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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | DECEMBER 6-12, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.31

VOTE NOW FOR 2018 BEST OF AT BOHEMIAN.COM

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Bohemian

Destination: All in.

Editor

Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

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Tom Gogola, ext. 106

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Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Contributors

Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Ari LeVaux, James Knight, Rory McNamara, Jonah Raskin, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

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Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

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California’s Finest Casino

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Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2017 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Rory McNamara. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

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Thank you for your confidence.

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Clubs & Concerts p25 Arts & Events p28 The Nugget p34 Classified p35 Astrology p35


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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Fungus Fascination Your article a few years back when the oil spill happened in San Francisco Bay (“Mycroremedia What?” Jan. 9, 2008), turned me on to mycology. It held me captive in a Mexican restaurant on Yulupa for the length of the article. After I finished I went home and Googled mushroom expert Paul Stamets and bought his book. Reading your story (“Natural Remedy,” Nov. 29) is very

inspiring and a reminder of why I got into mycology and love fungi. Thank you.

WHITNEY SILVA Via Facebook

Spineless GOP The contemptible greedheads in power, by which I am referring to the Republican Party and the Groperin-Chief himself, have achieved something previously unimaginable in U.S. politics: a willingness to openly lie

THIS MODERN WORLD

to the American people in the pursuit of personal gain. They no longer feel compelled to appear fair or balanced, or mindful of the needs of other human beings. When the Senate approved a bill that would eliminate healthcare for 13 million Americans, raise taxes on the elderly, set the stage for a further erosion of Medicare and Medicaid, call for the elimination of Roe v. Wade and dismantle the Affordable Care Act while providing an enormous tax benefit to the people who need it

By Tom Tomorrow

least, they showed once again their contemptuous disregard for the citizens of America, the values expressed in the Constitution and an understanding of what constitutes the best of humanity. The Republican Party has become a bastion of spineless, gutless, soulless, woman-hating, pedophile-supporting, Nazi-loving, white supremacist creeps hell bent on devouring every human and natural resource they can get their hands on while hording every dollar they can squeeze, extort or steal from the middle and lower classes.

KEVIN RUSSELL Sebastopol

Fascist in Training When Adolf Hitler became chancellor of Germany in 1933, no doubt concerned Germans were told that the seeming buffoon was a passing fad. And yet Hitler was able to flourish as dictator for over a decade, transform the press into propaganda outlets and murder German dissidents, 6 million Jews, many Gypsies, Jehovah’s Witnesses, the disabled and others. Finally, on April 30, 1945, cornered in Berlin, Hitler swallowed cyanide and shot himself dead. Statements Trump has made insulting minorities, his mild-mannered response to the white supremacy rally in Charlottesville, coupled with his pardon of Sheriff Joe Arpaio of Arizona this past August reinforce the fact that the president is especially dangerous to minorities. In 1787, Thomas Jefferson wrote to his friend William Smith, “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.” Although he was referring to 18th-century political events, I think his words are applicable right now!

NICOLE GILLETTE

Kentfield

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


#MeToo

training

What will the sexual harassment backlash teach us? BY MARCIA SINGER

M

e, too. I’ve survived shaming and blaming cycles, suicidal depression, fear of telling and PTSD. I’ve engaged in psychological counseling, emotional release bodywork and spiritual healing. And for the past 30 years, I’ve been helping deliver others from their injurious histories toward fulfilling, “response-able” lifestyles and educating people about the roots of sexual predation. President Trump’s “grab ’em” video exposure was excused as typical “alpha male” behavior. While unbridled testosterone and the drive for sex, power and status may be genetic, we’re also an evolving species, aspiring to humane, loving relations. Fist-shaking, name-calling, shocked outrage, punitive reactivity can only go so far. Can the #MeToo rallying cry against sexual harassment expand and embrace all parties held hostages by abusive events? Healthy intimacy—like unhealthy predation—is multilayered, involving many crucial elements, such as the roles of gender, child rearing and adolescent sex education. The popular notion that it’s manly to dominate, womanly to please, or the taboo on feeling, admitting vulnerability are good place to start. Many social norms disconnect and rob us of authentic intimate connections and maintain a collectively low emotional IQ. Our familiar form of patriarchal education twists us unwittingly into being compliant and controlling counterparts. Anger, fear and grief are understandable starting places. Will courage, heart, introspection, savvy activism find center stage, too? Can we activate sufficient gray matter to see beyond black/white, victims/victimizers, innocent/guilty? Or will we stay stuck in the muck of knee-jerk reactivity? Realistically, few MeToos are ready to forgive. Many just want to forget. Exploitive sexual legacies are embedded, easy to excuse and taken as givens. But we can acknowledge that when a serial perpetrator says “I’m sorry,” she or he also needs rehab to change that addictive behavior. Will we choose response over reactivity? Adrenaline rushes are addictive, as is watching celebrities dramatically fall from towers. But I’m hoping for a wellspring of intent for change and that #MeToo will be more than another flash in the pan that leaves us exposed to future onslaughts. Marcia Singer, MSW, provides massage, grief counseling and mindful meditation training in Santa Rosa. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS To address the threat of mudslides on fire-scorched mountains in Sonoma County,

the board of supervisors considered a network of early warning rain and stream gauges.

By a Landslide

Sonoma County to front cost of water gauges in hope FEMA will reimburse BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he Sonoma County Board of Supervisors was scheduled to vote Tuesday to spend up to $400,000 to install rain and stream gauges throughout the county, a move undertaken out of a growing concern over landslides on eroded hilltops and mountains scorched in October’s wildfires.

The fear, says Supervisor James Gore, is “melting mountains” around the region. County officials are rightly concerned, he says, over the possibility that the regional drinking water supply might be compromised in the event of massive rain-driven landslides. Extensive mudslides have the potential to impact drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people in the North Bay, says

Gore, if muddy water clogs the county’s filtration system. On Tuesday, the supervisors authorized the Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA) to execute a year-long contract with an asyet-undetermined consultant under a program called the Burn Area Watershed Protection: Flood Warning Monitoring Network. The consultant will work with SCWA to install 11 stream gauges and 11 rain gauges, and associated

tech, “as part of a post-fire early warning and monitoring system, to protect the public and property during storm events.” The agency already has a handful of the gauges spread around the region. New gauges would be installed along Mark West Creek and elsewhere around the county. A Cal Fire post-mortem of the Nuns and Tubbs zones found a “higher potential for landslides, debris flows, and flash floods that could be a risk to public safety and property.” That was one of several contracts on the agenda last Tuesday designed to stave off the threat of a water-borne disaster in the county. Supervisors also approved an additional nobid, no environmental-review contracts totaling $900,000 for emergency tree removal and cliff stabilization, sewer repairs “to prevent any hazardous waste from entering the watershed” and to provide utility hookups to meet the imminent arrival of FEMA trailers for the dispossessed. The North Bay has received up to six inches this rainy season, according to National Weather Service data cited by the county. Supervisor Susan Gorin, who lost her Oakmont home to the inferno, noted early in the meeting Tuesday that despite the recent rain, there’s an absence of new green growth on Hood Mountain. “I am very worried about Mt. Hood.” The emergency expenditure highlights a dynamic in which FEMA determines whether a local expenditure that was reimbursed ought to have been reimbursed. That process can play out for years after a disaster has been all but remediated. Supervisor Shirlee Zane noted on Tuesday that the SCWA will put in the request with FEMA to see if the water gauge expenditure is reimbursable. That remains to be seen. The resolution passed Tuesday highlighted an “ongoing emergency need to abate and stabilize dangerous conditions resulting from the Sonoma Complex Fires” as it extended the county’s suspension of ) 10


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competitive bidding requirements for emergency-related contracts and exempted contracts from California Environmental Quality Act review. The streamlined contract approval is in place because the county remains under an emergency disaster declaration made by the federal government and the state Office of Emergency Services soon after the fires broke out on Oct. 8. The emergency declaration makes it possible to expedite contracts without the typical procurement process, which can last months. The county passed resolutions on Tuesday that highlighted the rain-season urgency as it gave a green light to the relevant county agencies (i.e., General Services) to engage in the no-bid contracts. FEMA disaster-recovery programs for which reimbursement is available fall under two general categories: the Personal Assistance Program, which assists individuals who suffered losses; and the Hazard Mitigation Program, designed to reimburse funds to localities after a disaster when money has been laid out locally to protect infrastructure that was not damaged by the disaster itself but which could be impacted by its aftermath. The SCWA says it will apply for reimbursement of the rain gauges through the Personal Assistance FEMA pipeline. The county would of course like FEMA to pay for everything related to disaster recovery, but Gore warns of the prospect of a FEMA “clawback” of funds. FEMA audits its financial response to a disaster to determine if there were monies that should not have been devoted to localities for post-disaster work. Often the issue is a lack of understanding on the part of local officials over what’s reimbursable and what isn’t. A 2016 report from the Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General (FEMA is an agency of the DHS) determined that out of $1.55 billion that FEMA spent on disasters in 2015, nearly

$457 million was subject to a FEMA clawback. The report noted that FEMA didn’t necessarily claw back the questionable reimbursements if they ran afoul of federal contracting requirements (i.e., minority set-asides), but was more inclined to claw back money that was errantly spent on infrastructure upgrades that aren’t covered under the FEMA rules.

Mudslides have the potential to impact drinking water for thousands of North Bay residents. With nearly 5,100 fewer homes in the county and around a thousand businesses destroyed in the county, the ripple effects from the fires have already taken root and include the looming potential for upwards of $30 million in lost property tax revenues in the region, which could translate into a three-way, $10 million deficit for schools, local budgets and the county budget, says Gore. The disaster trickle-down has already manifested into additional workload for two positions that provide critical auditing and accountability services to the county. One is county auditorcontroller Erick Roeser, who, reports Gore, is “having to move

people from the auditor’s office to help FEMA.” That means he’s spending less time on day-today county auditing services. Roeser and the other in-house auditor, County Clerk-RecorderAssessor Bill Rousseau are the county equivalent, Gore says, of an internal Office of the Inspector General who audit county policies and spending. With millions of dollars in grant money and other disaster assistance pouring into the county (the county recently made available, for instance, some $900,000 for post-fire mental-health services), Gore says he’s been in conversations with both officials to make sure they’re keeping tabs on the glut of disaster-related money. “The one thing we need right now,” says Gore, “is to track the money coming into the county.” One question he’s been asking the county auditors gets at their role as in-house fiscal watchdogs: “How are you guys going to track the money coming in and out of this place?” The accruing costs and attendant pressure on key county staff is all the more reason, Gore says, for the county to find ways to get FEMA to pay for as much of the recovery as possible—and to make sure that the county is sufficiently staffed to effectively work FEMA’s Public Assistance and Hazard Mitigation programs. But according to the SCWA, there’s no guarantee that FEMA will pick up the tab for those emergency rain or stream gauges, or other disaster-related projects. The water agency is footing the initial bill for the $400,000 contract and might wind up eating the cost should FEMA decide the money is not reimbursable. “The Water Agency intends to apply for reimbursement of this expense under [FEMA’s] Public Assistance funds,” according to water-agency documents that were a part of the Tuesday meeting, “although there is no guarantee of full or partial reimbursement.”


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Dining PRETTY IN PINK California grows most of the country’s pomegranates.

