of music from Laurie Lewis and Tom Rozum, Jeanie and Chuck Poling and Kim and Ryan Hett. Feb 10, 8pm. $20. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

NAPA COUNTY Hip Spanic Allstars

San Francisco’s Mission District collaborative outfit has spent the last two decades blending Latin rhythms with funk and world music melodies. Feb 8, 7:30 and 9:30pm. $10-$25. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Mariachi Los Camperos Grammy Award-winning band returns to the Napa Valley for their third concert in as many years. Feb 10, 7pm. $45-$85. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

You’ll Never Know

Take a trip down memory lane with love songs from the American Songbook, featuring crooner RobertoJuan Gonzalez and a full band. Feb 11, 7:30pm. $10-$25. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7510.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Annie O’s Music Hall Feb 8, Hype It Up with DJ Konnex and Chango B. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Aqus Cafe

Feb 7, aqus blues jam. Feb 8, Peace of G. Feb 9, the Polydactyls. Feb 10, Teja Gerken and Doug Young. Feb 11, Gary Vogensen & the Ramble Band. Feb 14, Native Harrow. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Feb 10, My Children My Bride with Capsize and Kingdom of Giants. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Feb 7, the Peach Thieves. Feb 8, Paul Schneider Quartet. Feb 9, the 4-Inch Studs. Feb 10, Alabama Mike and Coyote Slim. Feb 11, Seventh Avenue. Feb 13, Mambo Fest with Rhythmtown-Jive. Feb 14, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

The Block

Feb 10, 1pm, Timothy O’Neil Band. 20 Grey St, Petaluma. 707.775.6003.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Feb 9, Terri-Anne & Lane. Feb 10, Flying Salvias. Feb 13, Michael Hantman. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Brew

Feb 10, 6pm, “Love Is Hard” showcase with Matt Bailey and Blue Doria. 555 Healdsburg Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.303.7372.

Cellars of Sonoma

Feb 11, 2pm, Craig Corona. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Cloverdale Arts Alliance

Feb 10, Blues Night on Second Saturdays. 204 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.894.4410.

Crooked Goat Brewing Feb 10, 3pm, Craig Corona. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Dry Creek Kitchen

Feb 12, 6pm, Christian FoleyBeining and Tom Shader Duo. Feb 13, 6pm, Susan Sutton and Piro Patton Duo. 317 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.0330.

Elephant in the Room

Feb 8, David Dondero. Feb 10, Trace Repeat. 177-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg.

Flamingo Lounge

Feb 9, Rock and Roll Rhythm Review. Feb 10, Santa Rosa Salsa night. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club

Feb 10, the Interpretations. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

Feb 14, Bourbon & Burlesque Performance. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall Feb 10, Hindustani vocalist Laxmi G Tewari. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Feb 9, Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet with Stephen Hough. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Feb 8, Ed Gerhard. Feb 9, Lutan Fyh & the Riddem Rebels. Feb


25 THIS ! AY SATURD

VOLT & BEER DRINKERS AND HELL RAISERS

THU, FEBRUARY 15

SATURDAY, FEB 17

MAJESTIC AND LONG TIME

A TRIP TO BOSTON AND THE BEST OF CLASSIC ROCK

Johnny Mathis The Voice of Romance Tour

SATURDAY, MAR 17

GAMMA

SAT, FEBRUARY 24

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

HARRY’S BIG ROCK REVIVAL

Jake Shimabukuro

SATURDAY, MAR 24

GETTING HOT IN HERE San Francisco’s Le Jazz Hot Quartet turn the heat up

at the White Barn in St. Helena on Feb 10 and at Rancho Nicasio in Marin on Feb. 14. See Clubs & Venues, p26.

STEVEN KENT

WED, FEBRUARY 28

AND THE

CASH & KING BAND HOUSE OF ROCK 3410 Industrial Drive

10, Whole Lotta Love burlesque night. Feb 12, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Green B. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Feb 9, Low Flying Birds. Feb 10, Wendy DeWitt. Feb 11, Gaelynn Lea and Caitlin Jemma. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Feb 10, “Hit the Road” with Alan Hall Quartet. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

The Imaginists

Feb 11, 6pm, “Own Our Home” benefit with Big Kitty. 461 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7554.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Feb 9, Kentucky Street Pioneers with the Gentlemen Soldiers. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Feb 7, Lisa-Marie Johnston. Feb 8, Bloomfield Bluegrass Band. Feb 9, Muncie. Feb 10, Los High Tops. Feb 11, Hop Sauce. Feb 14, Two Lions. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Last Record Store

Feb 10, 12pm, Open Vinyl Day. 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Local Barrel

Feb 11, 5pm, Charley Paul. 490

Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433.

Main Street Bistro

Feb 8, Susan Sutton. Feb 9, Tumbleweed Soul. Feb 10, Bad Ass Boots. Feb 11, Greg Hester. Feb 13, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Feb 9, DJ MGB. Feb 10, DJ Forrest. Feb 11, 4pm, Barbara Olney and friends. Feb 11, 9pm, DJ MGB. Feb 12, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Feb 12, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Feb 9, Tudo Bem. Feb 10, the Straw Wattles. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Feb 7, the Expendables with Through the Roots and Pacific Dub. Feb 9, Pride & Joy. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

The Phoenix Theater Feb 10, Bad Boy Eddy with Gypsy Flight and Dave Friday Band. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Feb 8, 6:30pm, Jon Gonzales. Feb 14, 6:30pm, Valentine’s Day with Alec Fuhrman. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

SANTA ROSA 707.709.6039

Pub Republic

David Rawlings

THU, MARCH 1

TICKETS & INFO:

Feb 9, Holus Bolus. 3120 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.9090.

