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INSIDE 2018 BEST OF BALLOTS

SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | NOVEMBER 1-7, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.26

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FIRE A Q&A WITH FIRE EXPERT STEPHEN J. PYNE ABOUT THE NORTHERN CALIFORNIA FIRES AND HOW TO PREPARE FOR THE NEXT ONES P15 DONATE TO HELP

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GREENBELTS AND THE FIRES P8 NAPA VALLEY FILM FEST P24 FIRE BENEFIT P28


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Destination: All in.

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2017 Metrosa Inc.

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THANK YOU personnel, volunteers, and other members of our community and beyond who are working hard to protect and care for our families, friends and neighbors. Our hearts and thoughts go out to all We wish for safety, comfort and peace to you and your loved ones. The outpouring of love and compassion we have witnessed has made us prouder than ever to call Sonoma County home. We are a resilient community, and we will work together to recover and rebuild. -With love from the Lavish family

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‘The bad news is, we’ve seen this over and over again.’ COV E R STO RY P 1 5 Greenbelts and the Fires TH E PA PE R P8

Fire Expert Stephen J. Pyne: Q&A COVE R STO RY P1 5

Local Theaters Soldier On STAG E P26 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p12 Swirl p14 Cover Feature p15

Culture Crush p23 Arts & Ideas p24 Stage p26 Film p27 Music p28

Clubs & Concerts p29 Arts & Events p33 The Nugget p38 Classified p39 Astrology p39


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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

On Air with KSRO As a Sonoma County resident, I deeply appreciate the exceptional contributions of the staff of KSRO radio during the recent fires as reported by Stett Holbrook in “Dialed In” (Oct. 25). At the same time, I deeply regret the lack of mention of the equivalent aid provided by staff and volunteers of KBBF, the oldest bilingual station in the country. Like contributors to KSRO, our staff

and volunteers were on the air night and day throughout the duration of the crisis. It isn’t just that we provide a public service to Sonoma County’s large Spanish-speaking population; we serve a population, many members of which lack internet access and lack the sophisticated skills in English necessary to understand complex directions about evacuation and the like when under the stress of advancing flames. We are a unique source of information for them. KBBF served valiantly as the sole source of information and communication

THIS MODERN WORLD

for this large portion of our county’s population, undoubtedly saving lives and providing access to needed services and thus deserves equal recognition for its contribution to our mutual welfare.

ALBERT WAHRHAFTIG

Member KBBF board of directors, Sebastopol

Thank you, Bohemian, for your gripping article on KSRO’s anchoring of the fire reporting. My husband and I were tuned

By Tom Tomorrow

in to KSRO for most of this crisis (even though we live adjacent to the fairgrounds, with a rotation of thousands of firefighters camped out in our back yard). We have many opportunities for gratitude. First responders from Sonoma and Napa counties; Sheriff Giordano and the daily, no-nonsense media briefings from multiple agencies; PG&E crews; fire and police crews from the Western U.S., the greater U.S. and the world. Shout out to Pete, a water tank crewman, and the responders from Oregon sleeping in the fairgrounds field, as well as firefighters from Lassen, San Mateo and Menlo Park. These are just the folks we met personally. It may be your job, but it was our homes you were working to protect. KSRO staffers, when the thanks are going around, please understand that we were desperate to know what was happening, and we turned to you. You more than rose to the call of disaster. All of you—Pat, Mike, Michelle, Heather, Alex, the Steves and others behind the scenes. We deeply appreciate the dedication you showed to your listeners, which has strengthened our community. Thanks for going behind the scenes to laud your colleagues, Stett Holbrook. Boundless gratitude.

ELLEN SKAGERBERG Santa Rosa

Great article! KSRO deserves all this praise and more. They literally saved lives. Outstanding professionalism and stunning humanity. I know I was just one of many residents that relied on KSRO during the darkest hours of the storm and absorbed strength and hope through the KSRO radio waves. Thanks to all at KSRO!

MONICA

Via Facebook

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Emergency to Emergence In wake of the fires, now is the time to create lasting change BY JUDITH IAM

L

ast month’s fires present us an opportunity for real transformation rather than minor, piecemeal change. We need to change on every level.

It’s time to break the pattern. Painful as it is, homes lost in the fire were temporary housing, but the-build-and-burn cycle can stop here. Building for a thousand years, as in Europe, is well within our capability, if we’re not stopped by building-material-supplier lobbyists and antiquated code restrictions. It’s time to go from wood-framed homes (built the same way for centuries) with highly flammable oil-composition roofs, to healthy mineraled cement and 3D-printed homes. Earthquakes are not an if but a when, and naturally resilient materials and forms can survive quakes, fires, storms and floods. A 3D-printed house can be created in a few days at about $34 per square foot. And they are available now. Earthbag, cob and magnesium-based-cement homes sequester carbon and actually support our health. Look them up. We need to move from unnecessarily large to smaller, better designed homes. We must transition from “boxes” to more rounded and organic shapes that are more beautiful and far more able to withstand the elements. Let’s replace fire-vulnerable wood fences with masonry structures. From water wastage to water wisdom, we need to rethink our infrastructure systems. Graywater is not only good for plants, it’s a fire deterrent too. We need energy-neutral and carbon-sequestering buildings, as well, along with more gardens. Living in intentional communities offers resiliency from natural and manmade disasters through healthy social relations that will help us evolve from isolated units back into a community. We must go from construction on scraped, decimated land, to being respectful inhabitants and stewards of the natural world. None of these changes is “up to code”; they are beyond code. For decades, we’ve been precluded from progress by varying elements of the status quo. We know how to do this. “Code” is largely legislated lobbying by the building materials and insurance industries. Let’s use the disastrous fires to welcome a new, better world. Judith Iam is a longtime Sonoma County resident, teacher, producer and community builder. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

between developed areas which comprise the urban growth boundary. It would be a “huge leap to say that the community separator or urban growth boundary could have prevented [the fires],” Shore says. “On the other hand, it could have been worse if we had built more outside of the city boundaries.” In other words, the regional UGBs may have played a role in the fires akin to the “chicken soup rule” when you’re sick: in the event of a catastrophic fire, UGBs can’t hurt, and they might even help limit the damage to property.