Wonderful

Winter’s sweet jewel-like pomegranate is remarkably versatile BY ARI LEVAUX

C

alifornia’s pomegranate harvest is in full swing. About 95 percent of the crop is the large, dark variety called Wonderful. The 2017 crop is expected to be a bit light, as trees recover from years of drought. But while yields will be down, the quality of the fruit is expected

to be high, as sometimes happens with fruit trees. Expect California pomegranates to be larger, juicier and sweeter. Worldwide, pomegranate consumption is on the rise for culinary and health reasons, and there is also demand from cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. A peeled pomegranate looks like the world’s biggest and most delicious freshly cut jewel. The

ruby-like seeds are called “arils.” There are many ways to get them out. Azcookbook.com has a video that demonstrates how to quickly remove the arils by cutting along the membranes that run between them and then swatting the arils from their clingy membranes with a wooden spoon. Alas, I usually end up clawing it apart with my fingers and dumping the arils in a bowl of water so the membranes float out.

But I don’t try to remove every last shred, as the membranes are where a many of the fruit’s potentially medicinal compounds reside. Feride Buyuran has a recipe in her new book Pomegranates & Saffron: A Culinary Journey to Azerbaijan for a dish called “narnumru”—basically fried eggs atop fried pomegranate arils, which burst open in the pan’s heat and steam the eggs sunny side up. It’s a visually shocking dish, but in your mouth, it all makes perfect sense. Buyuran starts with a half-cup of chopped onion in a pan with butter and a little olive oil. When the onions turn translucent, she adds two cups of arils (for two eggs) and fries them for a few minutes, before cracking the eggs on top and covering briefly. If you have a glass lid, you can watch the eggs turn white before your eyes in the pomegranate steam. Everyone in my house thought the idea of frying eggs on pomegranate arils was awful, even those who professed to love both pomegranates and eggs. I made a batch, personalized with bacon and browned bits of deer meat, prior to the addition of onions. The haters were all wrong, of course. And they never got to find out how wrong they were, because I ate it all. Then I began stir-frying meat with pomegranate seeds, onions and garlic, while playing around with various spice mixtures from pomegranate country. Egyptian dukkah was a standout. Soon enough, I was marinating meat in pomegranate juice, as Buyuran says she does with kebabs. Strong-flavored meat like lamb or goat is wonderful in a pomegranate-juice marinade. By far the simplest way to cook with pomegranate is to make what you are going to make, and then sprinkle fresh pomegranate seeds on it. Sprinkle them on salad, soup, meat and rice. There is no end to the ways we can use that bright juicy tang, balancing the fat in food with a burst of acid. A handful belongs atop a bowl of linguini with creamy mushroom sauce, and on your morning Cheerios.


The devastating fires in our region have resulted in an increased need for food and nutrition assistance in our community. The Redwood Empire Food Bank needs your help. Please, give generously.

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City Mouse Winery Sixteen 600 comes down from the mountain BY JAMES KNIGHT

N

amed for an address in the hills high above Sonoma, Winery Sixteen 600 has been pouring its wines in a little old house on a quiet side street of the city of Sonoma since 2015. Just look for the Stanley Mouse flag flying on the front lawn.

Not “freak flag flying,” but you hear Stanley Mouse, and that’s what you think, right? Actually, this work, by the celebrated 1960s rock ’n’ roll poster artist, and which appears on the winery’s labels, is Belle Époque and quite demure.

Now here’s another sign. Lucky for us, it says, “Open.” The reverse side says, “In the vineyard—text Sam,” and gives Sam’s phone number. Sam Coturri runs the winery with his father, Sonoma County organic viticulture guru Phil Coturri, along with some other employees who are generally friends of the family as well, says Ben Pickering, friend of the family and winery employee who describes his job title as . . . well, a bit of everything—vineyards, winery, tastings. Today Pickering is recovering from hosting a bachelorette party, but he’s happy to pour us a few samples. Then a few more. Then one for himself—it’s about that time of day. Most days, this isn’t a limodelivered party kind of joint, and staff meet with only a few tasters a day in a worn wood-floored cottage that’s also the office, furnished with theater seats, a farmhouse table and something like a half ton of vinyl albums. And, yes, plenty of tie-dye. To start, Pickering pours two glasses and sets them on the table without naming them, just for fun. From left to right, they seem to be in reverse order of that day’s tasting menu. The first is apricotscented—it’s the 2016 Steel Plow Viognier ($35)—while the second, the Grenache Blanc-based 2016 Hommage Blanc ($35), a field blend with Marsanne and Roussanne from Rossi Ranch, suggests white flowers. The Coturris also farm Landmark Vineyard’s Steel Plow vineyard in Kenwood. The 2014 Steel Plow Grenache ($44) brings more fruit to the fore than any version I remember from this vineyard, yet it’s the more subdued of a pairing with the toothsome 2014 Oakville Ranch Grenache ($64). Also on the menu recently, 2014 Dos Limones Syrah ($44), 2014 Val Rossi Hommage ($64) red Rhône blend, and 2013 Hamel Family Zinfandel ($35). There’s even something for Cabernet fans, too, at this address. Winery Sixteen 600, 589 First St. W., Sonoma. By appointment only; $35 tasting fee waived with “a couple of bottles” purchased. 707.721.1805.


15

SPOTLIGHT ON WEST COUNTY

Rory McNamara

NO RTH BAY B O H E MI A N | B O H E MI A N.COM

Better with Butter India Isaac adds (a lot of) butter to dough for Wild Flour Bread’s sticky buns. That explains why they’re so good.


Rory McNamara

N O RTH BAY B O H E MI A N | B O H E MI A N.COM

16

SPOTLIGHT ON WEST COUNTY

RISING LOAFERS The oven that produces Wild Flour Bread’s sought-after baked goods is wood-fired and reaches 1,250 degrees.

Wild for Bread

Inside Freestone’s one-of-a-kind Wild Flour bakery BY JONAH RASKIN

W

est Sonoma County’s iconic Wild Flour bakery doesn’t advertise. Word-ofmouth is all the bakery and its adjoining gardens need. Granted, there’s a website that’s updated regularly with days and hours of operation. It’s closed from Jan. 2 to Jan. 18 for winter break. What’s noticeable about the bakery’s website (wildflourbread.com) is its frequent use of the pronoun “we,” as in “We are located in beautiful Freestone Valley” and “We want

to meet out customers, we do not wholesale, ship or franchise.” That’s all true. They don’t make bakeries like Wild Flour anymore, or if they do, they’re as rare as Gravenstein apples in December or Bodega Reds months after the potato harvest. Yes, the founder has his photo on the website. “Owner and baker, Jed Wallach, is often behind the counter,” the text reads. But there’s no biographical information about him and no testimonials either. That’s the way he wants it. In fact, he has always wanted the breads and scones to speak for themselves. They speak

loudly and clearly, and they travel far and wide. Locals and tourists line up four days a week, Friday through Monday, from 8am to 6pm. They buy the sticky buns, the fougasse, which is packed with cheese and onions, and the famous Bohemian, a loaf with bits of apricot, orange and pecan. Then there are the scones in a variety of flavors: white chocolate, double chocolate, ginger, espresso and hazelnut. The coffee makes the baked goods taste doubly good. There’s no yeast, no baking powder and no baking soda in Wild Flour loaves. It’s probably no exaggeration to

say that the breads and the scones are made with love, though the sourdough, as the word itself suggests, adds that unmistakable sour taste. Most of the breads have a hard crust and are soft and moist inside. Desiree Kavanagh, known as Desi, has been a mainstay ever since she was 23. “I remember that I arrived on March 18, 2002,” Kavanagh says. “I was just looking for a job. But it has been my passion for years.” Born in Willits and now a Santa Rosa resident, Kavanagh has done everything there is to do at Wild Flour, from mixing the four essential ingredients (flour, water, salt and the sourdough starter) to managing the place and training new employees, like India Isaac and John Grotting, both 25. Grotting came to Freestone from Colorado where he studied at the Auguste Escoffier School of Culinary Arts and learned to make cakes. “Working here is exactly what I’ve wanted to do,” he says. “You need strong hands and you get to know how the dough should look, feel and smell. You don’t want it stiff and you don’t want it to stick to your hands.” Everyone works hard, especially the bakers who start their days at 4:30am. But perhaps the real workhorse is the brick oven that heats up, with seasoned eucalyptus, to 1,250 degrees and then cools down to 575, the optimal temperature for baking. The oven is fussy and changes its needs with the seasons. “You can’t just follow a recipe,” says Kavanagh. “You have to evaluate each day and think about the kind of bread you’re baking.” When work is done she takes a loaf home. “The breads are almost a whole meal,” she says. “They sustain me through the day.” For 19 years customers have echoed her sentiments. Wild Flour Bread, 140 Bohemian Hwy., Freestone. 707.874.2938. Jonah Raskin is the author of ‘Field Days: A Year of Farming, Eating and Drinking Wine in California.’


17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 6-1 2, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

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N O RTH BAY B O H E MI A N | B O H E MI A N.COM

18

SPOTLIGHT ON WEST COUNTY

your community costume shop

FAMILY MEAL Michele Wimborough owns Hazel Restaurant with her husband and chef, Jim Wimborough. We’re guessing their son, Graham, gets free cupcakes.

wigs, festival wear and funny novelties We carry Best all manner stocking of unique stuffers and ever! curious gifts

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Michele Wimborough, co-owner of Hazel Restaurant, dishes on Occidental Where is your favorite place to eat in Occidental and why? When we’re not working and cooking (which is not very often!), we love Howard’s for healthy breakfasts and sandwiches from Bohemian Market—especially the Monster. And the takeout pizza from the Union Motel. I also have to shamelessly plug our restaurant. We have been open for two and a half years now and couldn’t be more thrilled with our decision to leave the big city for tiny-town living. Where do you take first-time visitors to Occidental? We love to do a drive down Coleman Valley to the ocean and back around through Bodega Bay to get a full appreciation of this amazing area. What do you know about Occidental that others don't? Occidental is home to the friendliest people we’ve ever met! Must be something about all the fresh air that makes people genuinely happy to be here. If you could change one thing about Occidental what would it be? Can’t think of a thing! Hazel Restaurant, 3782 Bohemian Hwy., Occidental. 707.874.6003.


HIGH WIRE ACT Travel through the redwoods from above at Occidental’s

Sonoma Canopy Tours.

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Things to Do in West County Occidental Community Choir

Occidental Holiday Crafts Faire

Since 1986, the festive, locally sourced Occidental Holiday Crafts Faire has raised money for the area’s nonprofits while also offering residents a chance to find one-of-akind crafts from dozens of vendors in every range of style and medium. Artisans

include the likes of Saraba African Art, Jungle Maiden Jewelry, Berkana Publications and over 30 other crafters and designers. The holiday happening also boasts a raffle, plenty of food vendors and fresh baked goods from Salmon Creek School students. Run by the all-volunteer, nonprofit group the Occidental Community Council, the fair takes place in the heart of town, meaning it’s also a perfect opportunity to stroll Main Street and check out the other independent shops and stops in Occidental. Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 9–10, at Occidental Community Center, 3920 Bohemian Hwy. Saturday, 10am to 5pm; Sunday, 10am to 4pm. Free. occidental-ca.org.