ROCKSTARUNIVERSITY.COM

Olivia Newton-John

Red Brick

Feb 9, the Side Men. Feb 10, the Rhythm Drivers. Feb 11, 4pm, Foxes in the Henhouse. Feb 13, Fairel & Tucker. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Feb 10, Element Brass Band. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Feb 10, Captain Paisley. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Scouts Feb 9 Beer Rock it Out! 8:00 / No Cover Fri

Sat

Always a Party! Feb 10 Zydeco Flames

4:00

Feb 10, Volt with Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Wed Feb 14

Bring your sweetheart Wednesday night for a romantic evening with live music & fabulous food & drink!

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Petty Theft Weekend Fri Feb 16 & Sat Feb 17

Smith’s Feb 24 Lavay “Speakeasy Supper Club” Sat

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30

Jones Gang Feb 25 The High Octane Americana 4:00 Sun

Feb 10, 2 and 7pm, Rumi’s Caravan. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Feb 7, the Acrosonics. Feb 8, King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. Feb 9, the ) doRian Mode. Feb

26

Mike Garson, Earl Slick, Gerry Leonard, Carmine Rojas, Bernard Fowler, Gaby Moreno, plus additional special guests!

SUN, MARCH 18

Buddy Guy

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with Le Jazz Hot

Rock Star University House of Rock

Feb 10, Blue Jazz Combo. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Celebrating David Bowie

West Coast’s Premier Zydeco Band 8:30

& Smith Feb 11 Misner Poetic Songwriting/ Fine Harmonies Sun

SUN, MARCH 4

MARCH 24 - 25

The Ladies of Broadway from Transcendence WED, APRIL 4

I’m With Her

See You Around Tour Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz, and Aoife O’Donovan

Tommy Castro Weekend Fri Mar 2 & Sat Mar 3 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

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SATURDAY, FEB 10


LOVE shouldn’t cost money.....

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Bums. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

10, “Love in the Air” fundraiser for North Bay fire relief with the Scarlett Letters. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Terrapin Crossroads

Starling Bar

Feb 10, the Bumblin’ Bones. 19380 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.938.7442.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Peri’s Silver Dollar

VE

The Tradewinds Bar

Feb 9, Loose with the Truth. Feb 10, Attila Viola & the Bakersfield Boys. Feb 13, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118. Feb 10, DJ Crisp. Feb 11, Tre Jones. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

@ Lagunitas Brewing Company 1280 N. McDowell Blvd. Petaluma, CA www.lagunitas.com/taprooms/petaluma www.twolionsband.com

FREE SHOW - FREE SHOW - FREE LOVE

Feb 9, Last Call Troubadours album release show. Feb 10, For the Love of You: tribute to Isley Brothers. Feb 11, Derek Rolando and the Latin Pop Revue. Feb 14, Valentine’s Day show with Top Shelf. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

Feb 9, Pop Rocks. Feb 10, the B Sharp Blues Band. Feb 11, 1pm, Natural Gas Jazz Band. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Dog training the with love, natural way not treats Offering:

• private sessions • boot camp

an intensive 3 week in board program with unlimited owner follow-up

TRAINING EVALUATIONS always FREE by appointment We have over 45 years of experience training dogs and their people. From helping you raise a well adjusted puppy to resolving serious behavioral issues—our expertise gets RESULTS!

incrediblecanine.com • 707.322.3272

Papermill Creek Saloon

Feb 10, Pacific Soundrise. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

Feb 10, Radio Active. Feb 11, Gypsy Jazz. 116 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.544.8623.

Whiskey Tip

Feb. 14 - Valentine’s Day - - 4:20pm - 7:30pm

Feb 7, Donna D’Acuti. Feb 8, John Hoy. Feb 13, Panama Jazz Trio. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993. Feb 9, 5pm, Danny Montana. Feb 9, 9pm, Kelly Peterson Band. Feb 10, 5pm, Michael Brown and Amy Gervais. Feb 10, 9pm, Motorboat. Feb 11, Kevin Meade & the Highway One Band. Feb 13, Agents of Change. Feb 14, Judy Radiloff. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Toad in the Hole Pub

LO

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Feb 7, D’lilah Monroe & the Tom Cats. Feb 14, Jazzitude. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church Feb 7, A Mill Valley Philharmonic Valentine. 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley, millvalleyphilharmonic.org.

