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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | JANUARY 17-23, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.37

The Legacy of 500 Grateful Dead Shows p13

Trippin' OFFSHORE DRILLING P8 MUSSEL UP P11 RAINBOW GIRLS P20


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Bohemian

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Contributors DNA, Harry Duke, James Knight, Tom Tomorrow

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Effective anti-aging products by GM Collin

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Advertising Account Managers Augusto León, ext. 212 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

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Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

New Sheriff in Town? Since last spring, the Sonoma County Permit and Resource Management District (PRMD) has been persecuting residents who have small medicalcannabis farms. This tactic means many families will lose annual income. Residents with agricultural residential zoned properties are given no option to contest zoning restriction on cultivation permits.

The option to go legal needs to be equally accessible to all landowners, and the final decision of approval of the application is up to the county PRMD. However, in my opinion the PRMD is stepping up using its land-use-violation jurisdiction. Using aerial surveillance, the PRMD has sent letters to every property with a greenhouse, claiming they are generated from individual neighbor complaints about commercial marijuana growing and unpermitted structures. This is a false claim based on little or no evidence. Based on talking with the numerous individual who received PRMD

THIS MODERN WORLD

letters, it is apparent that no neighbors filed complaints. This is a fabricated story. The PRMD has taken over the role of sheriff. With fines to levy and property to confiscate, the county stands to make money off growers’ hard work. This is not acceptable or fair to taxpaying citizens. The county is greedy and corrupt and needs a swift legal kick in the proverbial pants, which the feds may provide.

It Makes No Sense I am from Alabama, and I believe that Attorney General Jeff Session can’t get out of his own way (“Alabama Slammer,” Jan. 10). I served in Iraq and am 45 years old with PTSD. Since when do I need someone to tell me what’s good for me? If I smoke pot, I have to do it illegally. What sense does that make?

CAT COVINGTON

Sebastopol

DON

Via Bohemian.com

By Tom Tomorrow

Closing Act David Templeton will be sorely missed (“Exit Stage Left,” Jan. 10). The Press Democrat failed miserably by ignoring theater and its importance to readers in our community. Thanks to David’s fair and intelligently written reviews in the Bohemian, culture in the North Bay was alive. Well done, Mr. Templeton. Thank you and break a leg.

BOB CANNON

Via Bohemian.com

Soul Food Thank you, Shepherd Bliss, for this inspiring and informative article (“Down at the Death Cafe,” Jan. 10). I’m a grief counselor and have been wanting to attend a Death Cafe for years. This particular event feels very much to me like psychospiritual and emotional food for the soul. What a beautiful way to share our hearts, grief, joy and all that arises when facing death’s final frontiers.

STARLA DEAN

Via Bohemian.com

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants

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Rebuilding in fire zones requires new thinking BY JUNE BRASHARES

T

ragic losses from the October firestorms are still very fresh in our hearts and minds. Discussions about how to rebuild are difficult and sensitive. Dan Wade of United Policyholders says, “Rebuilding in a fire ecology can present unique challenges in the insurance process. Knowing how to maximize insurance benefits can help ensure that homeowners are able to rebuild with fireresistant materials and continue to be insurable.”

There is a growing understanding that many homes in California were built in “fire ecology areas,” zones where periodic wildfire is a natural part of the ecosystem. In the 1970s, Ray Krauss worked as an environmental planner contributing to early drafts of Sonoma County’s first general plan, which, informed by research about the 1964 Hanley fire, proposed limiting development in high-risk fire hazard zones. A political backlash stifled that proposal. “If there had been acceptance of the county’s early environmental planning, many current losses could have been avoided,” says Krauss. Recognizing fire ecology, how do we ensure responsible planning so community members aren’t put in harm’s way? When disaster strikes, how will we assist those who want to rebuild safely? To address such questions, several groups are co-organizing a series of events called Conversations Around the Fire. Over a hundred people turned out for the first event about the increasing difficulties faced by renters and those without homes. For the second gathering, Santa Rosa Councilmember Julie Combs will be joined by Wade and Krauss to talk about “Rebuilding in a Fire Ecology.” Other speakers include Laura Neish of 350 Sonoma County on support for fire victims for rebuilding green, ethnobotanist Edward Willie on permaculture and native-land-management practices, and Teri Shore of the Greenbelt Alliance on ideal locations for new housing. Conversations Around the Fire: Rebuilding in a Fire Ecology will take place on Jan. 22, from 6pm to 8pm, at Christ Church United Methodist, 1717 Yulupa Ave., Santa Rosa. There will be information about fire-resistant and eco-building materials, zero-net energy homes, affordable housing, cleanup standards, resource management and efforts for a resilient recovery with the big picture of climate change in mind. For information, call 707.292.4233.

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June Brashares is a clean-energy professional and social justice activist. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

LIKE OIL AND WATER U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke exempted Florida from offshore-drilling plans.

Why not California?

Rigged

Trump offshore drilling plan faces wellspring of opposition in California BY TOM GOGOLA

L

ast week, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom was one of numerous elected officials from around the nation to tee off on U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke for his decision to exempt offshore drilling in the vacation state of Florida while failing to do the same for blue states such as California with big tourist economies of their own.

The move by Zinke highlighted a federal energy policy under President Donald Trump to open offshore drilling, but only if it doesn’t interfere with Trump’s ocean view from Mar-a-Lago. Newsom zeroed-in his critique, via a few pointed tweets directed at Zinke, over the secretary’s rationale for giving Florida a pass from fulfilling the Trump administration’s offshoredrilling plans as detailed in a report released this month from the Bureau of Ocean Energy

Management (BOEM), which operates under the aegis of the Department of the Interior. Newsom noted that Zinke cited the impact on the state’s tourism industry as the signal driver behind his decision to keep the drilling rigs from view of tourists. Zinke did not, however, extend the same courtesy to other states with a robust tourist economy: Oregon, New York, Virginia and, of course, California. Newsom had the numbers on hand to make his point. Florida,

he noted in a series of tweets directed at Zinke, had 113 million visitors in 2016, while California had 269 million statewide visitor trips. Tourists in Florida spent $109 billion; in California, they spent $126.3 billion. “Using this logic,” tweeted Newsom, “CA’s coast should be declared free of offshore drilling as well. Or do blue states not get exemptions?” So far, they do not, and Newsom was unavailable for further comment on the matter. The BOEM document, the 20192024 proposed draft for the National Outer Continental Oil Shelf and Gas Leasing Program (the OCS, for short), sets out a Trump-approved schedule for renewed offshore drilling from the North Atlantic around the bend of the Gulf of Mexico, and up to Northern California and the Pacific Northwest. Under the OCS, the federal government will sell drilling leases in Northern California in 2021, and then again in 2023. The feds would offer new lease sales in Southern California in 2020 and 2022. Central California would also see new potential leases in 2021 and 2023. The last offshore drilling leases in Northern California were sold in 1963, when seven exploratory wells were drilled and came up dry. That same year, a dozen exploratory wells were drilled in Central California and, similarly, no oil was found. Oil was discovered in Southern California, which is where all the current leases are. The idea is that this time around, improvements in oilexploration technology may yield something other than mud. The problem is those improvements are causing grave concern among opponents—a concern now met with outrage over the Zinke duplicity in Florida. “Offshore drilling is inherently dangerous,” says Kristen Monsell, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. The Oakland-based Monsell notes that the practice “causes dangerous pollution, risks devastating oil spills that kill marine life and harm coastal ) 10


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Twenty-nine years ago something happened to me that changed my life forever. Let me tell you my story.

I was studying pre-Med in college, in hopes of becoming a medical doctor. Things were looking up, and life was good, until things took a turn for the worse. I began to have terrible back and stomach problems. For a young guy, I felt pretty rotten. My back hurt so badly that I had a hard time even concentrating in class. I was miserable. The medical doctors tried different drugs, but they only made me feel like I was in a “cloud.” I was just not getting better.

A friend of mine convinced me to give a chiropractor a try. The adjustment didn’t hurt, it actually felt good. I got relief, and I soon was off all medication. It worked so well that I decided, then and there, to become a chiropractor myself. Now for my kids, Hayden and Henry. They have been under chiropractic care their entire lives. And, unlike most other kids in their class, they never get the “common” childhood illnesses like ear infections, asthma and allergies. In fact, they have never taken a drug in their lives. And they are now 19 and 21!

It’s strange how life is, because now people come to see me with their back problems and stomach problems. They come to me with their headaches, migraines, chronic pain, neck pain, shoulder/arm pain, whiplash from car accidents, asthma, allergies, numbness in limbs, athletic injuries, just to name a few. If drugs make people well, then those who take the most should be the healthiest, but that simply isn’t the case. With chiropractic we don’t add anything to the body or take

Dr. Taajes with his sons anything from it. We find interference in the nervous system and remove it thus enhancing the healing capacities of the body. We get tremendous results…it really is as simple as that. Here’s what some of my patients had to say:

“I have had a problem with migraines as well as low back pain. Even after seeing doctors and other health professionals, the pains remained. After coming to Dr. Joel, they have helped tremendously. They even take away my migraines. They’re great!” (Judy E.) “I came in pending laser surgery for two herniated discs. Over a few months here the need for surgery subsided, and the pain has subsided to a mild discomfort with occasional morning stiffness. Over all, I feel better visit after visit. It’s a gradual process.” (Jaime O.) Several times a day patients thank me for helping them with their health problems. But I can’t really take the credit. Find out for yourself and benefit from an AMAZING OFFER. Look, it shouldn’t cost you an arm and a leg to correct your health. You are going to write a check to someone for your health care expenses, you may as well write one for a lesser amount for chiropractic. When you bring in this article between January 17 through

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Dear Friend, I wanted to let everyone know what happened while I was in college. It was a moment that changed my life forever. But before I tell you about my experience, I wanted to tell you my story from the start. Let me start by explaining the photo in this letter, I’m the guy in the middle, Dr. Taatjes. You know when I meet people in town and they usually say, “Oh yeah, I know you, you’re Dr. Taatjes. You’ve been in Petaluma for years…” Well, that’s me.