‘There is an opportunity to talk about how we should rebuild.’

ALL GONE The devastation of the North Bay fires puts the efficacy of urban growth boundaries in a new light.

Blazing Speed

Urban growth boundaries up for a vote as post-fire rebuild plans come into focus BY TOM GOGOLA

I

t would be inaccurate to say that the firelimiting qualities of so-called urban growth boundaries and community separators were vindicated in the North Bay fires.

After all, as Teri Shore notes, the catastrophic Tubbs fire swept through the Fountaingrove neighborhood, crossed the

community separator there, jumped into Santa Rosa’s urban growth boundary (UGB) and then burned it up. Shore, regional director at the Greenbelt Alliance, has embraced UGBs and community separators. Urban growth boundaries took root decades ago in places like San Jose, Boulder, Colo., and Sonoma County as part of a new urbanism vernacular of “livable

cities,” “walkable cities,” “resilient cities” and other sobriquets to indicate a civic emphasis on high-density development in order to keep the surrounding lands pristine in their agricultural and biodiverse glory—as they set out to reduce sprawl, not for fire protection per se, but to save farms and communities and local cultures. The community separators indicate the area

“We’re thinking through it,” says Shore of the relationship between preventing fires and the rebuilding path forward, and the role of greenbelts in the rebuild. “I don’t know if there’s a correlation,” she says, “but clearly keeping our growth within the town and cities, instead of sprawling out, potentially reduces the impact from wildfires.” The subject of UBGs comes up for a vote next week as Windsor and Novato go to the polls Nov. 8 to extend the duration of their already-established local urban growth boundaries. Coming on the heels of the catastrophic fires, which only this week were fully contained, the votes in Windsor and Novato (Measure H and Measure D, respectively) are expected to pass with wide margins, but they raise questions about role of UGBs moving forward. Now that the fires are all but out, reconstruction ) 10


9

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I was studying pre-Med in college, in hopes of becoming a medical doctor. Things were looking up, and life was good, until things took a turn for the worse. I began to have terrible back and stomach problems. For a young guy, I felt pretty rotten. My back hurt so badly that I had a hard time even concentrating in class. I was miserable. The medical doctors tried different drugs, but they only made me feel like I was in a “cloud.” I was just not getting better.

A friend of mine convinced me to give a chiropractor a try. The adjustment didn’t hurt, it actually felt good. I got relief, and I soon was off all medication. It worked so well that I decided, then and there, to become a chiropractor myself. Now for my kids, Hayden and Henry. They have been under chiropractic care their entire lives. And, unlike most other kids in their class, they never get the “common” childhood illnesses like ear infections, asthma and allergies. In fact, they have never taken a drug in their lives. And they are now 19 and 21!

It’s strange how life is, because now people come to see me with their back problems and stomach problems. They come to me with their headaches, migraines, chronic pain, neck pain, shoulder/arm pain, whiplash from car accidents, asthma, allergies, numbness in limbs, athletic injuries, just to name a few. If drugs make people well, then those who take the most should be the healthiest, but that simply isn’t the case. With chiropractic we don’t add anything to the body or take

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Dear Friend, I wanted to let everyone know what happened while I was in college. It was a moment that changed my life forever. But before I tell you about my experience, I wanted to tell you my story from the start. Let me start by explaining the photo in this letter, I’m the guy in the middle, Dr. Taatjes. You know when I meet people in town and they usually say, “Oh yeah, I know you, you’re Dr. Taatjes. You’ve been in Petaluma for years…” Well, that’s me.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10 Rebuild ( 8 and development will soon move into the foreground. Last week saw the emergence of Rebuild North Bay, a public-private coalition that aims to create “a comprehensive plan for recovery and rebuilding.” It’s headed by Clinton-era Federal Emergency Management Agency director James Witt. In very short order, Rebuild North Bay has found ample support in the local political, media and business class. That’s not a big surprise. Darius Anderson has taken a leading role in the organization’s creation. Anderson is a Democratic lobbyist, managing partner of the Sonoma Media Group, which owns the Press Democrat, and a real-estate investor through his Kenwood Investments California Opportunity Fund. Urban growth boundaries are designed to protect against unfettered urban sprawl and keep overzealous real estate development at bay. The knock on the popular UGBs is that by limiting growth within highdensity urban zones, they set the stage for exactly the sort of dilemma that Santa Rosa and Sonoma County faced before the fires, and which has now become wildly exacerbated with the destruction of thousands of homes and other structures: housing is scarce and the rent is too high. That’s no reason to dispense with the UGBs, say advocates of the anti-sprawl measures, but rather an opportunity to further leverage their benefits. “Overall, we want to maintain these policies, especially as we move forward and rebuild,” Shore says. The UGBs have done their job in limiting sprawl, which is one reason why the Greenbelt Alliance is endorsing the two votes next week. The unfolding parameters of the regional rebuilding process has itself raised questions of its own about an incipient regional “rush to rebuild” without ample pause to reflect on 21st-century best practices in urban planning

