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RebuildSonomaFund.org

Mushrooms Help Protect North Bay Waterways from Toxic Fire Runoff p13

EDIBLE CLICHÉ P10 SEASONAL BREWS P12 ‘LITTLE WOMEN’ P17


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Here’s where to apply: Sonoma County

North Bay Fire Relief Fund | How to Apply for Support The North Bay Fire Relief Fund (NBFRF) was created to support the immediate needs of fire victims. If you’ve lost your home, had a reduction in or loss of employment or your business has been impacted, you can apply for support. Funds are available to support fire victims in the four affected counties (Sonoma, Napa, Mendocino, Lake), including undocumented residents. The North Bay Fire Relief Fund was created by RCU Community Fund, Inc. in partnership with those listed below. RCU is paying all administrative costs, (including for nonprofits) so 100% of donations are aiding fire victims. We’ve partnered with the agencies (at right) to accept applications and disburse funds to fire victims. For more information visit www.redwoodcu.org/apply4firerelief

United Way of the Wine Country Application deadline: November 30 u Apply online: www.unitedwaywinecountry.org u Applications also available at: • Sonoma County Local Assistance Center (LAC): Press Democrat building, 427 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa La Luz Center Application deadline: December 15 u Applications available at: • La Luz Center, 17560 Greger St., Sonoma

Napa County Center for Volunteer and Nonprofit Leadership Application deadline: December 8 u Apply online: cvnl.org/2017-napa-county-wildfire-relief-fund/ u Applications also available at: • Napa CVNL office, 433 Soscol Ave. #A-100, Napa • Napa Local Assistance Center (LAC): Napa County Health and Human Services, Building A, Conference Center, 2751 Napa Valley Corporate Drive, Napa

Businesses Impacted (both counties) Lake Area Rotary Club (LARCA) u Apply online for business recovery grants: www.larca5130/business-recovery-grant

We are continuing to accept contributions to help fire victims. To donate, visit www.redwoodcu.org/northbayfirerelief

RCU Community Fund Inc. (RCUCF) is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization—Tax ID #47-5084832. All donations are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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DISASTER AVERTED?

nb Now that the fires are out, bioremediation efforts are aimed at holding back toxic ash from local waterways, p13.

‘It is significant when private interests prevail over the public interest and our democratic processes.’ T H E N U G G ET P 2 6 Q&A with Mariam Aboudamous TH E PA PE R P8

Mycoremediation to the Rescue COVE R STO RY P1 3

What Happened to the One-Acre Cap? TH E NUG G ET P26

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6

Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Do the Research

recognized as a medicine in the United States Pharmacopeia medical journal.

medical applications. In fact, sometimes marijuana is the only thing that works.”

Peter White of Santa Rosa, thank you for sharing your opinion on cannabis tourism (Letters, Nov. 22). It is only with open and respectful dialogue that we create the space to educate each other of our viewpoints, and hopefully find understanding and tolerance. A few historical facts for you:

Harvard professor Dr. Lester Grinspoon states that “marijuana is one of the least toxic substances in the whole pharmacopeia.” He also explains that “if marijuana were a new discovery rather than a well-known substance carrying cultural and political baggage, it would be hailed as a wonder drug.”

Like pineapples in Hawaii or coffee in Colombia, cannabis is a crop that is embedded in our history and culture here in the North Bay. Dan Offield, a 20-year veteran of the DEA stated in 2010 that this region is “ground zero for marijuana. Nobody produces better marijuana than we do right here.”

From 1850 to 1937, cannabis was widely used in American medical practice for a range of ailments. From 1851 to 1942, cannabis was documented and

Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN’s chief medical correspondent, said in August 2013 that cannabis “doesn’t have a high potential for abuse, and there are very legitimate

Cannabis has been inaccurately stigmatized, Peter. I challenge you to research your endocannabinoid system. I challenge you to set aside your “God

THIS MODERN WORLD

By Tom Tomorrow

would tell you how evil pot is” narrative and consider the science, facts, biology and history of cannabis. In regard to cannabis tourism, in these early stages, our mission is to provide a safe space to learn about the cannabis plant, from health and wellness to celebrating our Northern California culture and cannabis heritage.

BRIAN APPLEGARTH Guerneville

It’s really shameful that you spread this ignorance regarding cannabis use. It helps children with seizures that Big Pharma is obviously duping you not to believe. It absolutely does not in any way cause death. You cannot OD on it. Alcohol does kill. Alcohol is a huge health epidemic, and does cause death and deterioration of bodily organs. It’s legal and dangerous. Check your facts on automobile fatalities and cannabis vs. alcohol and prescription medications! Did you know that CBD oil, made from cannabis, fights cancer? Research has proven that. Google “Rick Simpson full cannabis extract oil.” It’s ingested, not smoked, and is effective for many medical and mental-health purposes. Please stop spreading misnomers about a plant (from God) that is capable of aiding in many illnesses, too many to list. It’s also a valuable crop to save the environment of our dear Earth. Chemical manufacturers don’t want you to know that. Comparing cannabis to heroin and meth? Absurd. Educate yourself, please. I mean that in the most gentle way.

NIELAND FOWERS Rio Nido

Department of Corrections In “Top (Secret) Chef” (Nov. 22), the price of State Bird Seed was misstated. It’s $4.99 a bag. The author is eating crow.

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


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ince the October fires, I have read periodicals and listened to the news regarding accounts of the catastrophic fires and the tragic aftermath, but nowhere has there been any mention of water use by the wine industry.

Vineyard owners sink wells hundreds of feet into aquifers, divert water from rivers, streams, creeks, and seem not to care about how their practices affect the environment. If wineries keep extracting ground water and diverting water from natural sources, the environment will become drier leading to more extensive, catastrophic fires than the North Bay fire. Sonomacounty.com states, “Sonoma County stretches from the Pacific Coast in the west to the Mayacamas Mountains in the east, and is home to almost 60,000 acres of vineyards and more than 425 wineries.” In 2016, 62,136 acres of grapes were irrigated. Since so many people have to start over, it is time for people involved in the wine industry to become introspective, to take a long, hard look at their practices and change them in a way that respects people, animals and the natural world. It is time for the wine industry to be accountable to the people who live in Sonoma County and to stop catering to tourists. While I understand that the county needs the revenue generated by the wine industry, too much is too much. Too many vineyards, wineries, tasting rooms, event centers. Too many mountains, hills, woodlands, meadows and fields destroyed in order to plant grapes. Too many animals dead on our roads because what once was their habitat is fenced off to protect vineyards. Too much traffic and inebriated people driving county roads that they do not know. Due to the catastrophic fires, thousands of people have lost homes, belongings, businesses and animals, so I say to the people in the wine industry, “Slow down.” People in this county are suffering and will be in shock for a while. Nothing is normal in Sonoma County, and no one will ever be the same. We are a changed people. Please change your winery practices to something that involves the whole, not just the few.

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Paper THE

LOCALLY GROWN ‘I am blessed to have grown up in such a diverse community where my religion is welcomed rather than mocked or criticized,’ says American Canyon city councilmember and Muslim Mariam Aboudamous.

A First for Napa A Q&A with American Canyon’s city council member Mariam Aboudamous BY CHRIS ROONEY

A

s Napa County’s first Muslim elected politician, Mariam Aboudamous has experienced a unique rise to prominence.

She was elected to the American Canyon City Council in November 2016. Considering the current political climate under President Trump, her insights are brought to bear personally and in her and prevalent in her

professional role as an immigration attorney. Born in San Francisco, her family moved to Napa when she was one year old and American Canyon when she was two. “We’ve been here ever since,”

she says. “My parents were born and raised in Jerusalem. We are of Palestinian ancestry, which has always been controversial in and of itself.” BOHEMIAN: What inspired you to run for local office? Were there specific local issues that you felt needed addressing or attention? ABOUDAMOUS: I began volunteering with the city at the age of 14 in the Parks and Recreation department. When I turned 16, I was hired and began my first job. After college, I became involved in a different way. I was elected to the Napa County Democratic Party Central Committee at the age of 21. I was one of the founding members of the American Canyon Democratic Club (ACDC). Unfortunately, I had to leave my volunteer posts when I moved away for law school, but jumped right back in as soon as I returned. I have always been a leader and an advocate for the city of American Canyon. Now, I believe that I have a lot to offer and want to continue giving back to the community that made me. The No. 1 issue that I believe needs addressing is traffic. I was driving home from work one day, which was only five miles away from my house at the time. The drive took me 45 minutes! This is the day that I made my decision to run. If I want to see change, I need to be a part of it and not just complain about it. Had you served on any local boards or commissions? Do you have any children in local schools? I hadn’t served on any local board or commissions, but I have always been politically active from behind the scenes. I’ve volunteered a lot and worked on several local campaigns. I do not have any children. Did being Muslim impact your campaign—did it create any obstacles or provide opportunities? It’s funny you ask that because when I decided to run for office,


You were elected, so the community must have liked what you had to say. How do you think you resonated with the voters? I have lived in this city for a very long time and have always been an active contributor. I played soccer with, was camp counselor for, or went to school with many residents and their parents. People here know me and know my passion for the community. For those who didn’t, I made sure to engage in meaningful dialogue with them and truly listen to their concerns. Do you consider yourself a role model? I believe that my election has inspired many people to take an interest in local government. I am interested to see how many people run in the 2018 election. I try to always be available to people, especially our youth, who are interested in the campaign and election process. What have been your biggest accomplishments on the city council? I believe that the focus of the council has shifted since I’ve been elected. Now we’re having an open and honest dialogue about our traffic issues, whereas before it was mostly centered on parks and recreational programming. Also, I was part of the first ever iftar dinner during Ramadan. The American Canyon Arts Foundation received some grant funding to host cultural events. I was asked about the Middle Eastern culture, and it just happened to be during the month of Ramadan, so I suggested that we host an iftar dinner. We expected a low turnout of 50 to 75 people and didn’t think we would

even get that many. We ended up with 130 RSVPs and turned many others away. We had a guest speaker who is a senior lecturer at UC Berkeley, Dr. Hatem Bazian. He is also a cofounder of Zaytuna College, which is the first accredited Muslim liberal arts college in the United States. After the presentation, we had a call to prayer recital. Then we provided dinner for all of the attendees.