Sonoma Canopy Tours

Sure, you’ve “seen” the redwoods—but have you seen them while gliding through the air on a thrilling zip line ride? If not, acquaint yourself with the Sonoma Canopy Tours, a recreational adventure offered in the wooded hills of west Occidental. Each of the two courses promises twoand-a-half hours of sky-high activity, all with an experienced guide to keep you secure. The adventure packages are located within the Alliance Redwoods conference grounds, which has facilitated zip line, high ropes and challenge courses for students within the framework of environmental education programs since the 1970s. This gift-giving season, the canopy tours is playing

secret Santa and giving away a gift card to those in need for every one sold through Dec. 17. 6250 Bohemian Hwy., Occidental. Open daily. Adults, $99–$129; seniors, $89–$119; children, $69–$99. sonomacanopytours.com.

Osmosis Festival of Lights

A sanctuary in western Sonoma County, Osmosis Day Spa neighbors Occidental in the unincorporated community of Freestone, and it’s a particularly peaceful escape from the stresses of modern life. Osmosis is perhaps best known for offering one of the only cedar enzyme baths and footbaths in the country, and its masterfully designed meditation gardens and Japanese tea gardens are a perfect setting for relaxation and rejuvenation. This month, Osmosis invites the public to see for themselves at two seasonal events. First, the Osmosis Festival of Lights sparkles with holiday cheer and includes cedar footbaths, mini-massages, fire-dancing performances, live music, specialty shop items and cheese and wine sampling. Wednesday, Dec. 13, 5pm. $30. Next, the spa’s Winter Solstice Sound Healing Ceremony connects guests to the season and surrounding nature through a mindful observance marked by gongs and other instruments. Thursday, Dec. 21, 9am. Free; $15 footbath and sound therapy included. 209 Bohemian Hwy., Freestone. RSVP required. osmosis.com.

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SPOTLIGHT ON WEST COUNTY

A west Sonoma County cultural signpost for almost 40 years, the Occidental Community Choir is unique in the region in that it performs music composed almost entirely by its own members. These choral pieces act as a mirror to the community’s experience in a personal and identifiable way. Earlier this year, longtime choir member and former director Sarah Saulsbury once again took the reigns of the 40-plusmember group. Now, in line with the holiday season, the OCC presents its annual winter concert, this year titled “Alleluia Anyway,” that reflects on the hardships of the last year while also signifying the need to celebrate all the lights of kindness and community support that continue to shine in the darkness. After a singalong opening last weekend, the Occidental Community Choir performs its inspiring new program on Friday and Saturday, Dec. 8–9, at the Occidental Center for the Arts, at 8pm, and Sunday, Dec. 10, at Glaser Center in Santa Rosa at 3pm. $15. occidentalchoir.org.

Integrative Medicine with Integrity

NO RTH BAY B O H E MI A N | B O H E MI A N.COM

Photo Courtesy Sonoma Canopy Tours

19


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | DEC E M BE R 6-1 2, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Crush CULTURE

P E TA L U M A

Party Like It’s 1992

The week’s events: a selective guide

Music lovers in the North Bay have long called Petaluma’s Mystic Theatre & Music Hall one of the area’s best concert venues. It’s gone by many names over the last century, but this week the Mystic celebrates its 25th anniversary with several shows and fan-appreciation events. The shows start with hip-hop stars Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, performing on Thursday, Dec. 7. The next night, the 25th-anniversary party features tribute band Saved by the 90s and lots of free goodies from local sponsors. 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. Thursday, 8:30pm. $42–$48; Friday, 8:30pm. Free (two ticket limit). 707.775.6048.

HEALDSBURG

Hands-On Holidays This weekend, the Healdsburg Shed hosts a packed day of gatherings in the Making Merry Holiday Open House. Foodies, crafters, even kids can enjoy one of nearly a dozen individual events, including chocolate tasting, oyster shucking, a pie-dough-making demo, winter shrubs workshop, a giftwrapping demo, a holiday appetizer workshop and more. Each event ranges in prices and availability, so check ahead to RSVP for the open house’s offerings, happening Saturday, Dec. 9, at Healdsburg SHED, 25 North St.,

HERE COMES YOUR BAND Underground heroes the Pixies play a pair of nights in Napa when they rock the Uptown Theatre on Dec. 8–9. See Concerts, p33.

Healdsburg. 10:30am to 7pm. Free admission, workshops and tastings, $10–$95. 707.431.7433.

S A N TA R O S A

Illustrated Relief After Santa Rosa–based artist and author Brian Fies lost his home in the Tubbs fire, he made national headlines for his response to the tragedy, a graphic novel, Fire Story, in which he shared his story in striking and intimate illustrations. This weekend, Fies appears with several big name authors and artists for the Drawing Strength fire-relief fundraiser. Fies

talks healing through creativity with author Christopher Moore and Pearls Before Swine comic-strip creator Stephan Pastis, with a reception, draw-a-thon and book signing that also features author Dave Eggers and others on Saturday, Dec. 9, Charles M. Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. Doors at 5:30pm. $30–$50. 707.579.4452.

P E TA L U M A

Big Band Holidays A bi-monthly showcase in Petaluma,

the Wednesday Night Big Band regularly packs underground jazz club the Big Easy with more than a dozen musicians and special guest performers jumpin’, jivin’ and wailin’ to the best of the American Songbook. This month, the big band celebrates the holiday season with the Sinatra Holiday Spectacular that features Los Angeles crooner Ned Rifkin sitting in with the ensemble and singing the best of both Sinatra’s classic catalogue and traditional Christmas tunes. The family-friendly jazz show gets festive on Wednesday, Dec. 13, at the Big Easy, 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 7pm. Free. 707.776.7163.

—Charlie Swanson


MADE IN SEBASTOPOL A careful viewing of ‘Coco’ will reveal images drawn from Michael Anthony Carnacchi’s Sebastopol boot shop.

Coco Carnacchi Renowned Sebastopol boot shop features in latest from Pixar BY TOM GOGOLA

C

oco opened in Sebastopol on a Tuesday, and Michael Anthony Carnacchi was there in the audience for the first area screening. The Sebastopol shoemaker-to-the-stars and city councilman isn’t quite a star in the latest release from Pixar Animation Studios—but he’s got a pretty cool connection to the animated feature.

Carnacchi’s North Main Street boot shop was used as the basis for an animated shoemaker’s shop in the film, which appears several times. Carnacchi says he was contacted in 2015 via a weirdly nonspecific email that made no mention of Pixar, and then by a documentary film company, which asked if they could come shoot his shop and also made no mention of Pixar. It was all very hush-hush. The doc crew came up and shot the

store, and he never heard from them again and figured they’d lost interest in him and his shop. Three weeks later, Carnacchi got a phone call from the Pixar legal people, “and they basically told me that they were interested in doing consulting with me for an upcoming production they were doing.” At that point, Carnacchi connected the dots back to the mysterious email and documentary film crew. “A-ha!” he exclaims. “I figured it out!”

He subsequently signed legal documents that granted Pixar exclusive rights to the film, says Carnacchi with a laugh, “in all languages and throughout the universe.” Carnacchi’s previous brush with high drama and power was of a different sort: he made headlines for his years-long pursuit of a federal lawsuit against U.S. Bank National, where he sued the financial institution and charged it with violating federal racketeering laws over usurious credit-card fees. Carnacchi, who was elected to the Sebastopol city council in 2016, saw Coco with his girlfriend, and they each caught parts of the shoe shop, he says, that the other missed as the film unspooled. His cobbler’s shop features prominently because the main character in the film, Miguel, is descended from a shoemaking family with a musical background. Miguel wants to be a musician, and trouble ensues. He strums a magic guitar and disappears into a Day of the Dead–inspired adventure in the afterlife, along with a hairless dog named Dante. “I think they maximized the footage that they took,” he says, “but I need to watch the movie again to see exactly what they took. There are some exaggerations, and certainly there are parts where I was like, ‘That’s my shelf with the lathe on it, that’s cool!’” Equally cool was watching the credits roll. Carnacchi didn’t make the “Special Thanks” cut, but he did make the “Additional Thanks” roster. “I just let out a whoop when I saw it,” says Carnacchi, who shall forevermore be known in these parts as Coco Carnacchi, your spirit guide to a solid pair of swanky, hand-hewn shoes.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 6-1 2, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Ideas

21


Stage Kevin Berne

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | DEC E M BE R 6-1 2, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

LOVELY Adam Magill plays

Shakespeare, and Megan Trout is Viola in ‘Shakespeare in Love.’

All’s Well

MTC’s ‘Shakespeare’ in love with the stage

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Adapted by Lee Hall (Billy Elliot) from the screenplay by Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard, the rambunctious, joyously performed production now running at Marin Theatre Company frequently delights—assuming this kind of Mel Brooksian jokes-at-the-expenseof-actual-drama-and-truthfulstorytelling appeals to you. I confess, it appeals to me. First produced in 2014 in London to great acclaim (despite it’s nearly two hour and 45 minute running time), the current version clocks in at a lean two hours and 15 minutes. Stripped down and cleaned up, the original

stage story’s obvious deficits— confusion, sloppiness, excessive bloat—are now largely outweighed by Hall’s tightened script. The new ending, too, showcasing one of the film’s most quoted lines, works much better. Though still clunky and unfocused, Shakespeare in Love frequently soars with energy and enthusiasm, given flight by director Jasson Minadakis’ skillful emphasis on pace, silliness and a deep love of all things theatrical. Played with wistful charm by Adam Magill, a decidedly fictionalized William Shakespeare is introduced as an unknown playwright battling writer’s block while attempting to complete something called Romeo and Ethel, the Pirate’s Daughter. The play, if finished, will prove the salvation of the struggling Curtain Theater, represented by Kat Conley’s spare assemblage of naked scaffolding and skeletal framework. Romeo and Ethel will also save the theater’s debt-ridden owner Mr. Henslowe (an uncharacteristically stolid Robert Sicular). As in the film, Will is ultimately rescued from literary impotence upon meeting the young actor Thomas Kent, whose mustache and doublet are actually the masculine disguise of the wealthy Viola de Lesseps (Megan Trout). Viola is desperate to act, despite the period’s laws against employing women as actors. In short order, Will has fallen for her, though she is tragically tied to the despicable Lord Wessex (Thomas Gorrebeeck). After accepting the futility of their love— despite some very modern sex— Shakespeare is inspired to create his masterpiece Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare in Love, despite its flaws, is a true celebration of the art of theater, and the bruised and battered, slightly lunatic artists who’ve kept that art alive for the last 400 years. Rating (out of 5): ‘Shakespeare in Love’ runs Tuesday– Sunday through Dec. 17 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $20–$58. 415.388.5208.


Film

23 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 6-1 2, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

ART IMITATES ART James Franco plays the director and actor

of the ‘so bad it’s good’ cult film ‘The Room.’

True Believer

James Franco is Tommy Wiseau in cryptic biopic BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

his one’s clearly for the fans. In The Disaster Artist, we watch actor and man of mystery Tommy Wiseau (James Franco, who also directed) devise his indie film The Room (2003)—widely considered one of the worst movies ever made, and with the cult following to prove it.

