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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | JANUARY 10-16, 2018 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.36

Health & Wellness Issue Feds threaten California‘s emergent cannabis industry p12

Not So Fast CALISTOGA BUILDS P8

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Cover illustration by Raisa Yavneh. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

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Legal Pot Meets Sessions COV E R STO RY P 1 2 Santa Rosa as Bike Hub A RTS & I D EAS P 17 David Templeton Takes a Bow STAG E P 19 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p10 Swirl p11 Cover Feature p12

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Raisa Yavneh is an Occidental-based illustrator. She has worked on a range of projects from maps to murals to anatomical illustrations. In her free time, she enjoys walking through the redwoods and scanning the night sky for UFOs. Find her at Raisayavney.com and on Instagram @dumptruck.jpg.


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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Back to Nature Driving home into Sonoma County along Highway 12 recently, I was distracted by the brightly lit sign of a cross on a well-recognized hillside. Could this be a new version of the cross that had been visible from walks around Spring Lake for so many years? The same cross that had been debated by the community, then left to recede naturally into the landscape after its creator was denied access in 2012? I thought this matter had been put to rest.

The controversy over this cross has been around for 35 years. In a 2015 Press Democrat article, Chris Smith addressed the dispute saying, “The only opinions that matter are those of the couple who own the property on which the cross resides.” The owners of the property wanted trespassing to stop, and urged neighbors to contact the police. Owner Suzanne Merner is quoted as saying, “It’s really time the hillside return to the state it was in.” She appealed to everyone to end the clash that was worsening the scarring of the land. “It’s become an eyesore.”

THIS MODERN WORLD

That was before the cross became electrified. Does anyone know if this cross is even legal? Is the property zoned commercial? This is not a yard ornament; it’s as big as an advertising sign. I agree with the property owner. Let’s allow this piece of land to return to its natural state.

JANYCE BODESON Santa Rosa

By Tom Tomorrow

Animal-Free It seems as though most folks aren’t concerned whether or not animals are used in the products they consume. What they may not realize is the huge potential here to lessen the impacts on our environment, the animals and our health. I simply suggest that we should be aware of our food sources, and to consider our own ideals in the process. It can be as easy as choosing dark chocolate over milk, or buying potato chips without milk powder. Have you tried the awesome nut milks or nondairy cheeses? We don’t need a cow to make these products great.

RAY COOPER

Petaluma

What If? I wonder what the NRA’s response would be to a mass joining by members of the Antifa movement or Communist Party? At the very least, it would be fascinating to watch these Second Amendment obsessives trying to keep such an event from happening.

THOMAS RICHMAN

South Brisbane, Australia

Way to Go! I want to thank the Trump administration for finally deciding that it is time to enforce this country’s laws against the sale and use of cannabis. Until now, our country has been losing the drug war and it is time to finally win. In fact, we are losing so badly that the cannabis industry employs hundreds of thousands of Californians with quality jobs and is poised to raise over a billion dollars for our state. But, with concerted and immediate efforts, we will finally be able to take the moral high ground and imprison hundreds of thousands of Californians, for not “a” billion dollars but for ”many” billions of dollars.

GABRIEL FROYMOVICH Healdsburg

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


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Down at the Death Cafe Coffee, snacks and the end of your life BY SHEPHERD BLISS

P

utting “death” and “cafe” together seems odd. In the United States, many ignore mortality. Americans tend not to accept that they will die, much less talk openly about it, especially with strangers. Going to a favorite cafe is something to enjoy. Being in a cafe talking about death may not seem appealing, yet it can be invigorating. Death Cafes began in Europe. More than 5,400 monthly Death Cafes now exist in over 52 countries. Initiated in 2010 by John Underwood in London, they soon began happening in Sonoma County. Adults sit around tables, share snacks and tea, and talk about their experiences, hopes and fears. The idea is to create a comfortable, informal and respectful environment where people can talk openly. In Santa Rosa, Tess Lorraine has been facilitating them monthly since 2014, and will begin offering them at the Sebastopol Senior Center on Friday, Jan. 19, from 3:30pm to 5pm (open to all adults). Santa Rosa gatherings are at the Fountaingrove Lodge on Saturdays. “As we age, conversations happen regarding degenerative and life-threatening diagnoses,” Lorraine says. “The cost of denial is that we lose opportunities for the wisdom, growth and healing that can occur when we share authentically. Death is our final frontier and our lasting legacy.” According to deathcafe.com, “At a Death Cafe, people gather to eat cake, drink tea and discuss death. Our objective is ‘to increase awareness of death with a view to help people make the most of their (finite) lives’ . . . There is no intention to lead people to any conclusion, product or course of action.” Death Cafes offer a structure and format that encourage conversation. Laughter is not unusual, especially as people get to know each other and feel comfortable enough to share in a safe, facilitated environment. Death Cafes are an indication of growing death awareness. For more information and to get on the monthly email list for Sonoma County Death Cafe meetings, write to tesslorraine@mac.com. Shepherd Bliss is a retired college teacher. He can be reached at 3sb@comcast.net. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

IN THE PIPELINE Last year’s fires made the North Bay’s housing market even tighter. A new housing project

in Calistoga is scheduled for construction next year if approved by the city council.

Calistoga Builds Construction of 50 units of housing on track near where Tubbs fire began BY CHRIS ROONEY

N

apa and Sonoma counties are in the early stages of rebuilding as the region recovers from the massive fires that decimated the region last year.

In a stroke of good timing, Calistoga, the city where the Tubbs fire began on Oct. 8, has already approved a condominium project for 50 units of sorely needed housing.

Housing has become an urgent need for those whose homes were destroyed in the fire. Last month, the Calistoga Vista development cleared the city’s planning commission; the city council votes on the project next week. The Tubbs fire began Oct. 8 north of the city limits on Tubbs Lane. Fierce winds blew the fire into Sonoma County and Santa Rosa with devastating results. Calistoga lost 30 homes on the outskirts of the city.

Calistoga Mayor Chris Canning said the market-rate housing would be geared toward lower and middle-income residents— precisely those suffering from a dearth of available housing made worse by the fires. Calistoga Vista, located on Grant Street, will offer 46 condominiums and four live/work townhomes. The development includes 18 studio units, 15 one-bedrooms homes, two two-bedroom units and two three-bedroom condos.

While Canning predicted a waiting list for applicants, it hasn’t yet been created. The new homes can’t come fast enough, but construction won’t begin until early 2019. New development is often a contentious issue in Calistoga; the Vista project, however, appears to have been improved with minimal opposition. There were two public forums on the project last year. At the first one, no members of the public showed up. At the second, there were four people in attendance. The project is designed to be eco-friendly. Napa-based architecture and construction firm Healthy Buildings created the project and designed it for LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification. Solar power and other environmentally conscious technology will be part of the design, says Lisa Batto, managing principal at Healthy Buildings. It’s only 50 homes, but with many people still displaced from the fires, it’s a start, says Canning. Another well-timed development is the city’s new Boys & Girls Club, which began its first full year of use in 2018. The Napa Valley Vintners Boys & Girls Clubs of St. Helena and Calistoga clubhouse benefited from a $10.5 million capital campaign that drew from donors across Napa County. Had the fundraising campaign been waged after the fires, it would have faced competition from the many fire-recovery fundraising efforts. The facility’s primary purpose is to serve the area’s youth, but its versatility may provide a bigger boon to the community, says Canning. The 14,000-square-foot clubhouse and kitchen double as a rental venue. Fundraising events are still being held to help those impacted by the fires, and the facility offers a venue for those events. Canning hopes rental revenue for other events like weddings and quinceañeras will help keep the club’s coffers filled in the uncertain economic climate following the fires.


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The race for Sonoma County Sheriff is heating up in the new year, and last week SCSO Captain Mark Essick nabbed the endorsement of interim Sheriff Rob Giordano and three county supervisors. In a release, Essick reported that Shirlee Zane, David Rabbitt and James Gore have each endorsed him. Essick is the the only candidate for sheriff who is an employee of the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office. The other candidates are outspoken reformer John Mutz from Los Angeles, the most demonstrably progressive of the candidates (he initiated reforms in L.A. following the Rodney King incident), and Santa Rosa City Councilman (and former Santa Rosa Police Department officer) Ernesto Olivares. Windsor Sheriff Carlos Basurto, also a member of the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office, dropped out of the race last month. Among a slew of posted endorsements, Olivares has grabbed support from numerous past and current Santa Rosa elected officials, along with getting the nod from U.S. Congressman Mike Thompson and California State Assemblyman Marc Levine. Mutz, the former police chief in Los Angeles, has been endorsed by the likes of San Francisco police chief William Scott, along with a number of community members and activists from around the county. Essick’s posted endorsement list is very heavy with current members of the SCSO, and includes department spokesman Sgt. Spencer Crum. There were six contenders

to replace Sheriff Steve Freitas back in May 2017, and Freitas had endorsed Basurto before he dropped out of the race. Freitas left office for health reasons and was replaced by Giordano last August. He pledged to stay out of the race even as his public profile was enhanced mightily by his media presence during the North Bay fires. A profile of Giordano in the Press Democrat from late in October 2017 noted that Supervisor Zane was then pushing him to change his mind and run. Now they’re both endorsing Essick. The primary is in June, and the issue will be decided in November—an election of the first uncontested sheriff’s candidate in two decades. In other county-related election news, District Attorney Jill Ravitch has announced she is running for re-election.

Fake News Napa State Sen. Bill Dodd is at it again. He just reintroduced his “fake news” bill in Sacramento (SB 830) after it stalled in the Assembly in the 2017 session. His bill sets out to add media-literacy education to school curriculums to address the real-time concerns of educators that kids are confused and overwhelmed by the info offered on social media. “The rise of fake and misleading news is deeply concerning,” says Dodd, “as is the habit by some to dismiss real facts as ‘fake news’ just because they don’t like them.” In offering his bill again, Dodd cites a 2016 Stanford study which found that 82 percent of middle school students in California can’t tell an advertisement from a news story. That’s a sad fact which cannot be helped with the advent of all those confusing “sponsored content” news stories that are popping

The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.

up all over the regional daily newspapers. The bill has naturally picked up support from media-literacy advocates, along with a range of bipartisan lawmakers. Also on board is Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom who says it’s critical to teach kids how to “discern factual information from farce.” It’s a fact that Newsom is running for governor this year.