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communities, and exacerbates the climate crisis.” The advent of offshore fracking, which would be allowed by the Trump administration’s plan, “only heightens those risks,” she says. That process involves blasting a high-pressure waterand-chemical stew into the ocean floor, which cracks rocks and exposes oil or gas fields. “The high pressures used in offshore fracking increase the risk of well failure and oil spills.” Then there’s the back end, says Monsell. Federal rules allow petrochemical companies to “dump their waste fluids, including fracking chemicals, into the ocean,” she says. “Scientists have identified some commonly used fracking chemicals to be among the most toxic in the world to aquatic life.” Her organization is pushing to end all offshore drilling and vows to fight the Trump move in court. “We need to transition away from this dirty, dangerous practice and toward a clean-energy future.” Numerous state agencies provided comments to the Department of the Interior as it was hashing out its offshoredrilling plans—including the California Coastal Commission and the California State Lands Commission. They were joined in opposition by the state’s Office of the Attorney General and the California Fish and Game Commission. The Coastal Commission and State Lands Commission would be responsible for implementing federally approved coastalmanagement programs through the issuance of permits. In its comments to the BOEM, the Coastal Commission says it is “steadfastly opposed to any new leasing in ‘frontier’ areas of the OCS.” New drilling activities would mean new drilling platforms, pipelines “and other infrastructure that would likely cause significant adverse effects on coastal resources.” The commission cites impacts to commercial fishing, tourism, marine wildlife and wetlands,

and says that “expanded use of fracking and other well-stimulation treatments increases the risk of an oil spill occurring and potentially causing devastating statewide environmental impacts.” California Attorney General Xavier Becerra noted in the BOEM report that oil companies were not exactly clamoring to pursue new exploratory wells in California waters even if there’s general support in the industry to undo the Obama no-drill push.

‘We need to transition away from this dirty, dangerous practice.’ The Shell Oil Company, for example, urged Zinke in the BOEM report to “make new OCS areas available to assess the extent of United States energy resources,” as it expressed disappointment in Obama for banning offshore drilling and urged Trump to “quickly replace the current national OCS program and grant access to new areas.” Shell has numerous leases in Southern California waters. So do the Koch brothers. Meanwhile, Chevron U.S.A., which operates an oil-and-gas refinery operation in Richmond, was less gushing in its embrace of the new drilling timetables in the BOEM report. It appears Chevron is not interested in Central or Northern California. In its comments to the BOEM, the company did say the federal government “should move expeditiously to open unavailable submerged lands with believed resource potential for exploration and development.” But Chevron also provided a

ranking to the BOEM of its most desirable areas for exploration and development, and left Central and Northern California off the list. Its first three are regions of the Gulf of Mexico. The next three are regions of the Atlantic Ocean, and “the Southern California Planning area was ranked seventh.” The company did not comment on or mention drilling in Central and Northern California in the BOEM report— or in a follow-up email sent in response to questions about its views on oil-exploration in offshore California waters. “Chevron encourages expansion of domestic and global energy production, including development of energy resources on federal lands onshore and offshore,” says Veronica FloresPaniagua, a spokeswoman for Chevron North America. “Our U.S. offshore priorities are continued exploration in the Gulf of Mexico deepwater, and to better understand the potential of the Atlantic waters off the East Coast.” As it set out to reopen offshore drilling, the BOEM also heard from Florida’s Department of State and other of its agencies engaged in wildlife conservation. NASA also chimed in with concerns about offshore rigs’ affecting future space missions. Florida is led by Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who supported Donald Trump for president in 2016, as did the state as a whole. The president spends significant time in Florida, playing golf at the oceanfront Mar-a-Lago. Zinke’s Florida flip-flop, says Monsell, “clearly shows the total incompetence of this administration. One day it’s in the plan and a few days later it’s out? That’s not at all how the process is supposed to work.” She notes that the federal Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, enacted in 1953, “requires the administration to consider several specific factors in developing an offshore oil and gas leasing plan in light of national energy needs and the risks of offshore drilling.” “Helping Republicans to win elections,” she adds, “certainly isn’t one of those factors.”


Pick-Me-Up Cider-Steamed Mussels • • • • THAT’S SO SHELLFISH Steaming mussels in cider instead of white wine puts a local twist on a classic preparation.

Mussel Up

It’s gray and cold outside, but a bowl of smoky steamed mussels brings warmth inside BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he gray days were getting to me. I know we need the rain, blah, blah, blah, but the cold, overcast weather had me feeling down last week. So I took to the kitchen.

You can’t change the weather, but you can change what’s for dinner. I’ve had enough chicken soup but wanted something warm, brothy and nourishing. I settled on a bowl of steamed mussels.

The rule of thumb used to be to consume shellfish only during months with an r in them—September to April. The rule seems to make sense if you are harvesting clams, oysters and mussels yourself. The non-r months are warmer, and shellfish are more susceptible to toxic red tide events—and are quarantined in California for that reason during those months. The warmer months are also generally when shellfish spawn. Spawning shellfish are milky, thin and less

than delicious. I considered heading to the coast and picking my own mussels, but though better of it. I’m all for a free lunch (or dinner), but harvesting mussels on your own requires a sport fishing license, and the shellfish can be gritty with sand unless you purge them with flour or cornmeal. Not a big deal, but I didn’t feel like it. I was kind of mopey, remember? Instead, I went to Santa Rosa Seafood, my go-to spot for seafood. The classic method for

3 to 4 pounds mussels 3/4 c. dry hard cider 1/3 c. water 3 slices of bacon, chopped • 3 to 4 slices of lemon, roughly chopped • 1 shallot, peeled and chopped • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 2 tablespoons butter • chopped Italian parsley • 1/2 tsp. sea salt Clean mussels by submerging under water, discarding any that are open. Place in a wide pan. Cook bacon until crisp, but not too crisp. Drain, blot off extra fat and set aside. Add cider, water, bacon, shallots, garlic and salt to a wide pan. Cover and heat over a medium flame until all mussels have opened, discarding those that haven’t. Add butter and let it melt. Serve in wide bowls and sprinkle with parsley.

11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 17-23, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dining

steamed mussels is to place them in a wide pan with a few glugs of white wine, a little water and some chopped garlic and shallots, and cook until all the mussels have opened. Traditionally, they’re served with crusty bread and more white wine. That’s a fine method, but I improved on it. Instead of wine, I used hard cider. And not just any hard cider. I reached for Tilted Shed’s smoked cider. It’s subtly infused with smoked apples. If you can’t find it, any local dry cider will do. To up the smoky quality of the dish, I added crisp diced bacon. And because my backyard Meyer lemon tree is loaded with glorious, glowing yellow fruit right now, I tossed in some chopped lemons to balance the richness of the dish. The whole thing took about 10 minutes. I felt better after the first bite.


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he oldest wines poured at Chateau Montelena Winery’s “Dream Tasting” held Jan. 11—a one-of-a-kind lineup of vintages from 1974 to 2013 that, according to winery CEO Bo Barrett, may never be replicated—aren’t necessarily what most wine consumers would readily drink, or name “best.”

It’s a misperception that all wines get better with long aging in some musty cellar. What this tasting was about was how much better that musty cellar has become over those long years, and how this estate’s particular expression of Cabernet Sauvignon shows up year after year. Bo Barrett was a surfer kid when he began working for his father, Jim, in 1972 (the two were fictionalized in the 2008 film Bottle Shock). Now silverhaired and sporting a soul patch

goatee, Barrett is quick with an entertaining quip, but he’s not “selling” us on wine today—he’s our tour guide, stopping at points of interest throughout the decades, which can be tasted in the glasses in front of us. That leafy note in the 1980? Typical of aged Cabernet, but also the old crusher used in those days beat up the stems. Later in that decade, they had a machine custom-built to crush gently and sort out the stems—although Barrett prefers not to eliminate stems completely, as they contribute cinnamic acid. On cue, the 1994 shows cinnamon and mint notes. The tannins haven’t fallen out, and aren’t gritty, either. In this decade, says Barrett, it wasn’t just the influence of wine critic Robert Parker, but a convergence of new viticultural findings from UC Davis, the growing confidence of a cadre of winemakers and an unprecedented string of vintages with favorable weather that made the modern Napa style. The “old cask” aroma of the 1979? Montelena aged the wine in a series of progressively older barrels. The recipe has stayed the same, with only 20 percent new oak barrels contributing a toasty, graham-cracker aroma to the 2007 Cabernet. What changed in the decade of the 2000s was the harvesting practice. Montelena expected its picking crew to complain about night-harvesting the Chardonnay; instead, the Cabernet crew asked why couldn’t they pick at night too. Besides all that, the wine has been made from the get-go from the same vineyard, using the same yeast, with the same people making and sampling the tanks twice a day during fermentation. “We want to go for batting average,” says Barrett, “not just one hit over the fence.” After the tasting, we are released on platters of cheese and hors d’oeuvres, paired with a sample of the as-yet-unreleased 2015 estate Cabernet Sauvignon. It’s a brandnew version of that old-school Montelena style. Chateau Montelena, 1429 Tubbs Lane, Calistoga. Daily, 9:30am–4pm. Walkin tasting, $30; library tasting, $60. 707.942.5105. montelena.com.


y n a So M s d a o R O n a Grateful Dead tour, you met the best people on Earth. People from all walks of life were drawn to Dead shows, the way Richard Dreyfuss was drawn to Devils Tower in Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

But there were also narcs, feds, drug addicts, clinically insane misfits and jerks. There was a series of “religious” groups, like the Golden Roaders, selling backless dresses and Sufi spinning at shows. Then there were the Moonies, although I only saw them at shows in the

Northeast, who were aggressive and deceptive, selling lame stickers and incense. The Krishnas gave out free rice, but they also played their freaking tambourines and drums at sunrise to greet the day. Not a good group to camp next to. From Scientologists to evangelical Christians to mini-messiahs that paraded around in full regalia (mostly a robe, loincloth and a conch full of burning sage), there was no shortage of wackadoodles to join up with or be abducted by. I know that I and hundreds (or at least dozens) of other Deadheads took it upon ourselves to be the ones to “look out” for the weaker ones as the scene grew exponentially and then collapsed

The legacy of 500 Grateful Dead shows BY DNA

upon itself. I am grateful for my time in that world, and recently I reflected on that journey—at least the parts I could remember.