Bulked up and sporting dyed hair, Wiseau was a natural to play heavies—a “Caliban,” one director (Bob Odenkirk) calls Wiseau after seeing him audition. Despite his distinctly Transylvanian appearance, Wiseau sought to be a mainstream romantic star, but there was the matter of the actor and director’s peculiar manner of speech. Wiseau claimed he was from the bayou. One clue: a passing mention of an accident that almost killed him—was this the cause of something that would interest a speech therapist? (“Waaa accent?” Wiseau asks here, incredulous.). The Disaster Artist is strictly bromance. Wiseau whisks novice actor Greg Sestero (Dave Franco) to his L.A. apartment. Are there ulterior motives? Franco perfectly recreates Wiseau’s acting ability to turn on a dime—“I did not hit her, I did not hit her!—Oh, hi Mark”— and celebrates the seismic tonal shifts of The Room’s deathless sex scene, in which a single long-stemmed red rose, flickering candles and fluttering chiffon curtains are juxtaposed with the humping of Wiseau’s beefy behind. The Disaster Artist is a benign salute to midnight-movie melodramas. As was the case with Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, Franco gives Wiseau a gigantic klieg-light premiere for his film, a premiere that never happened in real life for either Wood or Wiseau. When The Room became a hit, it seemed to particularly affect actors who never really know the measure of their worth and have to gamble on every role, little knowing how the movie they’re acting in will play. They may not be able to write or direct, but they sure can feel. ‘The Disaster Artist’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.

Honorable 12/8–12/14 Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri R

10:15-1:00-2:45-3:45-6:30-8:00-9:10 Weds 12/13 only: 10:15-1:00-3:45-6:30-9:10 Thurs 12/14 only: 10:15-1:00-2:45-3:45-6:30-9:10 Lady Bird R 10:45-1:15-3:30-5:30-6:15-8:30 Wed 12/13 & Thur 12/14 only: 10:45-1:15-3:30-6:15-8:30

The Man Who Invented Christmas PG 10:30-12:45-3:15-6:00-8:30

Bill Nye: Science Guy NR 10:15-12:30 No show times Tue 12/12 or Wed 12/13!

Wait For Your Laugh NR 10:30am Novitiate R 12:30pm Victoria & Abdul PG13 3:15-5:45 Thur 12/14 only 3:15pm!

Loving Vincent NR 8:15pm No show times Thurs 12/14!

The Polar Express G

Weds 12/13 @ 11:00-1:45-4:30-7:15 The Shape of Water R Sneak Preview Thurs 12/14 @ 5:30-8:15 Wonder Wheel PG13 Sneak Preview Thurs 12/14 @ 7:00 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

® BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, December 8 – Thu, December 14

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd

Schedule for Fri, June 22nd•- Salads Thu, June Bruschetta • Academy Paninis Soups • 28th Appetizers Award “Moore Gives •Her BestNominee Performance 8 Great BeersBest on Tap + Wine by theFilm! Glass and Bottle Foreign Language

In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling

Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 7:00 (12:30) 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:20 9:15 9:45 RR EBBING, MISSOURI (12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 7:10 9:20 2 Academy BestRActor! (12:00Award 2:30 5:00)Including 7:30 9:55 R

“A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 2:45 5:10 7:30 9:45 R Times LA VIE EN 7:25 ROSE (1:00 3:10 5:20) 9:40 (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13R THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! (1:20 No One Could Make This Believable 4:10) 6:50 9:15 4:00 7:10 9:40 R R One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!” – Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

LADY BIRD

THE FLORIDA PROJECT ONCE 8 Academy Award NomsARTIST Including THE DISASTER PRODIGAL SONS

(1:00) 3:10 R Best Picture, Best5:20 Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 NR 4:50) No 9:107:05 Show 9:20 Tue or Thu (12:30 2:40 R

MILK

MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

JUST GETTING STARTED

THE(12:40 GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, Show Thu PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show PG-13 Thu 2:45 5:00) 7:10 9:15 WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 7:10 9:309:30 R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including Best Mon: No 7:104:00 Wed: (3:30) only “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today FROST/NIXON

MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine “Deliciously unsettling!” – RLA Times PARIS, JE7:15 T’AIME (11:45 2:15 4:45) PG-13 (11:45) 4:45 9:509:40

THE (12:50 GHOST Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere 3:45) 6:45 9:25 R of (1:15) 4:15 7:00 9:30 R

COCO (2:15) 7:15 PG-13 PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK Michael Moore’s JUSTICE LEAGUE Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 THE MOST DANGEROuS

Star Wars: The Last Jedi • Coco Murder on the Orient Express Lady Bird • Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com 707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

SICKO (1:30 MOVIES 4:15) 7:10 PG-13 No Passes IN THE MORNING MAN IN9:45 AMERICA

Starts Fri, June 29th! Thu: No evening shows Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 NR No7:30 6:507:00 Show Tue or Thu (1:15 4:00) 9:30 PG FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 5:00 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! Thu: No evening shows 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED Mon, Dec 11 7pm HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

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FERRARI 312B STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI Starts Thu, Dec 14 2D: 7:00 10:15 3D: 7:30 PG-13


24 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | DEC E M BE R 6-1 2, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC

Thu 12⁄7 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–$30 • 21+ An Evening with Mike Cooley ( Drive-By Truckers) Sat 12⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $37–$42 • All Ages

Sons of Champlin

Tue 12⁄12 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

The Coffis Brothers & The Mountain Men FREE Holiday Concert Thu 12⁄14 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–$30 • 21+ Allah-Las + Big Light Sat 12⁄16 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $22–$25 • 21+

Zepparella

the All-Female Zeppelin Powerhouse

+ Lotus Revival Sun 12⁄17 • Doors 10am ⁄ $12–$22 • All Ages

Little Folkies Family Band Holiday Celebration feat Irena Eide

Sun 12⁄17 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–$30 • All Ages

Country Joe McDonald Last Mill Valley Show featuring the Electric Music Band

50th Anniversary Show Celebrating Electric Music for the Mind & Body Mon 12⁄18 • Doors 6pm ⁄ $17–$27 • All Ages

The Christmas Jug Band Family Night

Tue 12⁄19 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $24–$27 • All Ages The Christmas Jug Band special guest Bonnie Hayes Fri, Sat, Sun 12⁄29-31 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $42–$97 • 21+

GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM SPECIAL GUEST ROCKIN JOHNNY BURGIN TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU DEC 7 • COUNTRY LINE DANCE EVERY 1ST AND 3RD THURSDAY 7PM / ALL AGES / $10 FRI DEC 8 • ANTHONY PRESTI AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

LUCERO three night New Years Bash www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

HEART SPACE PRESENTS Sat Dec 16

thu disclaiMeR ( ) dec 7 the band w/ Jazz Music 8pm/$10

MaRia MuldauR & heR

fri dec 8 Red hot bluesiana band 8:30pm/$20 adv/$25 dos sat thugz & solid aiR dec 9 7:30pm/dancing/$10 tue aRt Reception with dec 12 fRench oak gypsy band 6pm thu buzzy MaRtin holiday dec 14 conceRt 8pm/$5 fri foxes in the henhouse dec 15 7:30pm/americana/$10 sat annie saMpson band dec 16 8:30pm/dancing/$15 thu stacey Joy dec 21 8pm/$5 fri iRie RockeRs dec 22 8:30pm/dancing/$12

the soRentinos annual

sat dec 23 chRistMas show 8:30pm/dancing/$15 thu dylan black pRoJect dec 28 8pm/dancing/$10

RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

Music

Harrison Stafford (Groundation) & The Professor Crew ROOTS REGGAE 21+ DOORS 9PM $20 ADV/$25 DOS Reel Fish Shop & Grill (Sonoma) Sat Dec 30

SoCo Trio World/Jazz/Funk Free Admission! ALL AGES, Families Encouraged! Church of The Oaks (Cotati) Fri Jan 12

Los Lobos Grammy Award Winning Rock Legends! DOORS 7PM/ SHOW 8pm Raven (Healdsburg) Sat Jan 20

Coco Montoya Blues Star Returns to the Cabaret! DOORS 6PM/ SHOW 7pm ALL AGES The Old Cotati Cabaret (Cotati) Sun Feb 18

Julian Lage Trio 2018 JAZZ • ALL AGES DOORS 6:30PM $30-$50 Raven (Healdsburg) Sat Feb 24

English Beat 2018 SKA • ALL AGES DOORS 7:30PM $35 ADV/$38 DOS Raven (Healdsburg) HeartSpacePresents.com 707-800-9485 Presenting music that gives hearts the space to heal, connect and be happy!

ROOTSY The Roots headline this

year’s Emerald Cup.

Cream of the Crop Emerald Cup hosts national headlining bands

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

W

hile it’s widely regarded as the preeminent cannabis growers’ competition, the Emerald Cup, returning to Sonoma County on Dec. 9 and 10, has also earned the reputation as one of the industry’s biggest blowouts of the year. “It was always a party,” says Emerald Cup founder and producer Tim Blake. When the inaugural Emerald Cup took place in Mendocino County in 2003, it was an all-night affair that featured incredible music until dawn. “We had what we called a survivors breakfast for anybody who was still awake in the morning,” Blake recalls.

Over the years, the Cup has evolved to include informative speakers, eclectic cannabis vendors and stunning glass art exhibits to accompany its cannabis contest, but music has always been at the core of the event’s success. “It’s still a wonderful celebration of the fall harvest,” says Blake. The event attracts talent like Damien Marley, last year’s headliner. This year, Blake is bringing the Roots, Jimmy Fallon’s house band on The Tonight Show, to headline on Saturday, Dec 9. Formed 30 years ago in Philadelphia, and anchored by lead MC Tariq “Black Thought” Trotter and drummer Ahmir “?uestlove” Thompson, the band has long been a guiding force in alternative hip-hop and won Grammys for collaborations with Erykah Badu in 2000 and John Legend in 2011. On Sunday, Dec. 10, the Emerald Cup closes the show with Portland, Ore., indie-rock outfit Portugal. The Man, who scored one of this year’s biggest hits with the infectious single “Feel It Still,” off the band’s latest album, Woodstock. Other bands appearing over the weekend include indie-funk ensemble Pimps of Joytime, Bay Area hiphop collective Hieroglyphics and rising electronica duo Bob Moses, as well as several DJs spinning throughout the event. With this year’s event set to be the biggest yet, Blake plans on giving back in a big way. “We formed the Emerald Cup Charity Foundation about six months ago,” says Blake. “When the fires came in, we really saw the need to step up.” To that end, the Cup is matching funds from its sponsors, donating a portion of every contest entry fee and hosting an auction to support fire victims. “We’re dedicated to the community,” says Blake. “We’re going to show how much we really stand together.” The Emerald Cup takes place Dec. 9–10 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. $70–$130 and up. theemeraldcup.com.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Bone Thugs-n-Harmony Pioneering hip-hop group kicks off Mystic Theatre’s 25th anniversary week of shows. Dec 7, 7:30pm. $42-$48. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Holly Jolly Pops

Annual holiday pops show features maestro Michael Berkowitz with the Santa Rosa Symphony and special guests. Dec 10, 3pm. $37 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Olivia O’Brien

North Bay native and accomplished singersongwriter performs a firerelief benefit show to cap off her US tour. Dec 11, 7pm. $15. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

MARIN COUNTY A Broadway Cabaret

Marin Musical Theatre Company presents song and dance revue from classic and contemporary Broadway shows, with wine, beer and a silent auction. Dec 8-9, 8pm. $30-$50. The Playhouse, 27 Kensington Rd, San Anselmo, marinmusicals.org.

Kitka

Sound Orchard Winter Fest

Ramblin’ Jack Elliott headlines a musical variety show with the West Marin Choir, Point Reyes Children’s Choir and a singalong. Dec 10, 4pm. $25-$30/ kids under 12 are $5. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1075.