9 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 29 - DECEMBE R 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

a member of the community said to me, “But you’re Muslim. Is that going to be a problem?” My response to that was, and still is, absolutely not. American Canyon is such a diverse town [that] embraces our differences. I am blessed to have grown up in such a diverse community where my religion is welcomed rather than mocked or criticized.

What’s your biggest goal as a council member? My biggest goal is to genuinely make a difference in this community. Traffic is a nightmare here. Even I try to avoid driving on Highway 29 as much as possible. Another goal I have is to be a resource and a role model for our youth. I am a first generation Arab-American and had to learn how to navigate everything on my own. I understand how difficult it is to find support and understand your true potential on your own. I would like to help others, who are in this situation, find their way. As an immigration attorney, how do you see the current administration’s impact? How scary is it for immigrants—and, for that matter, any citizens whose parents came from anywhere but Europe? I have seen the fear that has been instilled in people from all backgrounds by this administration. The Muslim bans that have been attempted have scared Muslim green card holders from leaving the country for any reason. People who have had green cards for years are now applying for citizenship. People seeking asylum are heading to Canada instead of coming to the USA. The impact is definitely prevalent within the immigrant community. I’m seeing petitions being reviewed under more scrutiny. I’m also seeing an increase of asylum cases sent to court. California has had the highest asylum approval rate in the country, and our current president has begun questioning it, which is leading to more asylum cases being adjudicated in court.

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10

Dining

do appear about the same time, so I got to wondering how to combine these two cold-weather compadres. The result: Dungeness crab-chanterelle mushroom cakes. Wild chanterelle mushrooms had not yet appeared locally yet, but recent rains may have changed that. For me, a crab cake should be a barely held together mass of crab. Crab cakes that rely on mounds of breadcrumbs are disqualified. I use as little as possible, but they add a nice golden color. And please make your own. Storebought breadcrumbs aren’t fit for pigeon feed. The fennel adds a vegetal counterpoint to the richness of the crab and mushrooms, and the Padron pepper powder is one of my new favorite ingredients. It sneaks in a little chile pepper warmth. Pimentón, smoked paprika, can also be used. Dungeness CrabChanterelle Mushrooms Cakes (makes about 10)

BEST FRIENDS As the weather turns cold and rainy, Dungeness crab and wild chanterelle mushrooms

make their appearance in Sonoma County.

Delicious Cliché Crab and mushrooms are a match made in Sonoma County BY STETT HOLBROOK

I

n Politics and the English Language, the great George Orwell offers rules for good writing. The one that sticks in my mind is his prohibition on clichés: “Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.”

That’s good advice, but “never” is a strong word. The thing about clichés is, many of them are true. Birds of a feather flock together. Youth is wasted on the young. Happy wife, happy life. All true. While I strive to heed Orwell’s advice, I’m going use another cliché here: “Grow together, go together.” It not only rhymes, but it’s a fact and a cooking guideline I use all the time.

The commercial Dungeness crab season generally opens a few weeks before Thanksgiving. This year it began Nov. 15 south of Mendocino County. I’ve had a few crab feasts already, and the scuttling critters were fat and sweet. Shortly after crab season begins, the rains come, and that means wild mushrooms start popping up. Crab and mushrooms don’t exactly grow together, but they

1/2 pound fresh Dungeness crab meat 1/2 pound of chanterelle mushrooms, cleaned and chopped 1/3 c. diced fennel root 1/3 c. homemade breadcrumbs 1 egg, beaten 1 tbsp. mayonnaise 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. white pepper 1/2 tsp. dehydrated Padron pepper powder (available at Healdsburg Shed) 3 tbsp. butter lemon wedges Lightly salt the mushrooms and let stand in bowl for about 15 minutes, and then squeeze to remove moisture. Combine with all the other ingredients except butter and lemon. Form into 10 patties. (You’ll probably cook these in two batches.) Heat half the butter in a heavy skillet until bubbles have disappeared. Fry about three minutes or until golden brown. Carefully flip and repeat. Add the rest of the butter and cook remaining cakes as above. Serve with a squeeze of lemon. The proof is in the pudding of this recipe, no matter what Orwell says. If it grows together, it goes together. Try not to wolf them down.


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Lagunitas Brown Shugga’ Sweet Release Yeah, it’s made with brown sugar, but Santa’s little helpers, the yeast, ate it all up, leaving mostly a strong, malt liquor profile—in the best way. At 10 percent ABV, it’ll warm your winter, all right. My one wish: could the dog at least be wearing a little Santa hat?

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Deschutes Jubelale This is what it’s all about: liquid gingerbread man. Spicy and sweet-scented, this amber-to-brown ale is neither syrupy nor too dry on the finish. This Bend, Ore., brewery is fully in the spirit of the season. 6.7 percent ABV.

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scene on the label sure fooled me—although the label does not lie. This is an earthy, more robust style of Sierra, brewed with fresh hops. Nothing spicy or otherwise seasonal about it. 6.8 percent alcohol by volume (ABV).

Season Ale Highlights from a miserly selection of seasonal brews BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

s it too much to show a little holiday spirit? This is my new attitude regarding holiday beers, those vaguely Xmassy or otherwise winter-themed beers that come and go with the season. My old attitude was, “Why must we now have apple cider spices in beer? This seems unnecessary.” I’d been passing them up for years.

These days, it being necessary to have blood orange and chile pepper and everything in between in our triple-hopped IPA, why not? I give up—I mean, celebrate. Sierra Nevada Celebration Fresh Hop IPA The little snowed-in cabin

Fogbelt Armstrong Stout In the mix only because at one point, frustrated at the poverty of proper winter warmers on offer locally, I just started grabbing stouts. This reveals a nice surprise: sweet, foresty fresh, wreath-hop aroma. Consider that it’s named after a mighty big tree in the Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve, and we’ve got a reasonably seasonal brew in this strongly flavored but not head-bangingly high-alcohol stout. Brewed with English Maris Otter malt and aged with American oak. 6.5 percent ABV. Cloverdale Ale Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Stout Nothing says “holidays” about this 22-ounce “bomber.” You have to read the fine print on the raisin-purple label to learn it’s a seasonal winter ale—hey, that’s code for “holiday.” More than that: “You know Santa would rather have this than a plate of cookies.” This cookie-inspired stout is no dessert in a glass, showing more like an Irish oatmeal stout with black roasted barley aroma and a creamy palate, but the flavors of raisin and cola liven up the center, and a note of cinnamon wafts over the nuanced but rich brew, as if freshly baked cookies have been set out nearby. I’m with Santa on this one. 8 percent ABV.


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CUTLINE KICKER Cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline.

After the fires, mycoremediation offers a ‘tragic opportunity’ BY STETT HOLBROOK

he disaster of October’s wildfires didn’t stop once the flames were finally extinguished. The toxic ash left by the firestorms—incinerated plastics, hydrocarbons, solvents, pesticides, heavy metals— lay like a ticking bomb on home sites, awaiting a rain storm to wash the deadly debris into drains and creeks. Once in waterways, the lethal plume could infiltrate watersheds and imperil drinking water and aquatic life. ) 14

Photos courtesy Fire Remediation Action Coalition

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TOXIC TIDE The green wattle atop this water barrier has been inoculated with

mycelium, the weblike network of fungus that sprouts mushrooms.

Mushrooms ( 13 But thanks to an unprecedented public-private partnership, protection from that environmental hazard in hard-hit areas like Coffey Park, Larkfield-Wikiup and Fountain Grove has come from an unlikely source: mushrooms. Erik Ohlsen, a landscape architect and permaculture educator, saw that second wave of disaster coming and acted quickly to rally a diverse team of volunteers, environmental groups, landowners and public agencies to deploy cutting-edge bioremediation techniques using mushrooms and compost to absorb and neutralize the deadly runoff. He created the Fire Remediation Action Coalition on Facebook to help organize the effort and spread the word. And word spread quickly. The project took off as another example of the volunteerism and generosity that have characterized local efforts after the fire. Sebastopol’s Gourmet Mushrooms donated thousands of pounds of substrate used

to grow mushrooms. Sonoma Compost and West Marin Compost donated compost. Petaluma’s Wattle Guy provided, you guessed it, wattles—barriers and fences made from natural materials like rice straw and sticks. And groups like Russian Riverkeepers and the Clean River Alliance marshaled volunteers to make, fill and install the wattles and monitor water flow during and after the recent rains. It’s too early to know what impact the group has had in staving off another catastrophe. Data is still being collected and winter hasn’t even begun yet. But if the techniques prove effective, their efforts could be used as a case study for use elsewhere when urban firestorms occur—which fire experts say is a question of when, not if. Ohlsen says the undertaking offers a “tragic opportunity” to divert and neutralize the toxics from this disaster and to prepare for future wildfires. “These wildfires aren’t going anywhere,” he says. “They are ramping up in severity.” In the days after the fires,


15

‘ASH RHYMES WITH TRASH’ Mycoremediation allows mushrooms to filter and absorb toxins in landscapes and

waterways. In Coffey Park, that includes a long list of household toxins reduced to ash that run off when it rains.

the groups with wattles, and is actively monitoring their use and the effect of bioremediation. Use of compost and wattles to capture toxins and divert water is a well-established practice, but Dougherty says mycoremediation is not one the agency has used before. Before last week’s rain, Chris Brokate and Will Bakx spent their days following storm drains and tracking the course of Coffey Creek in the fire-ravaged neighborhood to scout out the best places to lay wattles. Coffey Creek flows into Piner Creek, and Piner Creek empties into the Laguna de Santa Rosa, which in turn flows in the Russia River. They focused their efforts where storm drains entered Coffey Creek. “The next disaster is right around the corner with all the toxics coming off,” says Brokate, founder and executive director of the Clean River Alliance, a Guerneville-based nonprofit dedicated to removing trash from the Russian River. “‘Ash’ rhymes with ‘trash,’” quips Brokate.