19 Broadway Club

Feb 7, Damon LeGall Band. Feb 8, Acoustically Speaking’s Grateful Jam. Feb 11, 4pm, Westside Jazz Club. Feb 12, open mic. Feb 13, Jeb Brady Band. Feb 14, One Dollar Check with Honey B & the Cultivation. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osher Marin JCC

Feb 10, Winter Nights with Steve Lucky & the Rhumba

Feb 8, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Feb 9, Barnyard Hammer. Feb 10, Jethro Jeremiah Band. Feb 11, the Reset Button. Feb 12, open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Feb 9, Beer Scouts. Feb 10, Zydeco Flames. Feb 11, 4pm, Misner & Smith. Feb 14, Le Jazz Hot. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Feb 7, Andoni. Feb 13, James Harman & Ava Roche. Feb 14, Lady D. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

Feb 9, 6pm, the Guarneri Jazz Quartet. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.524.2800.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Feb 8, Del Sol Jazz Band with Charity Goodin. Feb 9, Bait & Switch Blues Band. Feb 10, Pacific Mambo Orchestra. Feb 11, 4pm, Somos el Son with Braulio Barrera. Feb 13, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Feb 8, Joanna Barbera. Feb 9, Salt Suns with Kit Center & the Hollow Bones and Desiree Cannon. Feb 10, MKC. Feb 11, Lydia Ramsey. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Feb 8, Bob Marley birthday party with IrieFuse and Sol Horizon. Feb 9-10, the English Beat. Sold-out. Feb 11, Junior Reid & the One Blood Band. Feb 12, Adrianne Serna student concert. Feb 14, 8pm, Valentine’s Day show with Tony Lindsay and Jimmy Dillon. 19

Feb 8, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Feb 8, Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band in the Grate Room. Feb 9, Eric Krasno and friends. Feb 10, Experience CSNY with Midnight North. Feb 12, Grateful Mydland Monday with Scott Guberman and friends. Feb 13, Fat Tuesday celebration with the Uptown Rulers. Feb 14, “Classic Country Love Songs” with Scott Law and friends. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Feb 10, Richard Howell and Sudden Changes. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Feb 9, Dennis Hagerty & Blind Date. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Feb 7, Justin Diaz. Feb 10, Austin Hicks. Feb 14, John Vicino. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Blue Note Napa

Feb 7, Alvon Johnson: Ambassador of the Blues. Feb 9-10, Pete Escovedo Orchestra. Feb 13, Kingsborough. Feb 14, “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” with Kellie Fuller and friends. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards

Feb 10, Mark Harold and Bob Henderson. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Feb 10, Jinx Jones & the KingTones. Feb 11, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

River Terrace Inn

Feb 9, Craig Corona. Feb 10, Smorgy. Feb 14, Craig Corona. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Feb 8, Robert Foley Band. Feb 9, the Rhythm Method Four. Feb 10, Mustache Harbor. Feb 11, Tuck & Patti. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

The White Barn

Feb 10, Pre-Valentine’s Day concert with Le Jazz Hot. 2727 Sulphur Springs Ave, St Helena. 707.987.8225.


Galleries RECEPTIONS Feb 8

Caldwell Snyder Gallery, “Luis Montoya & Leslie Ortiz,” the artists display their recent conceptual sculptures. 5:30pm. 1328 Main St, St Helena. 415.531.6755.

Feb 9

Chroma Gallery, “Healing By Art: After the Fires,” exhibition of art, sculpture and photography reflects the aftermath of October’s wildfires and features many works created from salvaged materials. 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Feb 10

The Back House Gallery at Heebe Jeebe, “Foiled!,” St Valentine’sthemed group art show utilizes the versatile and ubiquitous material. 7pm. 46 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.773.3222. Hammerfriar Gallery, “Art Moura,” Sebastopol artist shows works from his massive assemblage works inspired by African Masks. 6pm. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600. Napa Valley Museum, “The Art of Chocolate,” Napa Valley’s finest chocolatiers take inspiration from Julia Child to create delicious works of art. 5:30pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Feb 26, “Julia Pozsgai,” the Sonoma County artist shows her acrylic, clay, fiber and metal works of art. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. WedThurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery

Through Feb 10, “Gallery Group Show,” featuring Calabi Gallery’s contemporary artists and selections from its vintage collection. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

East West Cafe

Through Feb 28, “Katie Kruzic Solo Show,” local artist displays landscapes and scenes large and small. 128 N Main St, Sebastopol. Mon-Sat, 8am to 9pm; Sun, 8am to 8pm 707.829.2822.

Erickson Fine Art Gallery

Through Feb 13, “Bob Nugent: Brazil,” artist’s recent paintings are inspired by the power and delicacy of the Amazon rainforests and rivers. 324 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Thurs-Tues, 11 to 6. 707.431.7073.

Gallery One

Through Feb 19, “Emerging Artists,” get a look at seven diverse artists who are on the rise in the North Bay. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Through Feb 28, “Reflections,” exhibit tells the story of Petaluma’s black population since the 1800s as part of Black History Month. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Feb 28, “Heaven & Earth & the Space Between,” featuring paintings by Marilee Ford and Sharon Feissel. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Feb 11, “Year of the Dog,” it’s the Chinese Year of the Dog, and several artists present their distinctive look at man’s best friend. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

NAPA COUNTY Workmix Cafe Lounge Through Feb 18, “Venetian Bella Notte & Irish Sea

Dancers,” Marissa Carlisle’s collection of images printed on metal and drawn patterns is on display. 950 Randolph St, Napa. Mon-Fri, 8am to 5pm; 7am to 5 for members; Twilight hours, 5 to 7pm. 707.603.3986.