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Tax News It’s also a fact that state Sen. Mike McGuire hosted an informal hearing on Jan. 10 to talk about the ways the recently enacted federal tax reform bill will impact Californians. Quite badly, is the general upshot in a release from McGuire’s office this week, which highlighted how the new law would hit the 99 percent hard, and those are his words. McGuire notes that among other damage done or proposed to be done, the bill will “ruthlessly cut the health insurance of 1.7 million Californians.” The hearing is archived at senate.gov.

Ember Alert A couple weeks ago we wrote about a pending legislative push by the North Bay state delegation to bring reform to California’s inadequate early warning system for emergencies (“Next Time”, Dec. 27). This week the lawmakers made good on their pledge and introduced SB 833, which seeks to bring various emergency-warning systems around the state under one set of protocols. Call it the “Ember Alert” bill. The push was prompted by shortcomings in the regional early-warning system which were smoked out during the North Bay fires of October. —Tom Gogola

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Dining THREE-FER One roasted chicken can yield three different dishes.

Bird of Plenty

In the post-holiday doldrums, eating frugally does not mean sacrificing deliciousness BY STETT HOLBROOK

T

he holidays are over. Any Christmas or New Year’s meal leftovers are gone—or should be. What’s that smell? Check your fridge. Now comes the cold reality of recovering from any holiday overspending as the bills come due. I’ve got just the thing for the post-holiday belt-tightening: I call

it Three-Meal Chicken. It’s really three separate meals made from one humble yet generous bird: roast chicken, chicken tacos and chicken broth. And it will cost you about $20 or less. A roast chicken is one of those basic recipes that should be in everyone’s repertoire. The key for me is to generously salt the skin and inside of the bird at least 12 hours before cooking. This insures crispy skin and

juicy, moist meat. Also, be sure to bring your chicken up to room temperature before cooking. Going from refrigerator to oven adds cooking time since the chicken is stone cold. And that can mean a dry, overcooked bird. I sprinkle fresh thyme or rosemary in and on the chicken, and add chopped onions, garlic, carrots and potatoes to the same vessel I’m cooking the chicken in. I use a cast-iron skillet and

place the chicken on top of the vegetables so they bathe in chicken fat as they cook. I add a little olive oil and salt and pepper to help them along. Then it’s into a 375 degree oven for 60 minutes or so until the skin is beautifully browned and it feels like you can pull off a leg without too much trouble. After it’s done, let the chicken rest for about 15 minutes so the juices seep back into the meat. Cut it right out of the oven and juice will run onto your plate instead of into your mouth. So that’s the roast chicken. Now for the tacos, in particular a quick version of chicken tinga. Unless you fed a crowd, there should be meat left on the carcass. Pick it off and set aside. Reserve the pickedover carcass for the broth. In a skillet, sauté sliced onions in vegetable oil until soft and translucent, and then stir in a few diced chipotles, the kind that come in a can with sauce. Include some of the sauce, too, adding a bit of water if it gets too dry. Now stir in the chicken and heat through. Heat up some corn tortillas and eat it up. Now for the final act, the broth. One carcass is enough for this recipe but two is better. I throw my chicken bones into a plastic bag or a sealed container and store them in the freezer for just such an occasion. Fill a pot with a gallon or so of water. Put the chicken bones in. Simmer for two or three hours, taking care not to let the broth boil. Next, add roughly chopped carrots, celery, onion, a bay leaf and some black peppercorns. Simmer another 45 minutes. Strain the bones and vegetables and pour the broth into another pot or bowl. Season generously with salt. I like to squeeze in half a lemon. Taste and see if it’s to your liking. You’ll probably want to add more salt. Add some sautéed fresh vegetables for a quick soup, or simply sip your broth on its own as you look out the window upon a cold, winter night.


Tocai Tip Unconventional portfolio at Bank Club Wine Collective BY JAMES KNIGHT

W

ine fans, next time you find yourself daytripping in Guerneville, but yoked to a boutique-hopping death march with family or companions, here’s the strategy: curios and ice cream for them, wine for you. Until recently, picturesque Korbel was the only wine stop on the way into town; now Equality Vines anchors the town’s former Mercantile five-and-dime building with pride. The Bank Club Wine Collective takes a little more footwork to find—not that the

Bank Club Wine Collective, 16290 Main St., Guerneville. Open Friday–Sunday, noon–5pm. Tasting fee, $15. 707.604.6938.

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sturdy artifact of the Beaux-Arts style it’s located in doesn’t make a statement on Main Street. Designed in 1921 by architect Carl Ingomar Warnecke, according to the historical plaque, the Bank of Guerneville building somehow survived 30 years of neglect until it was restored by Robert Anderson Pullum in 2015. The tasting room is secreted away behind a Russian River Historical Society exhibit about the glory days of the river vacation wonderland, which in turn is tucked behind an ice cream shop, pie company and boutique gift shop. It’s got a small bar, tables for two, a lounge area and a nice little “library” of wine books to kill some time with. The deeply fruited, chocolate and plum cordial–inflected Baldassari 2015 Russian River Pinot Noir ($42) comes from one of two family wineries in this collective. Both of them are bona fide winemakers’ wineries—that is, most of the principals have day jobs in the industry, and are not simply ordering up consultant-made juice like high-priced takeout (not that, you know, there’s anything wrong with that). Father-and-son team Dom Michael and Matt Michael run this outfit—the name’s a tribute to ancestor Vincenzo Baldassari. The rich and chocolatey 2015 Nolan Vineyard Bennett Valley Syrah ($35) is a tribute to this underappreciated varietal. INIZI Wines, cofounded by A. J. and Jen Filipelli and John and Kirsti Harley, brings more of the unexpected to the table, rare Italian varietals like nutty, broadly acidic 2016 Tocai Friulano ($24), a Sangiovese blend, and 2014 Calistoga Charbono ($32), which brings old wine casks and leather to mind. The chewy palate is poised between acidic tang and puckery tannin, but this rare varietal is famously food-friendly. An old school California red with obscure origins, Charbono is grown on just 80 or so acres today. OK, so a curio for you, too.

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Alabama Slammer Jeff Sessions rains on California’s pot parade BY TOM GOGOLA

canning the daily headlines for a minute there on New Year’s Day, it looked like the biggest cannabis issues facing California in 2018 would center on some of the unsettled areas of policy that attended the new law that legalized the sale and purchase of recreational pot in the country’s largest and most diverse state.

S

Full legalization, which occurred after a rousing and affirming vote by Californians via Proposition 64 in 2016, was a moment decades in the making. Possessing up to an ounce of cannabis has been legal in the state since last January. As of New Year’s Day 2018, the new day had indeed fully dawned. The next-day headlines spoke of long lines at places like Peace in Medicine in Sebastopol; they spoke of a cannabis-consuming populace coming out of the shadows, surprising for the number of elderly imbibers of the health-enhancing plant; and they hinted at a growing pro-pot bias even among non-users beginning to feel that a bush that springs from God’s green earth ought to be liberated from the grips of a self-defeating federal drug law that bans it outright. The moment of full legalization in California evoked the staying power, and the suasion power, of the classic cannabis-freedom tome, The Emperor Wears No Clothes. The book came out during the “Just Say No” days of 1985 and underscored the cultural

history of hemp and cannabis and their suppression in the United States. It’s a book that’s often cited as the jump-off point for a decades-long push for cannabis access as a civil right. The Emperor Wears No Clothes was and remains the major printed-matter driver for cannabis-legalization efforts in this country (sorry, it wasn’t those Cheech and Chong movies). So on New Year’s Day, who could not take a moment to marvel at the somewhat ironic fact that, just as a president was at his most wretchedly naked and exposed—thanks to a blistering new book, Fire and Fury, from journalist Michael Wolff—the sixth largest economy in the world had just thrown cannabis into its commerce mix with very little actual fuss. The naked-truth moment signaling cannabis comeuppance and general acceptance was not to last, as we all now know. On Jan. 4, in a move that was shocking, while not surprising at all (a wearying hallmark of the current administration), Attorney General

Jefferson Sessions stepped in and rescinded the Cole Memo. The memorandum, undertaken under President Barack Obama and former Deputy U.S. Attorney General James Cole, eased the way for states like California to enact legal weed regimes without fear of a federal crackdown on peaceful pot people and their plants and extracts. It sought to address a looming schizophrenia between states’ rights under the 10th Amendment of the Constitution, and a Federal Controlled Substances Act that equates cannabis with heroin and declares it has no medical value whatsoever. It also sought to highlight that the feds would still take an abiding interest in drug cartels and international drug trafficking, as it directed U.S. Attorneys to focus its prosecutorial discretion in that area and not work to stymie new state laws that legalized or decriminalized pot. The Sessions pushback on legal pot put the overall health and wellness of California’s landmark Proposition 64 into question, and with it, the health and wellness of the state’s millions of cannabis consumers, recreational and medical alike. As the month unfolds, nothing much has happened yet to amplify the Sessions announcement into on-the-ground action, but the tone and tenor of the news reports about cannabis at once shifted to consider the Sessions move and its potential implications. All eyes are now on the four U.S. Attorney’s offices in California, says Ellen Komp, deputy director of Cal NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws), who adds that the Cole Memo was a highly useful guide to state policymakers as they set out to create the new regulations that animate the state’s legalization regime. The upshot is that future states considering legalization won’t have a Cole Memo to look to for sanctioned guidance from the DOJ. Now, says Komp, attention shifts to the U.S attorneys who occupy or will occupy Department

of Justice prosecutors’ chairs in the state. One key post is in flux. Just as Sessions was announcing the rescinding of the Cole Memo, the Obama-appointed U.S. Attorney for Northern California, Brian Stretch, announced he was stepping down to join the national law firm of Sidley Austin. Pro-pot activists and state leaders were quick to lash out at Sessions, including California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who pledged to fight the antipot push from the Trump White House. In a statement, Lori Ajax, chief of California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control, said her office was conferring with Becerra and other states as a new bureaucracy now tangles with a new wrinkle from the feds. “We expect the federal government to respect the rights of states and the votes of millions of people across America, and if they won’t, Congress should act,” Ajax says. “Regardless, we’ll continue to move forward with the state’s regulatory processes covering both medicinal and adult-use cannabis consistent with the will of California’s voters, while defending our state’s laws to the fullest extent.” Republicans in legalized states, such as Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado, also vowed to fight the Sessions move which would undo, in that state, a legalization regime that’s brought in billions in new revenues—while not delivering, as has been widely reported, on opponents’ insistence that legal weed would lead to a spike in nonadult use. As the news of Sessions’ slapdown of the Cole Memorandum seeped out, progressive military veterans chimed in across social media to express their dismay over the lack of empathy for struggling vets, many of whom struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder and suicidal depression after their service. In recent years, cannabis has gained therapeutic acceptance among veterans and their caregivers for its various health benefits. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has itself been slow to follow, but did announce a new