Bakt, a soil scientist who operates Sonoma Compost, created a custom blend for wattles made of straw, mushroom substrate, compost and manure. In addition to the use of oyster and turkey tail mushrooms, compost also helps chelate and biodegrade hydrocarbons in the soil, he said. “We do believe it’s making a difference,” Brokate says, adding that data gathered from the sites will help confirm that. While Coffey and Piner creeks already suffered from pollution and trash, he said they are not dead yet. “We can still save them.” Chris Grabilll serves on Santa Rosa’s Board of Public Utilities and is acting as a liaison with the Water Quality Control Board and local nonprofits on the bioremediation projects. He is also part of the city’s Joint Watershed Task Force. While Brokate and Baxt installed their wattles where storm drains entered Coffey Creek, Grabill’s team helped install wattles in Coffey Park and the Larkfield-

Wikiup area near burned-out housing sites with an eye on data collection and removal of toxic ash. The wattles in LarkfieldWikiup were inoculated with mycelium; the Coffey Park sites were not, and will act as the control group. Peer-reviewable data will reveal the impact that local efforts have on the protection of water resources. “The best-case scenario is we mitigate a second disaster,” says Grabill. Toxins are hard to remediate once they enter the watershed, he says. “It goes from a two-year issue to a 25-year issue if we don’t take all steps in the first rains.” For Ohlsen, the spirit of volunteerism and grassroots partnership with public agencies is one of the bright spots of an otherwise grim situation. He’s also working with large landowners on mycoremediation, and hopes to gain rich data about best practices that could be duplicated elsewhere. “This is just the start of the whole process,” Ohlsen says.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 29 - DECEMBE R 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Ohlsen, who owns Permaculture Artisans in Sebastopol, had been meeting with Daily Acts’ Trathen Heckman to brainstorm how to mitigate the effects of erosion and runoff from burn sites. Daily Acts is a Petaluma-based nonprofit volunteer organization that has served as a nexus for recovery efforts around the fire. “The rain is coming,” Ohlsen said. “What do we do?” Ohlsen and Heckman settled on rice-straw wattles as the quickest, easiest technique for absorbing and diverting hazardous runoff. Ohlsen took the idea one step further: Why not inoculate the wattles with mycelium, in the hope that mushrooms that grew could absorb and in some cases transform the toxins through a process called chelation? The toxin-laden mushrooms would then be harvested and disposed of offsite. Mycelium is the weblike network of fungus that grows underground. The use of mushrooms to clean up landscapes is called mycoremediation, a technique that’s gaining acceptance in cleaning up oil fields and toxic waste sites. Permaculture is a method of design based on the principles and systems of nature, and mycoremediation exemplifies the practice. “It’s the perfect answer for this moment,” says Ohlsen. Mycoremediation was pioneered by Washington state mushroom expert Paul Stamets, but the practice has never been used to remediate fire sites on this scale. The fires offer a tremendous opportunity to put the practice into action. The Santa Rosa office of the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board has been deeply involved in stormwater diversion projects, and partnered with local groups on bioremediation because the need is so great. “What was an erosion hazard before is an erosion hazard now times 10 or 100,” says Clayton Creager, environmental program manager for the water board. Mona Dougherty, a senior waterresource control engineer for the water board, helped supply


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16

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

SONOMA COUNTY

Dine & Donate

A nationwide culinary day of action that dates back to 1991, Dining Out for Life returns to Sonoma County this week to offer the community a chance to patronize one of 90 local restaurants and ensure a portion of the proceeds go toward Forestville-based Food for Thought, which feeds and cares for persons living with HIV and other serious illnesses. The participating restaurants run the gamut of trends, tastes and locations, and donating diners can find lunch and dinner options for the event, happening Thursday, Nov. 30, throughout Sonoma County. Find a list of restaurants and details at diningoutforlife.com/sonomacounty.

S T. H E L E N A

Art on the Screen

London-born filmmaker and visual artist Isaac Julien has been developing a unique cinematic language since his debut feature film, Young Soul Rebels, screened at Cannes Film Festival in 1991. His work is often presented as video art installations, such as his 2003 short “Baltimore” and his 2007 multiscreen work Western Union: Small Boats, both of which are shown with Julien on hand in Napa Valley this week. The event includes reception, dinner and conversation between Julien and Aebhric Coleman, curator of the renowned Kramlich Collection of multimedia art, on Friday, Dec. 1, at Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St., St. Helena. 5:45pm. $75–$150. 707.963.9779.

SEBASTOPOL

Hand-Printed Holiday

Eric Johnson’s Iota Press began life as a venue for teaching and sharing his love of old-style letterpress art and books. It quickly grew into a collective that established itself as the North Bay Letterpress Arts nonprofit group in 2015. Currently housing 12 artists and printmakers in a 1,600-square-foot shop, Iota Press hosts the North Bay Letterpress Arts Holiday Open House this weekend that includes art and books for sale, live poetry reading, tours of the shop and a demonstration of the Gutenberg-style press, and a raffle of handmade gifts. Sunday, Dec. 3, 925-D Gravenstein Hwy. S., Sebastopol. 1pm to 5pm. Free admission. northbayletterpressarts.org.

AMERICAN ORIGINAL Tony Bennett, the singer who left his heart in San Francisco, performs on Tuesday, Dec. 5, at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa. See Clubs & Venues, p21.

S A N TA R O S A

Naughty & Nice

Every Christmas Eve, boys and girls around the globe await gifts from Santa. But naughty little boys and girls, especially in the folkloric traditions of Eastern Europe, have the horned figure known as Krampus to look forward to. The half-goat demon that punishes wicked children has captured the imaginations of artists for centuries, and is the subject of the new ‘Krampus Group Show,’ opening with a reception this month. Featuring the artwork of nine local talents and special live performance piece, the show is perfect for gift givers with a naughty streak. Tuesday, Dec. 5, at Beluga & Bee Studio, 24 10th St., Santa Rosa. 5pm. 707.318.9760.

—Charlie Swanson


BHS_Boho14_LBC.pdf

Eric Chazankin

HEY JO Sarah Wintermeyer lends her

fine voice as Jo March in the musical version of Louisa May Alcott’s novel.

Seasonal

‘Little Women’ offers holiday warmth BY DAVID TEMPLETON

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hough not technically a Christmas story, Spreckels Theatre Company’s Little Women, running through Dec. 17, generously bestows all the warmth, holiday spirit and gentle, good feeling one could desire from a more specifically Christmas tale. And for what it’s worth, the story does start out at Christmastime.

The 1868 novel by Louisa May Alcott detailing the lives of a poor but loving New England family during and after the Civil War has been adapted numerous times over the last century and a half. To date, the loving, squabbling, inventive, delightful and enduring March sisters and their colorful extended family have appeared six times in motion pictures. The first two were silent films; the most recent one, in

‘Little Women’ runs Friday–Sunday through Dec. 17 at Spreckels Performing Arts Center. 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. Friday–Saturday at 8pm; 2pm matinees on Sundays, with additional matinees on Saturday Dec. 9 and 16. $16–$26. 707.588.3400.

10/27/17

11:23 AM

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DECEMBER 1-3

LUTHER BURBANK CENTER

Get Tickets Now 707-546-3600 BroadwayHolidayShow.com FREE Bring this ad to Merchandise GIFT28 booth. 1 per family. Exp 12/3

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Stage

1994, starred Petaluma’s Winona Ryder. Over the decades, Little Women has been turned into four television series, including shows in England and Japan (one, an anime series), and has been turned into numerous stage dramas, one recent opera adaptation and a Tony-winning Broadway musical. The musical is currently onstage at Spreckels. Written by Allan Knee, Mindi Dickstein and Jason Howard, it had its Broadway debut in 2005, and was previously staged in Spreckels’ small Bette Condiotti Experimental Theatre in 2015. For those who recall that production fondly, the new production features a few of the same supporting performers. But under the direction of Michael Ross, with a mostly new cast, including the marvelous Sarah Wintermeyer as Jo March, this one frequently feels like a whole new show. As Jo, the impulsive and somewhat selfish narrator of the tale, Wintermeyer (resembling a young Tina Fey at times) is in remarkably fine voice, is often funny, and is truly heartbreaking on occasion. Other acting and singing highlights in a show full of strong performance are Madison Scarborough as the selfless, doomed Amy March; Eileen Morris as Marmee, the girls’ patient and unflappable mother; Albert McLeod as Theodore “Laurie” Laurence, the next-door neighbor who takes a disastrously unrequited shine to Jo; and Sean O’Brien as Professor Bhaer, the boarding house teacher who acts as the grownup to Jo’s literary Jiminy Cricket. Special kudos to musical director Lucas Sherman, whose stripped-down piano, cello and violin orchestra brings this sweet, heart-lifting tearjerker of a musical to lush and lovely—and appropriately Christmas-y—life. Rating (out of 5):

1


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18

MAKE TRACKS TO WHISTLESTOP ANTIQUES

Film

Storewide Sale! 20% Off (Unless already on sale)

Sat & Sun, Dec 2 & 3 Hot Cider & Free Popcorn See why our customers say “I love shopping here” Gift Certificates Open daily 10–5:30 and Sun 10–5

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DONT TREAD ON HER Or Frances McDormand will mess you up.

Vengeance Is Hers

Frances McDormand gets ornery in dark comedy ‘Billboards’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

A

person can be composed of a set of perfectly good facial features—a strong chin, a proud nose, kind eyes, a generous mouth—and still be basically ugly, and that’s the case with Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.

® BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Fri, December 1 – Thu, December 7

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd•- Salads Thu, June Bruschetta • Paninis • Soups • 28th Appetizers

Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance

8 Great BeersBest on Tap + Wine by theFilm! Glass and Bottle Foreign Language Years!” – Box Office Stone “RawIn and Riveting!” – Rolling NOTE: No shows After 8pm Monday, Dec 4 Demi Moore David Duchovny WALTZ WITH BASHIR

A MIGHTY HEART

(1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 R

(12:30)THE 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:20 9:45 R THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE (12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor! EBBING, MISSOURI “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER

(12:00 5:00) 7:30 9:55 Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 2:45 5:10 9:45 R RTimes LA2:30 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE (1:00 3:10 5:20) 7:25Deeply 9:40 –R “★★★★ – Really, Truly, “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

LADY BIRD

JUSTICE LEAGUE

ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including

PRODIGAL SONS (1:30Best 4:15) 7:10 9:45 PG-13 NoRPasses (1:00) 3:10 Picture, Best5:20 Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director!

(2:20) 9:10 NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu MILK (1:15 4:00)– 7:00 “Haunting and Hypnotic!” Rolling9:30 StonePG “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

WONDER THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, 6:45 PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS MURDER ON (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award4:00 Noms Including THE ORIENT “★★★ 1/2! An unexpectedEXPRESS Gem!” – USA Today FROST/NIXON FROST/NIXON (11:45 2:15 4:45) 7:15 9:40 PG-13

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

(12:50 3:45) 6:45 9:25 COCO REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

“Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times

Honorable

12/1–12/7

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri R 10:15-1:00-2:00-3:45-6:30-7:30-9:10

Lady Bird

R 10:45-1:15-3:30-5:00-6:00-8:30

Wait For Your Laugh 10:30-12:45-3:00-6:15-8:15

NR

Novitiate

R 11:00-12:30 No show times on Weds 12/6!

The Florida Project R Victoria & Abdul PG13

8:15pm

3:15-5:45

Loving Vincent No show times on Weds 12/6!

NR 10:15am

551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

R

(1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 ESQ. R THE J ISRAEL KevinROMAN Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of 7:15 PG-13 (1:45 PuRE: 4:30) (2:15) 7:10 9:45 PG-13FLICK No Passes A BOuLDERING Michael Moore’s Thu, Feb 26th at 7:15 THE MOST DANGEROuS THOR: RAGNAROK SICKO MOVIES IN THE MORNING MAN AMERICA (1:40 4:30)IN 7:15 9:55 PG-13

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! (12:30 4:50) NR 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 No7:30 6:506:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00 10:00 10:15 VICKY CRISTINA BARCELONA Their First Joint Venture In 25 Years! Tue/Wed: (4:50) only Thu: (12:30) only AM 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING (2:40)Starts 9:00 NR Held Over! 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS (Sun Only) Fri, June 29th!

JANE

FACES PLACES

Mon/Tue: No 9:00 Tue/Wed: (2:50) Thu: No (2:50) or 9:00

RAVENFILMCENTER.COM HEALDSBURG Bistro Menu Items Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

FOR SHOWTIMES: 707.525.8909

Short hair tied up with a bandanna, dressed in coveralls as if she worked at a Jiffy Lube instead of an Ozark gift shop, Mildred (Frances McDormand) has a sudden inspiration to harass the police force in her town. Seven months previously, her daughter was raped and burned to death, and no one has been arrested yet. She decides to tell the police chief off through a set of billboards. This embarrasses the terminally ill Andy Griffith–like chief (Woody Harrelson), revered in the town in spite of (or because of) the police department’s reputation for torturing black prisoners. Dixon, his assistant—a drunk and sometimes vicious Barney Fife, well played by Sam Rockwell—is far more angry. Through her bereavement, Mildred has a license to spit venom. It’s a role that runs a small gamut. There are little nuggets of surprise embedded in the monotony of her forcefulness, and it’s a powerful part: kicking kids, throwing firebombs, maiming a dentist and usually having the last word. But “powerful” is also a term that defines a bully. One moment of tenderness has Mildred addressing a deer, telling it, and the audience, that she doesn’t believe it’s a reincarnation of her lost daughter. Yet there is the deer—we’ve seen the symbol of hope, and writer-director Martin McDonagh (In Bruges) gets it both ways. Caleb Landry Jones (Byzantium) is a relief from the ambient overheatedness as a self-amused billboard salesman. Harrelson is at his most benign as the police chief, even if McDonagh is at his roughest when he tries to write tenderly. ‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.


SENSE OF PLACE Corey Smith draws inspiration from his hometown.

Stomping Ground

Home is where Corey Smith’s heart is BY CHARLIE SWANSON

C

ontemporary country music songwriter Corey Smith was born in a small town, Jefferson, Ga., and his roots have been a huge part of his musical success. “It’s an important place to me, it’s home,” Smith says. “I never felt too inclined to leave.” An independent performer and prolific musician, Smith has 10 well-received albums to his name, and is currently wrapping up production on his forthcoming record, The Great Wide Underground. Throughout his career, Smith says he’s valued creative freedom over the allure of Nashville skylines, and his self-reliant nature is reflected in catchy and heartfelt songs that connect with fans

Corey Smith performs with opener Jade Jackson on Saturday, Dec. 2, at 8pm JaM Cellars Ballroom in Napa (1030 Main St.; $22–$40; 707.880.2300), and Sunday, Dec. 3, at 8pm at Sweetwater Music Hall in Mill Valley (19 Corte Madera Ave.; $27–$30; 415.388.3850).

19

BENEFIT SHOW FOR FIRE VICTIMS SATURDAY, DEC 9

THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE

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Music

for their relatable intimacy and distinct sense of place. “I’ve chosen to do things the hard way, perhaps because I’m stubborn,” Smith says. “But living [in Jefferson] has allowed me to develop in my own way, at my own pace.” Today’s corporate country-rock songwriting model, especially in Nashville, is writing by committee, with content that’s influenced by label execs, managers and producers. Smith says that when he started out in the business, he flirted with the idea of relocating to the big city, but his priorities were raising a family and giving his kids stability. “Having fame and fortune never appealed to me,” he says. “It’s never been what’s most important.” For Smith, the ability to carve out his songwriting career on his own terms is the most rewarding part of music for him. “So much of commercial music, in particular in country, is just telling people what they want to hear,” says Smith. “They get the data and know before it’s put out what kind of things will make it on the radio. “I think that’s contrary to what art is supposed to be,” Smith adds. “Art is supposed to be someone internalizing their experience in the world and trying to turn it into something that they can put out there. It either resonates or it doesn’t, but it has to be honest.” Smith’s forthcoming album was written last year while he toured the western part of the country over the course of six weeks, and reflects both Smith’s exhilaration in visiting new places and the homesickness of missing his family. “It’s a snapshot of the broad swath of things I’ve been going through,” he says. “I’m excited about several of the songs on the record, because they’re very autobiographical and personal to me.”


Music

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20 HEART SPACE PRESENTS Sat Dec 16

Harrison Stafford (Groundation) & The Professor Crew ROOTS REGGAE 21+ DOORS 9PM $20 ADV/$25 DOS Reel Fish Shop & Grill (Sonoma) Sat Dec 30

WED, NOVEMBER 29

Mannheim Steamroller by Chip Davis DECEMBER 1 - 3

Transcendence’s Broadway Holiday Spectacular TUE, DECEMBER 5

SoCo Trio WORLD/JAZZ/FUNK Free Admission! ALL AGES. Families Encouraged! 6:30PM-8:30PM Church of The Oaks (Cotati) Fri Jan 12

Los Lobos Grammy Award Winning Rock Legends! DOORS 7PM/ SHOW 8pm Raven (Healdsburg) Sat Jan 20

Coco Montoya Blues Star Returns to the Cabaret! DOORS 6PM/ SHOW 7pm ALL AGES The Old Cotati Cabaret (Cotati) Sun Feb 18

Tony Bennett

Julian Lage Trio 2018 JAZZ • ALL AGES DOORS 6:30PM $30-$50 Raven (Healdsburg) Sat Feb 24

FRI, DECEMBER 8 RODNEY STRONG VINEYARDS DANCE SERIES

11th Annual

Posada Navideña THU, DECEMBER 14

English Beat 2018 SKA • ALL AGES DOORS 7:30PM $35 ADV/$38 DOS Raven (Healdsburg) HeartSpacePresents.com 707-800-9485 Presenting music that gives hearts the space to heal, connect and be happy!