NAPA COUNTY The Pixies

Immensely influential

Trinity

Bassist Stuart Hamm, guitarist Dean Brown and drummer Gergo Borlai come together for a night of virtuosic jazz fusion performance. Dec 10, 7pm. $25-$30. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Vineyard Home Companion

Cloverdale Veterans Memorial Hall

Dec 9, Healdsburg Community Band’s Christmas Concert. 205 W First St, Cloverdale. healdsburgcommunityband.org.

Congregation Ner Shalom

Dec 9, Jeanette Lewicki and the Gonifs. 85 La Plaza, Cotati. 707.664.8622.

Crooked Goat Brewing Dec 9, 3pm, Brandon Eardley. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Variety show in the Vaudevillian tradition features music from Obsidian Son and Misner & Smith, with local humorists Beverly Shotwell and Judd Finkelstein. Dec 7, 7:30pm. $20-$25. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

El Verano Inn

Clubs & Venues

Dec 10, 3pm, “Alleluia Anyway” with Occidental Community Choir. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Dec 6, aqus blues jam. Dec 7, Aqus Celtic Music Session. Dec 8, Blue Seven. Dec 9, Kurt Huget and Chris Smith. Dec 10, 2pm, Madera Marin. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Dec 8, the New Trust with Slow Bloom and Bad Thoughts. Dec 9, Union Jack & the Rippers with Profits of Doom and Lord Mountain. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Barley & Hops Tavern Dec 7, Awesome Hotcakes. Dec 9, Viva La Rêve. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Dec 8, fire relief benefit with the Gentlemen Soldiers and the Bumblin’ Bones. 705 Laurel Ave, El Verano. 707.935.0611.

Flamingo Lounge

Dec 8, Matt Applin & the Midnite Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

D

BENEFIT SHOW FOR FIRE VICTIMS SATURDAY, DEC 9

THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE

ZOSO ROCKSTAR UNIVERSITY WOULD LIKE TO INVITE YOU TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR TOP NOTCH RECORDING STUDIO

Glaser Center

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Dec 8, SSU Latin Band and SSU Jazz Orchestra. Dec 9, “Hosannas” with SSU Concert Band and SSU Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Dec 10, 3pm, “Handel’s Messiah” with Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra & Chorale. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

WE ARE CURRENTLY OFFERING DISCOUNTS ON DAY RATES. CALL 707.694.1785 OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE RSURECORDINGSTUDIO.COM FOR DETAILS

Gundlach Bundschu Winery

Dec 9, Justin Townes Earle and Mapache. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Healdsburg Community Church

Dec 7-9, “A Christmas Fantasia” with Healdsburg Chorus. 1100 University Ave, Healdsburg, healdsburgchorus.com.

Bennett Valley Senior Center

Hermann Sons Hall

Dec 7, 11am, Holiday choral concert with the Silver Singers. 704 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8608.

Dec 11, 7pm, Holiday Folk Dance Party with Da! Mozhem. 860 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9962.

The Big Easy

HopMonk Sebastopol

Dec 6, Zeena Quinn. Dec 7, Georgia Ruth & the Absynth Quartet. Dec 8, Tin Whiskers and Natural Bridges. Dec 13, Sinatra holiday spectacular with Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

THIS WEEKEN

Dec 7, Charlie Hunter Trio. Dec 8, David Luning Band with Frankie Boots. Dec 9, David Luning Band with the Sam Chase. Dec 11, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Konnex. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300. )

26

Give a Parks Membership

SONOMA COUNTY PARKS

$69

Internationally renowned women’s vocal ensemble performs its beloved Wintersongs program and celebrates the release of their latest holiday album. Dec 9, 8pm. $10-$55. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

alternative band is in town for two nights of bona fide rock. Dec 8-9, 8pm. $75 and up. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Dec 10, 2pm, Dustin Saylor. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

gen

eral

$49

senior

Annual Parks Membership includes: Free parking at 50+ regional parks Free night of camping Festival admission Free boat launching

Gift Memberships available at Regional Parks’ Office, REI, Oliver’s Markets, Whole Foods Markets and other retail partners

sonomacountyparks.org

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 6-1 2, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

25

Cellars of Sonoma


Music ( 25

26 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | DEC E M BE R 6-1 2, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

HopMonk Sonoma

Dec 9, Nate Lopez. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100. 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI WED DEC 6 ON SALE FRIDAY AT NOON MON, MAY 14

Maks, Val & Peta Live On Tour: Confidential Members Buy Early! JOIN TODAY!

ON SALE NOW! THIS WEEK

SUN, DEC. 10 Symphony Pops:

A Holly Jolly Pops Special Guests Roustabout Theater, Santa Rosa Symphonic Chorus and Bay Area vocalists Tina Meals and Jonathan Poretz!

SUN, DECEMBER 17

SCIENCE BUZZ CAFE $5/DOORS-SHOW 7/ALL AGES

THU DEC 7

AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS

TWO NIGHTS WITH

Lagunitas Tap Room

FRI DEC 8 & SAT DEC 9

THE DAVID LUNING BAND PLUS FRANKIE BOOTS $20–30 BOTH NIGHTS DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

MON DEC 11

THE WBLK DANCEHALL MASSIVE

DJ KONNEX BERFDAY BASH $10/ALL SAGITTARIUS FREE B4 11PM DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

FRI DEC 14

ZION I

+ PURE POWERS

$20/DOORS 9/SHOW 9/21+

SAT DEC 16

MORILLO

+ SHARU, GABRIEL FRANCISCO

$15–20/DOORS 9:30/SHOW 9:30/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

SUN, JANUARY 7

Kris Kristofferson

TUE, FEBRUARY 6

An Evening with Lyle Lovett and Robert Earl Keen

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

Dec. 18 Miracle on 34th Street Jan. 4 The BIG Fat Year End KISS OFF Comedy Show Jan. 8 John McCutcheon in Concert Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

Dec 8, A Very Trebuchet Christmas. 518 B St, Petaluma. 707.762.4271.

The Phoenix Theater Dec 8, Frobeck and Thus the Buzz. Dec 10, fire relief benefit with Victims Family. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Dec 7, 6:30pm, Amy Hogan Trio. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Redwood Cafe

The Laugh Cellar

Dec 9, Country Christmas with Steven Kent. 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

Local Barrel

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Main Street Bistro

Rock Star University House of Rock

Dec 9, Johnny Tsunami and the Hurricanes. 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433. Dec 6, Willie Perez. Dec 7, Vernelle Anders. Dec 8, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Dec 9, Rhonda Benin. Dec 10, Eric Wiley. Dec 12, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

SUN, JANUARY 28

Petaluma Woman’s Club

Dec 8, Maria Muldaur & Her Red Hot Bluesiana Band. Dec 9, Thugz and Solid Air. Dec 10, 3 and 6pm, Celtic Fiddle Music & Irish Jam Session. Dec 11, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Dec 12, art reception with French Oak. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Dec 8, DJ MGB. Dec 9, Wiley’s Coyotes. Dec 10, 4pm, Barbara Olney and friends. Dec 10, 8pm, George Heagerty. Dec 11, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Dec 11, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

3 Doors Down Acoustic Back Porch Jam

featuring Sonny Landreth

Dec 6, JimBo Trout. Dec 7, Aqua Velvets. Dec 8, the Rhythm Drivers. Dec 10, Devine & Co. Dec 13, Todos Santos. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Mc T’s Bullpen

TUE, JANUARY 23

John Hiatt & The Goners

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

$20–25/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

CHARLIE HUNTER TRIO

Sebastiani Theatre

THU, FEBRUARY 1

Dec 9, “Music from the Brazilian Songbook” with the Ricardo Peixoto Trio. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Dec 8, Train Wreck Junction. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Easton Corbin

Whose Live Anyway

Hotel Healdsburg

a Winter’s Eve” with the Petaluma Chorale. 580 Sonoma Mountain Parkway, Petaluma. 707.763.2277.

Dec 8, Saved by the 90s. Dec 9, Poor Man’s Whiskey and One Grass Two Grass. Dec 10, Flobots with Bang Data. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Newman Auditorium

Dec 6, 7:30pm, Santa Rosa Junior College Jazz Combos fall concert. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Dec 8-9, “Alleluia Anyway” with Occidental Community Choir. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Valley Baptist Church Dec 9, 3pm, “Music for

Dec 9, Out of the Blue. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Dec 9, Zoso: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Saturday Afternoon Club Dec 9, 2pm, Holiday Concert for Compassion. 430 10th St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8436.

Sebastopol Community Center Dec 8, Jim Hurst Trio. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Sonoma Cider Dec 8, Soulshine Blues Band. 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

St. Vincent’s Church Dec 11, 6 and 8:30pm, A Chanticleer Christmas. 35 Liberty St, Petaluma. 707.762.4278.

The Tradewinds Bar

Whiskey Tip

Dec 8, Charley Peach. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Dec 8, King James. Dec 9, Illeagles. Dec 10, Gypsy Soul holiday concert. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Dec 8, Pride & Joy. Dec 9, DJ party. Dec 10, Banda Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato

Dec 7, M6. Dec 8, Hot Grubb. Dec 9, Reisender with the Fell Swoop and John Courage. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Dec 6, Aaron Redner and friends. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin Center Showcase Theatre

Dec 8, 8pm and , Dec 9, 2:30 and 7:30pm, “A Wonderful World: Songs of Peace, Love & Joy” with Mayflower Chorus. Dec 10, An Evening of Sacred Song & Devotional Pop Music with Donna De Lory. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium

Dec 12, 7pm, Marin Symphony Holiday Pops. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

19 Broadway Club

Dec 6, Damon LeGall Band. Dec 7, Small Change Romeos. Dec 8, 5:30pm, No Filler. Dec 9, 5:30pm, the Restless Sons. Dec 9, 9:30pm, Hotter than Helga and the Blind Venetians. Dec 10, 4pm, North Bay Allstars. Dec 10, 8:30pm, the River City Band. Dec 12, 6pm, Jeb Brady Band. Dec 12, 8:30pm, Guy and friends. Dec 13, Soulbillies. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Dec 8, “Polarity at the Tradewinds” with Krngle, JPower and Haddit. 8210 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7878.

No Name Bar

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Old St Hilary’s Landmark

Dec 7, Country Line Dancing. Dec 9, Kevin Russell and friends with Volker Strifler. Dec 12, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Dec 8, Michael Aragon Quartet. Dec 11, Kimrea. Dec 12, open mic. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Dec 10, 1 and 4pm, “Queen of Heaven” with Musae. 201 Esperanza, Tiburon, musae.org.

Osteria Divino

Dec 8, Barrio Manouche.


27

Sara Sanger

37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Dec 6, Arthur Javier. Dec 7, J Kevin Durkin. Dec 12, Panama Jazz Trio. Dec 13, the Buzz. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

THURSDAY

DEC 7

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Original Fine Art, Watercolors, Oils, Acrylic Paintings, & Prints, Handmade Talisman Jewelry, Ceramics, Handmade Clothing, Sushi Chef Pop-up, Authentic Chai, Empathic Tarot Card Readings, Fine Art Tattooing, Handmade Leather Goods, a Visual Feast, Fun!