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policy in December that allows VA doctors to at least talk about cannabis therapy, even if they can’t sanction it. “It’s up to the veteran to bring it up,” says Aaron Augustis of the new policy at the VA. Augustis founded the North Bay–based Veterans Cannabis Group in 2016 and has been pressuring the VA to embrace cannabis therapies ever since. At the VCG, the emphasis is on “getting healthy, not high,” and the nonprofit has been a leading advocate for cannabis therapies for veterans. On the group’s website, Augustis, its Marinbased founder and a U.S. Army combat veteran stresses that “We do not advocate cannabis as a cure-all, but as a medicinal tool that should be incorporated with other healthy tools and lifestyle choices.” Reflecting on Sessions’ revocation of the Cole Memo, Augustis says he’s glad to be in California, where Gov. Brown and Becerra have pledged to stand up for the state law. “We’re not going to follow the Sessions lead, essentially. But you never know, and it’s kind of scary and disturbing that someone so far away can have such a potential impact on something that we’re doing here.” To use the vernacular of the infantry, his organization is at the tip of a spear of health and wellness for a community of veterans with outsized rates of PTSD, suicide and addiction to opiates. Augustis, an Iraq War vet, says that moving forward, he hopes the “U.S. government [will] consider the veterans’ population a little bit more, as having more weight and meaning than the average citizen who has not served in the military.” All returning veterans are or have been federal employees, “who have been entrusted with weapons of mass destruction,” he says, along with providing intelligence up the chain of command, “so we could operate and execute missions and take out the enemy. So I would say to Sessions, ‘Why are you not listening to us now over this battle—the suicides, the ) 14

PARTY POOPER

The legalization celebration was still going when Jeff Sessions threatened a federal crackdown.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 0 -1 6, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Sessions ( 13

climbing

opiates, the PTSD—a battle of these different issues?’” As someone with a serviceconnected disability, Augustis says he took strong issue with Sessions infamous comment that “good people don’t smoke marijuana.” “Are you telling me that U.S. military veterans are not good people?”

training

t was curious that on the eve of the Sessions announcement instead of celebrating legal-weed access for all, pro-pot organizations offered words of caution in the so-called Blaze New World of recreational pot acceptance. Just as the state was about to enact legalization and thus fulfill a decades-long drive by NORML, the nation’s oldest prolegalization organization was on Dec. 29 sending out an email warning of the dangers of driving under the influence of cannabis. It seemed kind of a fuddy-duddy move when celebration was in order. But Komp says the organization was concerned about people who might jump in the car to buy some legal weed for the first time, perhaps smoke it, and then get back in the car. Not a good idea. DUI law was one of the pot policy areas that was perhaps left for another day as California pushed to enact Proposition 64 last year. In hashing out the various and complex intricacies of a legal pot rollout, state leaders did not set a legal threshold for THC intoxication, as has been done in other legal states, including Colorado and Nevada. There’s been a long-standing pushback to setting that threshold from organizations such as NORML. A useful explainer on the DUI conundrum over the New Year’s weekend that ran in the Los Angeles Times said the state had not set a low threshold because, for one thing, cannabis affects people in various ways, whereas alcohol pretty much gets people drunk and lowers their

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judgment in equally dangerous ways. Another reason: states like Colorado that do set the threshold have found themselves on the losing end of jury trials brought by the very people they’ve arrested on DUI charges. Those are expensive trials to lose.

‘We will continue to enforce state law, which allows for personal use of marijuana.’ Komp says that state guidance on DUIs and drugs is either inadequate or filled with scare tactics. NORML offered advice to bridge any DUI confusion for imbibers, and to maintain health and wellness behind the wheel: ease up on the edibles and be careful when you ingest them; for God’s sake don’t smoke and drive; and if you can’t stand on one foot for 30 seconds without losing your balance, don’t get in the car. Another concern that popped up after New Year’s in newspapers writing on the California initiative was whether the state would be able to fully leverage its new cannabis tax regime to achieve a maximally health revenue stream, in light of an expected rush-todispensaries push by liberated recreational users. Medicalcannabis purchases are not subject to the state sales tax that’s levied on recreational cannabis. The Sessions moved also highlighted the fraught health and wellness of our nation’s judicial system under an administration that has taken a less than friendly posture toward the rule of law and the role of the courts in meting out justice.


represents some 20,000 sheriffs across the country, issued its own statement of support for the move as it said confusion and a Colorado spike in DUI drug arrests had influenced its view: “We applaud the Attorney General for this action today that brings clarity on enforcement of the law by rescinding a confusing policy brought on by the previous administration that hindered law enforcement. This will allow sheriffs to carry out their mission of upholding the rule of law and keeping their communities safe.” The statement was sent to a Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office spokesman to gauge his view of the Sessions move. Speaking on behalf of Sheriff Rob Giordano, Sgt. Spencer Crum noted that Giordano’s “understanding [is] that Sessions is letting the attorneys general in each district decide how vigorously they want to prosecute federal law,” and added that “the sheriff would appreciate some attempt to rectify the conflict between state and federal law. We will continue to enforce state law, which allows for personal use of marijuana. Driving under the influence of marijuana will continue to be taken seriously. This federal decision doesn’t change anything we do in regards to marijuana enforcement.” Meanwhile, legalization advocates remain in a wait-andsee mode after the Sessions’ move and hope that Becerra and Ajax will use their offices to ensure a proper and legal rollout of the new law. NORML’s Komp says she was encouraged by their respective statements that highlighted the necessity of Proposition 64 participants to be in compliance with state law. That, she offered, may make it less likely for a federal crackdown to ensue. “It remains to be seen,” she says. “A lot will be at the discretion of the four district attorneys.” On Monday, the DOJ announced that the First Assistant U.S. Attorney under Stretch, Alex G. Tse, was named acting U.S. Attorney for the Northern District.

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That concern just got a whole lot more localized with the abrupt departure of U.S. Attorney Stretch. His exit was curious for its timing and telling for its implication. As the deeply Republican Modesto Bee pointed out last week from the heart of the wholesome Central Valley, “Stretch’s decision allows Sessions to appoint an interim U.S. attorney just as he announced he was rescinding an Obama-era policy that paved the way for legalized marijuana to flourish in California and other states.” Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Washington and Oregon have all made the leap in recent years. Last week, Lisa Murkowski, the Republican senator of Alaska, joined with Gardner in blasting the Sessions move as unhealthy for her state. Harsh pushback to Sessions also arrived from states that don’t currently have a recreational use law but do allow medical cannabis. The New York–based Cannabis Cultural Association (CCA) sued Sessions last week over his rescinding of the Cole Memo. The nonprofit works with low-income and underrepresented communities to participate in the legal weed industry with “an emphasis on criminal justice reform, access to medical cannabis and adult-use legalization.” Cannabis Cultural Association co-founder Nelson Guerrero blew the doors open on the implications of the Sessions move: “Rescinding the Cole Memorandum threatens patients’ access to life-saving medication and thwarts restoration of communities most impacted by cannabis prohibition, while jeopardizing the careers of over 150,000 full-time cannabisindustry employees and the collection of billions of dollars in valuable tax revenues.” The CCA is also committed to ending mass incarceration, whereas law enforcement has pledged to do its part to keep the jails and prisons full of nonviolent pot offenders. Following the Sessions announcement, the National Sheriffs’ Association, which


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 0 -1 6, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

ORCHESTRA OF VOICES San Francisco–based ensemble Chanticleer celebrate their 40th anniversary in 2018, starting with a concert on Friday, Jan. 12, at Green Music Center in Rohnert Park. See Clubs & Venues, p22. S A N TA R O S A

N A PA

S A N TA R O S A

SEBASTOPOL

Progress in Comics

Get the Dirt

Red-Hot Help

When Charles Schulz integrated his “Peanuts” comic strip in 1968 by introducing an African-American character named Franklin, it was seen as a cultural touchstone of the Civil Rights movement. The story behind Franklin actually begins with a letter written to Schulz by educator Harriet Glickman. The resulting correspondence reflects American attitudes on race. In honor of that benchmark event, the Charles M. Schulz Museum opens the exhibit ‘50 Years of Franklin,’ that includes those letters and some of the comic strips that Franklin first appeared in. The exhibit opens on Saturday, Jan. 13, at 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 10am to 5pm. $5–$12. 707.579.4452.

Any farmer or chef will tell you healthy food starts with healthy soil. This weekend, dirt gets its day at the Dirt to Dish weekend in Napa. The event’s highlight is a discussion with Alice Waters, founder and owner of Chez Panisse Restaurant, and Bob Cannard, farmer and founder of Green String Farm. Other offerings include a familyfriendly garden-to-table mac ’n’ cheese cooking demonstration, a soil tasting (yes, really), film screenings and an art show by Sonoma County artist Douglas Gayeton. Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 13–14, at CIA at Copia, 500 First St., Napa. The Alice Water event and mac ‘n’ cheese are $15; the rest is free. ciaatcopia.com/soil-weekend.

A pop-up theater experience in Sonoma County for the last few years, Lois Pearlman’s one-woman show, ‘Last of the Red Hot Tenants,’ tells the true story of Jean Herman, a Manhattan artist who refused to leave her rentcontrolled apartment when developers offered her more than $500,000. This weekend, Pearlman pops up with the show again in a benefit event for Undocufund, helping residents who lost homes and/or jobs in the recent fires but who do not have documentation to qualify for government aid. Last of the Red Hot Tenants takes on a new light in the North Bay on Sunday, Jan. 14, at the Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 2pm. $10–$20. 707.528.3009.