Under the Streetlamp: Hip to the Holidays SUN, DECEMBER 17

Easton Corbin

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Santa Rosa Symphony

Music Director candidate Andrew Grams conducts the orchestra in “A Luscious Euro Sound,” with acclaimed pianist Stewart Goodyear. Dec 2-4. $29 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Transcendence’s Broadway Holiday Spectacular

From the creators of Broadway Under the Stars, comes a new holiday concert revue featuring performers from Broadway shows. Dec 1-3. $39 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

MARIN COUNTY Blitzen Trapper

Portland folk-rock veterans play off their new album, “Wild & Reckless,” with songwriter Lilly Hiatt (daughter of John Hiatt) opening. Dec 4, 8pm. $20-$25. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Grove Valve Orchestra SAT, JANUARY 6 Symphony Pops

FRIDAY

DEC 1

What a Wonderful World: A Tribute to Louis Armstrong

THURSDAY

SUN, JANUARY 7

DEC 8

DEC 7 FRIDAY

TUNE-YARDS

FOLK POP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY HIP-HOP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

25TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY FEAT SAVED

BY THE 90S

ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ • FREE

Kris Kristofferson

SATURDAY POOR MAN'S WHISKEY PLUS

TUE, JANUARY 23

FLOBOTS WITH DATA DEC 10 BANG HIP-HOP/ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ FRIDAY ANUHEA PLUS DEC 15 PAULA FUGA & MAHI

DEC 9

ONE GRASS TWO GRASS

BLUEGRASS/ROCK • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SUNDAY

3 Doors Down Acoustic Back Porch Jam WED, JANUARY 31 RODNEY STRONG VINEYARDS DANCE SERIES

Pilobolus

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

REGGAE/POP • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SATURDAY

DEC 16 FRIDAY

ROY ROGERS

BLUES/SLIDE GUITAR • DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

DAVID ARKENSTONE'S

FANTASY DEC 22 WINTER ROCK • DOORS 7PM • ALL AGES

12/29 & 12/30 The Brothers Comatose 12/31 NYE 2018 with Tommy Castro, 1/12 Marty Stuart and his Fabulous Superlatives, 1/19 Pablo Cruise, 1/20 Fleetwood Mask & ILLEagles, 1/23 Reverend Horton Heat, 1/27 Royal Jelly Jive, 2/1 New Kingston with The Late Ones

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Made up of musicians from the Clif Bar company, the accomplished 11-piece R&B ensemble performs a fire relief benefit. Dec 2, 8pm. $10. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

NAPA COUNTY Project KIKS Musical Extravaganza

Kind Initiative for Kids Shoes marks 10 years and supports wildfire and hurricane victims with sets by Peggy Shropshire and Amos Carter, Orquestra La Secarda, Luv Fyah and others. Dec 3, 3pm. $40 and up. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

The Young Fables

Nashville-based country duo, comprised of “American Idol” vet Laurel Wright and guitarist/vocalist Wesley Lunsford, returns to Napa.

Dec 6, 8:30pm. $15-$17. Silo’s, 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe Nov 29, St Cinder. Nov 30, Desi and the Mish. Dec 1, the Rivertown Trio. Dec 2, La Guingette. Dec 3, 2pm, Kenneth Roy Berry. Dec 5, Music for a Winter’s Eve. Dec 6, aqus blues jam. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Nov 30, Midnight Sun Massive. Dec 1, Manzanita Falls with Your Fearless Leader and Battlehooch. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Nov 29, 2pm, Instrumental Repertory Recital. Nov 30, Jewish Music Series presents Veretski Pass with Polyn. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Dec 1, “Late Night with Leonard Bernstein” with Jamie Bernstein. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol Nov 30, Dragon Smoke. Dec 1, the Dixie Giants with Beat Mosaic. Dec 2, Trapeze Worldwide. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Dec 1, Aki Kumar and Jon Lawton. Dec 2, Low Flying Birds. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Dec 2, 6:30pm, classic movie themes with Noel Jewkes Quartet. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Nov 29, Free Peoples. Nov 30, Rosetown Soul. Dec 1, Foxes in the Henhouse. Dec 5, Pacific Soundrise. Dec 6, Zeena Quinn. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille

Lagunitas Tap Room

Dec 2, DJ Cal and DJ Primo. 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Cellars of Sonoma Dec 3, 2pm, Craig Corona. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Church of the Incarnation Dec 1, fire relief benefit concert with North Bay Sinfonietta. 550 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, classicalsonoma.org.

Coffee Catz

Dec 1, Kentucky Street Pioneers EP release show. Wed, open mic night. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478. Nov 29, Dirty Red Barn. Nov 30, Trotta & Walters. Dec 1, the Hucklebuck. Dec 2, Timothy O’Neil Band. Dec 3, Hop Sauce. Dec 6, JimBo Trout. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Nov 29, Mannheim Steamroller Christmas by Chip Davis. Dec 5, Tony Bennett. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Main Street Bistro

Dec 1, 1pm, Feedback piano with Jerry Green. Dec 1, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. Dec 3, 2pm, Blues and R&B jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Nov 30, Susan Sutton. Dec 1, Wild Janie Roberts. Dec 2, Bad Ass Boots. Dec 3, Memory Lane Combo. Dec 5, Mac & Potter. Dec 6, Willie Perez. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Cooperage Brewing Co

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Dec 1, URSA with Lord Mountain and Hexarkana. 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787.

Flamingo Lounge Dec 1, Supra Kool Thang. Dec 2, Konsept Party Band. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Dec 1, Jay Dub & Dino. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Dec 1, Tune-Yards with Linafornia. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.


Din n er & A Show Fri

Dec 1

Koolerator

Rancho

with Jonathan Korty and Debut!

Danny Uzilevsky 8:00 / No Cover

Bishop’s Big Fun Trio Dec 2 Elvin with Bob Welch and Sat

Willy Jordan 8:30

Parlor Dec 3 Junk Gypsy/Crooner/Punk 4:00 / No Cover Fri Dec 8 Beer Scouts Sun

Rock & Roll Xmas Show 8:00 / No Cover

Dec 9 Danny Click’s Birthday Party with The Hell Yeahs! 8:30 Sun “Blue Christmas Show” Rancho 10 Dec Mark Hummel’s ebut! Sat

D

Deep Basement Shakers and Howelldevine 4:00 Fri Dec 15 The Rivertown Trio featuring Julie Bernard

Sat

Fabulous Harmonies 8:00 / No Cover

North Bay Fire Relief Fundraiser Dec 16 M.C. Bill Bowker & KRSH Radio present

The Angela Strehli Band with Mighty Mike Schermer

8:30 Gospel Christmas Eve Weekend Dinner Shows The Incredibly Exciting

Sons of The Soul Revivers Sat Dec 23, 8pm & Sun Dec 24, 7pm Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

IT TAKES TWO Rising Nashville-based country-pop duo the Young Fables return to the North Bay on Wednesday, Dec. 6, at Silo’s in Napa. See Concerts, adjacent page.

Newman Auditorium

Dec 6, 7:30pm, Santa Rosa Junior College Jazz Combos fall concert. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Dec 2, 7:30pm and , Dec 3, 3pm, “Alleluia Anyway” with Occidental Community Choir. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Petaluma private mansion

Dec 3, Cinnabar Theater presents “Music in the Mansion” with Claire-Jeanne Martin and Nancy Hayashibara. 920 D St, Petaluma, cinnabartheater.org.

The Phoenix Theater

Nov 29, the Faceless and Inanimate Existence. Dec 1, R4id with Year of the Fist and Dirty Rice. Dec 2, Ramuun with Jackson Whalan and Honeycomb. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pub Republic

Dec 2, the Thundering Heard. 3120 Lakeville Hwy, Petaluma. 707.782.9090.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Wed, 6pm, open mic session. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Redwood Cafe

Nov 29, Pop-Up Jazz Jam with Debra Anderson. Nov 30, Kevin Russell and friends. Dec 1, Dusty Green Bones Band. Dec 2, Community Pride Celebration Dance. Dec 3, 5pm, Gypsy Kisses. Dec 4, West Coast Songwriters Competition. Dec 5, Rock Overtime student performance. Dec 6, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Dec 2, the Straw Wattles with Colin Gilmore. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Dec 2, parade of lights afterparty. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Sebastopol Community Center

Dec 1, Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

21

Fireside Dining 7 Days a Week

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Sebastopol United Methodist Church

thu keVin Russell & soMe nov 30 fRiends 8pm/Dancing/$10 fri dusty GReen bones band Dec 1 8:30pm/Dancing/Jamgrass/$10

coMMunity PRide

sat Dec 2 celebRation dance 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

MaRia MuldauR & heR

fri Dec 8 Red hot bluesiana band 8:30pm/$20 aDv/$25 Dos sat thuGz & solid aiR Dec 9 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 tue aRt RecePtion with Dec 12 fRench oak GyPsy band 6pm thu buzzy MaRtin holiday Dec 14 conceRt 8pm/$5 fri foxes in the henhouse Dec 15 7:30pm/americana/$10 sat annie saMPson band Dec 16 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 aDv/$12 Dos thu Dec 21 fri Dec 22

stacey Joy 8pm/$5

iRie RockeRs

8:30pm/Dancing/$12

RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC

Dec 3, 3pm, the Old World Carolers. 500 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.7971.

Thu 11⁄30 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $27–$32 • All Ages

Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas (seated show) Fri 12⁄1 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22 • All Ages

Sonoma Cider

Moonalice & David Freiberg’s Quicksilver Messenger Service

Dec 2, Beat Mosaic. 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Sat 12⁄2 • Doors 11am ⁄ FREE • All Ages Free Brunch Show with

Subud Hall

Dec 2, Jai Uttal with Daniel Paul and Prajna Vieira. 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.1986.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Dec 1, Weekend at Bernie’s. Dec 2, Crayzed. Dec 4, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Dec 5, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip

Dec 1, Fresh Fridays with DJ MD. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY The Belrose

Thurs, open mic night. 1415 Fifth Ave, San Rafael. ) 415.454.6422.

22

Plage Boys

Sat 12⁄2 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $18–$22 • All Ages

Holiday Kick-Off Party with The King of the Funky Drums

Zigaboo Modeliste and the New Aahkesstra

Sun 12⁄3 • Doors 12:30pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

Trump Impeachment Preview with

Roger McNamee from Moonalice (solo acoustic)

Sun 12⁄3 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $27–$30 • All Ages Corey Smith + Jade Jackson Mon 12⁄4 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $27–$30 • All Ages Blitzen Trapper + Lilly Hiatt Thu 12⁄7 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–$30 • 21+ An Evening with Mike Cooley ( Drive-By Truckers) Sat 12⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $37–$42 • All Ages

Sons of Champlin

Tue 12⁄12 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

The Coffis Brothers & The Mountain Men FREE Holiday Concert

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM SPECIAL GUEST STEVE FREUND TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR FRI DEC 1 • WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT DEC 2 • CRAYZED AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 29 - DECEMBE R 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch


Music ( 21

22 NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOVE MBER 29 - D EC E M BE R 5, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Fenix

Dec 1, the Sun Kings. Dec 3, Yolandra Rhodes. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Dec 2, DJ party. Dec 3, Banda Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato

Nov 30, Marin School of the Arts rock bands. Dec 1, Choppin Broccoli. Dec 2, the Devil in California with Stimuli and Flanelhed. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Nov 29, Charlie Hickox Trio. Dec 6, Aaron Redner and friends. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club

Nov 29, Night Animals. Nov 30, Beat Mosaic with Dixie Giants. Dec 1, 5:30pm, Danny Montana and friends. Dec 1, 9pm, First Fridays Reggae Night with Broken Silence Sound System. Dec 2, 4pm, Michael Brown and friends. Dec 3, 6pm, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. Dec 3, 9pm, Elvis Johnson’s blues jam. Dec 4, open mic. Dec 5, Blues Champions. Dec 6, Damon LeGall Band. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.