09-06-80 Maine State Fairgrounds Lewiston, Maine I had, like, 20 or 30 Grateful Dead concerts under my belt, but this show in Lewiston, Maine, was my first outdoor show. Personally, my life was in a bit of a downward spiral. I was 18 years old. I had recently not graduated from high school. I failed gym—don’t ask. For good or ill, I still hadn’t found a steady girlfriend. Most of my buddies had left for college. I was reluctantly working at Swensen’s

Ice Cream shop and dreading starting Kean University in Union, N.J. I only applied because my father thought I was mentally deficient. “Who fails gym?!” was the battle cry around the DNA household. Entering Lewiston, it seemed as if the entire town was welcoming—or looking to cash in on—the invading horde. People were standing in their driveways offering $10 parking to anyone desperate enough for the promise of an indoor bathroom. Restaurants had “Welcome Deadhead” signs in their windows. The line of VWs, broken-down wrecks and school buses en route to the show was viewed as a parade. ) 14

13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 17-23, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

DEAD NATION The Grateful Dead performing in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, June 20, 1992. From left, Phil Lesh, Bob Weir, Jerry Garcia and Bruce Hornsby.


Dead ( 13

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Children were waving. There was no undercurrent of judgment. It was a true community spectacle. Post-show articles cried about the wild atmosphere that the Dead circus brought to town, but they cried all the way to the bank. I was used to people scampering to the stage and setting up perimeters, establishing little Trumpian invisible walls between their space and my space. This was different. This was my first outdoor show, and in the big field that had been in use since 1898, there was space enough for everyone. The Dead played for three hours, and it was a slice of heaven. An undeniable connection between fans, band and environment occurred. Gone was the cement underneath. I took my shoes off. This might seem, especially to my California friends, a simple enough move, but it was revelatory. Unlike the Great Nothing in The Neverending Story, there was a great something afoot, and the music of the Grateful Dead was the conduit. And much like The Neverending Story, every person there felt like they were the central character in a cosmic tale. It was a grounding experience. The roles I played at home, mostly that of a lowly ice cream scooper with a GED, melted away. I felt lucky as hell to be there, and I knew I wanted more. Now, as many have argued before, it could have all been a dream brought on by hallucinogens and projected expectations. But the way I saw it, a dream was better than no dream at all—or, worse yet, suburbia.

10-11-83 Madison Square Garden New York City, N.Y. If I had to call one venue my home, it would be Madison Square Garden. I must have seen the Dead there 20 times. From my parents’ house, it was less than 40 minutes to get to the city and wind my way to Seventh and 33rd. In the world of concert experiences, MSG is a singular adventure. Opened in 1968,

the roof was built with shock absorbers, so when the entire venue is rocking with 20,000 fans going apeshit, the roof literally bounces up and down. I’ve been in a lot of coliseums, but MSG has that special feel of being a world-class stage where magic has occurred over and over again. The original space was five blocks away, opened in 1879, and featured people like Nikola Tesla. But from Ali vs. Frazier’s “Fight of the Century” to the Ringling Bros.’ home to the birth of Hulkamania, the “new” MSG has a thousand stories. It is every East Coaster’s mecca. It should be remembered that, as reverential a space as MSG is, right outside the door is New York City, the city that never sleeps, the city with an incredibly organized police force that deals with crazies 24/7. So when the Dead came to town, they geared up. Yes, the cops could be helpful in their brusque, in-your-face NYC way. But every police squad needs to generate arrests, and Dead crowds were easy pickings. On the street, 25 undercover cops were putting on their tie-dyes—that they had just confiscated—and walked around filling garbage bags with Deadheads’ crafts and shirts. Everyone knew it was risky to sell anything on the streets of New York, but Deadheads need gas money just to get to the next show, and often selling a few trinkets was the only way to do it. The tour lot, dubbed Shakedown Street, was a bazaar of crafts, food, drumming and anything you could imagine. It was our Silk Road. It was the original dark web. Over the years, I sold shirts, drums, these purple face masks you blew in that created a hypnotic experience, grilled cheese sandwiches, anklets (these were my bread and butter), hand-painted sun dresses and baby food. Some friends made a killing with Steal Your Face metal license plates. It was pure copyright infringement, but the profits were enormous. Some Guatemalan dealers made a mint at shows. For most of the Deadheads trying to hustle a few stickers, it


personal song about suicide and depression). It appeared perhaps I was wrong, that maybe the boys were wrapping it up—but I still had a feeling. Then out of space came the first notes of “St. Stephen.” They hadn’t played it since 1979, and suddenly everyone was on their feet. When the lyrics “In and out of the garden he goes” were sung, the Garden exploded. Twenty thousand people were now screaming along: “Wherever he goes the people all complain.” New Yorkers, the butt of everyone else’s jokes, knew better than most what this meant. Now we were all standing on our chairs, and the magic of Madison Square Garden was in full effect. It was a supersonic jolt. Everybody behind me was smiling. Whatever neurolinguistic programs were running got a hard reboot. Although there was another Dead show at MSG the following night, and then two more in Hartford, Conn. (where they played “St. Stephen” again, my second and last time hearing it), this show was the peak, the pinnacle that Maslow runs on about. Was it their best show? No. Not even close. But for a short amount of time, something occurred that turned a coliseum of strangers into a community.

8-31-85 Manor Downs Speedway Manor, Texas Driving into Texas, I was following a black Porsche that was doing a cool 85 miles an hour. Following me was a Texas trooper. Flashers on, he motioned for me to pull over and went after the now accelerating Porsche. I had been in Texas for five minutes, and I had no intention of being arrested. I slowed down, saw the cop disappear from view and kept going. I was young and fearless. I also had a lot of weed in the car. It was the beginning of a 13-show run. The temperature in Texas in late August borders between Holy Hell and Kill-Me-Now Hell. Not only was it sweltering, but massive storms extended to the horizon. I always wanted ) 16

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was dire straits to not sell them, so the risk was worth it. Being stuck in NYC after a show could be grim. One summer, I paid for the entire journey with just a few balls of hemp string and a big bag of African trading beads. Ninety percent of what you saw people selling was handmade. It was Etsy in real time. I was 21. I had turned my life around. My dad had a string of heart attacks, my grandparents died, and something in my head clicked. Even though, in my first semester, I got a 0.00 GPA at Kean University, I finally “got” that if I just repeated back to teachers what they said to me, I could get an A. I decided I was going to go to graduate school in California, to be closer to the band, and doing well as an undergrad was my meal ticket. I was working full-time, going to school full-time and helping my family out. I was also ingesting everything that came my way. Rumors were circulating at this MSG show, as they would at almost every show: songs overheard in sound check, possible guest appearances and Jerry’s health. I disregarded all the pre-show talk. I could give a wharf rat’s ass about guest appearances. I wanted the core band; everyone else was a distraction. I was feeling my oats at this show. The crowd was on stun, and I sat in my seat like all the others through the first set. I almost bailed and went to the hallways where the real action was, but I wanted to actually see whatever the band had up its sleeve. Top of the second set, I decided I was going to stand for the entire thing. I let the people behind me know. I told them, “Look, guys, there’s no fucking way I’m sitting down.” At least everyone around knew I was a dick. In NYC, this is known as “being courteous.” The second set rolled through “China Cat,” “Rider,” “Miracle,” “Bertha,” and still nobody around me stayed on their feet. People would get up and then sit back in their metal folding chair. Then the band broke it down, slowed it to a halt and drifted into a haunting “China Doll” (the band’s most


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 17-23, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16 Dead ( 15 to spot a twister, and sure enough in the distance a black funnel cloud was touching down. I finally got to Austin, and fell in love with the town. Lotta Heads. Plenty of bars. Music playing in the streets. Imagine the TV show Deadwood, if everyone in the town was on mescaline. Manor Downs was being run at this point by Sam Cutler, exmanager of the Dead and the Rolling Stones. So it was going to be a full-blown freak fest. Manor Downs is on the edge of town. It was Saturday night. Every cowboy and cowgirl within a hundred miles was coming to see the shindig. Time to blow off steam, Texas-style. Upon entering, I noticed a Greenpeace booth. This was a good sign. This was before every organization in America had a clipboard on the corner and pestered you for a signature. Back in 1985, Greenpeace had serious cred. Besides the Rainbow Warrior, this booth might have been the only place it was disseminating info. I bee-lined for the front row. I was going to go toe-to-toe with Texas. Saturday night, oversold show, front row, Jerry side. The energy was off the hook. Everyone in the front row realized early on that there was a 50-50 chance we would all be crushed to death. Keeping balance and helping anyone near you that dipped down was key, and went without being said. The show started, and out came the Saturday-night party accoutrements. Booze, joints. But this was Texas, and, as you might have heard, everything is bigger in Texas. The joints were the size of a baby’s forearm, the Jack Daniels was in a gigantic, novelty-sized bottle—or maybe that’s just the way it comes in Texas. Everything was shared. We were the front-row army, locking arms and keeping the ship of fools behind us. It’s common to label the Dead a psychedelic rock band, a ’60s relic and a jam band. Lesser known is that they were also a

kick-ass country band. That night, pumping out Marty Robbins and Johnny Cash, the Texans crowed, caw-cawed and hooted, and the electricity was jumping around the crowd like a frog in a hailstorm. The second set ended with 15,000 people clapping along to the Buddy Holly song “Not Fade Away” until the band left the stage, leaving drummer Mickey Hart conducting the 10-gallon crowd with just one drumstick. Then he left as well. The show ended. Pleasantries were exchanged. Suddenly, I lost my bearings. Where was the Greenpeace booth, had they already packed up and left? My foot hit a piece of wood. Looking down amidst the mud was scattered debris. The Greenpeace booth had been shattered, decimated, and was already decomposing in the mud. It wasn’t ominous, it was Texas, and that’s just the way they do things. Sitting on the hood of my car in the middle of the cornfield like something out of Hee Haw, young Texans began popping up between the stalks, adjusting overalls straps, pulling down shirts and blouses. The cornfields were full of people fucking! And at that moment I finally understood Texas. Nobody, and I mean nobody, parties like Texans on a Saturday night.