Remembering Johnny It’s been nine years since the music community in Sebastopol lost beloved guitarist Johnny Downer. Gone, but not forgotten, Downer is celebrated at the annual Johnny Downer Tribute this weekend. First, an invitational open mic brings together Downer’s many friends and bandmates, and the evening’s concert features Free Peoples, which Downer helped form in 2000, and other local favorites the Marshall House Project, B & the Hive and King Street Giants. Sunday, Jan. 14, at HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. Open mic, 11am; show, 6pm. $10. 707.829.7300.

—Charlie Swanson


LONG AND WINDING ROADS Andy Hampsten says Sonoma County offers a wealth of world-class rides.

Ride On

Cyclist Andy Hampsten opens the Astro Motel with a bike ride BY CHARLIE SWANSON

R

etired professional cyclist Andy Hampsten first visited Santa Rosa as a teenager in the early 1980s to train on the winding roads of Sonoma County at the invitation of Santa Rosa native and cyclist Gavin Chilcott. “My first ride was actually up Trinity Grade [in Sonoma

Valley],” says Hampsten. “It was so, so beautiful, really challenging riding, but just stunning and really fun.” While he’s never officially lived in Santa Rosa, the Boulder, Colo.– based Hampsten often visits several times a year to keep his riding chops up. “In all stages, I got to train in Santa Rosa, and that really helped my career,” he says. After a successful professional

riding career, these days Hampsten spends his time leading cycling tours of Tuscany with his company Cinghiale, and he hopes to be able to do something similar in Sonoma County. “Every direction out of Santa Rosa for cyclists is spectacular,” he says. Hampsten is also an investor in the Spinster Sisters restaurant, located in Santa Rosa’s South of A Street arts district. In addition,

he’s invested in the newly renovated Astro Motel, adjacent on Santa Rosa Avenue, owned and operated by the same folks who run the Spinsters Sisters. In a region bursting with scenic bike-riding options, Hampsten sees Santa Rosa and the Astro Motel as a potential new hub for both professional and amateur cycling enthusiasts. And he’s helping kick off the trend by leading a grand opening bike ride that launches from the Astro Motel on Thursday, Jan. 18. After fueling up with coffee in the motel’s stylish lounge and tuning up the bikes at the motel’s onsite repair shop, Hampsten will take a group out on several West Sonoma County roads leading to Occidental, Freestone and Sebastopol and back to Santa Rosa. After the ride, the Astro Motel’s official grand-opening celebration continues with a ribbon cutting, tour and reception. Both events require an RSVP by Jan. 13 to attend. The “West County Meander,” as Hampsten calls it, is one of his favorite rides in the North Bay. Starting with the Joe Rodota Trail, linking downtown Santa Rosa with Sebastopol, riders get to experience the picturesque apple orchards and wineries of Graton and Forestville that give way to the redwoods. Hampsten also likes the ranching country of the Sonoma Mountain and Lawndale route that circles from Santa Rosa to Glen Ellen and back to Rohnert Park. And for serious riders, he recommends Cavedale Road and Trinity Grade, “not because they’re fun on the legs,” says Hampsten, but because “the Valley of the Moon is so dramatic and gorgeous.” Going north out of Santa Rosa, Hampsten also ) 18 recommends the Chalk

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Arts Ideas

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Hampsten ( 17 Hill Loop in Windsor and cycling through the Alexander and Dry Creek valleys in Healdsburg. “And if I have energy, I go out Skaggs Springs all the way to the coast,” says Hampsten. “For me, that’s the super-classic ride.” Though Hampsten has not visited the North Bay since the October wildfires, he knows that extensive parts of some of these trails were decimated. “I watched it, horrified and terrified for friends and the people who did lose their lives and homes,” he says. “As a visitor to Santa Rosa, it's heartbreaking to see so many people lose so much.” Hampsten hopes he can take his model for group tours and translate it into a Sonoma County experience that begins and ends at the Astro. A once famously downtrodden den of vice, the Astro Motel’s retro-future charm has been revitalized into a minimalist boutique inn with 30-plus rooms outfitted with mid-century furnishings, original art and stylish amenities. “What I really love about this place the most is how many local artists came together to really make this place shine,” says the hotel’s day manager Sam Hamby. From the bathroom tiles to the fruit-tree-lined courtyard, the Astro’s aesthetic was conceived and crafted by North Bay hands. “The idea behind this is we’re bringing the community up by using the community,” says Hamby. The motel has already opened its doors as a FEMA-approved emergency lodging for victims of the wildfires, and hosted a New Year’s Eve concert in the lounge. “This place is completely changed now,” he says. “We’ve had so many people from the neighborhood stop by to say thank you, they never thought they’d see this.” Astro Motel grand opening and bike ride with Andy Hampsten happens Thursday, Jan. 18, 323 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. Ride at 9am; ribbon cutting at 2pm. Free; RSVP required by Jan. 13. 707.200.4655.


CURTAIN CALL As David Templeton

steps down, Harry Duke takes his place.

Exit Stage Left After 16 years, ‘Boho’ theater critic hangs it up

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

W

hen contemplating the ending of things, we often feel compelled to look back to the beginning. This being my final column as the Bohemian’s theater reviewer, I thought I’d do the same. When I first started writing for the Bohemian, I was mainly known as a film writer. Though I’d had a fair amount of stage experience, having launched my own Southern California theater company (and, um, puppet troupe) in the late 1970s, my North Bay journalistic efforts had been almost entirely focused on movies, local news and general arts reporting.

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Stage

Then something happened that changed my life. The Bohemian found itself in need of a theater critic. For many reasons, mainly the fact that nobody else wanted it, I took the gig. It made sense. Unlike some of the writers who’d previously reviewed, I actually loved theater. I’d written and directed shows, read plenty of Russian and Elizabethan plays (for fun!) and knew what it was like to stand out there in front of an audience. I strongly believed in theater as a vital, compassionbuilding, deeply humane art form. Reviewing is a tremendous responsibility, not just to the artists who create theater. A critic also has a responsibility to audiences, confirmed theater junkies who deserve to get their money’s worth every time. After 16 years, I’ve decided to let the title of theater critic go to pursue writing and performing without the knotty tangle of complications that come from reviewing theater while making it. I leave with a heart full of gratitude. I had the opportunity to talk and write about an art form I cherish. I have seen hundreds of stage shows around the Bay Area, and along the way have gotten to know many of the artists who work so hard to create theatrical magic onstage. Most significantly, I have had the honor of playing a small part in alerting the wider Bay Area scene to the marvelous work being done by Sonoma and Napa County theater companies. It’s been an astonishing ride. But all rides, like all plays (even the great old Russian ones), must eventually end. Beginning next week, Santa Rosa writer, actor and teacher Harry Duke will take over, and I will step back into the less “critical” role of general arts writer, and, happily, occasional theater artist. To the local theaters who’ve opened their doors, to the theatergoers and donors who help keep those doors open, and to the many readers who’ve been my own weekly audience, I give you my deepest thanks. It’s been a privilege and a joy. I’ll see you at the theater.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 0 -1 6, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 THEBILLBOARDS MOST DANGEROuS THREE OUTSIDE SICKO MOVIES IN THE MORNING MAN IN AMERICA R Starts Fri, June 29th! EBBING, MISSOURI Fri, Sat, Sun & Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE PENTAGON PAPERS Michael Moore’s

WED, JANUARY 31

Advance Tickets On Wed: Sale Now at Box (3:00) 7:20 (3:30) onlyOffice! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 R Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa Redgrave Meryl Streep Glenn Close CHEECH AND (1:00 5:15) 9:45 Wed:CHONG’S No matinee shows 10:40 AM RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

LADY BIRD

RODNEY STRONG VINEYARDS DANCE SERIES

Pilobolus

THU, FEBRUARY 1

John Hiatt & The Goners featuring Sonny Landreth

THE OPERA HOUSE

Special Documentary! Sat, Jan 13 10am • Wed, Jan 17 1 & 7pm

1/12–1/18

Honorable

Call Me By Your Name R 10:30-1:30-4:30-7:30 Darkest Hour PG13

10:00-12:45-3:30-6:15-9:00

An Evening with Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen

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Johnny Mathis

10:30-1:15-4:00-6:45-9:30

Lady Bird

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Jake Shimabukuro

R Sneak Preview Thurs 1/18 @7pm! Opens Friday 1/19!

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WED, FEBRUARY 28

David Rawlings

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

‘Call Me by Your Name’ doesn’t live up to hype BY RICHARD VON BUSCACK

A

s

TUE, FEBRUARY 6

THU, FEBRUARY 15

Nice Views

The Post • Darkest Hour Call Me by Your Name The Shape of Water Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

s New York Times film critic Manohla Dargis says “you don’t just watch Luca Guadagnino’s movies, you swoon into them.” The director’s latest, however, invites not a swoon but a pitch forward into a doze. Call Me by Your Name focuses on two American men in a highly unequal relationship in Italy’s Lombardy region in the summer of 1983. Young Elio (Timothée Chalamet) becomes fascinated with a handsome 24-year old American student named Oliver (Armie Hammer). Hammer is tremendously built, and watching him stride coolly through this film seems to prove F. Scott Fitzgerald’s speculation that rich people are less affected by heat than the rest of us. His aloofness (he’s almost rude) compliments Elio’s personality. Oliver strokes the boy with one hand and pushes him away with the other, leaving Elio notes that say things like “Grow up. I’ll see you at midnight.” Elio—so good pianist that he’s bored by his own facility—has all the ruthlessness of a 17-year-old, and is twice as callow. Call Me by Your Name has its acute moments, risky ones, as when Elio inhales the fragrance of Oliver’s bathing suit or his sudden, intense lust for a peach. The film concludes with a critically praised monologue by Elio’s father (Michael Stuhlbarg) about how the old are no longer capable of the kind of all-consuming love felt in youth. It’s no favor to his love-scalded son, and it’s hardly true. Age does what it can to put the brakes on the folly of romantic love, but of course it never stops, all the way to the grave. Director Luca Guadagnino show us the townscapes of Crema, Italy, the country roads, stunning waterfalls—this is where the swoon comes in. The film is getting great reviews. But do people love the movie, or do they love the real estate? ‘Call Me by Your Name’ is playing at Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Road, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909..


R.P. REPRESENT Ceremony formed

in Rohnert Park, where the band tapped into the local punk scene.