PICK UP THE PACE Rebuild North Bay is set to hit the ground running, with support from local politicians, business leaders and recovery agencies.

or what new best practices might emerge after a raging fire destroyed entire neighborhoods within the Santa Rosa UGB. The Sonoma County Board of Supervisors and the Santa Rosa City Council have both pushed out emergency ordinances to expedite the cleanup and find short-term housing options for displaced citizens. “Elected leaders are trying to move quickly to allow people who were immediately impacted to rebuild,” Shore says, “and we totally support that.” She says she takes comfort that as the rebuilding imperative gathers momentum, no one is talking about building in greenbelts. As the flames are at last extinguished, the dominant message from civic leaders and the Press Democrat editorial board has been a defiant “Sonoma Strong” posture that says, in effect: We’re going to rebuild, we want to make it easy for people to rebuild, and we’re going to come back stronger. But that position has so far glossed over any questions

about whether certain parts of town should be rebuilt—i.e., Fountaingrove—and what, exactly, it means to “come back stronger.” As that debate unfolds, Rebuild North Bay has emerged as the go-to organization to lead the charge, as highlighted in a supportive Press Democrat editorial last week that championed Witt as it warned against unspecified “infighting” that might stymie Rebuild’s sudden and self-ascribed mandate as top recovery dog in town. A press conference last week announcing the effort was highlighted by comments from U.S. Congressman Mike Thompson, State Sen. Bill Dodd and Sonoma County Supervisor David Rabbitt, who all embraced the organization and the public-private nonprofit arrangement now forged between local business interests and federal and state disaster-aid and recovery agencies. The blue-dog Democrat Thompson tweeted his approval of Rebuild North Bay’s selection of James Witt to lead the organization. “No one I’d rather

have lead this organization & help us rebuild,” tweeted Thompson on Oct. 26. At a press conference announcing its creation, Dodd said he was “all in” on Rebuild North Bay. Everyone thanked Anderson for his key role in the creation of Rebuild North Bay. There is an urgency to the recovery, says Shore. “They don’t want people to leave Santa Rosa or Sonoma, that’s the message now. But there’s an opportunity,” she adds, “to talk about how we rebuild.” Another new urbanist conceit emphasizes transportationoriented development. This notion amplified the argument in favor of a build-out of the Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit some 10 years ago. At the time, SMART was a big idea whose time had come. What’s the smart move now? “You could see [the fire disaster] as an opportunity that goes beyond rebuilding what we lost,” Shore says, “but that also triggers the next phase of smart growth, now that we have the trains running.”


11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Annual Food & Funds Drive The devastating fires in our region have resulted in an increased need for food and nutrition assistance in our community. The Redwood Empire Food Bank needs your help. Please, give generously.

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Dining BONEHEADED Forget the dogs. Save those bones for yourself and make a nourishing meal in a bowl.

Bone Soup

Good for Halloween, and all year long

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ot only is bone soup good for you, but learning how to make the stock will take your cooking to new levels.

Bones contain a diverse cocktail of nutrients that become available as they cook. After a few hours of heat, the tendon, cartilage and other pieces of connective tissue begin to melt into collagen, gelatin and other base proteins that are hard to get from non-

animal sources. Just ask any vegetarian Jello lover. Those melted connective tissues are good for our own connective tissues, helping them rebuild after a tough session, which is one reason bone soup is considered a great recovery drink for athletes. Many prefer to cook their bones even longer, in order to extract minerals like calcium. A common practice is to add a tablespoon of vinegar to the bones to enhance mineral leaching.

BY ARI LEVAUX In order to get rid of some fat (and perhaps save it for other uses later), the first step is to roast the bones in the oven. This not only melts a lot of fat, but also adds browned favor. I’ll sprinkle them with salt and garlic powder and bake at 350 degrees, turning when necessary until the pieces develop a nice dry brown all around. When fat has melted off and everything is brown, allow to cool. Then transfer the bones to your cooking pot. Whole birds can be cooked into

a broth in much the same way. Bake at 300 degrees until fully cooked; after it cools, fish the bones out of the meat and skin and proceed with the extracted bones, reserving the meat for later. Or do the same with a rotisserie chicken, and proceed. Next, simmer the bones on the stovetop for about six hours on low to medium heat. Strain the bones and let the stock cool slowly to room temperature, then put it in the fridge. (I prefer to use the Instant Pot, a multifunction electric cooker that has all kinds of functions. I pressure-cook the bones for 60 minutes of high pressure, and let the unit cool until the pressure drops and the lid will open.) After it cools completely, the solid fat can easily be removed. When making a soup of chicken, duck or beef bones, I will leave an amount of fat that I think will taste good with what I’ll be serving. When in doubt, take it out; you can always add the fat back later when the soup is cooking. If I’m making stock to freeze, I’ll skim all the fat out. To make a general stock or broth, add aromatic veggies like carrots, celery and onion, and cook at a gentle simmer for an hour or two. You can dress it up at serving time. Start with salt or soy sauce. If it needs fat, and you don’t have any skimmed fat reserved from earlier, use a good olive oil. Hot sauces can be added, along with cilantro, parsley, sliced peppers, raw onions and lemongrass, grated ginger and garlic, and a dusting of black pepper. Dress it up in different ways, adding noodles or sopping it up with bread. You have all winter, and the rest of your life, to perfect your bone soup. Once you get the hang of it, all the research becomes quite edible.