Rafael, and before you could say “Aoxomoxoa,” I was living right between the Grateful Dead studio and office. So now I was hanging with my childhood buddy in Marin, painting apartments, chilling out with John Cipollina (our roommate’s brother was his manager) and decompressing by hiking Mount Tamalpais every single day. I don’t know about holy spots and vortexes, but Mt. Tam is very special to me. I had no desire to go back to New Jersey, but life is funny that way. This next part is hard for me to write about. Long story short, I made a phone call that interrupted a friend’s suicide attempt. I felt obligated to fly back to New Jersey. She was stuck in the mental ward for a week. While there, I met her estranged father, and he told me I could stay in his Florida condo for a few days if I needed to get away. Well, the Dead were playing two shows in Florida, so I agreed. He might have never done anything for her, but I was going to take advantage of this opportunity. I’m sorry to say that Deadheads will capitalize on misfortune if it leads to seeing a show. Florida was the Orange State, and I was coming with orange sunshine. If you removed all of the tourists, gangs, spring breakers, and old people from Florida, it would still be the weirdest state in the country. It’s the land that’s weird. It’s spongy. There’s a higher and higher percentage of water in the landmass that increases until you hit the Everglades. Alligators, pumas, panthers, poisonous snakes and bugs the size of your fist abound. Florida would be overrun with wildlife in a week, given the chance. There were two shows in two days, about seven hours apart. The Sportatorium was a monstrosity. The acoustics were terrible, and it was evident somebody built this place as a cash cow rather than

Was it at every show that this something happened?

10-25-1985 Hollywood Sportatorium Pembroke Pines, Florida By September of 1985, I’d made it to California. I was living in San Francisco’s Mission District with my brother and his wife. That lasted about two weeks. It ended with him, naked, pinning his wife to the ceiling. I’m pretty sure it was real, but it also was a good stunt to get me to leave. A childhood friend was going to Dominican College in San

a sacred—or even comfortable— space. I didn’t care. My mind was full of thoughts, and I needed to unravel my helix with my favorite band in the world. That night the band spoke to me. Now, did Deadheads really believe that the Dead, or specifically Jerry, was sometimes communicating with them? Short answer: yes. Short response from you: probably disbelief, possibly even scorn, like, “What, are you crazy?” I get that. Believe me, it has swirled around my head for decades. It seems that saying the band “communicated with us” and is too narrow a way to talk about it. There was a something. How each person interpreted it was up to him or her. Was it at every show that this something happened? No, which is one reason Deadheads went to as many shows as possible: to increase the odds of catching it. Once, at a show in Laguna Seca, I had the privilege of spending some time with a Navajo chief. He said his tribe is called Dineh. I kept thinking he was saying DNA. Eventually we figured it out and had a laugh. He told me that the Deadheads were part of the Navajo prophecies. He laid a story on me about how once the rainbow people gather, the buffalo will return. Were you expecting something more nuanced? It’s prophecy, people, it’s supposed to be cryptic! Another time I saw writer Joseph Campbell at the Palace of Fine Arts. It was a symposium called “From Ritual to Rapture: From Dionysus to the Grateful Dead.” It was Campbell’s belief that what he witnessed at some recent Dead shows in Oakland, where Campbell and I locked eyes for a while, was an ecstatic movement, a Dionysian catharsis, where, through dance, music and intoxicants, transformation was happening. All right, I’m with you, this could all be bullshit. But I’m also a Deadhead who saw some wild stuff. Santa Cruz-based DNA has been published internationally since 1989. He currently produces several comedy festivals and believes in community out of chaos.


The week’s events: a selective guide

Crush CULTURE

SEBASTOPOL

P E TA L U M A

HEALDSBURG

S A N TA R O S A

Future Talk

Power Up

Literary Salon

Musical Sight

A leading intellectual figure in Silicon Valley’s digital revolution and the founder of Sebastopol-based tech publisher O’Reilly Media, Tim O’Reilly has a radar-like sense of what the future holds. O’Reilly shares all in his new book, WTF?: What’s the Future and Why It's Up to Us, that gets into the good and bad sides of several issues facing future generations and offers ways we can shape the future economy today. O’Reilly appears in an event hosted by Copperfield’s Books on Friday, Jan. 19, at Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 7pm. $10; $40 includes book. copperfieldsbooks.com.

Marking its 10-year anniversary, the Petaluma Art Center opens 2018 with a group show, ‘Power of Ten: Scaling Up,’ that takes the art center into a new decade with innovative and thoughtful works in several mediums. Inspired by Charles and Ray Eames’ 1978 film, Powers of Ten, in which connections are made between the largest and smallest objects in the universe, the show is curated by Lisa Demetrios, granddaughter of the Eames, and presents paintings, photography, sculpture and even architecture that encompass themes of natural patterns and sustainability. The exhibit opens with an artist reception on Saturday, Jan. 20, at Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St., Petaluma. 5pm. $5. 707.762.5600.

Alabama-born and Santa Rosa-based author Waights Taylor Jr. is the featured reader for this month’s Healdsburg Literary Guild Third Sunday Salon. Taylor reads from his latest murder mystery, Heed the Apocalypse, and talks about his three earlier books, the mysteries Kiss of Salvation and Touch of Redemption, and his award-winning history of the South, Our Southern Home. The second half of the program is an open mic, so come prepared to read your latest work, or just come to listen on Sunday, Jan. 21, at the Bean Affair, 1270 Healdsburg Ave., Ste. 101, Healdsburg. 1:30pm. hbglitguild.org.

Meditative and ethereal, the ambitious indie-folk collage of Chicago-based Circuit des Yeux—the namesake of vocalist, composer and producer Haley Fohr’s longtime solo project—has never been better than on last year’s album, Reaching for Indigo, which presented Fohr’s emotionally drenched voice swimming in a sea of lush acoustic guitars, strings, organs and ambient digital effects. Fohr is currently traversing the West Coast with her project and North Bay promoter Shock City, USA hosts Circuit des Yeux in concert with Oakland’s Emily Jane White and Santa Rosa’s Self Care on Sunday, Jan. 21, at Atlas Coffee Company, 300 South A St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $10. facebook.com/ shockcityusa.

—Charlie Swanson

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SHINE A LIGHT Blues guitarist Coco Montoya performs two sets at the Old Cotati Cabaret in a benefit for Live Music Lantern on Saturday, Jan. 20. See Clubs & Venues, p23.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 17-23, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Ideas IN THE STARS Ala Ebtekar’s new work at di Rosa explores what it means to live without borders.

Art Moves

Napa’s di Rosa rebrands with fresh exhibits and programs BY CHARLIE SWANSON

‘T

his is really a pivotal moment for di Rosa,” says Bob Sain, executive director for the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art. “Everybody talks about going to the next step and the next stage, but this is more about changing the game.” Nestled between Napa and Sonoma in the Carneros region, di Rosa began as the private art collection of grape grower Rene di Rosa. Since 1997, the 217-acre

property has operated under the ambiguous title of di Rosa. Now the nonprofit is rebranding itself as the di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, as it invites artists to create new works onsite and engaging the public through new educational programs. “This is a moment and an opportunity to explore what a contemporary art center should be,” says Sain. “We feel compelled to share why art matters and how art and artists can be a resource and an asset to the concerns and needs of our time.” For the past year, di Rosa has

been renovating its gallery spaces and curating the upcoming exhibition, “Be Not Still: Living in Uncertain Times,” opening Jan. 27, which commissioned several Bay Area artists to address the country’s post-election political and social atmosphere through immersive installations. “When we first conceived of the concept last year, we wondered if it would seem a little dated by the time it opened,” says Sain. “But the times have continued to be uncertain, and the show continues to have relevance.” Curator Amy Owens approached

the exhibition as a shift in the center’s focus. “We wanted to address pressing issues of our time and hand the reins over to the artists by inviting them to drive the themes and topics,” says Owens. “Through this model, I think we’re getting much closer to what di Rosa historically has been and was intended to be. We’re putting artists at the forefront.” “Be Not Still” features four installations, including IranianAmerican artist Ala Ebtekar’s Azimuth (shown), which transfers an image of the cosmos taken by the Hubble telescope onto ceramic floor tiles and explores what it means to live without borders. Other works include Allison Smith’s investigation of the rise of white nationalism through cast-iron tiki torches, and Rigo 23’s three-dimensional model of the American flag as a series of walls that viewers can walk through. The show was scheduled to debut in November, but smoke damage from October’s wildfires, which came over the ridge of Milliken Peak adjoining the center’s property, delayed the opening. Forging ahead after the fires, the upcoming exhibit is being bolstered by new art-making programs and art-appreciation workshops, “Third Thursday” socials and a book club, as well as partnerships with the Boys & Girls Club of Napa and other groups that aim to bring art to the people. “Education is central to what an arts organization is about,” says Sain. “It’s new for di Rosa to have this level of educational programming. It’s an integral part of the exhibition and a way to make it accessible and meaningful.” ‘Be Not Still’ opens with a reception on Saturday, Jan. 27, at di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, 5200 Sonoma Hwy., 4pm. Free. dirosaart.org.


Eric Chazankin

WHAT A WAY TO MAKE A LIVING

Amy Webber channels Dolly Parton in new 6th Street Playhouse production.

Country Roads

Music trumps story in ‘Honky Tonk Angels’ BY HARRY DUKE

N

orth Bay theater kicks off the new year with 6th Street Playhouse’s Honky Tonk Angels, a country-music revue by Ted Swindley. Swindley, best known for the community theater staple Always . . . Patsy Cline, has taken about 30 country standards and wrapped the thinnest of stories around them to create a raucous and enjoyable evening of entertainment.