Home Sick

Ceremony headline Petaluma rock fest BY CHARLIE SWANSON

F

ormed in 2005 in Rohnert Park, Ceremony have become one of the most uncompromising and successful bands to come out of Sonoma County’s punk scene in the last two decades. Currently signed to mega-indie label Matador Records and touring nationally, Ceremony come home when they headline the Home Sick Festival at the Phoenix Theater on Jan. 13. Bursting with eclectic rock, hardcore and indie acts from near and far, the festival is a fire-relief benefit conceived by guitarist Anthony Anzaldo as a chance for the band to share their passion for music with the community they still call home. “Music was a really big part of my life, since the inception of my

21 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

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SAT JAN 13

PETE STRINGFELLOW + BENTON VAUGHAN

$20–25/DOORS 7:30/SHOW 8/21+

SUN JAN 14

9TH ANNUAL JOHNNY DOWNER TRIBUTE

+ FREE PEOPLES, MARSHALL HOUSE PROJECT, B AND THE HIVE, KING STREET GIANTS

$10/DOORS 5:30/SHOW 6/21+

OPEN MIC IN THE BEER GARDEN 11AM

MON JAN 15

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

DJ KOBIE (ASHANTI HIFI) $10/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

FRI JAN 19

THE SOFT WHITE SIXTIES + VISTA KICKS

$12–15/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

MON JAN 22

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

DJ BESET

$10/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

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next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

HEART SPACE PRESENTS Sat Jan 20

Coco Montoya Blues Star Returns to the Cabaret! DOORS 6PM/ SHOW 7pm ALL AGES The Old Cotati Cabaret (Cotati) Sat Jan 27

TUESDAY

WITH DIRTY

RED BARN

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

REVEREND HORTON HEAT

W/ VOODO0 GLOW SKULLS, BIG

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TAHOE ADVENTURE FILM ROAD TOUR 2018 JAN 26 FESTIVAL MOVIE • DOORS 7:30PM • ALL AGES FRIDAY

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FEB 1

PETALUMA HIGH SCHOOL BENEFIT ROCK • DOORS 8PM • ALL AGES

NEW KINGSTON WITH THE LATE ONES

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SATURDAY

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THE MOTHER HIPS

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WEDNESDAY

FEB 7

ROYAL JELLY JIVE

CALIFORNIA ROOTS PRESENTS:

THE EXPENDABLES REGGAE • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

2/9 Pride & Joy, 2/16 The Reverend Shawn Amos, 2/17 An Evening With Wonder Bread 5, 2/18 Igor and The Red Elvises, 2/22 Young Dubliners, 2/23 Lee Ann Womack, 2/24 Shooter Jennings, 2/25 Mickey Avalon & Dirt Nasty with DJ Aspect, 3/2 Tainted Love, 3/3 Greg Brown

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

FRIDAY, JAN 19

GENERATION IDOL BILLY IDOL COVER BAND WITH FEATHER WITCH

SATURDAY, JAN 20

Jon Gonzales N’ Friends

KALIMBA

5:30–7:30pm • FREE Admission ALL AGES, Families Encouraged! Church of the Oaks (Cotati)

SATURDAY, JAN 27

Sun Feb 18

Julian Lage Trio Grammy Nominated • 2018 JAZZ ALL AGES • DOORS 6:30PM $30-$50 Raven (Healdsburg) Sat Feb 24

English Beat 2018 SKA • ALL AGES DOORS 7:30PM $35 ADV/$38 DOS Raven (Healdsburg)

Sat Feb 24

Maury and Cheri + Friends Singer/Songwriter ALL AGES • Families Encouraged! DOORS 5:30–7:30pm FREE Admission Church of the Oaks (Cotati) Fri Mar 9

Home Sick Festival happens on Saturday, Jan. 13, at the Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St., Petaluma. 3–11:30pm. $38–$40. 707.762.3565.

FRIDAY

SUPERLATIVES JAN 12 FABULOUS COUNTRY • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 0 -1 6, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

life,” says Anzaldo, whose father was a radio DJ before working for MCA Records. “I always gravitated toward people who were into music more than as a hobby but as a lifestyle.” Growing up in Rohnert Park, Anzaldo was introduced to the North Bay’s long-running punk scene through friendships with people like Scott Phillips (Life Long Tragedy) and Ross Farrar, who would become Ceremony’s vocalist. “Once we found this subculture, that was the beginning of everything we do now,” says Anzaldo. Over the years, Ceremony’s sound has gradually transitioned from a pummeling hardcore assault, which culminated in the band’s acclaimed 2010 album, Rohnert Park, into a sparse, haunting proto-punk sound that was featured on their last album, 2015’s L-Shaped Man. All the while, the band’s stature grew incrementally with each release and each tour. “We never really recognized a big break with us; it was more like a slow burn that’s happening even now,” says Anzaldo. When Anzaldo began organizing the Home Sick Festival nearly a year ago, the idea was to celebrate punk’s de-segregated aesthetic with a variety of bands representing all aspects of underground music. “Everyone’s kind of into everything,” he says. “But the midlevel fests don’t represent that diversity.” The bands on the bill for Home Sick include Texas group Power Trip offering intense thrash metal grooves, Los Angeles posthardcore outfit Touché Amoré, Brooklyn’s Black Marble serving up a synth-heavy wave of melody, and San Francisco doom-metal band King Woman. Local acts like Acrylics also show off the best of today’s North Bay scene. “It’s a really diverse show,” says Anzaldo. “I’m really proud to bring this level of music to the place that showed us the ropes.”


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | JANUARY 1 0 -1 6, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

2017

Lo Coco’s

Voted Best Italian restaurant of the North Bay.

C u c i n a R u s t ic a

—North Bay Bohemian

Music Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Ceremony

Rohnert Park’s most famous punk band headlines the Home Sick Festival along with heavy hitters like Power Trip, Black Marble, King Woman, Acrylics and many others. Jan 13, 3pm. $40. The Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Johnny Downer Tribute Concert

LoCoco’s is everything an Italian restaurant should be—boisterous, busy, fun, with excellent authentic food of the best quality: fresh seafood, meats and pasta.

Ninth annual celebration of the life of the late Sebastopol musician features performances by close friends Free Peoples, Marshall House Project and others. Jan 14, 6pm. $10. HopMonk Sebastopol, 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

707- 52 3 -2227

Santa Rosa Symphony

SERVING L UNCH & D INNER

H ISTORIC R AILROAD S QUARE , 117 FOURTH STREET, SANTA ROSA R ATED

of best

e m ia boh the

MARIN COUNTY

n ’s

ay th b nor the

Featured guest conductor Graeme Jenkins leads the orchestra in a program titled “Timeless Treasures,” featuring selections from Mozart and more. Jan 13-15. $29 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Claremont Trio

2005

G IFT C ERTIFICATES AVAILABLE L OC OCOS. NET

Live Music Lantern presents

Coco Montoya performing 2 sets at the

Old Cotati Cabaret

Saturday Jan 20, 2018 doors 6pm ⁄SHOW 7PM ALL AGES $ 36 ADV ⁄ $40 DOS

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THE OLD COTATI CABARET 85 LA PLAZA COTATI

Mill Valley Chamber Music Society presents the renowned piano-led group featuring special guest violinist Harumi Rhodes. Jan 14, 4pm. $35/ Free for students and youth. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley. 415.381.4453.

Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs

Veteran Marin musician celebrates seven years and 500 shows with his countryrock band. Jan 13, 9pm. $12. HopMonk Novato, 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Suzanne Santo

Frontwoman of Americana duo HoneyHoney performs a solo show with support from rising country folk outfit Mapache. Jan 12, 8pm. $15-$17. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

NAPA COUNTY A Musical Banquet Program features early

chamber music from Napa Valley’s Violet Grgich, playing harpsichord with Les Violettes and Ensemble Vermillian. Jan 13, 3pm. $85. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Spoon

Long-running indie-rockers out of Austin, Texas, play off their latest album, the sonically inventive “Hot Thoughts,” with special guests White Reaper. Jan 15, 8pm. $32. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Jan 10, Aqus Jazz Project. Jan 12, Dictator Tots. Jan 13, Musers. Jan 14, 2pm, Gary Vogensen & the Ramble Band. Jan 17, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Barley & Hops Tavern Jan 12, Sharkmouth. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

The Big Easy

Jan 10, Wednesday Night Big Band. Jan 11, Midnight Sun Massive. Jan 12, the Melt with Brooker D & the Mellow Fellows. Jan 13, the John Courage Trio with Angela Rockne and Ashley Allred. Jan 16, Obstinate Ostenuato. Jan 17, Haute Flash Quartet. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Jan 12, Terri-Anne & Lane. Jan 13, Flying Salvias. Tues, 6pm, Michael Hantman. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Coffee Catz

Jan 12, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. Jan 14, 2pm, Gypsy jazz jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Cooperage Brewing Co Jan 13, eNegative with the Den Brothers and Silas Fermoy. 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787.

Crooked Goat Brewing Jan 13, 3pm, Frederick Nighthawk. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Flamingo Lounge

Jan 12, Poyntlyss Sistars. Jan 13, Santa Rosa Salsa night. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge Jan 13, the Blind Barbers. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Graton Resort & Casino

Jan 10, Willie Nelson & Family. Sold-out. 288 Golf Course Dr W, Rohnert Park. 707.588.7100.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Jan 12, Chanticleer: An Orchestra of Voices. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Jan 12, Jason Beard & the Whiskey Family Band. Jan 13, Pete Stringfellow and Timothy Benton. Jan 14, 11am, Johnny Downer Tribute invitational open mic. Jan 16, open mic with Ceni. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Wed, open mic. Jan 12, Roem Baur. Jan 13, Alec Lytle & Them Rounders. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Jan 13, David Correa Trio with Tommy Hill and Rami Ziadeh. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Jan 10, Ash Powell. Jan 11, Solid Air. Jan 12, Miracle Mule. Jan 13, Jimbo Scott. Jan 14, Rivertown Skifflers. Jan 17, Ragtag Sullivan. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Local Barrel

Jan 13, Sonoma County Roller Derby Holiday Party. 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Jan 12-13, DJ MGB. Jan 14, 4pm, Barbara Olney and friends. Jan 15, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Jan 15, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Jan 12, Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Newman Auditorium Jan 14, 4pm, Parker Quartet.


SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Jan 14, 3pm, Jubilee Klezmer Ensemble. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Jan 11, 6:30pm, Awesome Hotcakes. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Jan 12, 6pm, Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Redwood Cafe

Jan 11, Craig Caffall Band. Jan 12, Marshall House Project and Silas Fermoy. Jan 13, Afro Funk Experience. Jan 14, 3pm, Celtic Fiddle Music. Jan 14, 6pm, Irish jam session. Jan 15, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Jan 17, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Jan 13, Stone People’s Medicine. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Jan 13, 5pm, Michael Hantman. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Jan 11, King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. Jan 12, Marin Crouse. Jan 13, the Side Men. Jan 14, 5pm, Lucas Domingue. Jan 14, 8:30pm, Sonoma Blues Jam. Jan 16, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. Wed, the Acrosonics. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Jan 12, Sweet Leaf and Tempest. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Jan 11, Levi’s Workshop. Jan 12, Vespertine Orchestra. Jan 13, Stagefrite. Jan 16, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

MARIN COUNTY Ali Akbar College of Music

Jan 13, Manik Khan & Nilan Chaudhuri. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6372.

Fenix

Jan 11, Larry Vann & the House Band. Jan 12, Deep Blue Jam with Stephanie Keys. Jan 14, Foni Mitchell. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Jan 11, Country Line Dancing. Jan 12, Pop Fiction. Jan 14, 1pm, Natural Gas Jazz Band. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Jan 10, Hopsauce. Jan 17, Soulbillies. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club

Jan 10, Book of Birds. Jan 11, Acoustically Speaking’s Grateful Jam. Jan 12, 5:30pm, No Filler. Jan 12, 9:30pm, TDK. Jan 13, 5:30pm, Blonde Sided. Jan 13, 9:30pm, Sunhunter with Modern Monsters. Jan 14, Los Troubadoux. Jan 17, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Osteria Divino

Jan 10, Jonathan Poretz. Jan 11, Jeff Denson’s Open Sky Trio. Jan 12, Barrio Manouche. Jan 13, Ian McArdle Trio. Jan 14, Brian Moran Duo. Jan 16, Ken Cook. Jan 17, J Kevin Durkin. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Jan 10, Ricky Ray. Jan 11, Charlie Docherty. Jan 16, Wanda Stafford. Jan 17, Rusty String Express. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Papermill Creek Saloon

Jan 12, 5pm, Danny Montana. Jan 13, 5pm, Agents of Change. Jan 13, 9pm, Atilla Viola & the Bakersfield Boys and Sweet Chariot. Jan 14, the Highway One Band. Jan 17, Judy Radiloff. 1 Castro, Forest Knolls. 415.488.9235.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Jan 11, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Jan 12, Spacerug and House of Mary. Jan 13, Inward Creature. Jan 14, Nightcap Blues Band. Jan 15, open mic. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Jan 12, Hybrid Vigor with David Gans and Terry Haggerty. Jan 13, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Jan 14, Rowan Brothers Trio. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse

Jan 11, Carol Luckerback. Jan 12, Bait & Switch Blues Band. Jan 13, Rolando Morales and Carlos Reyes. Jan 16, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Jan 11, Corey Leiter and RJ

Bracchitta. Jan 12, Pat Hull. Jan 14, Erica Sunshine Lee. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Jan 11, Orgone and the Humidors. Jan 13, Corduroy with Plush. Jan 14, 5pm, Mad Mama & the Bonafide Few with Noelle Glory & the Guarantees. Jan 15, open mic with Austin DeLone. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Jan 12, San Geronimo. Jan 13, Elliott Peck and Grahame Lesh in the Grate Room. Jan 13, Lake Charlatans. Jan 16, Stu Allen and friends. Jan 17, Colonel & the Mermaids. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Jan 13, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs album release show. Jan 14, 5pm, Sunday Sessions Songwriter’s Circle with Caren Armstrong and friends. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Jan 13, the Upbeats. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

23

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

Vigor Rancho Jan 12 Hybrid David Gans, Debut! Terry Haggerty 8:00 Fri

Nickels & Loose Change Jan 13 Buck Soulful, Original, Country Sat

8:00 / No Cover

Bros Trio Jan 14 Rowan Chris and Lorin Sun

Stellar Harmonies 4:00 / No Cover

Copasetics Jan 19 New Tim Eschliman, Dallis Craft, o ch Ran t! Sean Allen Fri

Debu

Dance Party 8:00 / No Cover

B Sharp Jan 20 The Blues Band 8:00 Sat

e Dancty! Par

“West Marinicana” Jan 26 Lowatters Fri

High Lonesome Twang to Lowdown Roots 8:00 / No Cover

Annie Sampson Band Jan 27 The Rock, Blues, & R&B 8:00 / No Cover Sat

Celebrate Valentine’s Day with Le Jazz Hot Bring your sweetheart Wednesday night for a romantic evening with live music & fabulous food & drink! Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

thu cRaig caffall band Jan 11 8pm/Dancing/$10

MaRshall house PRoject

fri Jan 12 & silas feRMoy 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 Sat afRo funk exPeRience Jan 13 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 thu dance PaRty with Jan 18 dj loisaida 8pm/ $5 fri boheMian highway Jan 19 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

the QuitteRs – steVie

Sat Jan 20 coyle & glenn houston 8pm/$20 thu bobby jo Valentine Jan 25 8pm/ $10 Adv / $15 DOS fri oddjob enseMble Jan 26 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 Sat the hots Jan 27 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

hillbillies, hiPPies &

fri feb 2 honky tonks — keVin Russell 8pm/Dancing/$10 thu feb 22 soul ska 8pm/$12 Adv/$15 DOS RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

Blue Note Napa

Jan 10, René Escovedo & the New E. Jan 11, Jeff Sanford’s Cartoon Jazz Septet. Jan 12, Dirty Cello. Jan 13, Funk Revival Orchestra. Jan 16, David Correa Trio. Jan 17, Alexa Weber Morales & Boca Mundial. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Jan 12, Self Proclaimed Heroes. Jan 13, Ari, Anthony & Jony. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Jan 13, Jinx Jones & the King Tones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

River Terrace Inn

Jan 12, Mark Harold. Jan 13, Smorgy. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Jan 11, Chris Cain Blues Band. Jan 12, Road Eleven. Jan 13, Uncorked Allstars. Jan 14, Mark Winkler and Cheryl Bentyne. Jan 17, Mike Greensill jazz. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

Jan 12, Who’s Bad tribute to Michael Jackson. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC

Thu 1⁄11 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–$20 • All Ages Orgone + The Humidors Fri 1⁄12 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $15–$17 • All Ages

Suzanne Santo of HONEYHONEY + Mapache

Sat 1⁄13 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $17–$19 • All Ages

Corduroy + Plush

– A Pearl Jam Tribute Band – Stone Temple Pilots Tribute

Sun 1⁄14 • Doors 4:30pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

Mad Mama & the Bona Fide Few + Noelle Glory and The Guarantees Mon 1⁄15 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

Open Mic Night with Austin DeLone Thu 1⁄18 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15–$17 • All Ages

Kuinka + Rainbow Girls

Sat 1⁄20 • Doors 8pm ⁄ 22– 24 • All Ages $

$

Wild Child

A Live Re-Creation of a 1960s Doors Concert

Sun 1⁄21 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $16–$22 • All Ages The Secret Sisters + Smooth Hound Smith Wed 1⁄24 • Doors 7:30pm ⁄ $20–$22 • All Ages Mild High Club + Jerry Paper Fri 1/26 & Sat 1⁄27 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$42 • All Ages TWO DAY PASS All Star Band feat Members of The Neville Brothers,

Radiators & Dirty Dozen Brass Band

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Arts Events RECEPTIONS Jan 12

Arts Works Downtown, “Color Emotion,” featuring artworks that primarily use color to evoke, express, or contemplate emotion or the narrative. 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119. Napa Main Library, “French Life,” photographer Karen Eberwein’s works look at traditional, charming images of day-to-day life from her year in France. 6pm. 580 Coombs St, Napa. 707.253.4070.

Jan 13

Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Annual Invitational Show 2018,” featuring works by 17 guest artists invited by members of the Arts Guild of Sonoma. 5pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. Erickson Fine Art Gallery, “Bob Nugent: Brazil,” artist’s recent paintings are inspired by the power and delicacy of the Amazon rainforests and rivers. 5:30pm. 324 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.7073. Gallery One, “Emerging

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Art Museum of Sonoma County Through Apr 15, “3 Friends,” North Coast contemporary artists Robert Hudson, Jack Stuppin and Richard Shaw display their steel, canvas and clay works together for the first time ever. Reception, Jan 20 at 6pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Charles M Schulz Museum Jan 13-Aug 5, “50 Years of Franklin,” celebrate the poignant “Peanuts” comicstrip character Franklin, a cultural benchmark inspired by a correspondence

Artists,” get a look at seven diverse artists who are on the rise in the North Bay. 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, “Expressions,” HCA’s annual members’ group show includes creative paintings, photographs, printmaking and more. 5pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, “Naturally,” prints and paintings by west Sonoma County artist Rik Olson are inspired by the North Bay’s natural environment. 3pm. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277. MarinMOCA, “InnerScapes” get a glimpse into several artists’ subconscious in this revealing show. 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137. Riverfront Art Gallery, “Winter Art Show,” group exhibit reflects the season in the North Bay. 5pm. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.4ART.

between Charles Schulz and schoolteacher Harriet Glickman in 1968. Through Jan 14, “Behind Peanuts: Pigpen,” learn more about the popular character from Charles Schulz’s comic strip through original sketches and memorabilia. Through Mar 11, “Mud Pies & Jelly Beans: The Flavor of Peanuts,” new exhibit covers the culinary side of the famous comic strip. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

exhibit of sculptures by local artists includes self-guided audio tours. 101sculpturetrail. com. Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. All day.

Graton Gallery

Through Jan 28, “From Clayton to Graton,” longtime local artists and old friends Fred Kling and Rik Olson display together. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Jan 31, “428 Collective,” group of 11 Sonoma County artists brings awareness to innovative and boundary-pushing art being produced in the area. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Redwood Cafe

Through Jan 10, “Generations,” featuring works by five artists from the same family. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Open daily. 707.795.7868.