Comedy Will Durst

Standup veteran presents his one-man show, “BoomeRaging: From LSD to OMG.” Feb 11, 3pm. $43. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Fat Tuesday Roast Battle

Party starts with a cajun buffet, then features eight standups taking verbal jabs at each other in a tournament of wits. Feb 13, 5:30pm. $5-$20. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Laugh & Celebrate Love

Pre-Valentine’s Day standup show includes comedians Priyanka Wali, Emily van Dyke and Mark Shrayber. Feb 10, 7pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Bill Maher

Highly charged political standup star dishes on the state of the union. Feb 11, 7:30pm. $50 and up. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

MarINSANITY

Some of the Bay Area’s top standup comics will tape for a new TV show and are in need of a live studio audience. Space is limited. Feb 12, 6:30pm. Free. Community Media Center of Marin, 819 A St, San Rafael. 415.721.0636.

Carlos Mencia

Headlining standup star is back in the North Bay for another round of laughs. Feb 10, 8pm. $30. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.665.0260.

Sandy & Richard Riccardi

Talented comedy cabaret duo combines original comedy

with live music from Wild Catahoulas. Feb 13, 5:30pm. $23. Calistoga Inn & Brewery, 1250 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4101.

Johnny Steele

Fire Wall Workshop

San Francisco standup staple takes the stage in Marin. Feb 10, 8pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato, marincomedyshow.com.

Events Apis Arborea

Demeter USA’s 2018 biodynamic event series presents Michael Thiele in a workshop about rewilding honeybees that’s suitable for beginning and advanced apiculturists, and those curious about the inner life of bees. Feb 11, 1pm. $15. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Chili Bowl Express

Fundraising event for Sonoma Ceramics serves homemade chili in artisanally crafted chili bowls to take home, with live music, ceramic demonstrations, silent auctions and more. Feb 10, 11:30am, 1:30 and 5pm. $30. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Chinese New Year Celebration

Enjoy traditional dances, special tastings and more. Reservations recommended. Feb 10, 12pm. Beringer Vineyards, 2000 Main St, St Helena. 866.708.9463.

Doctors with a Heart

New chiropractic patients can receive certain services free of charge for the month of February as part of the national movement. Through Feb 28. Maher Chiropractic, 101 Golf Course Dr, C5, Rohnert Park. 707.792.0202.

An Evening with Michael Pollan

In this autobiographical talk, the author tells the story of the path his thinking and writing have taken since he first planted a vegetable garden. Feb 8, 8pm. $35-$49. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Fat Tuesday at Calistoga Inn

Let the good times roll at the 26th annual fest in Napa Valley, featuring a menu of jambalaya, blackened catfish and more,

Make artwork and writings of your experiences and feelings about the October fires, led by artist Mario Uribe as part of a larger community project. Feb 10, 1pm. Free with admission. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

How to Measure the Cosmos

Travel through space from the comfort of your seat in this planetarium presentation that discovers how far certain celestial objects are from Earth. Fri-Sat through Mar 17. $5-$8. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.521.6914.

Lake Sonoma Steelhead Festival

Enjoy food trucks, beer, wines, arts and crafts projects for the kids, archery, live music and more. Feb 10, 10am. Free admission. Lake Sonoma Visitors Center, Skaggs Springs Rd, Geyserville, lakesonoma.org.

Make ’em Bleed

Bay Area roller derby leagues and teams partner up for a massive blood drive. Feb 10, 10am. American Red Cross, 5297 Aero Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.577.7600.

Paws for Love

Gala fundraiser features silent and live auctions, gourmet food and wines, live music and a gallery of paintings by animals shelter pets. Feb 10, 6pm. $45$55. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Peace in Process

Relax deeply with a morning spiritual event. Sun, 9:30am. By donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Rising! A Fire Relief Benefit

Join Bay Area kink, leather and sex-positive communities in a night of merriment and good will to raise funds for those affected by the California wildfires. Feb 9, 8pm. $12 and up. Annie O’s Music Hall, 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Sonoma County Grape Day

Sonoma County Winegrape Commission presents a talk

on research-based topics including vine performance, mildew resistance and new tools for management and more. Feb 8, 7am. $42-$47. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.565.2621.

Wild Jungle Love Party Curious about love in the wild? Take a tour of the wildlife preserve and enjoy bites, lectures and more. Feb 10-11, 11am. $148. Safari West, 3115 Porter Creek Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.579.2551.

Wine Country Affordable Housing Raffle

Hawks Wine holds several online raffles for vacation and travel experiences, private dinners and more to support victims of October’s wildfires. Through Mar 10. Hawkes Tasting Room, 6738 Hwy 128, Healdsburg, winecountryhousing.org.

Field Trips Pollinator Workshop

Help sort, identify and prepare bees as part of a surveying project on Mt Tam. Feb 10, 9am. Marin Water District Office, 220 Nellen Ave, Corte Madera, marinwater.org.

Solar Viewing & Public Star Party

View stars near and far with the observatory’s telescopes and docents on hand. Feb 10, 11am and 7pm. Free/ $3 plus parking. Robert Ferguson Observatory, Sugarloaf Ridge State Park, 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd, Kenwood, 707.833.6979.

Sonoma State Historic Park Nature Hike Join this casual hike through portions of the Montini Trail. Feb 11, 12pm. Free. General Vallejo’s Home, 363 Third St West, Sonoma, 707.938.9547.