The plays tells the tale of three would-be singers, each stuck in a rut, who decide to take a chance and follow their dreams of a singing career to Nashville. There’s Angela (Daniela Innocenti-Beem), queen of her double-wide, who’s having trouble standing by her man (cue Tammy

‘Honky Tonk Angels’ runs Thursday– Sunday through Feb. 4 at 6th Street Playhouse. Thursday–Saturday, 7:30pm; Saturday–Sunday, 2pm. $22–$38. 52 W. Sixth St. 707.523.4185.

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Stage

Wynette); Darlene (Abbey Lee), who’s struggling with being a coal miner’s daughter (cue Loretta Lynn) and the loss of her boyfriend Billy Joe (cue Bobbie Gentry); and Sue Ellen (Amy Webber), who’s fed up with the chauvinist boss at her 9-to-5 job (cue Dolly Parton). Act one begins with their backstories and individual decisions that it’s time for them to fly (cue REO Speedwagon—wait a minute, REO Speedwagon?) and concludes with their fortuitous meeting on a Greyhound bus. A lot must happen during intermission because act two consists of their farewell performance after a recordbreaking six-week engagement at Nashville’s Honky Tonk Heaven. In addition to the songs alluded to earlier, others include “I Will Always Love You,” “Delta Dawn,” “Rocky Top,” “Sittin’ on the Front Porch Swing” and “I’ll Fly Away.” Director Michael Ross has a trio of talented women for angels. Innocenti-Beem as Angela is the unabashed leader of the trio. As the oldest and most worldly member, she grabs hold of the stage—and the audience—and never lets go. Webber gives her a run for her money as the brassy, big-haired Sue Ellen, while Lee has the quieter moments as the wideeyed, innocent Darlene. Swindley’s script—if you can call it that—doesn’t provide character depth and there’s no great message to be found beyond the pat “follow your dreams” axiom, but what Honky Tonk Angels does provide is the opportunity to hear some great American music performed live. Music director Robert Hazelrigg and musicians Ian Scherer, Quinten Cohen and Kassi Hampton handle the country/ bluegrass songbook well. Credit the women for bringing the right amount of character and a quality voice to each song, particularly on some sweet three-part harmonies. When it comes to shows like Honky Tonk Angels, it is all about the songs. They’ve got this. Rating (out of 5):


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 17-23, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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4:00 / No Cover

“West Marinicana” Jan 26 Lowatters Fri

High Lonesome Twang to Lowdown Roots 8:00 / No Cover

Annie Sampson Band Jan 27 The Rock, Blues, & R&B 8:00 / No Cover Sat

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with Le Jazz Hot Wed Feb 14

Bring your sweetheart Wednesday night for a romantic evening with live music & fabulous food & drink!

fri PRe-MaRdi gRas PaRty! feb 9 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

Petty Theft Weekend

sat Rockin’ Johnny buRgin feb 10 8:30pm/Dancing/Blues/$10 thu feb 22 soul ska 8pm/$12 Adv/$15 DOS

Tommy Castro Weekend

RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

Fri Feb 16 & Sat Feb 17 Fri Mar 2 & Sat Mar 3 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

TOGETHER IN SONG Since moving to the North Bay, Rainbow Girls have found a musical community.

Harmony Rainbow Girls strike a chord on new album

BY CHARLIE SWANSON FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU JAN 18 • COUNTRY LINE DANCE EVERY 1ST AND 3RD THURSDAY 7PM / ALL AGES / $10 FRI JAN 19 • MOONLIGHT RODEO AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SUN JAN 21 • INVITATIONAL BLUEGRASS JAM EVERY 1ST & 3RD SUNDAY—OPEN JAM 3PM INVITATIONAL 5PM /ALL AGES / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Thu 1⁄18 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$17 • All Ages

Kuinka + Rainbow Girls

Sat 1⁄20 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $22– $24 • All Ages

Wild Child

A Live Re-Creation of a 1960s Doors Concert

Sun 1⁄21 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $16–$22 • All Ages

The Secret Sisters + Smooth Hound Smith

Mon 1⁄22 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

Open Mic Night

with

Austin DeLone

Wed 1⁄24 • Doors 7:30pm ⁄ $20–$22 • All Ages

Mild High Club + Jerry Paper

Thu 1⁄25 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $12–$15 • All Ages

The Overcommitments

Fri 1/26 & Sat 1⁄27 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$42 • All Ages All Star Band feat Members of The Neville Brothers, Radiators & Dirty Dozen Brass Band

The New Orleans Suspects feat special guest

Eric McFadden

Sun 1⁄28 • Doors 6pm ⁄ $27–$32 • All Ages Johnny A. (The Yardbirds)

+ Matt Jaffe

Mon 1⁄29 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $27 • All Ages

Mattson 2 with Tommy Guerrero www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

I

n the eight years that vocalists, multiinstrumentalists and songwriters Erin Chapin, Caitlin Gowdey and Vanessa May have lived and played together as Rainbow Girls, their collective spirit has helped them grow as individuals, too.

“Playing as part of this collective has given me an opportunity to find harmony in my own life, in the most natural sense of the word,” says May. “To bring that to other people is really important, and has been a driving force for me.” In November, Rainbow Girls unveiled their first album as a trio, American Dream, which touches on experiences of love, loss and what May calls the political storm going on. “There’s been a lot of dissonance around, people having a hard time finding where they fit in,” she says. “Rainbow Girls’ and

my own journey with this is to help people find that harmony in their own lives.” Named after the so-called Rainbow House where the three first met and hosted weekly open mics while attending school in Santa Barbara, Rainbow Girls moved to Bodega Bay after college, living in a cottage on Gowdey’s grandparents’ property when they’re not touring the U.S. or Europe. There they continue to cultivate original, richly layered, threepart harmonic folk music and connect to the North Bay musical community through a new weekly open mic series at the house. “We moved up to the North Bay, and at first felt like it wasn’t home because we were traveling so much and had such deep roots in Santa Barbara, but as soon as we started doing open mics again, we realized we do have friends here and we do have something to contribute to this community,” says May. “And in that, we’ve seen so much of our own growth.” The 10-track American Dream is a culmination of that growth. The mostly acoustic album was recorded live in the band’s living room over the course of a month. “We were in such a place of deep comfort, and that comes through,” says May. Though the women often write songs individually, May says the trio’s shared experiences of living and traveling together makes it easy to know where to go musically as a group. “Sometimes you know exactly where you’re supposed to be, and other times we try to create something that is unexpected, and we like having both of those elements,” says May. “At this point, we can hear a song and know the feeling and essence of the song, and find harmonies accordingly.” Rainbow Girls open for Seattle folkpop band Kuinka on Thursday, Jan. 18, at Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave., Mill Valley. 8pm. $15–$17. 415.388.3850.


21

Sat Jan 20

Blues Star Returns to the Cabaret! DOORS 6PM/ SHOW 7pm ALL AGES The Old Cotati Cabaret (Cotati) Sat Jan 27

Jon Gonzales Stringband 5:30–7:30pm • FREE Admission ALL AGES, Families Encouraged! Church of the Oaks (Cotati)

ON SALE FRIDAY AT NOON FRI, APRIL 27

Mavis Staples

Sun Feb 18

Julian Lage Trio THU, JUNE 28

Sat Feb 24

The Magic of Adam Trent

English Beat SKA • ALL AGES DOORS 7:30PM $35 ADV/$38 DOS Raven (Healdsburg)

Sat Feb 24

Maury and Cheri + Friends Singer/Songwriter ALL AGES • Families Encouraged! 5:30–7:30pm FREE Admission Church of the Oaks (Cotati) Fri Mar 9

HeartSpacePresents.com 707-800-9485 Presenting music that gives hearts the space to heal, connect and be happy!

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3 Doors Down Acoustic Back Porch Jam

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WED, JANUARY 31 RODNEY STRONG VINEYARDS DANCE SERIES

$5 parking pass required in SSU general lots

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John Hiatt & The Goners featuring Sonny Landreth

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Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 THE JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:007:30 7:20 9:55 9:45 R R (12:00 2:35 5:00) PG-13 (12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor! “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, WRESTLER (1:00THE 3:50) 6:45 9:20 R Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (1:30 4:15) 7:15 (12:45) 3:45 6:45 9:45 PG-139:45 THEAward SECRET OF KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 9:40 R Believable (12:10 2:45 5:10) 7:35 PG-13 One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!” –9:55 Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

8 Great BeersBest on Tap + Wine by theFilm! Glass and Bottle Foreign Language

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THE SHAPE OF WATER FROST/NIXON (2:15) 7:20 R GREENBERG

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Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15

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22

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Beauty From the Ashes Local performers Kayleen Asbo, Bonnie Brooks and Larry Robinson present songs, stories and poems, benefiting Undocufund fire relief efforts. Jan 21, 4pm. $25$30. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Marc Cohn

Cohn performs his Grammy Award-winning self-titled debut record in its entirety, with special guests the Blind Boys of Alabama. Jan 18, 7:30pm. $25 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

3 Doors Down

Veteran Mississippi rockers perform a special acoustic set as part of their “Back Porch Jam Tour.” Jan 23, 8pm. $49 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY Todd Boston FRIDAY

JAN 19 TUESDAY

JAN 23

PABLO CRUISE WITH DIRTY

RED BARN

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

REVEREND HORTON HEAT

W/ VOODO0 GLOW SKULLS, BIG

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TAHOE ADVENTURE FILM ROAD TOUR 2018 JAN 26 FESTIVAL MOVIE • DOORS 7:30PM • ALL AGES FRIDAY

SATURDAY

JAN 27 THURSDAY

FEB 1

SATURDAY

FEB 3

WEDNESDAY

FEB 7 FRIDAY

FEB 9

ROYAL JELLY JIVE

PETALUMA HIGH SCHOOL BENEFIT ROCK • DOORS 8PM • ALL AGES

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Award-winning guitarist and multi-instrumentalist performs an intimate one man show celebrating the release of his Billboard Top Ten album, “ONE.” Jan 19, 8pm. $20-$32. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Eric Muhler

Back by popular demand, the jazz pianist and composer performs a solo show that presents a classical repertoire with improvised and engaging flair. Jan 20, 7pm. $20-$25. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

Tao Theory

Trio plays an album release show, influenced by their diverse backgrounds in classical, folk, rock, jazz and more. Jan 21, 6:30pm. $12. Fenix, 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

NAPA COUNTY A Capella Extravaganza Napa High School Vocal

Brew

Jan 19, 6pm, the Guide to Living Fast with Manley Martian and Brooks Palmer. 555 Healdsburg Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.303.7372.