Sebastopol Gallery

Through Jan 27, “… Creatures Big & Small,” assemblage artist Rebeca Trevino and oils painter Jeff Watts display new works as Sebastopol Gallery celebrates a decade in in the community. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

West County Museum

Through Apr 1, “Sebastopol Depot Centennial,” Western Sonoma County Historical Society celebrate 100 years since the construction of the depot that served the P&SR Railroad and is now the Society’s headquarters. 261 S Main St, Sebastopol. Thurs-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.6711.

MARIN COUNTY Book Passage

Through Feb 4, “Art of the Figure,” fourth annual group show features works by members of Sonoma County and Bay Area figure drawing group. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Through Nov 30, “Tom Killion Residency,” acclaimed Marin artist returns to Book Passage’s gallery for a yearlong exhibition of his original prints and hand-crafted books. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. Daily, 9am to 9pm. 415.927.0960.

Downtown Cloverdale

Corte Madera Library

Chroma Gallery

Through May 3, “Cloverdale Sculpture Trail,” year-round

Jan 10-Feb 12, “Holiday,” Mia Brown, a painter with a

disability, displays her dynamic acrylic paintings, created with a brush or stylus attached to a helmet. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Desta Art & Tea Gallery Through Jan 18, “Eclat de Couleur,” featuring paintings by Marius Bosc and sculpture by Dina Angel Wing. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6. 415.524.8932.

Gallery Route One

Through Jan 28, “Contemplating OTHER,” artists Alicia Escott, Linda Guneste and Brigitta Varadi examine how our relationship with animals has altered over time. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Community Foundation

Through Jan 12, “Hypercosmos des Songes (Supercosmos of Dreams),” the first major exhibition in the United States for French-born and Marin-based artist Jean-Marc Brugeilles includes over 80 artworks. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato. Open Mon-Fri, 9 to 5.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through Feb 1, “Annual O’Hanlon Members’ Show 2018,” see and purchase works from many of the 250 O’Hanlon Center members. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Robert Allen Fine Art Through Jan 31, “Nature Abstracted,” group show features works on canvas by Amy Donaldson, Beatrice Findlay and John Maxon. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. MonFri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

Stinson Beach Gallery Through Jan 13, “Collective Awakening,” featuring acrylic and pastel works by Jon Steven Walters and sculptural succulents by Jamie Johnson. 3445 Shoreline Hwy, Stinson Beach. Fri-Sun, Noon to 5pm And by appointment 415.729.4489.

Throckmorton Theatre Through Jan 31, “Katy Kuhn and Diana Bradley,” the two artists show in the main gallery and Crescendo gallery respectively. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery Through Jan 31, “Caldwell

Snyder Ten-Year Anniversary Show,” the gallery marks a decade in Napa Valley and displays works by Deladier Almeida, Siddharth Parasnis, Eva Navarro and others. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Comedy Lewis Black

Outspoken comedian performs as part of “The Joke’s on US” tour. Jan 13, 8pm. $55-$65. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Events Dirt to Dish

Conversations at Copia series features Alice Waters, founder and owner of Chez Panisse Restaurant in Berkeley, and Bob Cannard, organic farmer and founder of Green String Farm, in discussion, with wine reception and meet and greet. Jan 13, 5pm. $15. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

John Edward

Psychic medium and author is back in the North Bay for an interactive talk and reading. Jan 14, 12pm. $60-$100. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Jumpstart Writing Workshop

Bring a notebook and pen for the weekly workshop facilitated by Susan Bono or Marlene Cullen. Mon, Jan 15, 6:30pm. $15. Petaluma Copperfield’s Books, 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.762.0563.

Locals’ Day at the Barlow

Jam-packed with discounts, two-for-one-tastings, freebies and other offerings from nearly 30 makers and merchants. Thurs. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.824.5600.

WiseWomen in Business Monthly Gathering Group gets together to share resources, learn from each other, make new friends, deepen community connections and have some fun. Jan 11, 6pm. Free. Spatini, 304 Petaluma Blvd S, Petaluma. 707.762.3055.

Field Trips Bird Walk in Bodega Bay

Search Doran County Park for birds, led by Madrone Audubon Society. Jan 17, 8:30am. Bodega Bay Harbor, East Shore Rd, Bodega Bay, madroneaudubon. org.

Birds of Limantour Estero

Follow a trail to see birds foraging with the tide and out on the open water. Jan 14, 10am. Limantour Beach, Pt Reyes National Seashore, Point Reyes Station, marincounty.org.

Fire Ecology on Saddle Mountain

Though Saddle Mountain didn’t burn in the Tubbs fire, there will be views of the burned area, and an opportunity to discuss fire’s ecological role in a variety of native habitats. RSVP required. Jan 13, 10am. Saddle Mountain Preserve, Cleland Ranch and Calistoga Road, Santa Rosa, landpaths.org.

Stewardship Workday at Fitch Mountain Help maintain the trails, preserve natural resources, meet new people and learn new things. Rsvp required at landpaths.org. Jan 13, 9am. Fitch Mountain Preserve, 908 Chanticleer Way, Healdsburg, landpaths.org.

Sturgeon Derby

Join rangers for this popular annual fishing contest for all ages. Prizes will be awarded for the biggest fish. Jan 13, 9am. McNear’s Beach Park, 201 Cantera Way, San Rafael, marincounty.org.

Wednesday Wellness Walks

Join a healing walk through the redwoods. Wed, 10am. Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve, 17000 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, stewardscr.org.

Film Cinema Bites

Event pairs the documentary “Fermented,” about the process of fermentation in modern cuisine, with wine and handcrafted bites from Napa Valley chefs. Jan 15, 5pm. $45. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.


Dirt! The Movie

El Canto del Colobrí

Documentary explores the relationships between Latino immigrant fathers and their LGBTQ family members. Jan 11, 6:30pm. Free. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Family Friendly Films

Take the kids to see a recent animated feature for free, first come first served basis. Sat, 11am. through Jan 27. Third Street Cinema Six, 620 Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8770.

For Your Consideration See a selection of Academy Award submissions from around the world. Through Jan 11. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Let’s Talk About Death Final Passages’ ongoing film series screens 2007’s “Death at a Funeral,” followed by a lively and educational discussion. Jan 10, 6:30pm. $5-$15. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Loving Vincent

Alexander Valley Film Society screens the 2017 indie gem about Vincent van Gogh that is the world’s first fully oil-painted film. Jan 13, 1pm. Clover Theater, 121 East First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.6347.

The Opera House

Award-winning documentary filmmaker Susan Froemke surveys the rich history of New York City’s famous Metropolitan Opera. Sat, Jan 13, 10am and Wed, Jan 17, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

PGS

Australian director Bill Bennett will present and discuss the first US screening of his latest film about intuition as the personal guidance system. Jan 10, 7:15pm. $9-$12. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Polina

A rigorously trained ballet dancer discovers the world of contemporary dance in this 2016 French film

starring Juliette Binoche. Jan 13, 4 and 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Rocky

Patrons are invited to dress for the theme, as the Academy Award-winning boxing underdog film screens in the Vintage Film Series. Jan 15, 7pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Somm

Wine-centric film screens with tasting and talk by wine specialist Carter Dyer. Jan 17, 6:30pm. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.785.8177.

Sundance Short Film Tour

On the eve of the 2018 Sundance Film Festival, see a program of seven shorts, including two award winners, from last year’s event. Through Jan 11. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Food & Drink Napa Truffle Festival Leading chefs and scientists cover all things truffle for a weekend of delicious cuisine and informative seminars. Jan 12-15. prices vary by event. Westin Verasa Hotel, 1314 McKinstry St, Napa, napatrufflefestival.com.

Off the Grid Food Trucks Eat your way through the largest gathering of mobile food trucks in Marin, listen to live music and take in great views. Sun, Jan 14, 11am. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

A Taste of Soil

Learn about the importance of healthy soil from chef Anthony Myint and farmer Tucker Taylor Jan 13, 2pm. Free. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Winemaker Dinner at Bay View Restaurant

Craig McAllister of La Crema Winery serves Chardonnays and Pinot Noirs to accompany a full menu. Jan 12. $99. Bay View Restaurant at the Inn at the Tides. 800 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay. 707.875.2751.

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Winter WINEland

Wine Road’s 26th annual event lets you meet winemakers and taste limited productions at many wineries. All wineries are offering sales and some will offer food pairings. Jan 13-14. $45-$60. Wine Road wineries, various locations, Healdsburg. wineroad.com.

Yoga & Beer

Beginner-friendly, Vinyasastyle yoga class goes well with drinking fine craft beer. Sun, Jan 14, 10:30am. $12. Cooperage Brewing Co, 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787.

For Kids Doktor Kaboom!

Scientific exploration goes extreme! Jan 14, 1 and 3pm. $18-$25. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

JOKES ON US Comedian Lewis Black rants against modern politics and more

on his latest tour, coming to the Uptown Theatre in Napa on Saturday, Jan 13. See Comedy, adjacent page.

Hour of Code

Kids ages 9 to 12 can get an introduction to computer science. Jan 13, 2pm. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Museum Mondays

Enjoy stories, arts and craft activities and movement games Mon, Jan 15, 10am. $5. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Second Saturday Cartoonist

Meet, watch and talk to cartoonist Katie Shaw, creator of “Dragon Child.” Jan 13, 1pm. $5-$12. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Lectures Hidden History of Sonoma County

Book talk by author John Schubert is the first in a monthly lecture series showcasing different aspects of Sonoma County. Jan 17, 7pm. $5. Petaluma Historical Library & Museum, 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. 707.778.4398.