No Name Bar

Visit us at The Emerald Cup Dec 9-10! Booth T 58 & 59 Look for our flag • Free Dab with purchase 

• $5 deals • Stop by for a 20% Discount Card

Nov 29, Robert Elmond Stone. Nov 30, Remedy. Dec 1, Michael Aragon Quartet. Dec 4, Kimrea. Dec 5, open mic. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Nov 30, Passion Habanera. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Nov 29, Lorin Rowan. Nov 30, C-JAM with Connie Ducey. Dec 5, Swing Fever. Dec 6, Arthur Javier. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Dec 2, Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun Trio with Bob Welch and Willy Jordan. Dec 3, 4pm, Junk Parlor. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Dec 1, SwingSet. Dec 2, Charles Wheal Band. Dec 3, 13 Strings. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Nov 30, Donna D’Acuti Jazz Band. Dec 2, 4pm, holiday benefit event. Dec 3, 5pm, Julio Bravo & Salsabor. Dec 5, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Nov 30, JimBo Trout & the Fishpeople. Dec 1, Mendonesia. Dec 2, Go by Ocean and Salt Suns. Dec 3, LoWatters. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Nov 30, Alasdair Fraser and Natalie Haas. Dec 1, Moonalice and Quicksilver Messenger Service. Dec 2, Zigaboo Modeliste and the New Aahkesstra. Dec 3, 1pm, Roger McNamee solo acoustic. Dec 3, 8pm, Corey Smith with Jade Jackson. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Nov 29, San Geronimo. Dec 1-2, Everyone Orchestra. Sold-out. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Nov 29, 12pm, Derek Tam and Erik Andersen. Dec 3, 5:30pm, Nathan Bickart Trio. Dec 6, 12pm, Ian Scarfe. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Dec 1, Domestic Harmony. Dec 2, the Upbeats. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Dabs sponsored by Incredible Creations 2425 Cleveland Ave, Suite 175 Santa Rosa, CA 95403 707.526.2800

Hours: M-F 10:00 am—7:00 pm, S-S 10:00 am—5:00 pm

Nov 29, Fitz & Pieces. Nov 30, Dr Mojo. Dec 1, Swoop Unit. Dec 2, Sucker MCs. Dec 3, Matt Bolton. Dec 4, open mic. Dec 5, the Bad Hombres. Dec 6, the Weissmen. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Nov 30, singer-songwriter showcase with Mark Nichol. Dec 1, Koolerator with Jonathan Korty and Danny Uzilevsky.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Nov 29, John Vicino. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Blue Note Napa

Nov 30, Kurt Ribak Quartet. Dec 1-2, Willie K holiday performance. Dec 5, Roem Baur’s Holiday Soiree with Lilan Kane. Dec 6, Oddjob

Ensemble. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Dec 1, Latin Nights with DJ Jose Miguel. Dec 2, Nate Lopez. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Dec 2, California Zephyr. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Dec 1, Charles Wheal. Dec 3, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre Nov 29, LGBTQ dance party with DJ Rotten Robbie. Dec 1, Train. Sold-out. Dec 2, Corey Smith with Jade Jackson. Dec 3, 2pm, US Air Force Band of the Golden West. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Jarvis Conservatory Dec 2, It’s a Grand Night for Singers. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center Dec 2, Napa Valley College North Bay Wind Ensemble. 2277 Napa Vallejo Hwy, Napa. 707.256.7500.

Napa Valley Roasting Company

Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeff Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

Napkins Bar & Grill

Dec 1-2, DJ nights. Dec 3, 12pm, acoustic brunch with Doug Houser. Dec 5, the Gentlemen of Jazz. 1001 Second St, Napa. 707.927.5333.

River Terrace Inn

Dec 1, Timothy O’Neil. Dec 2, Johnny Smith. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Nov 29, Mike Greensill with Lisa Lindsley. Nov 30, Doug Houser. Dec 1, Papa Joe & the New Deal. Dec 2, the Cripple Creek Band. Dec 3, Garage Band 101 for Kids. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Susie’s Bar

Wed, Open Mic Night with Randy Foisy. 1365 Lincoln St, Calistoga. 707.942.6710.

Uptown Theatre

Nov 30, An Irish Christmas. Dec 2, Hotel California. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.


M.A. Psychology: Depth Deeply Professional

Info Session

SANTA ROSA, CA

December 2, Saturday 2:00 - 4:00 p.m.

SANTA ROSA HIGH SCHOOL 1235 mendocino avenue

Stevenson 3042, SSU sonoma.edu/depth

laurel.mccabe@sonoma.edu

HOLIDAYS

saturday, december 2 - 3pm

707.664.2130

benefitting

Untitled by Robert LaVigne, Oil on Canvas

face to faty ce

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

sonoma coun

707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI THU NOV 30 AN EVENING WITH

DRAGON SMOKE

$35/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

FRI DEC 1

THE DIXIE GIANTS

5YR ANNIVERSARY PARTY! + BEAT MOSAIC

$12–15/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SAT DEC 2

TRAPEZE WORLDWIDE

PROHIBITION BARRELL HOUSE DANCE PARTY AND BURLESQUEROTTI SHOWCASE

$15–100/DOORS 9/SHOW 10/21+

WED DEC 6

SCIENCE BUZZ CAFE (IN BEER GARDEN)

$5/DOORS-SHOW 7/ALL AGES

THU DEC 7

AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS

CHARLIE HUNTER TRIO $20–25/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

FRI DEC 8 & SAT DEC 9

TWO NIGHTS WITH

THE DAVID LUNING BAND PLUS VERY SPECIAL GUESTS

$30 FRI/$20 SAT/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

TICKETS: SFGMC.ORG

NOV E M BE R 29 - DECEMBE R 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Graduates develop depth-oriented programs in their communities, teach at universities, work with nonprofits, in human resouces, and beyond.

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Arts Events RECEPTIONS Dec 1

Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Holiday Art Show,” one-ofa-kind works are on display and available to complete your gift giving. 5pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. Chroma Gallery, “Small Works Show,” annual show includes paintings, sculptures and ceramics no larger than a square foot. 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051. Gallery 32, “Tangled, Painted & Slightly Tainted,” see the imaginative works of artists Elisa Tudor, Julia Reid and Biana Kolonusz-Partee. 5pm. 16190 Main St, Guerneville. 707.239.0518. Red Shoes Gallery, “Salon Photo Group Show,” featuring color and blackand-white images that boast new techniques and traditional styles. 5pm. 1040 Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.592.4949. Sonoma Community Center, “Artist in Residence: Karl Schwiesow,” ceramic artist shows off his sculptures created while in residence with Sonoma Ceramics Studio. 5pm. 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Dec 2

Hammerfriar Gallery, “428 Collective,” group of 11 Sonoma County artists brings awareness to

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Glaser Center Through Nov 30, “Unraveling Threads:The Mexican Indigenous Textile Project,” photographic prints highlight Mexican indigenous people, customs and textiles. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

History Museum of Sonoma County Through Nov 30, “Día de

innovative and boundarypushing art being produced in the area. 6pm. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. 707.473.9600. MarinMOCA, “Contemporary Landscape,” exhibit features works by artists from across the country, chosen by juror Chester Arnold while he was evacuated from his home during the recent North Bay fires. 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

Dec 3

Book Passage, “Tom Killion Residency,” acclaimed Marin artist returns to Book Passage’s gallery for a year-long exhibition of his original prints and hand-crafted books. 5pm. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. 415.927.0960. Bubble Street Gallery, “Calling on the Muse,” artist and gallery owner Daniel Merriam premieres paintings, sculpture and graphics created before and after the Tubbs fire, in which his home and studio were destroyed. 3pm. 565 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.339.0506.

Dec 5

Beluga & Bee Studio, “Krampus Group Show,” the folkloric holiday monsters is represented the artwork by nearly a dozen local painters. 5pm. 24 Tenth St, Santa Rosa. 707.318.9760.

Muertos,” exhibition combines traditional and modern takes on the artistic Mexican holiday. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500.

Paul Mahder Gallery

Through Nov 30, “Ann Wolff Glass Works,” the artist displays imaginative works in her preferred medium. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

MARIN COUNTY Community Media Center of Marin Through Nov 30,

“TRANSFRONTERIZA,” photographer John Pike offers a glimpse into the city of Tijuana as guided by members of the transgender community. 819 A St, San Rafael. 415.721.0636.

Dominican University Through Dec 15, “Nigel Poor: The San Quentin Project,” archive mapping and typology project displays alongside sculptures by Andrea Bacigalupo. 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440.

Marin Society of Artists Through Nov 30, “Innovations,” Marin Society of Artists celebrates its 90th anniversary with art from current members, including sculpture, painting, photography, printmaking, ceramics and jewelry. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

Robert Allen Fine Art Through Nov 30, “Under, Over & Out,” new works on canvas by Victoria Ryan. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

San Geronimo Valley Community Center Through Nov 30, “Pressing Matters VIII: Printmakers Group Show,” eighth annual exhibit includes etchings, woodcuts, linocuts, lithographs, letterpress and other prints. 6350 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Geronimo. 415.488.8888.