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Still Here Wine country’s next fight is against perception BY JAMES KNIGHT

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he problem with the so-called wine country fires isn’t just that the phrase is so awkward for many locals. For businesses in Sonoma County and Napa Valley Wine Country, it’s that the next thing that might occur to those outside of the area is, “Oh no—wine country just burned up!”

“I think the perception out there is that Napa Valley was completely destroyed,” says Shane Soldinger, general manager at Silver Trident Winery, of the many phone calls, texts and emails the winery received from wine club members

and personal contacts across the country. “I think that people are really relieved to find out that the majority of Napa Valley dodged a bullet.” Wineries as far away from the fires as Fort Ross-Seaview soon felt it necessary to send reassuring emails telling customers that, yes, the winery is still standing and, yes, the vineyards are fine. That people feared the worst is no surprise, given media reports like this CBS news spot: A reporter stands amidst smoking ruins off Old Redwood Highway in the path of the Tubbs fire, mentions California’s $58 billion wine industry, and says, “And now some of that could go up in smoke.” After the video cuts to a flyover of Coffey Park devastation that looks like—well, you know what it looks like—the reporter intones, “Also destroyed, huge expanses of vineyards.” Now, to the viewer, “some” looks like “most.” “There is a perception,” says Tim Zahner, chief operating officer at Sonoma County Tourism, “and it’s a perception not bound in reality—but it’s understandable— that Sonoma County wine country is completely burnt and it’s completely gone.” That’s particularly so among people who don’t know the area well and are getting their news from television. Awful as the experience was for everyone here, Zahner notes, locals have processed—or attempted to process—the arc of events from catastrophe toward recovery. “But the people who are just watching it in their living room,” says Zahner, “for them, the camera didn’t swing the other way.” The tourism office is now tasked with reminding out-of-towners that the county is still here, and would be very pleased to have their business. “What also happened is 90 percent of the county did not burn and over 400 wineries are open to the public.” At Silver Trident, Soldinger takes the long view, noting that parts of French wine country have seen some godawful stuff—bubonic plague, trench warfare—yet managed to carry on and bottle another vintage. “It was real history we just lived through.”


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Stephen J. Pyne Amid tragedy and destruction, Northern California’s fires present an opportunity

S

tephen J. Pyne is a regents professor in the school of Life Studies at Arizona State University, and one of America’s foremost experts on fire and fire history. He is the author of more than 30 books, including Between Two Fires: A Fire History of Contemporary America and Fire in America: A Cultural History of Wildland and Rural Fire, which won the Forest History Society’s best book award. He has twice been awarded National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, twice been a fellow at the National Humanities Center and received a MacArthur fellowship. Before his academic career, Pyne worked for the forest fire crew on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon for 15 seasons. I spoke to him Oct. 27 about the lessons of Northern California’s fires and the opportunities that lie ahead. We have to act quickly, he says. “There is a political ecology to fires, and it’s the same as slash-and-burn agriculture,” he told me. “That is to say, you can plant successfully in the ash, but if you wait a year, you probably can’t. And if you wait two years, the weeds have taken over and you have to start it again. You have essentially six to 12 months, or the opportunity is gone.” —Stett Holbrook

FIRE SCHOLAR Stephen J. Pyne casts a historical eye on last month’s fires,

and offers a road map to preventing future disasters.

) 16

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Q&A with


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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THE SAME, BUT WORSE Pyne says last month’s fires are nothing new, but rather the intensification of a trend that started in California after WWII.

Stephen Pyne ( 15 What struck you most about Northern California’s fires?

There were three things that really caught my interest. One, of course, is the scale of damage. This is double the housing loss from the Oakland fire [of 1991], which most people had considered the upper limit of what was possible. And the loss of life—we haven’t seen this scale of loss of life for more than a century. The second thing is what we might call the collateral damage of fire: smoke. Smoke has been of growing interest internationally for many years. And for the last couple of years, it’s really gotten around in the fire community that smoke is more than just an inevitable side effect; it’s a public health issue. It’s more than just a seasonal nuisance. It’s not something that just affects rural

or semi-rural communities. It really is a major issue. The third is the likely cause, which seems to be power lines. When I first heard of this whole bust of fires, I thought, “This is the signature of an electrical storm. This is what you have with lightning storms.” It’s not confirmed, but it’s looking like this was an electrical storm—but one of our own making, with power lines. Power line fires are becoming a major threat. They have been an issue in Southern California for a long time and in other places. We are starting to see power lines failing, sparking, trees falling on them. It’s really insidious because the fires start under the absolute worst conditions: high, dry winds. The liability issues are just going to go through the roof here. Have we entered a new era of fire in California?

I don’t think we’ve entered a new

era. In some ways it’s the same era. The “California style” of fire escalated after the World War II housing boom. This is more of the same. What we’re seeing is a ratcheting up of the damages. Climate change is probably contributing here, but we can’t just lay all of this on climate change. That’s just a way of evading all the social decisions we’ve made about how we live and where we build. Fire integrates all these things. It’s good news, bad news. It’s good news that it’s not something new. The bad news is we’ve seen this over and over again. It’s getting worse. It’s intensifying. What are the lessons from the Oakland fire?