Telling the Story

Tod Hill of the Reflective Democracy Campaign presents research on political imbalances and shares stories of how progress is being

made to challenge the status quo and build a reflective democracy. Jan 10, 7pm. $10. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Readings Book Passage

Jan 10, 7pm, “The Doha Experiment” with Gary Wasserman. Jan 11, 7pm, “One Nation After Trump” with Thomas Mann. Jan 13, 4pm, “The Amorous Heart” with Marilyn Yalom. Jan 13, 7pm, “The Day You Love Me” with Jay Humphrey. Jan 14, 4pm, “Three Tales from the Archive of Love” with Doreen Stock. Jan 14, 7pm, “The Trail Runner’s Companion” with Sarah Lavender Smith. Jan 15, 7pm, “From the Monastery to the World” with Robert Hass. Jan 16, 7pm, “The Wanted” with Robert Crais. Jan 17, 7pm, “The Gospel According to Father Coffee” with William Vlach. Jan 17, 7pm, “The Largesse of the Sea Maiden” with various authors, a tribute to Denis Johnson. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Book Passage By-the-Bay

Jan 10, 6pm, “Nobody’s Boy” with Mike Denney. Jan 11, 6pm, “Smashing Mindset” with Selena Bartlett. Jan 13, 1pm,

“Bloodstains with Bronte” with Katherine Bolger Hyde. Jan 13, 5pm, “Keeper of the Pond” with Margaret Stawowy. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Napa Bookmine Jan 13, 6pm, “Guera” with Rebecca Gaydos. Jan 14, 4pm, “The Book of Formation” with Ross Simonini. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Jan 14, 2pm, “The Craving Cure” with Julia Ross. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jan 13, 1pm, book “A Guide to How Your Child Learns: From Infancy to Early Adulthood” with David Sortino. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Theater The Gumshoe Murders Get a Clue Productions presents a new murdermystery dinner theater show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception. Reservations required. Fri, Jan 12, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. getaclueproductions.com.

Honky Tonk Angels

Three gutsy gals sing their way to stardom in this Nashvillebased revue featuring country music classics. Jan 12-Feb 4. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

My Way

Musical tribute to Frank Sinatra includes a New Year’s Eve party on Dec 31. Through Jan 14. $25-$45. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

Napa Focused Play Cycle Project Staged Reading

Reading of full-length plays in development “The Tasting Room” and “Bacchanlia Live!” is followed by conversation. Jan 12, 8pm. $20. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JANUARY 1 0 -1 6, 201 8 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Narrated by Jamie Lee Curtis, this documentary tells the story of Earth’s most valuable and underappreciated source of fertility, soil. Jan 14, 3pm. Free. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.


THE

26 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | JANUARY 1 0 -1 6, 20 1 8 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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’m standing outside the nondescript Peace in Medicine dispensary, which neighbors boutique Gravenstein Station in Sebastopol, waiting for my turn to purchase legal, recreational cannabis for the first time in California.

While I mill about on the patio with a handful of other folks who couldn’t fit in the packed waiting room, an elderly lady walks up and asks the group, “Is this a restaurant?” “No, ma’am,” we all murmur while not revealing the real purpose of our milling—which now that I think about it, really did resemble a brunch line. “I didn’t think so,” she exclaims as she walks back toward Gravenstein Station. “What’s in here will make you want to go to a restaurant, though,” says a young guy with a smile

aimed our way. Everyone nods approvingly. So it goes on Jan. 2, the second day since Proposition 64 went into effect. There are lots of people asking questions and lots of sly smiles as folks exit the dispensary with their plain white envelopes full of recreational and, presumably, medicinal cannabis. Though I sense that I avoided an onslaught of business on Jan. 1, the line is still out the door. Peace in Medicine’s Sebastopol location is one of three spots that began selling recreational cannabis for adult use on New Year’s Day, with Mercy Wellness in Cotati and Solful in Sebastopol being the other two, and it seems many in the county are quick to take advantage of it. What strikes me while I wait— first to give the desk attendant at Peace in Medicine my ID for input in their database, and next for space to become available in the dispensary’s shop, which is separated from the waiting room by a second door—is the diverse makeup of the people gathered together. Yes, there are “typical” stoner-looking people in sweat pants (thanks for dressing up for the occasion) and shaggyhaired guys who might have come straight from Scooby-Doo’s Mystery Machine, but there’s also the athletic-looking middle-aged man who probably biked here from across the county, and elderly grandmothers and 20-something couples who maybe spent the morning slinging lattes at the cafe. Seems like everyone’s at least curious about cannabis. Inside the shop, the displays cleanly and clearly offer information on the individual strains, effects, THC and CBD content and cost. The attendants at the counter are patient and friendly, and though I don’t browse for long, I happily leave with my own little white envelope. And don’t worry, Mom: I was there for journalistic purposes only.


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For the week of January 10

ARIES (March 21–April 19) I’m happy to inform you that life is giving you permission to be extra demanding in the coming weeks—as long as you’re not petty, brusque or unreasonable. Here are a few examples that will pass the test: “I demand that you join me in getting drunk on the truth”; “I demand to receive rewards commensurate with my contributions”; “I demand that we collaborate to outsmart and escape the karmic conundrums we’ve gotten ourselves mixed up in.” On the other hand, Aries, ultimatums like these are not admissible: “I demand treasure and tribute, you fools”; “I demand the right to cheat in order to get my way”; “I demand that the river flow backwards.” TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Are you familiar with the phrase “Open Sesame”? In the old folk tale “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves,” it’s a magical command that the hero uses to open a blocked cave where treasure is hidden. I invite you to try it out. It just may work to give you entrance to an off-limits or previously inaccessible place where you want and need to go. At the very least, speaking those words will put you in a playful, experimental frame of mind as you contemplate the strategies you could use to gain entrance. And that alone may provide just the leverage you need.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) While thumping around the internet, I came across pointed counsel from an anonymous source. “Don’t enter into a longterm connection with someone until you’ve seen them stuck in traffic,” it declared. “Don’t get too involved with them until you’ve witnessed them drunk, waiting for food in a restaurant for entirely too long, or searching for their phone or car keys in a panic. Before you say yes to a deeper bond, make sure you see them angry, stressed or scared.” I recommend that you take this advice in the coming weeks. It’ll be a good time to deepen your commitment to people who express their difficult emotions in non-abusive, non-psychotic ways. CANCER (June 21–July 22) My high school history teacher Marjorie Margolies is now Chelsea Clinton’s mother-in law. She shares two grandchildren with Hillary Clinton. Is that something I should brag about? Does it add to my cachet or my happiness? Will it influence you to love me more? No, nah and nope. In the big scheme of things, it’s mildly interesting but utterly irrelevant. The coming weeks will be a good time for Cancerians like you and me to renounce any desire we might have to capitalize on fake ego points like this. We Crabs should be honing our identity and self-image so they’re free of superficial measures of worth. What’s authentically valuable about you? LEO (July 23–August 22) If I were your mentor or your guide, I’d declare this the Leo Makeover Season. First, I’d hire a masseuse or masseur to knead you firmly and tenderly. I’d send you to the nutritionist, stylist, dream interpreter, trainer and life coach. I’d brainstorm with the people who know you best to come up with suggestions for how to help free you from your illusions and infuse your daily rhythm with 20 percent more happiness. I’d try to talk you out of continuing your association with anything that’s no damn good for you. In conclusion, I’d be thorough as I worked to get you unlocked, debugged and retooled. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) “It takes an extraordinary person to carry themselves as if they do not live in hell,” says writer D. Bunyavong. In accordance with the astrological omens, I nominate you Virgos to fit that description in the coming weeks. You are, in my estimation, as far away from hell as you’ve been in a long time. If anyone can seduce, coax or compel heaven to come all the way down to earth for a while, it’s you. Here’s a good way to get the party started: Gaze into the mirror until you spy the eternal part of yourself. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) In accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to move the furniture around. If you feel inspired, you might even want to move some of that old stuff right out the door and haul it to the dump or the thrift store. Hopefully, this will get you in the mood to launch a sweeping purge of anything else that lowers the

BY ROB BREZSNY

morale and élan around the house: dusty mementoes, unflattering mirrors, threadbare rugs, chipped dishes and numbing symbols. The time is ripe, my dear homies, to free your home of deadweight.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

When he was 16 years old and living in New York, Ralph Lifshitz changed his name to Ralph Lauren. That was probably an important factor in his success. Would he have eventually become a famous fashion designer worth $5.8 billion dollars if he had retained a name with “shitz” in it? The rebranding made it easier for clients and customers to take him seriously. With Ralph’s foresight as your inspiration, Scorpio, consider making a seemingly surface-level change that will enhance your ability to get what you want.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

In 1956, the prolific Spanish poet Juan Ramón Jiménez was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. The award committee praised his “high spirit and artistic purity.” The honor was based on his last 13 books, however, and not on his first two. Waterlilies and Souls of Violet were works he wrote while young and still ripening. As he aged, he grew so embarrassed by their sentimentality that he ultimately tried to track down and eradicate every copy. I bring this to your attention, Sagittarius, because I think it’s a favorable time for you to purge or atone for anything from your past that you no longer want to be defined by.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Three centuries ago, Capricorn genius Isaac Newton formulated principles that have ever since been fundamental to scientists’ understanding of the physical universe. In addition, he was a pioneer in mathematics, optics and astronomy. And yet he also expended huge amounts of time and energy on the fruitless attempt to employ alchemy to transform base metals into solid gold. Those efforts may have been interesting to him, but they yielded no lasting benefits. You Capricorns face a comparable split. In 2018, you could bless us with extraordinary gifts or else you could get consumed in projects that aren’t the most productive use of your energy. The coming weeks may be crucial in determining which way you’ll go. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) A rite of passage lies ahead. It could and should usher you into a more soulful way of living. I’m pleased to report that this transition won’t require you to endure torment, confusion or passive-aggressive manipulation. In fact, I suspect it could turn out to be among the most graceful ordeals you’ve ever experienced—and a prototype for the type of breakthrough that I hope will become standard in the months and years to come. Imagine being able to learn valuable lessons and make crucial transitions without the prod of woe and gloom. Imagine being able to say, as musician P. J. Harvey said about herself, “When I’m contented, I’m more open to receiving inspiration. I’m most creative when I feel safe and happy.” PISCES (February 19–March 20)

The Kalevala is a 19th-century book of poetry that conveys the important mythology and folklore of the Finnish people. It was a wellspring of inspiration for English writer J. R. R. Tolkien as he composed his epic fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. To enhance his ability to steal ideas from The Kalevala, Tolkien even studied the Finnish language. He said it was like “entering a complete wine-cellar filled with bottles of an amazing wine of a kind and flavor never tasted before.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Pisces, in 2018 you will have the potential of discovering a source that’s as rich for you as Finnish and The Kalevala were for Tolkien.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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January 10-16, 2018