Music Workshop hosts the ever popular, high-energy concert with headliners, The Filharmonic and other professional groups. Jan 20, 7pm. $30. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Cellars of Sonoma

Mark Hummel

Flamingo Lounge

Bay Area bluesman hosts his 27th annual “Blues Harmonica Blowout” with several top shelf musicians. Jan 24, 7:30 and 9:30pm. $35-$65. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

SONA

Premium cover band welcomes all-star artists the Bell Brothers, Rachel Rolleri and Rich Redmond for a fire relief fundraiser in partnership with Redwood Credit Union Community Fund. Jan 20, 7pm. $20-$25. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Clubs & Venues

Jan 21, 2pm, Dustin Saylor. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Crooked Goat Brewing Jan 20, 3pm, Viva la Reve. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Jan 19, Levi Lloyd and friends. Jan 20, UB707. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Jan 19, Sonoma Bach midwinter recital. Jan 21, 3pm, Anderson & Roe Piano Duo. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Jan 24, 6:30pm, Waldorf at Weill with Credo High School students. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery

Jan 20, Sun Kil Moon. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

HopMonk Sebastopol

A’Roma Roasters

Jan 19, Organix. Jan 20, Callie Watts. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Jan 19, the Soft White Sixties with Vista Kicks. Jan 22, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Beset. Jan 23, open mic with Ceni. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Aqus Cafe

HopMonk Sonoma

SONOMA COUNTY

Jan 19, Too Brand New. Jan 20, Michelle Lambert. Jan 21, 2pm, Madera Marin. Jan 24, bluegrass and old time music jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Atlas Coffee Company

Jan 21, 7pm, Circuit des Yeux with Emily Jane White and Self Care. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa, 707.526.1085.

The Big Easy

Jan 17, Haute Flash Quartet. Jan 18, the Acrosonics. Jan 19, Second Line. Jan 20, the Dorian Mode. Jan 21, Rivertown Skifflers. Jan 23, Cabbagehead. Jan 24, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Jan 19, Jimmy Roberts. Jan 20, the Jam. Jan 23, Michael Hantman. Jan 24, Mike & Patrick. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Jan 19, Jeff Campbell. Jan 20, Frankie Bourne. Jan 21, Emily Elbert and Ali Handel. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Jan 20, Almir Côrtes Trio with Harvey Wainapel. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Jan 17, Ragtag Sullivan. Jan 18, Matt Lax & Nearly Beloved. Jan 19, Charles Wheal Band. Jan 20, Hot Grubb. Jan 21, David Correa. Jan 24, Codi Binkley and friends. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Bistro

Jan 18, Willie Perez. Jan 19, Spyralites. Jan 20, Levi Lloyd Blues Band. Jan 21, Greg Hester. Jan 23, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Jan 20, Wiley’s Coyotes. Jan


showcase. Jan 19, Chick Jagger and the Trouble with Monkees. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

HopMonk Novato

Jan 19, Jon Emery. Jan 20, Dan Martin. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Jan 19, Pablo Cruise. Jan 20, Fleetwood Mask and Illeagles. Jan 23, Reverend Horton Heat with Voodo Glow Skulls and Big Sandy. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

The Old Cotati Cabaret Jan 20, Live Music Lantern presents Coco Montoya. 85 La Plaza, Cotati. livemusiclantern.org.

Rock Star University House of Rock

Jan 19, Generation Idol with FeatherWitch. Jan 20, Kalimba: the Spirit of Earth, Wind & Fire. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Sebastiani Theatre

Jan 22, 7pm, Sheila Whitney with Jennifer Woods and Syd James. 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Jan 21, 4pm, Santa Rosa Symphony Youth Orchestra Concerto Showcase. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Sonoma Cider

Jan 19, French Oak Gypsy Band. Jan 20, the Winter Sounds. 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Wed, the Acrosonics. Jan 18, Plan Be. Jan 19, the New Hip Replacements. Jan 20, Solid Air. Jan 21, 5pm, Lynne O & the Riots. Jan 21, 8:30pm, Sonoma Blues Jam. Jan 23, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Jan 20, 2 Minutes to Midnight and the Bill Decker Band. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Starling Bar

Jan 21, 3pm, “Songwriting Fools” with Adam Traum and friends. 19380 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.938.7442.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Jan 18, Liz Stires student

Wed, open mic. Jan 18, JB Jazz Ensemble. Jan 19, Notorious. Jan 20, the Theory with the Messengers. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Jan 17, Soulbillies. Jan 24, Jethro Jeremiah Band. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club

Jan 17, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. Jan 19, Zion-I with Z-Man and Vocab Slick. Jan 20, Neil Young tribute night. Jan 21, 4pm, Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Jan 22, open mic. Jan 23, Eddie Neon blues jam. Jan 24, Acoustically Speaking’s Grateful Jam. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino

Jan 17, J Kevin Durkin. Jan 18, Passion Habanera. Jan 19, David Jeffrey’s Jazz Fourtet. Jan 20, Walter Earl Duo. Jan 21, Parker Grant Trio. Jan 23, Greg Jacobs Duo. Jan 24, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Jan 17, Rusty String Express. Jan 18, Deborah Winters. Jan 23, Brian Byrnes. Jan 24, Lorin Rowan. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Papermill Creek Saloon Jan 17, Judy Radiloff. Jan 18, Rockin Johnny Burgin. Jan 19, Whiskerman. Jan 20, El Cajon. Jan 21, 5pm, Papermill Gang. Jan 23, Agents of Change. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Jan 18, the Mosswoods. Jan 19, Ancient Baby. Jan 20, Swamp Thang. Jan 21, Grateful Sundays. Jan 22, open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Jan 19, New Copasetics. Jan 20, the B Sharp Blues Band. Jan 21, 4pm, Emily Bonn & the Vivants. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse

Jan 18, Toque Tercero flamenco night. Jan 19, Reed Fromer Band. Jan 20, TDK. Jan 21, Mazacote with Louie Romero. Jan 23, Noel

Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Jan 18, Kuinka and Rainbow Girls. Jan 19, Green Leaf Rustlers featuring Chris Robinson. Jan 20, 12pm, tribute to Mikie Lee Prasad with Shark Alley Hobos and friends. Jan 20, 9pm, Wild Child. Jan 21, the Secret Sisters with Smooth Hound Smith. Jan 24, Mild High Club and Jerry Paper. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Live Music Lantern presents

Coco Montoya performing 2 sets at the

Old Cotati Cabaret

Saturday Jan 20, 2018 doors 6pm ⁄SHOW 7PM ALL AGES $ 36 ADV ⁄ $40 DOS

THE OLD COTATI CABARET 85 LA PLAZA COTATI

Terrapin Crossroads

Jan 17, Colonel & the Mermaids. Jan 18, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Jan 19, Chum: a tribute to Phish in the Grate Room. Jan 19, Top 40 Friday dance party. Jan 20, Paige Clem and friends. Jan 20, T Sisters and Hillstomp in the Grate Room. Jan 21, Grahame Lesh and friends. Jan 23, Lee “Scratch” Perry and Subatomic Sound System. Jan 24, Colonel & the Mermaids. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre

Jan 21, an evening with George Winston. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Jan 17, Vince Costanza. Jan 20, Jeff Campbell. Jan 24, Austin Hicks. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

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Blue Note Napa

Jan 17, Alexa Weber Morales & Boca Mundial. Jan 18, the Dustbowl Revival. Jan 19-20, Laith Al-Saadi. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

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SEBASTOPOL CHARTER

A Waldorf-Inspired Public School Since 1995

Jan 20, New Era Marching Ensemble. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Jan 20, the Musers. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

River Terrace Inn

Jan 19, Douglas Houser. Jan 20, Craig Corona. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Jan 18, Don Bassey and friends. Jan 19, Otis & the Smokestacks. Jan 24, Mike Greensill jazz. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE & ENROLLMENT EVENTS Friday, February 2, 2018 6:30-8:30pm at 3-8 campus Open House and Presentation on Waldorf education for parents only.

Feb 7 -or- Mar 6, 2018 7-9pm at K-2 campus Important Kindergarten Orientation meeting for parents only.

visit: www.sebastopolcharter.org

call: 707.824.9700

Sebastopol Charter shall be nonsectarian in its programs, admission policies, employment practices, and all other operations, shall not charge tuition, and shall not discriminate against any person on the basis of ethnicity, national origin, race, gender disability, or any other characteristic designated in SB777 and set forth in Section 47605(d) of the Education Code.

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 17-23, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

21, George Heagerty. Jan 22, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Jan 22, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.


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Steele Lane Community Center, “Grace Fong: Viewpoints,” local artist who discovered painting later in life shows her latest works. 4pm. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3282.

Jan 20

History Museum of Sonoma County, “Bear in Mind,” traveling exhibition examines the history of the Grizzly bear in California and how it can to represent the state. 6pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa.

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Bank of Marin, “Unchained Artists,” thought provoking show features artwork, poetry and handcrafted objects created by inmates in prisons from around the US and prisoners incarcerated on death row at San Quentin State Prison. 6pm. 19 Sunnyside Ave, Mill Valley. 415.380.4665.