That was a real stunner. The United States had not had an urban conflagration since it happened across the bay in 1906. These things don’t happen anymore, and so why was it

happening here? A lot of the attention went to Oakland as a kind of troubled municipality. In many ways, that was just a manifestation of its various pathologies, and it doesn’t really generalize [to other fires]. This was not the advent of something new. It’s just a peculiar thing. It was a horrific event. Startling. But for most people, it did not generalize. But I think with what we’re seeing now maybe with Santa Rosa, I think it will [generalize], particularly if you pair it with Gatlinburg, Tenn., or the big fires in Texas in 2011 and others. These fires were for a long time a California quirk, something only happening on the Left Coast. And it really didn’t have anything to do with the rest of the county. And that’s not true now. It’s becoming a national narrative. It’s all over the West. I think what we’re seeing now is the fires are going where the houses are. At that point, it’s a national story.


How did the Oakland fire change fire policy—or not?

How has Cal Fire’s role changed in California?

Cal Fire was originally a board of forestry. And then it was a department of forestry. And then it was a division of forestry and fire protection. And now it’s just Cal Fire. It’s a suppression organization, it’s an urban firefighting service in the woods. They’re really good at doing that. But the way you controlled fires historically in cities was not just by having more hydrants and fire engines; it was building codes and by zoning and building fire protection into the cityscape. And when you convert what are basically land-management agencies or fire agencies that had responsibility for managing that larger land, when you turn them into only a firefighting system, you lose control over the countryside. And that’s where fire derives its power. The power of fire comes from the power to spread. And the power to spread

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There were some lessons from not just Oakland but the growing number of these fires in Southern California and elsewhere. The state had moved to map high-risk areas and put in some general zoning and coding requirements, but clearly they were inadequate. The problem is people really hate to be told what they can and can’t do on their property or with their house. They want to build what they want to build the way they want to build it. But fire is a contagion phenomenon. Your neighbor’s house is a threat to you. Fire is not libertarian; it’s communal. It integrates its surroundings. We can’t all go off on our own. I don’t know if many changes were made, and even if they were, they only apply to new construction. What about 40 or 50 years of bad construction? You’re talking about a trilliondollar retrofit. That’s not going to happen. It’s a social problem, but at some point, you may just have to crack the whip. Not doing these things is like not vaccinating anymore.

resides in the countryside. The way you control is to take away some of the power so it doesn’t blow up on you. So every time we have one of these big fires, the natural response is we’ve got to protect our people, and we’ve got to protect these houses from being burnt. And we do, absolutely. But that tends to come at the expense of everything else. What about the other sides of this? What is the best defense against fire in a place like Santa Rosa?

There has been a national effort mandated by an act of Congress in 2009 called the Flame Act that aimed to fix fire funding at the federal level. It didn’t work because Congress never put in the money the act required. It did require fire agencies to create something called [the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy]. There’s no money behind this, but they came up with a three-part strategy and it’s pretty sound. You need to adapt it locally, but one part was to build “fire-adapted communities.” Many, many of our communities outside of New England are in fire-prone areas and can burn, and we need to accept that fact and build our cities and build our suburbs with that expectation in mind. This is a chance to rethink what fire means in those communities and to accept that urban conflagrations are now back. It’s like measles or polio coming back. We thought we’d fixed that. But they’re back, and we’ve got to start to do the things that took the plague out of these places in the past. We need to harden our cities and redesign them. The second part was “fireresilient landscapes” and to think about ways of putting these landscapes into forms that can burn without doing the kinds of damage that we see, and to burn in ways where we have a possibility of containing them and allowing these ecosystems to survive fire, because they are getting fires that are outside their evolutionary experience. The third part is to build your capability. That’s your workforce, your equipment ) 18

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Stephen Pyne ( 17

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What kind of political will is necessary to undertake this kind of nuanced approach?

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What eco-friendly measure can be undertaken to prevent fire in wildlands?

There are a whole lot of things we can do in wildlands, short of paving it or clear-cutting or just nuking the place. We don’t have to. You can let it burn. You don’t have to keep fire out. You just don’t want fires of the sort that are really going to be beyond our control and a threat. Places that used to have surface fires are now overgrown with woody shrubs and young trees, and fires are responding and behaving differently. We can thin those out. It’s a kind of woody weeding. It’s not logging. Logging is not a surrogate for fire. When you log, you take the big stuff and leave the little. Fire burns the little stuff and leaves the big. There may be a place for some prescribed grazing, say, after really heavy rains when you’ve got extra grass, maybe you bring in some grazing animals and let them knock that down. Mowing is an option. Greenbelts would be a great option as a way of stepping down from a wildland setting. And burning, prescribed fire. You can substitute your fires for wildfires. You have fires of choice rather than fires of chance. There are lots of things to do. It really varies by site, but you don’t have to strip it raw or pave it over.

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and all the stuff you need to apply it. That’s what generally gets the attention. “We’ll get more engines. We make more air tankers. We want to see those helicopters up there.” If you don’t do the other stuff, you’re in fire’s cycle. You’re just playing whack-a-mole. It’s just coming back at you.

Sonoma County

The problem will be defined as a matter of public safety—it is a matter of public safety. A lot of lives were lost, property burned up. Lives were disrupted. I imagine you’ve got an internal

refugee problem. Where are these people going to go? What do they do? That is going to dominate the discussion, as it should up front. But we should have this second discussion that goes back and echoes the National Cohesive Strategy and do the fundamentals and recognize cities can burn in ways we had not imagined. Have that discussion, and now you’re getting something, now the different pieces are interacting in a positive way. Otherwise you just build up the suppression and you’re going to have another blowup like this. Even if your firefighting force had been doubled, would that have made a difference in those first few hours? No. You’d have to have the fire equivalent of a police state. That can’t solve it. What opportunities do the fires present?