Dec 6, the Weissmen. Dec 7, the Cleanup. Dec 8, Ann Halen. Dec 9, Tom Finch Trio. Dec 10, Dr Montgomery. Dec 11, Billy D’s open mic. Dec 12, Fresh Baked Blues. Dec 13, the New Sneakers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Dec 8, Beer Scouts. Dec 9, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Dec 10, 4pm, Mark Hummel’s Deep Basement Shakers with HowellDevine. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

RISING TIDE Santa Rosa indie rockers the New Trust

Sausalito Seahorse

Winters and Peter Welker Bay Area All Stars. Dec 9, Blame Sally. Dec 10, 5pm, Sunday Sessions Songwriter’s Circle. Dec 10, 7pm, Sironka Dance Troupe. Dec 13, 12pm, Amaranth Quartet. Dec 13, 8pm, Throckmorton Chorus Winter Concert. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Valley. 625 Randolph St, Napa, singnapavalley.org.

Trek Winery

Dec 10, 3pm, “Beethoven’s Fifth” with Napa Valley College Community Orchestra. 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Fri

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater

Deep Basement Shakers and Howelldevine 4:00 Fri The Rivertown Trio 15 Dec featuring Julie Bernard

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Dec 7, Kitt Weagant. Dec 8, Bait and Switch Blues Band with Carrie Souza. Dec 9, Italian Folk Night with Sal DiMaggio and Sergio Catanzariti. Dec 10, 5pm, Orquesta la Moderna Tradicion. Dec 12, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Dec 7, Ali Handal. Dec 8, Night Animals. Dec 9, the Dixie Giants. Dec 10, Vanessa Silberman. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Dec 7, Mike Cooley. Dec 9, Sons of Champlin. Dec 10, 2pm, MY AMP student showcase. Dec 12, the Coffis & the Mountain Men holiday concert. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Dec 7, New Monsoon’s winter harvest show. Dec 9, “Dead Blues” with Phil Lesh and friends. Dec 10, David Nelson Band. Dec 13-14, John Kadlecik Band. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Dec 6, 12pm, Ian Scarfe. Dec 7, Michelle Schmitt’s Holiday Concert. Dec 8, Jazzin’ Up Joys of the Season with Deborah

Dec 9, Chime Travelers. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Dec 6, Oddjob Ensemble. Dec 9, Royal Jelly Jive Christmas Special. Dec 10, Ben Sollee & the Kentucky Native. Dec 12, San Geronimo. Dec 13, Sol Horizon. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Dec 8, David Correa and Tommy Hill. Dec 9, Ryan McCaffrey. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Dec 9, Jinx Jones & the KingTones. Dec 10, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

First United Methodist Church

Dec 10, 1pm, “The Joys of Christmas” with Sing Napa

Dec 9, 7pm, Voena: Voices of the Season. Dec 10, 3pm, “Holidays in Buenos Aires” with Michael Guttman and JP Jofre. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

River Terrace Inn

Dec 8, Mark Harold. Dec 9, Craig Corona. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Dec 6, the Young Fables. Dec 7, Kith and Kin. Dec 8, Luvplanet. Dec 9, Garage Band 101 for Adults. Dec 13, Mike Greensill with Maye Cavallaro. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Uptown Theatre

Dec 7, Chris Isaak Holiday Tour. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

FEAT SAVED

BY THE 90S

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ • FREE

DEC 9

ONE GRASS TWO GRASS

SUNDAY

FLOBOTS WITH

FRIDAY

ANUHEA PLUS

SATURDAY

ROY ROGERS

BLUEGRASS/ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

DATA DEC 10 BANG HIP-HOP/ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ FUGA & MAHI DEC 15 PAULA REGGAE/POP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ DEC 16 FRIDAY

BLUES/SLIDE GUITAR • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

DAVID ARKENSTONE'S

FANTASY DEC 22 WINTER NEW AGE • DOORS 7PM • ALL AGES FRI & SAT

THE BROTHERS COMATOSE W/ THE COFFIS BROTHERS ON SAT BLUEGRASS/FOLK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

JaM Cellars

Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center

25TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY

12/31 NYE 2018 with Tommy Castro, 1/12 Marty Stuart and his Fabulous Superlatives, 1/19 Pablo Cruise, 1/20 Fleetwood Mask & ILLEagles, 1/23 Reverend Horton Heat, 1/27 Royal Jelly Jive, 2/1 New Kingston with The Late Ones, 2/3 The Mother Hips, 2/7 The Expendables

unveil dreamy new LP with a show on Friday, Dec. 8, at the Arlene Francis Center. See Clubs & Venues, p33.

Dec 7, Sin Silver. Dec 8, Cave Clove. Dec 9, 2pm, Annual Ugly Christmas Sweater Party. 1460 First St, Napa. 707.265.7577.

HIP-HOP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SATURDAY POOR MAN'S WHISKEY PLUS

DEC 29 & DEC 30

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Dec 8, Charged Particles. Dec 9, Matt Kizer Band. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

FRIDAY

DEC 8

BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

Scouts Dec 8 Beer Rock & Roll Xmas Show 8:00 / No Cover Sat

Dec 9 Sun

Danny Click’s Birthday Party with The Hell Yeahs! 8:30

“Blue Christmas Show” Dec 10 Mark Hummel’s

Rancho Debut!

Fabulous Harmonies 8:00 / No Cover

Sat

North Bay Fire Relief Fundraiser Dec 16 M.C. Bill Bowker & KRSH Radio present

The Angela Strehli Band with Mighty Mike Schermer

8:30

Santa & Mrs. Claus 2:00–4:00 Dec 17 Sun

Tim Cain’s “Family Christmas Sing Along” 4:00–5:00

Gospel Christmas Eve Weekend Dinner Shows The Incredibly Exciting

Sons of The Soul Revivers Sat Dec 23, 8pm & Sun Dec 24, 7pm

Sat

Dec 30

Annual Faux New Year’s Eve with

The Sun Kings

“The Beatles Never Sounded So Good!” 8:30

14th Annual New Year’s Eve Party! Dec 31 The Zydeco Flames Sun

Marin’s Best Party Band 9:00 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 6-1 2, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Panama Hotel Restaurant


28 NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | DEC E M BE R 6-1 2, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Arts Events Galleries RECEPTIONS Dec 7

Robert Allen Fine Art, “Nature Abstracted,” group show features works on canvas by Amy Donaldson, Beatrice Findlay and John Maxon. 5:30pm. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.2800.

Dec 8

Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Small Work Big Deal,” annual members show displays a diverse range of mediums and techniques. 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Dec 9

Aqus Cafe, “Small Works Holiday Show,” find holiday gifts in this group show. 3pm. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

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Sebastopol Gallery, “… Creatures Big & Small,” assemblage artist Rebeca Trevino and oils painter Jeff Watts display new works as Sebastopol Gallery celebrates a decade in in the community. Reception, Dec 9 at 4pm. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

SONOMA COUNTY Arts Guild of Sonoma Through Dec 31, “Holiday Art Show,” one-of-a-kind works are on display and available to complete your gift giving. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery Dec 6-Jan 6, “Holiday Group Show,” local artists celebrate the season. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Chroma Gallery

Through Dec 31, “Small Works Show,” annual show includes paintings, sculptures and ceramics no larger than a square foot. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Fulton Crossing

Through Dec 31, “Mark Lifvendahl: Making a Splash,” Sonoma County artist displays his latest colorful, large-scale paintings. 1200 River Rd, Fulton. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm 707.536.3305.

Graton Gallery

Through Dec 17, “Inside Out,” artists Sandra Rubin and Susan Proehl illustrate the world around them while expressing a subconscious perspective. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. TuesSat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through Dec 30, “Holiday Gift Gallery,” a winter wonderland of art from over 50 regional artists is on display and for sale through the holiday season. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Journey Center

Through Dec 15, “Wonderful Gifts in Small Packages,” annual holiday art show and fundraiser features small works of art by local artists. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5; weekend hours by appointment. 707.578.2121.

Paul Mahder Gallery

Through Dec 31, “Holiday Group Exhibit,” celebrate the season with artwork by over 40 international artists. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Through Dec 17, “Petaluma Arts Association Exhibit,” the group celebrates 60 years with paintings, sculpture and ceramics by over 30 association artists. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Sonoma Community Center

Through Dec 10, “Artist in Residence: Karl Schwiesow,” ceramic artist shows off his

sculptures created while in residence with Sonoma Ceramics Studio. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. Daily, 7:30am to 11pm. 707.938.4626.

University Art Gallery

Through Dec 10, “2 Scale,” group show features large, mixed-media ceramic works. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown

Through Dec 23, “Small Works Exhibition,” annual show offers affordable, quality artwork for the holiday gift-giving season. Reception, Dec 8 at 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bubble Street Gallery

Through Dec 31, “Calling on the Muse,” artist and gallery owner Daniel Merriam premieres paintings, sculpture and graphics created before and after the Tubbs fire, in which his home and studio were destroyed. 565 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.339.0506.

Dominican University

Through Dec 15, “Nigel Poor: The San Quentin Project,” archive mapping and typology project displays alongside sculptures by Andrea Bacigalupo. 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440.

Gallery Route One

Through Dec 17, “Latino Photography Project,” GRO’s project displays scenes from west Marin through stunning photos, with member artists Mimi Abers and Marj Stone also exhibiting. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Society of Artists Through Dec 23, “Holiday Bazaar,” featuring original works by Marin Society of Artists members. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

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Through Dec 31, “Icons of Rock and Roll,” exhibit displays portraits of the most famous musicians from the 20th


century by the industry’s most celebrated photographers. 1473 Yountville Cross Rd, Yountville. 707.944.8642.

Posada Navideña

Eleventh annual show features Ballet Folklórico de Sacramento in a seasonal journey through the regions of Mexico. Dec 8, 7pm. $5-$10. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Marin Ballet’s Nutcracker

Full-length ballet classic comes to life. Dec 9-10, 1 and 5pm. $28-$44. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.473.6800.

A Frozen Ballet

Teresa Lubarsky’s Healdsburg Ballet premieres a brand-new show based on the beloved fairy tale “The Snow Queen” by Hans Christian Andersen. Dec 9, 7pm, and Dec 10, 2pm. $15-$20. Raven Theater. 115 North St, Healdsburg. healdsburgballet.com.

Mendocino Dance Project

Athletic and dynamic dance show is rich in content. Dec 9, 7:30pm. $5-$20. Sebstopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol 707.829.4797.

ArtQuest Dance Company Winter Performance Dec 8-9. $5-$15. SRHS Performing Arts Auditorium, 1235 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa.

Events Bay Area Made Holiday Market

Do your holiday shopping with makers and designers from the region, with a percentage of sales going to Undocufund. Dec 9, 11am. Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.824.5600.

Caldwell Snyder Gallery Anniversary

The renowned gallery celebrates a decade in Napa Valley with a party. Dec 9, 6pm. Caldwell Snyder Gallery, 1328 Main St, St Helena. 415.531.6755.

Community Open Studios at di Rosa Visitors can drop-in and

Drawing Strength

Fire relief benefit features a conversation on healing and humor, wine reception, a drawa-thon with several artists and book signings with popular authors. Dec 9, 5:30pm. $30-$50. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Freya Lodge Holiday Arts & Craft Fair

Shop for high quality items made by Sonoma County artists,with Scandinavian baked goods, Norwegian waffles, coffee and a light lunch available for purchase. Dec 9, 9am. Sons of Norway Hall, 617 W Ninth St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1080.

Goddess Crafts Faire

A community celebration of the coming of winter includes art, music, dance and a collection of handmade gifts by local and regional women Dec 9-10, 11am. $5-$13. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Hands-on Chanukah

Activities include dreidel spinning contests, menorah crafting, children’s book fair, gift raffle and more. Dec 10, 11am. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Hanukkah Hootenanny

Bring unwrapped new toys and canned (nonperishable) food items for donation and enjoy live entertainment, Latkes and libations. Dec 10, 12pm. $55. Judd’s Hill Winery, 2332 Silverado Trail, Napa. 707.255.2332.