Throckmorton Theatre Through Nov 30, “A Break in the Battle,” art installation from Ronie Dalton features large-scale canvas images that depict individual tattoos, quotes and portraits of US soldiers and their families. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Workmix Cafe Lounge Through Nov 30, “Soaring Beyond the Self,” Renuka Sondhi presents a journey of life displayed in surreal paintings. 950 Randolph St, Napa. Mon-Fri, 8am to 5pm; 7am to 5 for members; Twilight hours, 5 to 7pm. 707.603.3986.

Comedy The Immaculate Big Bang

Bill Santiago performs his new show, inspired by the death of his father and birth of his daughter, that laughs at the border of science and religion. Nov 29, 8pm. $20-$30. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Laugh Your Bingo Off! Play bingo to a standup comedy show. Dec 2, 7pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.843.3824.

T.J. Miller

Popular standup comedian and actor known for “Silicon Valley” and “Yogi Bear 3D” takes the stage. Dec 1, 8pm. $35-$50. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Events Bacchus Holiday Bazaar

Shop for unique holiday gifts at a Bavarian-inspired Christmas market, with wine, food trucks and a toy drive. Dec 2, 11am. Free admission. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Bijoux Holiday Open House

Fine arts exhibit and sale includes handcrafted jewelry, ceramics, clothing and more from local artists and designers. Dec 2-3, 10am. Free. Bijoux, 583 Harrison St, Sebastopol. 707.326.6874.

Brick Palooza

A huge exhibition of LEGO art, play areas, hands-on activity booths and more for the whole family. Dec 3, 9am. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa. thebrickhutt. com.

Calistoga Holiday Village & Christmas Faire On Friday evening, stroll downtown Calistoga and indulge in a holiday shopping spree, then spend Saturday finding artisan crafts and holiday activities at the faire. Dec 1-2. Napa County Fairgrounds, 1435 N Oak St, Calistoga. visitcalistoga.com.

Calistoga Lighted Tractor Parade

Calistoga’s ag heritage and

the holiday season comes together in this festive event. Dec 2, 7pm. Free. Downtown Calistoga, Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. visitcalistoga.com.

Community Open Studios at di Rosa

Visitors can drop-in and explore the studio stations arranged in di Rosa’s gallery, with staff and volunteers on hand. Sat, Dec 2, 11am. Free. di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Guerneville Holiday Extravaganza & Parade of Lights

Celebration opens with Thursday evening Tree Lighting and closes with Saturday evening parade of floats, horses, marching bands, antique cars, trucks and more decorated with Christmas lights. Nov 30-Dec 2. Free. Downtown Guerneville, Main St, Guerneville. russianriver. com.

Handmade Holiday Crafts Fair

Over 80 local artists sell their gift-ready wares, with live entertainment and holiday goodies. Dec 2-3. $2. Finley Community Center, 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Holidays in Yountville The town transforms into a winter wonderland with sparkling lights and schedule of live entertainment, art shows, workshops, shopping, food and wine tours, carriage rides and more. Through Dec 31. Downtown Yountville, Washington St, Yountville, yountville.com.

ICB Winter Open Studios

See more than 100 artists’ studios and work in this seasonal tradition. Dec 1-3. The ICB Art Studios, 480 Gate Five Road, Sausalito, icb-artists.com.

Lighting of the Snowmen

Music, dancing, beer and movies mark the annual celebration. Dec 2, 4pm. Free. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Luther Burbank Holiday Open House

View Burbank’s historic home and greenhouse, and get freshbaked cookies and spiced tea. Dec 2-3, 10am. $3. Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, 204 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.524.5445.

Maresca Art Barn Holiday Boutique

Local artists present their wares in a festive, cozy environment with refreshments and music. Dec 2-3, 10am. Free. Maresca Barn Studio, 16120 Watson Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9419.

Napa B&B Holiday Tour & Taste

Tour the town’s historical inns and savor winetastings and treats. Benefits local charities. Dec 2, 3pm. $75. Downtown Napa, First Street and Town Center, Napa, napaholidaytour. com.

NBC Pottery Studio Sale Fifth annual sale features holiday gifts, live music, food and drinks and amazing works of pottery from the Angwinbased artists. Dec 2-3, 11am. NBC Pottery, 380 Eastern Ave, Angwin. 7073180654.

Railroad Square Horse & Carriage Rides

The Railroad Square holiday tradition turns 30 and delights with free carriage rides, kids activities, hot cider and snacks, photo booth and more. SatSun, 11am. through Dec 24. Free. Railroad Square, Fourth and Wilson streets, Santa Rosa.

The Reindeer Run

Dress in colorful garb and walk or run in this seventh annual event hosted by KHOPE International poverty relief group. Dec 2, 8am. $37-$45. American Canyon Wetlands parking lot, Wetlands Edge road and Eucalyptus drive, American Canyon, khopeinternational.org.

Robert Mondavi Winery Holiday Tree Lighting & Celebration Seventh annual event includes horse and buggy rides through the vineyard, carolers, appetizers, wine tasting, hot apple cider and more. Dec 2, 3pm. $25. Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St Helena Hwy, Oakville. 707.968.2203.

Shop Party Craft Fair

Seventh annual pop-up event showcases over 30 local artists, crafters and makers, with homemade food, Atlas coffee and baked goods available. Dec 3, 11am. Free admission. Saturday Afternoon Club, 430 10th St, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8436.

Soil Alive!

Benefit party features live music, food and community bonding to give back to the growing


Field Trips Holidays Along the Farm Trails

Sonoma County farmers and producers open their barn doors to offer a taste of life on the farm. Maps and info at farmtrails.org. Through Jan 1, 2018. Free. Sonoma County farms, various locations, Sonoma. 707.837.8896.

Film American Yogi

Bay Area filmmaker and psychotherapist Steven Newmark is on hand for the US premiere of his new documentary on enlightenment. Dec 1, 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Crash

Northern California Writers presents “A Night At The Movies” series with a guest speaker introducing and discussing the award-winning film. Dec 5, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

King of Jazz

See a digital restoration of the early Technicolor musical. Thurs, Nov 30, 7:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Look & See: A Portrait of Wendell Berry New film profiles the philosopher farmer. Nov 29, 6pm. $20. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Spite Marriage

Musicians of the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra accompany Buster Keaton’s 1929 silent film, screening in 35mm print. Dec 3, 4:15pm. $15-$20. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Two Works by Isaac Julien

British filmmaker and installation artist appears in

conversation with Aebhric Coleman, Director of the Kramlich Collection for a exclusive North Bay showing of his work. Dec 1, 3 and 5:45pm. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Warren Miller’s Line of Descent

Annual globe-trotting ski film series this year features a visit to the French Alps with professional skier and Tahoe local, Amie Engerbretson and more. Dec 2, 4 and 7pm. $5-$15. Third Street Cinema Six, 620 Third St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.8770.

Food & Drink Beer Raffle

Get in on a massive raffle that benefits fire relief efforts and offers prizes like an instant beer cellar, wine, dinners and gifts. Tickets available now! Dec 1, 5pm. $5 and up. Cooperage Brewing Co, 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787.

Better with Bubbles

Cheese course with expert Janet Fletcher pairs bites with fine sparkling wines from Mendocino County’s Roederer Estate. Dec 2, 1pm. $65. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Holiday Tea Service

Indulge in a relaxing afternoon atmosphere while enjoying pastries, petit sandwiches, custom blend teas, classic cocktails and other holiday fare. Sat-Sun, 2pm. through Dec 24. Hotel Healdsburg, 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Inglenook Holiday Open House

Hosted by the Coppola Family, the tradition features seasonal gifts, holiday wines and surprises. Dec 3, 3pm. Inglenook Winery, 1991 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.968.1161.

La Viña Wine Auction Fundraising event opens with appetizers and wines from many local wineries leading to silent and live auctions, benefitting Napa Valley Language Academy. Dec 2, 5:30pm. $85. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

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The Living Room Chili Cook-Off & Toy Drive

Enjoy unlimited tastings of great homemade chili, silent auction, games for the kids, live music and more to help fire victims and women and children served by the Living Room. Dec 2, 12pm. $15. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Sausalito Gingerbread House Tour & Competition Stroll the shops around Sausalito and view elaborate, festively decorated gingerbread houses galore. Dec 1-31. Downtown Sausalito, Caledonia Street, Sausalito.

Sonoma County Resilience Fund Benefit

The evening features live music, silent and live auctions, tasty bites from renowned chef Roland Passot, local wines, craft beer and some needed holiday cheer. Dec 4, 5pm. $50-$60. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.927.3331.

Lectures Fire & the Lands We Call Home

Fire ecologist Dr Sasha Berleman speaks about fire’s role in ecosystems and how renewed land management techniques can live with fire rather than against it. Preregistration required. Nov 30, 7pm. $20. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Literacyworks Lecture Series

Spend an afternoon with former Ambassador Ted Eliot Jr and support low income adults in the North Bay get access to community college and technical education programs. Dec 3, 3:45pm. $20$25/students Free. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, literacyworks.org.

Readings Angelico Hall

Nov 30, 7pm, “God: A Human History” with Reza Aslan. $40. Dec 4, 7pm, “An American Family” with Khizr Khan. $40. Dec 6, 7pm, “What Unites Us” with Dan Rather. $40. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael 415.457.4440.

MAD MAN T. J. Miller comes to Napa with his ridiculously fun brand of standup

on Friday, Dec. 1, at the Uptown Theatre. See Comedy, p27.

Book Passage

Nov 30, 4pm, “Pattan’s Pumpkin” with Chitra Soundar. Dec 2, 1pm, “The Jaguar and the Cacao Tree” with Birgitte Rasine. Dec 3, 11am, “The Dogs of Avalon” with Laura Schenone. Dec 3, 1pm, Matt Coyle & Patricia Smiley in conversation. Dec 3, 4pm, “It Happened in Marin” with Jim Holden. Dec 4, 7pm, “Unaccompanied” with Javier Zamora. Dec 5, 5:30pm, “Eat Like Walt” with Marcy Carriker Smothers. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Book Passage By-the-Bay

Dec 6, 6pm, “Marinship” with Eric Torney. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Diesel Bookstore

Dec 1, 6pm, “The Wolf, the Duck & the Mouse” with Mac Barnett. Dec 2, 2pm, Cookbook Extravaganza with several authors and cooks. Dec 6, 7pm, “The Gourmands’ Way” with Justin Spring. 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur 415.785.8177.