California is specially placed to make a difference. The National Cohesive Strategy is worth taking as a frame and then operating within it. The state of Utah enacted that into law. I would have never predicted Utah of all places to do that. They have accepted we need to do all of it. If California were to do that in a serious way, it doesn’t necessarily mean tons of money; it means modifying the state fire plan so everything is not stripped to fight a fire in Southern California when they need to be doing burning in Northern California. It means reassessing what you can realistically do and getting a better balance between them. If California were to do that, it would affect the whole country. California is a huge presence nationwide in fire. That would be the hope. There really is an opportunity to step back and not overturn the system, but move the parts and give better balance so that we can really turn this into a virtuous cycle. Right now, we’re in a vicious cycle. We build up more suppression and the fires get worse, the damages increase. Nothing is going to change that if we keep doing the same stuff.


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The Bohemian Best of 2018

Readers Poll

Vote online at bohemian.com (mailed ballots will not be counted)

clothing boutiques to music venues and distilleries to outdoor dining. In our ongoing effort to capture the North Bay in all its manifold greatness, we’ve expanded our poll with more than three dozen new categories. So please think about what makes the North Bay special and vote. We’ll add it up and share the results with all of you in our biggest issue of the year March 21,2018.

A few online voting rules:

Important! Check one of the following.

☐ ☐ ☐ ☐ ☐

Complete at least 20 votes of the ballot for inclusion in the poll

My selections are for:

Only 20 votes per IP address

☐ Sonoma County ☐ Napa County

Bohemian staff members, contributors, advertisers and their families may vote

First Place Winners will be chosen

Deadline for online ballots is December 31, 2017

Keep your votes to locally owned businesses!

Include your name and a daytime phone number Ballots are confidential, but you may be called to confirm your vote

Art & Culture Best Art Gallery Best Ballet Company Best Band Best Charity Event Best Cover Band Best Dance Studio Best Festival Best Film Festival Best Indy Filmmaker Best Media Personality: TV, Radio, Print Best Movie Theater Best Museum Best Music Festival Best Music Venue Best Outdoor Art Event Best Outdoor Music Festival Best Outdoor Music Venue Best Performing Arts Center Best Performing Dance Company Best Place to Dance Best Theater Troupe Best Videographer

Recreation

Best Bike Route/Trail Best Bike Shop Best Boating Company Best Cycling Event Best Gym Best Health Club

Best Hiking Trail Best Horse Back Riding Best Hot Air Balloon Company Best Martial Arts School Best Outdoor Adventure Tour Best Park Best Personal Trainer Best Pilates Studio Best Skate Shop Best Sports Fishing Charter Company Best Surf Shop Best Swimming Pool Best Water Sports Company Best Yoga Studio

Food & Drink Best Bakery Best Bar Best Bartender Best BBQ Best Bourbon Best Breakfast Best Brew Pub Best Brunch Best Burger Best Business Lunch Best Butcher Shop Best Cabernet Best Cafe⁄Coffeehouse Best Caterer Best Chardonnay

NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

We love the North Bay. You love the North Bay. That’s all good, but we want to know just what makes our corner of the world the special place it is. Is it the scenery? The food? The beer? The great bike shops? Yes, but which beers? Which bike shops? To find out, each year we turn to you our readers to name names and vote for your favorite people, places and things in our annual Best Of poll that covers everything from vintage

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN |

NEW RIES CATEgo


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Best Cheese Shop Best Chef Best Chinese Best Chocolatier Best Cider Best Cocktails Best Craft Brew Event Best CSA (community supported agriculture) Best Diner Best Dining After 10pm Best Dive Bar Best Emerging Winery (less than 1 year) Best Farmers Market (specify location) Best Food Producer Best French Best Frozen Yogurt Best Gin Best Gluten-Free Menu Option Best Happy Hour Best Ice Cream Best Indian (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Italian Best Japanese/Sushi Best Latin American Best Local Coffee Roaster Best Locally Made Food Product Best Mediterranean (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Mexican (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Micro Distillery Best Microbrew Best New Restaurant Best Outdoor Dining Best Pinot Noir Best Pizza Best Port Best Restaurant Best Restaurant with a View Best Rosé Wine Best Rum Best Sandwich Shop Best Sauvignon Blanc Best Seafood Best Server⁄Restaurant Best Sommelier Best Sparkling Wine Best Spot to Dine Solo Best Syrah Best Tea Shop⁄Cafe Best Thai (must specify town & complete biz name) Best Vegetarian Best Vietnamese Best Vodka Best Whiskey Best Wine List Best Wine Made From Sustainably Grown Grapes Best Winemaker Best Winery Event Best Winetasting Room Best Zinfandel

Family

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Best Baby Gift Store Best Birthday Party Place Best Children’s Clothing Store Best Children’s Consignment Store Best Children’s Educational Center Best Children’s Indoor Sports Center Best Children’s Museum Best Dog Obedience School Best Dog Park Best Doggie Day Care Best Kennel Best Pet Boutique Best Pet⁄Feed Store Best Private School Best Public School Best Summer Day Camp Best Toy Store Best Veterinary Services

Home Improvement

Best Appliance Repair Best Architect Best Carpet Cleaning Best Carpeting⁄Flooring Best Cleaning Service Best Contractor (Commercial) Best Contractor (Residential) Best Deck & Fencing Best Electrician Best Hauling Best Home Furnishings Best Home Improvement Store Best Home Organizer Best Kitchen⁄Bath Remodeler Best Landscape Design Company Best Locksmith Best Moving & Storage Best Nursery⁄Garden Center Best Paint Supplier Best Painting Contractor Best Plumber Best Real Estate Brokerage Best Roofer Best Self-Storage Best Solar Supplier Best Tree Service Best Window Cleaners