Jan 19

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Petaluma Arts Center, “Power of Ten: Scaling Up,” Petaluma Arts Center celebrates a decade of art with 10 artists exploring scale and

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Through Apr 15, “3 Friends,” North Coast contemporary artists Robert Hudson, Jack Stuppin and Richard Shaw display their steel, canvas and clay works together for the first time ever. Reception, Jan 20 at 6pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through Jan 29, “Annual Invitational Show 2018,” featuring works by 17 guest artists invited by members of the Arts Guild of Sonoma. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

interconnectedness in paintings, sculpture, and other media. 5pm. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. 707.762.5600. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, “An Eye for Adventure,” photographs by author and world traveler Jack London are displayed alongside “Libros de Artista,” featuring books created by Latin American artists. Jan 20. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Jan 24

Marin Community Foundation, “Bond,” exhibit features art from three Bay Area couples, six individual artists, displayed side-byside with their partners. 6pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Sebastopol Library, “Parched, Drenched & Scorched,” exhibit on northern California’s drought, floods and the fires of last October includes photos by Karen Preuss and text by Jonah Raskin. 7pm. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Aug 5, “50 Years of Franklin,” celebrate the poignant “Peanuts” comicstrip character Franklin, a cultural benchmark inspired by a correspondence between Charles Schulz and schoolteacher Harriet Glickman in 1968. Through May 21, “AAUGH! The Language of Peanuts,” explore the familiar expressions and catchphrases found throughout “Peanuts.”. Through Mar 11, “Mud Pies & Jelly Beans: The Flavor of Peanuts,” new exhibit covers the culinary side of the famous comic strip. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Chroma Gallery Through Feb 4, “Art of the Figure,” fourth annual group show features works by

members of Sonoma County and Bay Area figure drawing group. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Erickson Fine Art Gallery

Through Feb 13, “Bob Nugent: Brazil,” artist’s recent paintings are inspired by the power and delicacy of the Amazon rainforests and rivers. 324 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. Thurs-Tues, 11 to 6. 707.431.7073.

Graton Gallery

Through Jan 28, “From Clayton to Graton,” longtime local artists and old friends Fred Kling and Rik Olson display together. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Jan 31, “428 Collective,” group of 11 Sonoma County artists brings awareness to innovative and boundary-pushing art being produced in the area. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through Feb 4, “Expressions,” HCA’s annual members’ group show includes creative paintings, photographs, printmaking and more. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Through Feb 28, “Heaven & Earth & The Space Between,” featuring paintings by Marilee Ford and Sharon Feissel. Reception, Jan 13 at 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Feb 11, “Year of the Dog,” it’s the Chinese year of the dog, and several artists present their distinctive look at man’s best friend. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Sebastopol Gallery

Through Jan 27, “… Creatures Big & Small,” assemblage artist Rebeca Trevino and oils painter Jeff Watts display new works as Sebastopol Gallery celebrates a decade in in the


community. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200. Through Apr 1, “Sebastopol Depot Centennial,” Western Sonoma County Historical Society celebrate 100 years since the construction of the depot that served the P&SR Railroad and is now the Society’s headquarters. 261 S Main St, Sebastopol. Thurs-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.6711.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Through Jan 31, “Caldwell Snyder Ten-Year Anniversary Show,” the gallery marks a decade in Napa Valley and displays works by Deladier Almeida, Siddharth Parasnis, Eva Navarro and others. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Napa Main Library

Through Jan 31, “French Life,” photographer Karen Eberwein’s works look at traditional, charming images of day-to-day life from her year in France. 580 Coombs St, Napa. Mon-Thurs, 10 to 9; FriSat, 10 to 6. 707.253.4070.

Comedy Mean Dave

A regular at comedy clubs in San Francisco and Sacramento, the cynical and hilarious standup performs in the North Bay with Nina G and a special surprise guest. Jan 20, 7pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Events After Hours Beauty Night Join a fun night with makeup lessons to achieve a different hollywood looks tailored to your skin tone, with treat bar and photos. Jan 19, 6:30pm. $45. Mad Mod Shop, 6780 McKinley St #140, Sebastopol. 707.329.6113.

The Bowl

Annual event features artist created, handmade ceramics bowls, with a silent auction, Mexican feast and Mariachi entertainment, supporting the center’s ceramics studio. Jan 20, 5pm. $35-$50. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

An evening of information addresses the daunting questions about rebuilding in a fire ecology and engaging the resources for a resilient recovery. Jan 22, 6pm. Free. Christ Church United Methodist, 1717 Yulupa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8902.

Duty to Warn

Mental health experts from the grassroots movement “Duty to Warn “ speak about the growing danger of Donald Trump in public office. Jan 20, 2pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Fueling the Resistance Celebration Indivisible Sonoma County hosts a party to commemorate a year of protecting democracy and toast to a triumphant 2018. Jan 19, 6pm. by donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Golden Dragon Acrobats

Chinese touring company combines award-winning acrobatics, traditional dance and spectacular costumes. Jan 21, 3pm. $16-$21. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Roe v Wade Birthday Celebration

Local female artists, performers and crafters come together for a benefit show supporting Planned Parenthood. Jan 20, 7pm. $10-$20. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Wedding Expo

Northern California’s biggest bridal show is back. Jan 20, 12pm. $12-$20. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Women’s March Napa Valley 2018

Gather at city hall and march to the Napa Expo, where music, speakers and more commemorate last year’s nationwide Women’s March. Jan 20, 10am. Free. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa. 707.253.4900.

Women’s March Santa Rosa 2018

Gathering and rally marks the anniversary of last year’s national women’s march with key speakers, music, community groups and

children’s activities. Jan 20, 10am. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa. 707.701.3620.

Women’s March Sebastopol 2018

Event takes on the themes of the recent Times’ Up movement against harassment and abuse. Jan 20, 12pm. Sebastopol Plaza, Weeks Way, Sebastopol. 707.522.9305.

Film Crazywise

Groundbreaking doc looks at the treatment of people with mental illness and how shamanic cultures treat them with compassion. Discussion follows screening. Jan 19, 7pm. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

David Hockney at the Royal Academy of Arts Exhibition on Screen Series screens the documentary on the popular British artist with in-depth and intimate interviews. Wed, Jan 24, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Dirtbag: The Legend of Fred Beckey

Alexander Valley Film Society hosts a screening of the doc about one of the world’s most notorious rock climbers. Jan 22, 7pm. Raven Film Center. 415 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.525.8909.

Food & Farm Film Fest

See short films from around the world dealing with the topic at hand. Jan 17, 6pm. $10. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Lifeworks Takes You to the Movies

a private showing of “The Greatest Showman” benefits LifeWorks programs that provide therapy services to local underprivileged and impoverished individuals and families. Jan 18, 6pm. $50. Raven Film Center. 415 Center St, Healdsburg. 707.525.8909.

The Opera House

Award-winning documentary filmmaker Susan Froemke surveys the rich history of New York City’s famous Metropolitan Opera. Wed, Jan 17, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Then the Wind Changed

Film about an Australian community’s difficult but inspiring recovery from devastating bush fires is screened with a discussion. Jan 21, 3:30pm. by donation. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.2398.

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Food & Drink Crab Feed & Auction

Thirty-seventh annual crab feed is hosted by Native Sons of the Golden West. Reservations recommended. Jan 20, 5:30pm. Napa County Fairgrounds, 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga. 707.942.9525.

Napa Craft Beer & Spirits Festival

Meet and mingle with local brewers and taste from over 70 craft selections, with chefs pairing bites to brews and music Jan 20, 12pm. $15-$135. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Napa Valley Restaurant Week

Locals and visitors are invited to dine throughout the valley and experience the legendary food and wine culture. Jan 21-28. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa, visitnapavalley. com.

Oxbow Market Tenth Anniversary

Napa Valley’s gathering place for great food, wine and local, artisan products celebrating its 10th anniversary throughout 2018 with a year of surprises beginning with a kick-off community event. Jan 20, 2pm. Free. Oxbow Public Market, 610 First St, Napa. 707.226.6529.

Yoga & Beer

Beginner-friendly, Vinyasastyle yoga class goes well with drinking fine craft beer. Sun, Jan 21, 10:30am. $12. Cooperage Brewing Co, 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787.

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Public meeting focuses on recommendations for improving the ) Sonoma County

26

Learn the Craft North Bay brews and spirits find balance in new festival

Wine country isn’t all about wine. Napa County spotlights the wide world of brewing at the inaugural Napa Craft Beer & Spirits Festival, taking place this weekend after being rescheduled from October due to the wildfires. More than 35 regional breweries will be pouring 70 craft-beer selections, with powerhouse brewers like Lagunitas, Anderson Valley and Bear Republic rubbing elbows with upstarts like Napa small-batch brewers Tannery Bend Beerworks (pictured) and San Francisco “farm-to-barrel” brewers Almanac Beer Company. In addition to hops and barley-based brews, several local spirits shine in exciting cocktails concocted by expert mixologist Mason Salicetti. Several chefs also pair the libations with flavorful bites in a Connoisseur Lounge that features live music from popular party band the King Street Giants (formerly the Dixie Giants). General admission gets you in the door, but serious tasters may want to get the VIP unlimited pass, which offers an hour headstart on the festivities. A portion of tickets sales benefits the Schoolbox Project, which helps refugees through education and art programs, and Napa Valley Share the Care, which connects older adults with advocacy services in the area. Napa Craft Beer & Spirits Festival happens on Saturday, Jan. 20, at the Napa Valley Opera House, 1030 Main St., Napa. 1pm; VIP starts at noon (21 and over only). $25–$125. napacraftbeerfestival.com. —Charlie Swanson

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 17-23, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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Sheriff’s Office. Jan 24, 6pm. Free. Healdsburg Community Center, 1557 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.3303.

California Yesterday & Today

One of Petaluma Museum’s most cherished artifacts, Eugene Urbain’s masterpiece painting “California Yesterday & Today,” is examined in a presentation. Jan 20, 2pm. Free / donations welcome. Petaluma Historical Library & Museum, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

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Book talk by author John Schubert is the first in a monthly lecture series showcasing different aspects of Sonoma County. Jan 17, 7pm. $5. Petaluma Historical Library & Museum, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

In Conversation: Sue Hodson & Helaine Glick on Jack London

Two curators and experts on London speak about his experiences as a photographer, in conjunction with the SVMA’s current exhibit. Jan 21, 2pm. $15. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

It’s Alive: An Introduction to Soil

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Talk covers the living nature of soil, dimensions of soil health, good and bad practices and carbon sequestration. Jan 20, 10:30am. Petaluma Library, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.9801.