Wednesday Wellness Walks

Join a healing walk through the redwoods. Wed, 10am. Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve, 17000 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, stewardscr.org.

Film Film & Fork

See the new thriller

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Arts Events

songs with progressive political parody. Feb 11, 4pm. $22-$25. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.


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“All the Money in the World” and dine next door at Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen. Feb 12, 5pm. $45. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Jane

Alexander Valley Film Society screens the acclaimed documentary on Jane Goodall featuring footage from “National Geographic” and a score by composer Philip Glass. Feb 10, 1pm. Raven Film Center. 415 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.525.8909.

Let’s Talk About Death Nonprofit Final Passages continues its monthly series with the Albert Brooks comedy “Defending Your Life” followed by a discussion. Feb 14, 6:30pm. $5-$15. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Petaluma Cinema Series

Petaluma Film Alliance presents significant classic and modern films with guests, lectures and discussions. This week, romantic comedy “Unleashed” screens with director Finn Taylor in attendance. Feb 14, 6pm. $6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, petalumafilmalliance.org.

Some Like It Hot

The Billy Wilder-directed, Marilyn Monroe-starring 1959 comedy screens as part of the Vintage Film Series. Guests are invited to dress in the theme of the movie. Feb 12, 7pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Tell Them We Are Rising

Film about the role historically that black colleges and universities have played in American history is presented as an Indie Lens Pop-Up event. Feb 12, 1 and 7pm. Free. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Yountville International Short Film Festival

Celebration of cinema features over 75 screenings, select film and wine pairings and other culinary events at multiple venues within walking distance. Feb 8-11. $25-$59 and up. Downtown Yountville, Washington St, Yountville, yisff.com.

Food & Drink

just the start in this Mardi Gras-style party. Feb 13, 5pm. Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, 738 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.4555.

Cabernet 2018

The Feast of the Heart

Afternoon of wine, cheese, music and other treats supports Sustainable Community Theatre Foundation. Feb 11, 3pm. $50. Incavo Wine Tasting & Collective, 1099 Fourth St, Ste F, San Rafael, 415.259.4939.

Chinese New Year Dim Sum & Wine Pairing

Handcrafted dim sum from San Francisco’s Koi Palace pairs with Napa wines throughout the day. Feb 10, 10am. $50. Yao Family Wines, 929 Main St, St Helena, 707.986.5874.

Chocolate & Wine Pairing

Gourmet three-course dinner and wines go well with the collection’s massive art gallery Feb 10, 6pm. $215. Hess Collection Winery, 4411 Redwood Rd, Napa, 707.255.1144.

Fogbelt Anniversary Party

The brewing company celebrates four years with live music from Down Dirty Shake, a pig roast and plenty of beers, including three new releases. Feb 10, 12pm. Fogbelt Brewing, 1305 Cleveland Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.978.3400.

Fresh Starts Chef Event

Taste pairings like Rosé with strawberry-infused white chocolate ganache and Port with coffee-infused dark chocolate ganache. Sat, Feb 10 and Wed, Feb 14. $25. KendallJackson Wine Center, 5007 Fulton Rd, Fulton, 707.576.3810.

Chef Luis Realpozo demonstrates recipes and shows guests how to make a simple chocolate ganache. Feb 13, 6:30pm. $60. The Key Room, 1385 N Hamilton Pkwy, Novato, 415.382.3363, ext 215.

Classic New Orleans Cocktails

Roll up your sleeves and enjoy live music, delicious hors d’oeuvres, a full lobster dinner and wines. Feb 10, 6pm. $125$150. Markham Vineyards, 2812 St Helena Hwy N, St Helena, 707.963.5292.

Fat Tuesday party features NOLA-inspired happy hour of drinks and jazz. Feb 13, 5pm. Free admission. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa, 707.967.2530.

Complimentary Valentine’s Day Flight Taste four single vineyard wines, including an exclusive Wine Club-only Willamette Valley Brut Rose. Feb 14. Free. La Crema Estate at Saralee’s Vineyard, 3575 Slusser Rd, Windsor.

Couples Who Wine Together

Pre-Valentine’s tasting event features romantic partners that make wine together. Feb 10, 3pm. $40. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa, 707.967.2530.

Don’t Be Bitter(s)

Alternative to Valentine’s Day includes a walk-around tasting of bitter liqueurs (amaros) from regions throughout Italy. Feb 14, 6pm. $35. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa, 707.967.2530.

Fat Tuesday at Farmstead

A celebrated Creole menu and live zydeco music are

Lobster Dinner

Love at First Sip

Enjoy a decadent four-course dessert and wine pairing. Feb 10-11. $30. Ferrari-Carano Vineyards & Winery, 8761 Dry Creek Rd, Healdsburg, 800.831.0381.

‘Made with Love’ Tastemakers Event

Invite that special someone for an intimate conversation with a winemaking couple that features winetasting and family-style plates. Feb 14, 5pm. $75. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa, 707.967.2530.

Mardi Gras Celebration at Breathless Wines

Sparkling wines pair with food from Parish Cafe in this New Orleans-inspired party. Feb 10, 1pm. $25. Breathless Wines, 499 Moore Lane, Healdsburg, 707.433.8400.