Hawaiian Holiday Craft & Bake Sale

Shop for unique Hawaiian holiday gifts and enjoy miniplate lunches, with raffles and live music by Kaniʻolu band and hula dances throughout the day. Dec 9, 10am. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 240 Channing Way, San Rafael. 415.479.4131.

Holiday Lighted Boat Parade

A parade of sparkling boats shine on the Petaluma River to ring in the season. Dec 9, 6pm. Free. Petaluma River Turning Basin, 222 Weller St, Petaluma.

Holiday Shop O’Rama

Find original art, handmade jewelry, leather goods and more for holiday gift-giving, with tarot card readings, sushi chef pop-up and more. Dec 10, 12pm. Tarot Art & Tattoo Gallery, 17977 Sonoma Highway, Sonoma. 707.938.3000.

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Holidays in Yountville The town transforms into a winter wonderland with sparkling lights and schedule of live entertainment, art shows, workshops, shopping, food and wine tours, carriage rides and more. Through Dec 31. Downtown Yountville, Washington St, Yountville, yountville.com.

Indivisible Healdsburg Jingle Mingle

Local political action group welcomes the public for an evening of good cheer, with non-perishable food drive. Dec 7, 5:30pm. Sonoma Cider, 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Light Up a Life

Heartland Hospice honors lives lost with annual candle- and tree-lighting ceremonies. Dec 7, 5pm. Free. Montgomery Village Shopping Center, 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

Making Merry Holiday Open House

Full day of cheer includes demonstrations, tastings and classes like chocolate tastings, oyster shucking, wreathmaking and more. Costs vary, RSVP online. Dec 9, 10:30am. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Napa Holiday Candlelight Tour

Annual tradition highlights the history and architecture of one of Napa’s oldest neighborhoods with a fun open-house tour. Dec 9, 2pm. Riverfront District, Elm and Riverside, Napa, napacountylandmarks.org.

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Occidental Holiday Crafts Faire

Stroll through town and view crafts by local and regional artists, with raffle, fabulous food and baked goods. Dec 9-10, 10am. Free. Occidental Community Center, 3920 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental.

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Dance

explore the studio stations arranged in di Rosa’s gallery, with staff and volunteers on hand. Sat, Dec 9, 11am. Free. di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | DEC E M BE R 6-1 2, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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holiday photos with Santa. Dec 9-10, 10am. Petaluma Community Center, 320 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma, petalumaarts.org.

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Enjoy holiday lights and décor of several different stylish homes, with cheerful music and festive bites on hand. Then, browse a variety of holiday crafts and decorations for sale. Dec 8-10. Pleasant Hill Christian School, 1782 Pleasant Hill Rd, Sebastopol, sebastopolholidayhometour.com.

Sonoma Ceramics, Fiber & Print Studio Sale Over 20 artists show and sell handmade work for the home and garden available in all price ranges. Dec 9-10, 10am. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

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Bring the kids and make crafts, stroll through the Charlie Brown Christmas Tree Grove and take a carriage ride before the annual treelighting ceremony. Dec 7, 5pm. $1-$10. Windsor Town Green, 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor, townofwindsor.com.

Worldwide Candlelighting Ceremony

Twenty-first annual global event commemorates children of all ages gone before their time, hosted by the Marin chapter of the Compassionate Friends. Dec 10, 7pm. Free. Unity of Marin, 600 Palm Dr, Novato, tcfmarin.org.

Field Trips Holidays Along the Farm Trails

Sonoma County farmers and producers open their barn

doors to offer a taste of life on the farm. Maps and info at farmtrails.org. Through Jan 1, 2018. Free. Sonoma County farms, various locations, Sonoma. 707.837.8896.

In Times Like These

Food & Drink The Epicurean Connection Pop Up

Partake in an interactive, guided walk through Muir Woods aimed at Millennials. Dec 9, 10am. $10. Muir Woods National Monument, 1 Muir Woods Rd, Mill Valley.

Shop for fancy cheeses, jams and spreads from popular chef and caterer Sheana Davis. Fri, Dec 8, 3pm. Steiner’s Tavern, 465 First St W, Sonoma. 707.938.3812.

The Moon & Stars

Holiday Cookies Workshop

Gaze at our celestial satellite, learn about the moon and the stars and enjoy a campfire. Dec 9, 5:30pm. $15. NatureBridge at Golden Gate, 1033 Fort Cronkhite, Sausalito, naturebridge.org/ golden-gate.

Film CULT Film Series Double feature of sciencefiction films from director John Carpenter, the romantic “Starman” and satirical “They Live,” screen back-toback. Dec 7, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

Elf Yountville holiday movie series screens the modern Christmas comedy. Dec 8, 7:30pm. $5$40. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Ferrari 312B The sensational story of the groundbreaking F1 race car includes legendary drivers and celebrates the sport’s history. Dec 11, 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

No Maps on My Taps Landmark music documentary that helped revive tap-dancing in the 1980s has been recently restored from the original negatives. Thurs, Dec 7, 7pm and Sun, Dec 10, 4:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Polar Express Robert Zemeckis’ animated feature plays with a Christmas concert by the St Helena Children’s Chorus. Dec 9, 11am. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Led by five-time James Beard Award-winning pastry chef and author Alice Medrich. Dec 10, 1pm. $20. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Holiday Tea Service

Indulge in a relaxing afternoon atmosphere while enjoying pastries, petit sandwiches, custom blend teas, classic cocktails and other holiday fare. Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Dec 24. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Sausalito Gingerbread House Tour & Competition Stroll the shops around Sausalito and view elaborate, festively decorated gingerbread houses galore. Through Dec 31. Downtown Sausalito, Caledonia Street, Sausalito.

For Kids Holiday Festival at the Mart

Bring the kids for cookies, hot chocolate, fairy tales and more. Dec 9. Marin Country Mart, 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

Teddy Bear Tea

Children of all ages can bring their families and beloved stuffed animals for a festive holiday tea to celebrate the season. Dec 9, 4:30pm. Muir’s Tea Room & Cafe, 330 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.634.6143.

Lectures California Labor History & Resistance in the Time of Trump

North Bay Jobs with Justice is hosting a special event with author, educator and activist Fred Glass. Dec 8, 5:30pm. Free. Operating Engineers Building, )

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An informative presentation about medical marijuana. Dec 8, 3pm. $5. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Elaine Petrocelli Book Talk

Co-founder of Book Passage highlights new literature and suggest books for holiday gift giving. Dec 7, 1pm. Free. Outdoor Art Club, 1 W Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2582.

Facilitated Women’s Support Group Explore what is holding you back from having the life you desire. Thurs, 6:30pm. Empowering Change, 130 Petaluma Ave Ste 2C, Sebastopol. 707.494.3216.

Love & Wisdom through the Qur’an, the Hadiths & the Bible Series of classes provide a resource for people of all religious backgrounds to deepen their own spiritual practice. RSVP required. Sun, Dec 10, 1pm. $60-$175. Institute for Sufi Studies, 14 Commercial Blvd, Ste 101, Novato. 415.382.7834.

Methods & Defense Against Russia Propaganda & Cyberwar

Political lecture is followed by a discussion, led by analyst and author Zarina Zabrisky. Dec 6, 7pm. Free. Rebound Bookstore, 1611 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.482.0550.

Mini-Succulent Gardens: the Perfect Gift Incorporate versatile plants and common household objects into mini-gardens with master gardener Diane Lynch. Dec 8, 2pm. Free. San Rafael Library, 1100 E St, San Rafael. 415.485.3323.

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Peace Economy vs War Economy

Peace activist Jodie Evans talks about how we can grow a local peace economy. Dec 10, 4pm. $20. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Readings Angelico Hall

Dec 6, 7pm, “What Unites

Us” with Dan Rather. $40. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael 415.457.4440.

10. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Book Passage

The danger and hilarity are nonstop in this glittering whodunit set during the Christmas holidays, presented by Ross Valley Players. Through Dec 10. $15-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Dec 7, 7pm, “Troublemakers” with Leslie Berlin. Dec 9, 7pm, “Oracle of the Song” with Gail Strickland, in conversation with Peter S Beagle. Dec 10, 4pm, “Meditations on Menopause” with JK Collins. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960.

Book Passage By-the-Bay

Dec 6, 6pm, “Marinship” with Eric Torney. Dec 10, 11am, “Ninja! Claus” with Arree Chung. Dec 12, 6pm, “The California Field Atlas” with Obi Kaufmann. 100 Bay St, Sausalito. 415.339.1300.

Diesel Bookstore

Dec 6, 7pm, “The Gourmands’ Way” with Justin Spring. 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.785.8177.

Healdsburg Shed

Dec 11, 7pm, “The City of Vines” with Thomas Pinney, part of the Healdsburg Literary Guild’s Luminarias series. $20. 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Napa Bookmine

Dec 12, 7pm, “Lies That Bind” with Craig Smith. 964 Pearl St, Napa. 707.733.3199.

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Dec 9, 12pm, “You’re Invited: Invitation Design for Every Occasion” with Jessie Alberts and Jen Kruch. Dec 10, 12pm, “Meditate With Me” with Mariam Gates. 610 First St, Shop 4, Napa. 707.726.6575.

Readers’ Books

Dec 7, 7pm, “All Systems Go” with Robert Adams and Brian Narelle. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Redwood Cafe

Dec 13, 6pm, Hanukkah Story Swap. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati 707.795.7868.

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Dec 11, 4pm, Chanukkah story time with Altie Wolvovsky. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Theater Daddy Long Legs

Catch the North Bay premiere of the newly released rags-toriches musical hit. Through Dec

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The Government Inspector

The College of Marin drama department presents the classic, yet timely, Russian comedy, written by Nikolai Gogol, adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher and directed by Lisa Morse. Through Dec 10. $10$20. College of Marin Kentfield Campus, 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9385.

Inspecting Carol

“A Christmas Carol” meets “Noises Off” in the hilarious holiday affair, presented by Sonoma Arts Live. Through Dec 10. $22-$26. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, sonomaartslive. org.

It’s A Wonderful Life: Live Radio Show American holiday classic comes to captivating life as a live 1940s radio broadcast, directed by Reed Martin of the Reduced Shakespeare Company. Through Dec 10. $12-$25. Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Le Cirque de Bohème

An old-style circus based on the French tradition of the 1920s presents a new show, “Freedom,” with an amazing cast of characters. Through Dec 17. $30-$55/ kids 15 and under are $22. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, cirquedeboheme.com.

Little Women: The Musical

The touching and uplifting adaptation of the classic 1869 novel by Louisa May Alcott has become a treasured part of the American musical canon. Through Dec 17. $16-$30. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Mrs Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge A new version of Dickens’ “Christmas Carol” puts Bob Cratchit’s wife center stage. Dec 8-23. $18-$28. Studio


Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

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CRITIC’S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | D EC E M BE R 6-1 2, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Nutcracker: The Musical

Musical version of the classic ballet features life-sized toys, rat kings and land of the Sugarplum Fairies. Through Dec 10. $12-$22. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

The Santaland Diaries

David Yen is back as Crumpet the Elf for his 10th annual and final production of bestselling author David Sedaris’ sardonic comedy, presented by Left Edge Theatre. Dec 8-23. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Shakespeare in Love

Stage adaptation of the beloved film written by Tom Stoppard and Marc Norman makes its Bay Area premiere. Through Dec 13. $25-$49. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

Stars of ‘Aladdin’ Benefit Concert

Cast members of the national tour of Disney’s “Aladdin” appear the North Bay for a onenight-only benefit event for 6th Street Playhouse, followed by discussion and Champagne reception. Dec 11, 6pm. $55. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

A Vintage Cristmas

Raven Theater goes on the road and offers the world premiere of Tony Sciullo’s wine country spin on two classic Christmas tales. Space is limited. Through Dec 10. $10-$25. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville, raventheater.org.