Self & Other

Occupy Sonoma County presents a tech-in with educator Bill Say about ways we divide ourselves from other people. Jan 22, 7pm. by donation. Peace & Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8902.

Readings Book Passage

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Jan 17, 7pm, “The Largesse of the Sea Maiden” with various authors, a tribute to Denis Johnson. Jan 18, 7pm, “The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump” with Tom Singer and Bandy Lee. Jan 20, 7pm, “Velvet on a Tuesday Afternoon” with Clive Rosengren. Jan 21, 1pm, “Bury the Past” with James

L’Etoile. Jan 21, 4pm, “Drop Dead Red” with Glenda Carroll. Jan 21, 7pm, “Aegean April” with Jeffrey Siger. Jan 22, 7pm, “Green” with Sam GrahamFelsen. Jan 23, 7pm, “Mindful Parenting in a Messy World” with Michelle Gale. Jan 24, 7pm, “Rebel” with Nick Nolte, acclaimed actor reads from his intimate memoir. Ticket includes signed book. $32. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Brix

Jan 21, 5pm, “Wine Country Women of Napa Valley” with various authors. 7377 St. Helena Hwy, Napa 707.944.2749.

Compline Wine Bar, Restaurant & Merchant

Jan 21, 4pm, “The Wine Bible” with Karen MacNeil, in conversation with winemakers Cathy Corison and Aaron Pott. Includes bits, wine and a autographed copy of the book. $75. 1300 First St, #312, Napa 707.492.8150.

Falkirk Cultural Center Jan 18, 7:30pm, Marin Poetry Center presents Martha Ronk and Brian Turner. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael 415.485.3438.

Many Rivers Books & Tea

Jan 18, 7:30pm, “Beyond Psychotherapy: the Intelligence Prior to Thought” with Jeff Tipp. $5. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.8871.

Napa Main Library

Jan 20, 2pm, “Achtung Baby” with Sara Zaske. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Jan 19, 7pm, “A Circle of Elephants” with Michael David Fels. Free. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Osher Marin JCC

Jan 24, 5pm, “Israel: A Concise History of a Nation Reborn” with Daniel Gordis. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael 415.444.8000.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 23, 4pm, “Hilo Book 4: Waking the Monsters” with Judd Winick. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Jan 18, 7pm, “Writing as a Path to Awakening” with Albert Flynn DeSilver. 775

Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Community Center

Jan 19, 7pm, “WTF?: What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us” with Tim O’Reilly. $10-$50. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol 707.823.1511.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Jan 19-20, 7pm, “Connections” with Off the Page Readers Theater, featuring 12 local writers and music by Hank Levine. $10-$15. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Theater The Children’s Hour

Ross Valley Players present the vital contemporary play, banned from stages in London and Boston when it first debuted in 1934. Jan 18-Feb 11. $12-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

The Dining Room

Six actors change roles, personalities and ages with virtuoso skill to create a mosaic of interrelated scenes in this Sonoma Arts Live production. Jan 19-Feb 4. $22-$37. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

8x10 Play Festival

Lucky Penny’s annual showcase of short plays packs eight original 10-minute works into one eclectic program. Jan 19-Feb 4. $22-$32. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Honky Tonk Angels

Three gutsy gals sing their way to stardom in this Nashvillebased revue featuring country music classics. Through Feb 4. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.


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For the week of January 17

ARIES (March 21–April 19) Many American women did not have the right to vote until Aug. 18, 1920. On that day, the Tennessee General Assembly became the 36th state legislature to approve the Nineteenth Amendment, thus sealing the legal requirements to change the U.S. Constitution and ensure women’s suffrage. The ballot in Tennessee was close. At the last minute, 24-year-old legislator Harry T. Burns changed his mind from no to yes, thanks to a letter from his mother, who asked him to “be a good boy” and vote in favor. I suspect that in the coming weeks, Aries, you will be in a pivotal position not unlike Burns’. Your decision could affect more people than you know. Be a good boy or good girl. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

In the coming weeks, Destiny will be calling you and calling you and calling you, inviting you to answer its summons. If you do indeed answer, it will provide you with clear instructions about what you will need to do to expedite your ass in the direction of the future. If on the other hand you refuse to listen to Destiny’s call, or hear it and refuse to respond, then Destiny will take a different tack. It won’t provide any instructions, but will simply yank your ass in the direction of the future.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Looks like the Season of a Thousand and One Emotions hasn’t drained and frazzled you. Yes, there may be a pool of tears next to your bed. Your altar might be filled with heaps of ashes, marking your burnt offerings. But you have somehow managed to extract a host of useful lessons from your tests and trials. You have surprised yourself with the resilience and resourcefulness you’ve been able to summon. And so the energy you’ve gained through these gritty triumphs is well worth the price you’ve had to pay. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Every relationship is unique. The way you connect with another person— whether it’s through friendship, romance, family or collaborative projects—should be free to find the distinctive identity that best suits its special chemistry. Therefore, it’s a mistake to compare any of your alliances to some supposedly perfect ideal. Luckily, you’re in an astrological period when you have extra savvy about cultivating unique models of togetherness. So I recommend that you devote the coming weeks to deepening and refining your most important bonds. LEO (July 23–August 22) During recent weeks, your main tasks have centered around themes often associated with strain and struggle: repair, workaround, reassessment, jury-rigging, adjustment, compromise. Amazingly, Leo, you have kept your suffering to a minimum as you have smartly done your hard work. In some cases you have even thrived. Congratulations on being so industrious and steadfast! Beginning soon, you will glide into a smoother stage of your cycle. Be alert for the inviting signs. Don’t assume you’ve got to keep grunting and grinding. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) created four versions of his iconic artwork The Scream. Each depicts a person who seems terribly upset, holding his head in his hands and opening his mouth wide as if unleashing a loud shriek. In 2012, one of these images of despair was sold for almost $120 million. The money went to the son of a man who had been Munch’s friend and patron. Can you think of a way that you and yours might also be able to extract value or get benefits from a negative emotion or a difficult experience? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to do just that. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) “I think I like my brain best in a bar fight with my heart,” says poet Clementine von Radics. While I appreciate that perspective, I advise you to do the opposite in the coming weeks. This will be a phase of your astrological cycle when you should definitely support your heart over your brain in bar fights, wrestling matches, shadow boxing contests, tugs of war, battles of wits and messy arguments. Here’s one of the most important reasons why I say this: Your brain would be inclined to keep the conflict going until one party or the other suffers

BY ROB BREZSNY

ignominious defeat, whereas your heart is much more likely to work toward a win-win conclusion.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

When he was 24 years old, Scorpio-born Zhu Yuanzhang (1328– 1398) was a novice monk with little money who had just learned to read and write. He had spent years as a wandering beggar. By the time he was 40 years old, he was the emperor of China and founder of the Ming Dynasty, which ruled for 276 years. What happened in between? That’s a long story. Zhu’s adventurousness was a key asset, and so was his ability as an audacious and crafty tactician. His masterful devotion to detailed practical matters was also indispensable. If you are ever in your life going to begin an ascent even remotely comparable to Zhu’s, Scorpio, it will be in the coming 10 months. Being brave and enterprising won’t be enough. You must be disciplined and dogged, as well.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

In 1892, the influential Atlantic Monthly magazine criticized Sagittarian poet Emily Dickinson, saying she “possessed an extremely unconventional and grotesque fancy.” It dismissed her poetry as incoherent, and declared that an “eccentric, dreamy, half-educated recluse” like her “cannot with impunity set at defiance the laws of gravitation and grammar.” This dire diss turned out to be laughably wrong. Dickinson is now regarded as one of the most original American poets. I offer this story up as a pep talk for you, Sagittarius. In the coming months, I suspect you’ll be reinventing yourself. You’ll be researching new approaches to living your life. In the course of these experiments, others may see you as being in the grip of unconventional or grotesque fantasy. They may consider you dreamy and eccentric. I hope you won’t allow their misunderstandings to interfere with your playful yet serious work.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Bubble gum is more elastic and less sticky than regular chewing gum. That’s why you can blow bubbles with it. A Capricorn accountant named Walter Diemer invented it in 1928 while working for the Fleer Chewing Gum Company. At the time he finally perfected the recipe, the only food dye he had on hand was pink. His early batches were all that color, and a tradition was born. That’s why even today, most bubble gum is pink. I suspect a similar theme may unfold soon in your life. The conditions present at the beginning of a new project may deeply imprint the future evolution of the project. So try to make sure those are conditions you like! AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “When one door closes, another opens,” said inventor Alexander Graham Bell. “But we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened.” Heed his advice, Aquarius. Take the time you need to mourn the lost opportunity. But don’t take more than the time you need. The replacement or alternative to what’s gone will show up sooner than you think. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Gilbert Stuart painted the most famous portrait of America’s first president, George Washington. It’s the image on the U.S. one-dollar bill. And yet Stuart never finished the masterpiece. Begun in 1796, it was still a work-inprogress when Stuart died in 1828. Leonardo da Vinci had a similar type of success. His incomplete painting The Virgin and Child with St. Anne hangs in the Louvre in Paris, and his unfinished Adoration of the Magi has been in Florence’s Uffizi Gallery since 1671. I propose that Stuart and da Vinci serve as your role models in the coming weeks. Maybe it’s not merely OK if a certain project of yours remains unfinished; maybe that’s actually the preferred outcome.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

JANUARY 17-23, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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First Friday, Feb 2, 2018 5 to 8pm. A casual evening whereby SOFA artists open their studios with small works & other art on display before Valentines. Little can be big. SOFA is located within the South A block just behind Juilliard Park.

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What’s More Local than being Employee-Owned? Roxanne Recommends

Meet Roxanne Abruzzo-Backman Deli Coordinator

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January 17-23, 2018

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January 17-23, 2018