Pliny the Younger Release

Get in line for the annual limited release of triple IPA some call “the best beer in the world.” Through Feb 15. Russian River Brewing

Company, 725 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.545.2337.

Romantic Valentine’s Day Dinner

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Bring your someone special for an elegant three-course dinner, complete with a rose. Feb 14. $40 per person. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, 707.665.0260.

Sharing the Love

Wine educator guides couples through a flight of four wines, paired bites. Feb 10-11, 11am. $35. Paradise Ridge Winery Kenwood, 8860 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 707-282-9020.

St Clair Brown’s Beer Garden Opening

Hang out in the new beer and wine garden and taste the latest from the urban winery and nano-brewery, with food trucks, live music and more. Feb 11, 12pm. Free admission. St. Clair Brown Winery, 816 Vallejo St, Napa, 707.255.5591.

Sweet 116

Enjoy decadent treats at 12 wineries along Highway 116. Feb 10, 11am. $20-$50. Taste Route 116, Wineries along Hwy 116, Sebastopol. tasteroute116.com.

Valentine’s Dinner at Fog Crest Vineyard

Celebrate love with a candlelit evening featuring an exquisite menu prepared by chef Barbara Hom. Feb 14. $200. Fog Crest Vineyard, 7602 Occidental Rd, Sebastopol, 707.829.2006.

Valentine’s Day at Goose & Gander

A special menu made exclusively for the holiday includes four courses and optional wine pairing. Feb 14. $115 and up. Goose & Gander, 1245 Spring St, St Helena, 707.967.8779.

Valentine’s Day at Left Bank

Offering brunch, lunch and dinner menus plus à la carte dinner specials in the spirit of the occasion. Feb 14. $65. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.3331.

Valentine’s Day Wine Train

Lunch and dinner reservations on the touring train is a perfect gift for loved ones. Feb 14. $149 and up. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa, 800.427.4124.

Wine & Chocolate Bliss

Fall in love with nature’s best

Sweet Emotions Play Cupid with these Valentine’s Day events

Love is in the air, as Valentine’s Day aims its arrows of romance throughout the week leading up to Feb. 14. Get in on one or more of these amorous outings. No Valentine’s Day is complete without chocolate, and in Yountville, the Napa Valley Museum is making an exhibit out of the confection with “The Art of Chocolate.” On Saturday, Feb. 10, the museum hosts a free celebration of wine and chocolate courtesy of several Napa Valley chocolatiers. Since research has proven that couples who laugh together stay together, you may want to “Laugh & Celebrate Love” with a pre-Valentine’s standup comedy show at the Laugh Cellar in Santa Rosa on Feb. 10. Headlining the show is physician and nationally touring comedian Priyanka Wali and San Francisco comic Emily Van Dyke. Another sure-fire winner for date night is going to the movies. This Valentine’s Day, Petaluma Film Alliance is offering a special romantic program for its weekly cinema series with a screening of the 2017 indie hit Unleashed, in which a San Francisco app designer reevaluates her outlook on dating and men after her pets are turned into two perfect guys. Writer and director Finn Taylor will be on hand to answer all your questions in a discussion following the film. For more info on these and other Valentine’s Day events, see Food & Drink, this page.—Charlie Swanson

food pairing, and learn all about how to match wine with chocolate. Feb 11. $50. Rutherford Hill Winery, 200 Rutherford Hill Rd, Rutherford, 707.963.1871.

For Kids St. Valentine’s Festival Kids can make Valentine’s cards, take old-timey photos


Readings Book Passage

Feb 7, 1pm, “The Most Dangerous Man in America” with Bill Minutaglio and Steve Davis. Feb 7, 7pm, “Tell Me More!” with Kelly Corrigan, features musician Matt Nathan. Feb 8, 7pm, “To Heal a Wounded Heart” with Dr Pilar Jennings. Feb 9, 11:30am, “If I Had a Horse” with Gianna Marino. Feb 9, 7pm, “The Clubhouse Thief” with James Janko, in conversation with Judy Halebsky. Feb 10, 1pm, “The Art of Screen Time” with Anya Kamenetz. Feb 10, 4pm, “Goddess of Power” with Isabella Price. Feb 11, 1pm, “I Wrote This Book Because I Love You” with Timothy Kreider. Feb 11, 4pm, “Inside the Star Wars Empire” with Bill Kimberlin. Feb 12, 7pm, “How to Stop Time” with Matt Haig. Feb 13, 7pm, “Song of a Captive Bird” with Jasmin Darznik, includes traditional Persian bites and beverages. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Dance Palace

Feb 11, 4pm, “West Marin Review Volume 8” release party. 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1075.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Feb 12, 7pm, “Thunderhead” with Neal Shusterman. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Feb 10, 7pm, “All the Women in My Family Sing” with Deborah Santana. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Feb 9, 7pm, “The Collected Letters of Alan Watts & Zen Odyssey” with Anne Watts and Janica Towne Anderson. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Theater Buried Child

Pulitzer Prize-winning drama

written by Sam Shepard is a gothic tale of family secrets and lost inheritance in the tradition of epic Greek drama and Shakespeare tragedies. Through Feb 25. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.823.0177.

theater show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception. Reservations required. Fri, Feb 9, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions. com.