Romance

Best Boutique Hotel Best Couples Counseling Best Erotica Store Best Florist Best Lingerie Shop Best Place for Singles to Meet Best Romantic Dinner Best Sex Therapist Best Staycation Best Wedding Caterer Best Wedding Event Planner Best Wedding Photographer Best Wedding Reception Venue

Health & Wellness Best Acupuncturist Best Allergist


Best Attorney—Cannabis Best Cannabis Event Best CBD Product Best Edibles Best Hydroponic Supply Store Best Medical Dispensary Best Mobile Delivery Best Pipe Shop Best Therapeutic Product

Everyday Best Accountant Best Antique Shop Best Art Supply Store Best Attorney—Bankruptcy Best Attorney—Business Best Attorney—Civil Best Attorney—Criminal Best Attorney—Divorce Best Attorney—Intellectual Property Best Attorney—Labor & Employment Best Attorney—Real Estate Best Attorney—Trusts and Estates Best Auto Dealer Best Auto Detailing Best Auto Repair Best Bank—Business Best Bank—Consumer

The End...

Vote online at bohemian.com.

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NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Cannabis

Best Barber Best Body-Art Place Best Bookstore—New Best Bookstore—Used Best Car Audio Best Casino Best Chamber of Commerce Best Church Best Clothing Store—Men’s Best Clothing Store—Women’s Best Comic Book Store Best Costume⁄Festival Apparel Shop Best Credit Union Best Culinary Store Best Day Spa Best Digital Creative Services Best Ethnic Market Best Event Production Services Company Best Eye Lash Extensions and⁄or Brow Enhancements Best Financial Advisor Best Framing Shop Best Full-Service Beauty Salon Best Furniture⁄Home Furnishings Best Gift Shop Best Green Business Best Grocery Store Best Hair Salon Best Home Audio Best Fashion Jewelry Store Best Fine Jewelry Store Best Judge Best Law Firm Best Locally Made Retail Product Best Massage Services Best Minister Best Motorcycle⁄Scooter Shop Best Musical Instruments Store Best Nail Services Best Natural Foods Store Best New Retail Business Best Nonprofit Best Optical Store Best Piercing Specialist Best Psychic Best Record⁄CD Store Best Recycling Center Best Repair (Computer) Best Repair (Phone) Best Resale Store Best Resort & Spa Best Senior Living Facility Best Shoe Store Best Skin Care Spa Best Spray Tan Best Tire Shop Best Transportation (Taxi/Limo) Best Travel Agency Best Vape Shop Best Vintage Clothing Store Best Waxing Studio

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN |

Best Chiropractor Best Dentist Best Dermatologist Best Endodontist Best ER Doctor Best Esthetic Dentist Best Family Practitioner Best General Practice Physician Best Health Care Clinic Best Heart Surgeon Best Holistic Herbal Shop Best Holistic Practitioner Best Internal Medicine Physician Best Laser Surgery Center Best Lasik Eye Surgery Best Local Hospital Best Marriage Family Therapist (MFT) Best Midwife Best OB⁄Gyn Best Oncologist Best Ophthalmologist Best Oral Surgeon Best Orthodontist Best Orthopedic Surgeon Best Pediatrician Best Pharmacy Best Physical Therapist Best Plastic Surgeon Best Psychiatrist Best Psychologist Best Rehabilitation Center Best Spa/Hot Tub Store Best Sports Medicine Specialist Best Urgent Care Center Best Wellness Retreat


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N A PA

Land of Rhythm

Acclaimed guitarist and San Francisco native Dennis Johnson continues to evolve the slide guitar by taking a “rhythm first” approach to songwriting. As bandleader of Dennis Johnson & the Mississippi Ramblers, his infatuation with Delta blues music goes to the next level on his new album, Rhythmland, released in September on Root Tone Records. The nine original tunes and cover of the classic song “Walkin’ Blues” showcase Johnson’s musicianship in several extended improvised jams that sound fresh and lively. Johnson and his ramblers conclude a twomonth tour of the West Coast with a show on Friday, Nov. 3, at Silo’s, 530 Main St., Napa. 8pm. $15–$20. 707.251.5833.

S A N TA R O S A

Art Support

Like many in the community, the curators at Calabi Gallery in Santa Rosa were looking for a way to rebuild and return to normalcy after October’s horrific wildfires. The gallery’s new exhibit, ‘After the Fire,’ aims to do that on an artistic level, with several mini shows including poignant fire imagery by photographer Penny Wolin, a selection of Dia de los Muertos–inspired works and art by immigrant populations and international artists. Ten percent of sales from the show will go to a fire relief fund for Sonoma County artists who suffered losses. “After the Fire” opens with a reception on Saturday, Nov. 4, 456 Tenth St., Santa Rosa. 4pm. Free. 707.781.7070.

SONOMA

Pass the Bar

Now in its 11th year, the popular Sonoma Bar Battle invites the town’s talented bartenders to roll up their sleeves and concoct furiously delicious cocktails. Participants in the big battle don’t know what secret ingredient they must use before the cocktail crafting begins, giving the event a spontaneous and exciting air of competition. In addition to the drinks, several tasting stations are set up and local rockers Train Wreck Junction pump out the jams. All proceeds go to benefit those affected by fires in Sonoma and Napa counties. Go bottom’s up on Saturday, Nov. 4, at Sonoma Veterans Memorial Hall, 126 First St. W., Sonoma. 6pm. $40–$45. sonomabarbattle.com.