White Christmas

Irving Berlin’s timeless holiday musical warms the hearts of all ages. Through Dec 23. $15-$38. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Made in the Bay Bay Area makers gather for new holiday market

When Bay Area Made launched this past summer, the promotional platform adopted the mantra “What we make makes us.” Now highlighting and supporting nearly a hundred independent Bay Area– based designers, crafters, artists and makers—like Sharon Zimmerman of Sharon Z Jewelry (pictured)—Bay Area Made celebrates the region’s diverse creative culture and brings most of its roster of vendors to the Barlow Center in Sebastopol for the inaugural Bay Area Made Holiday Market on Dec. 9. Get a look at what the Bay Area has to offer in custom works of art and accessories, including jewelry, home and apothecary goods, apparel and more. Over 40 artisan makers, from well-known designers to upand-coming brands, will be on hand, and guests will also get the chance to relax in the market’s winter patio lounge, boasting outdoor pieces for sale like heated furniture and botanical arrangements. Libations from Sebastopol’s Spirit Works Distillery and several North Bay wineries will be available, as will locally made sweets and snacks. A percentage of sales from the event goes to Undocufund, which is providing direct funding to undocumented immigrants and their families who were affected by the North Bay fires. Bay Area Made Holiday Market commences on Saturday, Dec. 9, at the Barlow Event Center, 6770 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 11am to 5pm. Free admission. 707.824.5600.—Charlie Swanson

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Market Rebel

‘Get big’ and ‘get branded’ are new watchwords BY STETT HOLBROOK

D

an Pomerantz has come down from the mountains.

For the past eight years, Pomerantz has operated Rebel Grown near Garberville in southern Humboldt County, earning a reputation for superior cannabis genetics and highpotency flowers. His 40-acre farm (pictured) is in an area called Palo Verde, a storied cannabis cultivation zone pioneered by back-to-the-landers in the 1970s. But in the rapidly changing cannabis industry, he’s realized growing high-quality weed and seeds in a remote mountain enclave is not enough. What was once an area of small-scale, mom-and-pop growers has devolved into an arms race of larger and larger operations chasing ever-falling prices. “It’s sad,” he says. “That’s what’s going to happen around the state.” So Pomerantz, 35, and his family

recently moved to Santa Rosa. It’s part of a move to scale up and diversify his business. While he’s still at the farm several days a week, sales calls, meetings with attorneys and other business made living on the property full-time untenable. “I’m fighting for survival in an industry about to get a lot of competition,” he says. Santa Rosa’s CannaCraft distributes his seeds. Rebel Grown is about to launch its own brand of flowers, vape pens and “raw resin.” Raw cannabis is extracted from fresh, frozen plants. Emerald Triangle growers like Pomerantz who don’t develop a brand or align with distributors face a dicey future as big money pours into an industry about to go fully legal next month. “Get big or get out” has been common wisdom. “Go big and get branded, or get out” seems like even better advice. So far it seems to be working for Pomerantz. His says his seed sales have increased 350 percent since 2011. He chalks that up to marketing and use of social media. He has high hopes for this weekend’s Emerald Cup, where he will sell his wares in classy blackand-white packaging. “I’m almost nervous about the demand this year,” he says. “I’m really excited.” His passion is breeding cannabis and getting his seeds and flowers into the hands of consumers and growers who appreciate his efforts. He and his team have developed their own strains based on tweaks to popular genetic lines and selective breeding. Rebel Diesel and Diesel 2.0 are two strains he points to as market standouts. Rebel Grown’s glossy 2017 seed catalog features 28 strains that are aimed at growers and consumers alike. “Growing seeds is easy,” he says. “Real breeding takes a lot of devotion.” But in the new cannabis marketplace, branding will be key to making sure his efforts reach consumers.


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ARIES (March 21-April 19) You may get richer quicker in 2018, Aries—especially if you refuse to sell out. You may accumulate more clout—especially if you treat everyone as your equal and always wield your power responsibly. I bet you will also experience deeper, richer emotions—especially if you avoid people who have low levels of emotional intelligence. Finally, I predict you will get the best sex of your life in the next 12 months—especially if you cultivate the kind of peace of mind in which you’ll feel fine about yourself if you don’t get any sex at all. (P.S.: You’d be wise to start working on these projects immediately.) TAURUS (April 20–May 20) The members of

the fungus family, like mushrooms and molds, lack chlorophyll, so they can’t make food from sunlight, water and carbon dioxide. To get the energy they need, they “eat” plants. That’s lucky for us. The fungi keep the earth fresh. Without them to decompose fallen leaves, piles of compost would continue to accumulate forever. Some forests would be so choked with dead matter that they couldn’t thrive. I invite you to take your inspiration from the heroic fungi, Taurus. Expedite the decay and dissolution of the worn-out and obsolete parts of your life.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) I’m guessing you have been hungrier than usual. At times you may have felt voracious, even insatiable. What’s going on? I don’t think this intense yearning is simply about food, although it’s possible your body is trying to compensate for a nutritional deficiency. At the very least, you’re also experiencing a heightened desire to be understood and appreciated. You may be aching for a particular quality of love that you haven’t been able to give or get. Here’s my theory: Your soul is famished for experiences that your ego doesn’t sufficiently value or seek out. If I’m correct, you should meditate on what your soul craves but isn’t getting enough of. CANCER (June 21-July 22) The brightly colored birds known as bee-eaters are especially fond of eating bees and wasps. How do they avoid getting stung? They snatch their prey in mid-air and then knock them repeatedly against a tree branch until the stinger falls off and the venom is flushed out. In the coming weeks, Cancerian, you could perhaps draw inspiration from the bee-eaters’ determination to get what they want. How might you be able to draw nourishment from sources that aren’t entirely benign? How could you extract value from influences that you have be careful with? LEO (July 23–August 22) The coming months will be a ripe time to revise and rework your past—to reconfigure the consequences that emerged from what happened once upon a time. I’ll trust you to make the ultimate decisions about the best ways to do that, but here are some suggestions. 1. Revisit a memory that has haunted you, and do a ritual that resolves it and brings you peace. 2. Go back and finally do a crucial duty you left unfinished. 3. Return to a dream you wandered away from prematurely, and either recommit yourself to it, or else put it to rest for good.

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VIRGO (August 23–September 22) The astrological omens suggest that now is a favorable time to deepen your roots and bolster your foundations and revitalize traditions that have nourished you. Oddly enough, the current planetary rhythms are also conducive to you and your family and friends playing soccer in the living room with a ball made from rolled-up socks, pretending to be fortune-telling psychics and giving each other past-life readings, and gathering around the kitchen table to formulate a conspiracy to achieve world domination. And, no, the two sets of advice I just gave you are not contradictory. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) In accordance with the long-term astrological omens, I invite you to make five long-term promises to yourself. They were formulated by the teacher Shannen Davis. Say them aloud a few times to get a feel for them. 1. “I will make myself eminently teachable through the cultivation of openness and humility.” 2. “I won’t wait around hoping that people will give me what I can give myself.” 3. “I’ll be a good sport about the consequences of my actions, whether they’re good, bad, or misunderstood.” 4. “As I

BY ROB BREZSNY

walk out of a room where there are many people who know me, I won’t worry about what anyone will say about me.” 5. “I will only pray for the things I’m willing to be the answer to.”

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21) To

discuss a problem is not the same as doing something practical to correct it. Many people don’t seem to realize this. They devote a great deal of energy to describing and analyzing their difficulties, and may even imagine possible solutions, but then neglect to follow through. And so nothing changes. The sad or bad situation persists. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Scorpios are among the least prone to this disability. You specialize in taking action to fulfill your proposed fixes. Just this once, however, I urge you to engage in more inquiry and conversation than usual. Just talking about the problem could cure it.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) As far back as ancient Egypt, Rome and Greece, people staged ceremonies to mark the embarkation of a new ship. The intention was to bestow a blessing for the maiden voyage and ever thereafter. Good luck! Safe travels! Beginning in 18th-century Britain and America, such rituals often featured the smashing of a wine bottle on the ship’s bow. Later, a glass container of Champagne became standard. In accordance with the current astrological indicators, I suggest that you come up with your own version of this celebratory gesture. It will soon be time for your launch.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) You may feel quite sure that you’ve gotten as tall as you’re ever going to be. But that may not be true. If you were ever going to add another half-inch or more to your height, the near future would be the time for it. You are in the midst of what we in the consciousness industry call a “growth spurt.” The blooming and ripening could occur in other ways, as well. Your hair and fingernails may become longer faster than usual, and even your breasts or penis might undergo spontaneous augmentation. There’s no doubt that new brain cells will propagate at a higher rate, and so will the white blood cells that guard your physical health. Four weeks from now, I bet you’ll be noticeably smarter, wiser and more robust. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) You come into a delicatessen where you have to take a numbered ticket in order to get waited on. Oops. You draw 37 and the counter clerk has just called out number 17. That means 20 more people will have their turns before you. Damn! You settle in for a tedious vigil, putting down your bag and crossing your arms across your chest. But then what’s this? Two minutes later, the clerk calls out 37. That’s you! You go up to the counter and hand in your number, and amazingly enough, the clerk writes down your order. A few minutes later, you’ve got your food. Maybe it was a mistake, but who cares? All that matters is that your opportunity came earlier than you thought it would. Now apply this vignette as a metaphor for your life in the coming days. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

It’s one of those bizarre times when what feels really good is in close alignment with what’s really good for you, and when taking the course of action that benefits you personally is probably what’s best for everyone else, too. I realize the onslaught of this strange grace may be difficult to believe. But it’s real and true, so don’t waste time questioning it. Relish and indulge in the freedom it offers you. Use it to shush the meddling voice in your head that informs you about what you supposedly should be doing instead of what you’re actually doing.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

D EC E M BE R 6-1 2, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

OCT 4 - DEC 31

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n o o s f a e S Giving Join Oliver’s Market as we work to support our community’s most vulnerable this season. IN ADDITION TO SUPPORTING REDWOOD EMPIRE FOOD BANK FOOD DONATION & BELL SALES, OLIVER’S IS PLEASED TO BE A COLLECTION LOCATION FOR WINTER WARMTH.

Sonoma County’s Winter Warmth Program’s mission is to provide homeless people with basic resources to help them endure the region’s deceptively cold winters. Each year, dozens of homeless people due of exposure and pre-existing health conditions that are worsened by continual exposure to the elements. We believe that by providing items as basic as a sleeping bag or jacket will help save lives and alleviate the struggles that the homeless face day and night.

Through the holiday season, donate coats and blankets at any Oliver’s Market location. Watch for the red bins in our lobbies near our Redwd Empire Fd Bank donation bins. 9230 Old Redwood Highway • Windsor • 687-2050 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123 | 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530

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December 6-12, 2017

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