The Children’s Hour

November

Ross Valley Players present the vital contemporary play, banned from stages in London and Boston when it first debuted in 1934. Through Feb 11. $12$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

Cow Pie Bingo

Award-winning playwright Larissa FastHorse’s drama, about four socially awkward humans and a cow navigating an increasingly immoral world while staying true to a moral compass, makes its world premiere. Through Feb 18. AlterTheater Storefront, 1344 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.2787.

Death of a Salesman

Playwright Arthur Miller’s drama about an aging salesman and his family is a tense examination of the American Dream. Through Feb 18. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato, 415.883.4498.

Disgraced

Left Edge Theatre presents the social drama about a PakistaniAmerican lawyer and his wife caught in an escalating dinner party argument. Through Feb 18. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Equus

Award-winning play about a psychiatrist’s journey into the mind of a 17-year-old is performed in an intimate setting. Includes mature content. Feb 9-25. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

Good People

Set in south Boston, this humorous work explores everyday struggles and unshakable hopes of living down and out in America. Through Feb 18. $15-$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma, 707.763.8920.

The Gumshoe Murders

Get a Clue Productions presents a new murder-mystery dinner

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | FE BR UARY 7-1 3, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

and enjoy heart-shaped waffles. Feb 10, 10am. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

David Mamet’s Oval Office satire depicts one day in the life of a beleaguered American commander-in-chief. Feb 9-17. $12-$25. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale, 707.829.2214.

Rapture, Blister, Burn Raven Players present the thoughtful and funny look at 21st-century gender politics. Through Feb 11. $10-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Richard II

Birdbath Theatre presents William Shakespeare’s epic. Through Feb 18. $20-$24. Key Tea, 921 C St, San Rafael, 415.426.0269.

Skeleton Crew

The third of Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit cycle trilogy is a tense drama about an auto plant at the start of the Great Recession. Through Feb 18. $10-$37. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

South Pacific

Set in an island paradise during World War II, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s popular musical mixes romance, duty and prejudice in a classic story that still rings true today. Feb 9-25. $28. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3400.

You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown

Charlie Brown, Snoopy and the rest of the gang are featured in this charming revue of vignettes and songs. Through Feb 11. $10-$17. Evert B. Person Theater, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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30 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | FE BR UARY 7-1 3 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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he old joke was that if you were so stoned that you forgot to roll another joint, chances are you’ve got a little problem. If you’re waking up in the middle of the night for a few puffs to help you get back to sleep—uh, you’ve probably got a problem. If you find that you can’t do anything without the aid of cannabis, chances are . . . yes, time to let the smoke clear and take a hard look at the habit.

Cannabis ingestion and its societal impact has become a much more serious business now that legalization is afoot in California. With legalization comes a reckoning for individuals who can now go into a store and buy an ounce of legal cannabis a day—but maybe shouldn’t. While the health benefits of moderate cannabis use are generally agreed upon, there’s a significant undercurrent of disdain

for the plant in addiction-recovery circles that holds it can be abused just like alcohol or opioids. And the fallout from cannabis addiction isn’t just falling asleep while bingewatching Peaky Blinders with a box of Pop-Tarts: there’s divorce, depression, financial ruin and suicide that spring from overdoing it on the cannabis. The British Journal of Psychiatry studied the cannabis-suicide connection several years ago and determined that “[i]t is conceivable that cannabis use could lead to an increased risk of suicide through a number of different mechanisms, including neurobiological effects, development of mental health problems such as depression or psychosis, or social disadvantages (such as poor academic achievement or unemployment) that might result from cannabis use.” That’s the message coming from recovering pot addicts in the North Bay. I heard from a long-time attendee at Marijuana Anonymous groups around Sonoma County, who wrote to offer (anonymously, of course) a counter to the legalization hoopla. “Legalization adds yet another layer of complexity for a person obsessed with cannabis.” Marijuana Anonymous has been around in the North Bay for 25 years. The program is based on the Alcoholics Anonymous model, offering a 12-step approach to getting an addiction under control. It’s hard work. But as is said in “the rooms”: Keep coming back, it works if you work it, and work it ’cause you’re worth it. There’s been a growing knock on AA from recovery academics and medical professionals who argue that the 12-step model doesn’t cure addiction and that there’s no available means-testing to determine, scientifically, the efficacy of the programs. Whatevs. It’s the poor man’s rehab for those who can’t swing $18,000 for a month of luxe addiction therapy at Serenity Knolls. Addiction is universal, but we don’t all have Jerry Garcia’s bank account.


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) British athlete Liam Collins is an accomplished hurdler. In 2017, he won two medals at the World Masters Athletics Indoor Championships in South Korea. Collins is also a stuntman and street performer who does shows in which he hurtles over barriers made of chainsaws and leaps blindfolded through flaming hoops. For the foreseeable future, you may have a dual capacity with some resemblances to his. You could reach a high point in expressing your skills in your chosen field, and also branch out into extraordinary or flamboyant variations on your specialty. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

When he was 32, the man who would later be known as Dr. Seuss wrote his first kid’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. His efforts to find a readership went badly at first. Twenty-seven publishers rejected his manuscript. On the verge of abandoning his quest, he ran into an old college classmate on the street. The friend, who had recently begun working at Vanguard Press, expressed interest in the book. Voila! Mulberry Street got published. Dr. Seuss later said that if, on that lucky day, he had been strolling on the other side of the street, his career as an author of children’s books might never have happened. I’m telling you this tale, Taurus, because I suspect your chances at experiencing a comparable stroke of luck in the coming weeks will be extra high. Be alert!