Napa Main Library

Nov 29, 7pm, “A Mountaineer’s Life”with Allen Steck. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

Novato Copperfield’s Books

Dec 1, 7pm, “Well Nourished” with Andrea Lieberstein.

999 Grant Ave, Novato 415.763.3052.

Outdoor Art Club

Nov 30, 1pm, “Sometimes Brilliant” with Larry Brilliant. 1 W Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley 415.383.2582.

Daddy Long Legs

Catch the North Bay premiere of the newly released rags-toriches musical hit. Through Dec 10. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Kinsey Sicks

Nov 29, 7pm, “A Paradise Built in Hell” with Rebecca Solnit, in conversation with Peter Coyote. Dec 2, 1:30pm, “100 Things Warriors Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die” with Danny Leroux. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

The Dragapella quartet performs their new show, “Things You Shouldn’t Say,” that tells the remarkable true backstory of the group’s formation in San Francisco 25 years ago. Dec 3, 7:30pm. $30-$45. Congregation Ner Shalom, 85 La Plaza, Cotati. 707.664.8622.

Umpqua Bank

The Little Mermaid

Dec 2, 11am, “The Flood of Kindness” with De’Ante Webster and Laurie Marshall, includes kids activities and cake. 999 Redwood Blvd, Novato 415.493.3121.

Theater Bakersfield Mist

Left Edge Theatre presents the mature comedy about an unlucky bartender who’s thrift-store painting may fetch millions in value. Through Dec 2. $25-$40. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Santa Rosa Junior College theatre arts department presents the Disney musical inspired by Hans Christian Andersen’s story. Through Dec 3. $12-$22. Maria Carrillo High School, 6975 Montecito Blvd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4307.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 29 - DECEMBE R 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

community in the wake of the devastating October wildfires. Dec 1, 7pm. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.


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arlier this month, the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) released its highly anticipated emergency rules for cannabis regulation in advance of a legal recreational market next year.

The result was a mixed bag, especially for small-scale growers. I asked California Growers Association executive director Hezekiah Allen for his take on the latest legislation from Sacramento. What are the takeaways from the new state rules? The rules are comprehensive and thoughtful. They represent a tremendous achievement, and agency staff have put in long, hard hours getting to know our businesses, and it shows. What are you pleased to see included? Everything, honestly. It’s so good to finally have some sense of certainty. These are emergency regulations, so there will be changes, but we finally have an understanding of where the initial lines are.

What’s missing? Time for small growers to transition. Proposition 64 was amended at the last minute to include this language: “The Adult Use of Marijuana Act ensures the nonmedical marijuana industry in California will be built around small and medium sized businesses by prohibiting large-scale cultivation licenses for the first five years.” Though the regulations do prevent large licenses for the first five years, they do not limit the ability of a farm to operate as a large farm by obtaining several smaller licenses. This is a violation of the spirit of Proposition 64. What do these rules mean for consumers? Regulated cannabis will be tested and will be the most sustainable crop grown in California. We are one step closer to achieving those goals. What do they mean for smallscale growers? Many small-scale growers are feeling betrayed by the CDFA. They feel as though the emergency regulations are an offense to the electoral process, to the legislative process and to our state’s environmental laws. What is the significance of the exclusion of the one-acre cap on grow sites? It is significant for a few reasons. It means the emergency regulations are not consistent with the state’s environmental impact report. It means the emergency rules are inconsistent with the spirit of Proposition 64, and it means the emergency rules are inconsistent with several years of legislative deliberation. It is significant when private interests prevail over the public interest and our democratic processes. It is significant because many growers are likely to fail— not because they are criminals, not because they are bad business people, but because they didn’t have time to run the permitting and regulatory gauntlet before well-capitalized, politically connected businesses capture the market and potentially capture the regulators.


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the potential to give the world specific gifts—benefits and blessings that are unique to you. One of those gifts has been slow in developing. You’ve never been ready to confidently offer it in its fullness. In fact, if you have tried to bestow it in the past, it may have caused problems. But the good news is that in the coming months, this gift will finally be ripe. You’ll know how to deal crisply with the interesting responsibilities it asks you to take on. Here’s your homework: get clear about what this gift is and what you will have to do to offer it in its fullness.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

Happy Unbirthday, Gemini! You’re halfway between your last birthday and your next. That means you’re free to experiment with being different from who you have imagined yourself to be and who other people expect you to be. Here are inspirational quotes to help you celebrate. 1. “Those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything.”—George Bernard Shaw. 2. “Like all weak men he laid an exaggerated stress on not changing one’s mind.”—W. Somerset Maugham. 3. “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds. With consistency, a great soul has simply nothing to do.”— Ralph Waldo Emerson. 4. “The snake which cannot cast its skin has to die. As well the minds which are prevented from changing their opinions; they cease to be mind.”—Friedrich Nietzsche.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) I suggest that you take a piece of paper and write down a list of your biggest fears. Then call on the magical force within you that is bigger and smarter than your fears. Ask your deep sources of wisdom for the poised courage you need to keep those scary fantasies in their proper place. And what is their proper place? Not as the masters of your destiny, not as controlling agents that prevent you from living lustily, but rather as helpful guides that keep you from taking foolish risks. LEO (July 23–August 22)

In his book Life: The Odds, Gregory Baer says that the odds you will marry a millionaire are not good: 215-to-1. They’re 60,000-to-1 that you’ll wed royalty and 88,000-to-1 that you’ll date a model. After analyzing your astrological omens for the coming months, I suspect your chances of achieving these feats will be even lower than usual. That’s because you’re far more likely to cultivate synergetic and symbiotic relationships with people who enrich your soul and stimulate your imagination, but don’t necessarily pump up your ego. Instead of models and millionaires, you’re likely to connect with practical idealists, energetic creators and emotionally intelligent people who’ve done work to transmute their own darkness.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) What might you do to take better care of yourself in 2018, Virgo? According to my reading of the astrological omens, this will be a fertile meditation for you to keep revisiting. Here’s a good place to start: Consider the possibility that you have a lot to learn about what makes your body operate at peak efficiency and what keeps your soul humming along with the sense that your life is interesting. Here’s another crucial task: Intensify your love for yourself. With that as a driving force, you’ll be led to discover the actions necessary to supercharge your health. (P.S.: Now is an ideal time to get this project underway.) LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Here are themes I suggest you specialize in during the coming

weeks. 1. How to gossip in ways that don’t diminish and damage your social network, but rather foster and enhance it. 2. How to be in three places at once without committing the mistake of being nowhere at all. 3. How to express precisely what you mean without losing your attractive mysteriousness. 4. How to be nosy and brash for fun and profit. 5. How to unite and harmonize the parts of yourself and your life that have been at odds with each other.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

I predict that in the coming months you won’t feel compulsions to set your adversaries’ hair on fire. You won’t fantasize about robbing banks to raise the funds you need, nor will you be tempted to worship the devil. And the news just gets better. I expect that the amount of self-sabotage you commit will be close to zero. The monsters under your bed will go on a long sabbatical. Any lame excuses you have used in the past to justify bad behavior will melt away. And you’ll mostly avoid indulging in bouts of irrational and unwarranted anger. In conclusion, Scorpio, your life should be pretty evilfree for quite some time. What will you do with this prolonged outburst of grace? Use it wisely!

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) “What is love?” asks philosopher Richard Smoley. “It’s come to have a greeting-card quality,” he mourns. “Half the time ‘loving’ someone is taken to mean nurturing a warmish feeling in the heart for them, which mysteriously evaporates the moment the person has some concrete need or irritates us.” One of your key assignments in the next 10 months will be to purge any aspects of this shrunken and shriveled kind of love that may still be lurking in your beautiful soul. You are primed to cultivate an unprecedented new embodiment of mature, robust love.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) You know that unfinished task you have half-avoided, allowing it to stagnate? Soon you’ll be able to summon the gritty determination required to complete it. I suspect you’ll also be able to carry out the glorious rebirth you’ve been shy about climaxing. To gather the energy you need, reframe your perspective so that you can feel gratitude for the failure or demise that has made your glorious rebirth necessary and inevitable. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In an ideal world, your work and your character would speak for themselves. You’d receive exactly the amount of recognition and appreciation you deserve. You wouldn’t have to devote as much intelligence to selling yourself as you did to developing your skills in the first place. But now forget everything I just said. During the next 10 months, I predict that packaging and promoting yourself won’t be so #$@&%*! important. Your work and character will speak for themselves with more vigor and clarity than they have before. PISCES (February 19–March 20) There used

to be a booth at a Santa Cruz flea market called “Joseph Campbell’s Love Child.” It was named after the mythological scholar who wrote the book The Hero with a Thousand Faces. The booth’s proprietor sold items that spurred one’s “heroic journey,” like talismans made to order and herbs that stimulated courage and mini-books with personalized advice based on one’s horoscope. “Chaos-Tamers” were also for sale. They were magic spells designed to help people manage the messes that crop up in one’s everyday routine while pursuing a heroic quest. Given the current astrological omens, Pisces, you would benefit from a place that sold items like these. Since none exists, do the next best thing: aggressively drum up all the help and inspiration you need. You can and should be well-supported as you follow your dreams on your hero’s journey.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

NOV E M BE R 29 - DECEMBE R 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

TAURUS (April 20–May 20) You were born with

BY ROB BREZSNY

27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN |

ANIMAL HEALING ARTS

FREE WILL


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November 29-December 5, 2017

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November 29-December 5, 2017