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) A survey of British Christians found that most are loyal to just six of the Ten Commandments. While they still think it’s bad to, say, steal and kill and lie, they don’t regard it as a sin to revere idols, work on the Sabbath, worship other gods or use the Lord’s name in a curse. In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to be inspired by their rebellion. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to re-evaluate your old traditions and belief systems, and then discard anything that no longer suits the new person you’ve become. CANCER (June 21–July 22) While serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II, Don Karkos lost the sight in his right eye after being hit by shrapnel. Sixty-four years later, he regained his vision when he got butted in the head by a horse he was grooming. Based on the upcoming astrological omens, I’m wondering if you’ll soon experience a metaphorically comparable restoration. My analysis suggests that you’ll undergo a healing in which something you lost will return or be returned. LEO (July 23–August 22) The candy cap mushroom, whose scientific name is Lactarius rubidus, is a burnt orange color. It’s small- to medium-sized and has a convex cap. But there its resemblance to other mushrooms ends. When dried out, it tastes and smells like maple syrup. You can grind it into a powder and use it to sweeten cakes and cookies and custards. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, this unusual member of the fungus family can serve as an apt metaphor for you right now. You, too, have access to a resource or influence that is deceptive, but in a good way: offering a charm and good flavor different from what its outer appearance might indicate.

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VIRGO (August 23–September 22) A grandfather from New Jersey decided to check the pockets of an old shirt he didn’t wear very often. There, Jimmie Smith found a lottery ticket he had stashed away months previously. When he realized it had a winning number, he cashed it in for $24.1 million—just two days before it was set to expire. I suspect there may be a comparable development in your near future, although the reward would be more modest. Is there any potential valuable that you have forgotten about or neglected? It’s not too late to claim it. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) The U.S. Geological Survey recently announced that it had come up with improved maps of the planet’s agricultural regions. Better satellite imagery helped, as did more thorough analysis of the imagery. The new data show that the earth is covered with 618 million more acres of croplands than had previously been thought. That’s 15 percent higher than earlier assessments! In the coming

BY ROB BREZSNY

months, Libra, I’m predicting a comparable expansion in your awareness of how many resources you have available. I bet you will also discover that you’re more fertile than you have imagined.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In 1939, Scorpio comic book writer Bob Kane co-created the fictional science-fiction superhero Batman. The “Caped Crusader” eventually went on to become an icon, appearing in blockbuster movies as well as TV shows and comic books. Kane said one of his inspirations for Batman was a flying machine envisioned by Leonard da Vinci in the early 16th century. The Italian artist and inventor drew an image of a winged glider that he proposed to build for a human being to wear. I bring this up, Scorpio, because I think you’re in a phase when you, like Kane, can draw inspiration from the past. Go scavenging through history for good ideas!

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) I was watching a four-player poker game on TV. The folksy commentator said that the assortment of cards belonging to the player named Mike was “like Anna Kournikova,” because “it looks great but it never wins.” He was referring to the fact that during her career as a professional tennis player, Anna Kournikova was feted for her physical beauty but never actually won a singles title. This remark happens to be a useful admonishment for you Sagittarians in the coming weeks. You should avoid relying on anything that looks good but never wins. Put your trust in influences that are a bit homely or unassuming but far more apt to contribute to your success.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) A Chinese man named Wang Kaiyu bought two blackfurred puppies from a stranger and took them home to his farm. As the months passed by, Wang noticed that his pets seemed unusually hungry and aggressive. They would sometimes eat his chickens. When they were two years old, he finally figured out that they weren’t dogs, but rather Asian black bears. He turned them over to a local animal rescue center. I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because I suspect it may have a resemblance to your experience. A case of mistaken identity? A surprise revealed in the course of a ripening process? A misunderstanding about what you’re taking care of? Now is a good time to make adjustments and corrections. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Charles Nelson Reilly was a famous American actor, director and drama teacher. He appeared in or directed numerous films, plays and TV shows. But in the 1970s, when he was in his 40s, he also spent quality time impersonating a banana in a series of commercials for Bic Banana Ink Crayons. So apparently he wasn’t overly attached to his dignity. Pride didn’t interfere with his ability to experiment. In his pursuit of creative expression, he valued the arts of playing and having fun. I encourage you to be inspired by his example during the coming weeks, Aquarius. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

According to ancient Greek writer Herodotus, Persians didn’t hesitate to deliberate about important matters while drunk. However, they wouldn’t finalize any intoxicated decision until they had a chance to re-evaluate it while sober. The reverse was also true. Choices they made while sober had to be reassessed while they were under the influence of alcohol. I bring this to your attention not because I think you should adhere to similar guidelines in the coming weeks. I would never give you an oracle that required you to be buzzed. But I do think you’ll be wise to consider key decisions from not just a coolly rational mindset, but also from a frisky intuitive perspective. To arrive at a wise verdict, you need both.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

FE BR UARY 7-1 3, 201 8 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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