P E TA LU M A

Dance Like an Animal

For more than three decades, Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue has annually rehabilitated and released over a thousand sick, injured and orphaned animals. Many of these critters were heavily impacted by the wildfires, meaning that this weekend’s Wild Thang Music Festival is a timely fundraising affair for the organization that is now deeply involved in helping the local wildlife recover from fire-related devastation. North Bay folk, rock and Americana artists like the Easy Leaves and Soul Fuse perform for the crowds, and silent auctions, raffles and more help the animals on Sunday, Nov. 5, at the Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 7pm. $15. All ages. 707.775.6048.

—Charlie Swanson

DAY OF THE DEAD The festive Mexican tradition of Dia de los Muertos is celebrated in Santa Rosa, Sonoma and elsewhere this week. See Events, p35.

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Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Ideas SERIOUSLY Will Ferrell will be honored in a special tribute on Nov. 10.

The Show Goes On Annual Napa Valley Film Festival on track after fires BY CHRISTINA JULIAN

N

early a month after the North Bay wildfires ravaged the land, the Napa Valley Film Festival charges forward as planned.

The decision to carry on was not an easy one, according to cofounders and directors Brenda and Marc Lhormer, who quickly reached out to employees and seasonal staff (many of whom lost homes) to verify their safety.

Next, they assessed the state of screening venues, partner wineries and the overall footprint of the fest to determine the viability of continuing. “A week and a half after the fires began, we called our team together, our masks on, choking back air. We went around the room and asked how everyone was feeling, mentally and physically. We asked every single person, ‘Do you think you can still do this?’ The resounding answer

was, ‘Yes. We want to do it more than ever, so we can be a part of the recovery efforts and make this the most memorable festival yet.’” Realizing they were in a position to assist, the Lhormers are donating 10 percent of all revenues to the Napa Valley Community Foundation Disaster Relief Fund. Presenting sponsor Lexus also stepped up and donated 1,000 tickets to select screenings for those impacted by the fires.

The festival lineup remains unchanged. More than 120 films, Q&As, culinary demos, special events and winetastings are set to take off on Nov. 8 with the openingnight screening of The Upside, starring Nicole Kidman and Bryan Cranston, at the Uptown. The film tells the true story of a Park Avenue billionaire left paralyzed after a hang-gliding accident. With the political climate of the country at a tipping point, there are a bevy of films that strike against the presidential grain. ACORN and the Firestorm tells a moving story about the grassroots organization that played a notable role in the campaign that led to Barack Obama’s landmark victory in 2008. LA 92 dives into the events surrounding the uprising following the Rodney King beating. To further torment the president, there are a string of films featuring strong women and their plights for equality. A Fine Line spotlights San Francisco chef Dominique Crenn, who delves into why only 6 percent of all head chefs and restaurant owners are women. Ella Brennan: Commanding the Table tells the tale of the chef and business woman whose legendary career shaped the culinary scene in New Orleans and launched Emeril Lagasse and Tory McPhail. Fans of the cult classic Thelma and Louise will revel in the documentary Catching Sight of Thelma and Louise, which examines how much (or little) has changed in the way women are treated and perceived. Famed director, writer and producer Nancy Meyers (Something’s Gotta Give, The Intern) will be honored on Thursday, Nov. 9, as part of the Celebrity Tribute night at Lincoln Theater in Yountville. Others being spotlighted include Michael Shannon, Michael Stuhlbarg, Nikki Reed and Ian Somerhalder.


For more info or to claim one of the Lexus free fire-relief tickets, contact or visit the Local Area Assistance Center (LAC) at 2751 Napa Valley Corporate Drive, Napa. nvff.org

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

On Friday, Nov. 10, Will Ferrell will be honored at a special tribute followed by a screening of the actor’s favorite film, Stranger Than Fiction. This year’s fest features more than 19 films from Bay Area filmmakers, actors and locations, including Make It Work: The Idea, about the students of Phillips Elementary in Napa, many of whom are children of immigrants living beneath the poverty line— none of which stopped them from beating 100,000 other kids in an online math competition. The feature Quest, about a 12-year-old graffiti artist, was inspired by the life of its directorwriter, Santiago Rizzo, who rose beyond a violent upbringing, thanks to Bay Area teacher Tim Moellering, who took Rizzo in as a child and changed his life. Copia makes a comeback this year as a screening venue, hosting the gala on Saturday Nov. 11, and serving as home to the Culinary Stage. CIA chefs, filmmakers, and wine and food experts come together for unique sessions including “Let’s Eat Some Bugs Everyone!” which will dissect the latest culinary wave, with filmmakers from The Gateway Bug, who are sure to stir up something original. Celebrities expected to attend this year’s festival include David Arquette, Dennis Quaid, Elijah Wood, Zoey Deutch, Lou Diamond Phillips, Thomas Middleditch, Haley Joel Osment, Jim Rash, Eric Stoltz and Lea Thompson. The NVFF will wrap with a screening of Molly’s Game at the Uptown, which follows the truelife story of Olympic-class skier Molly Bloom who ran the world’s most exclusive high-stakes poker game before being busted. Perhaps the most fitting film of the festival may be Man in the Red Bandana, the story of an unsung hero who rushed people to safety on 9-11 before the South Tower of the World Trade Center collapsed on him.

Help Sonoma and Napa Fire Victims BOHEMIAN’S BURN VICTIMS INITIATIVE Our fund will focus on nonprofits who are caring for burn victims and animals. Rebuild Sonoma was established by the Santa Rosa-based Bohemian weekly newspaper and is administered by the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. It has no administrative overhead and will direct all proceeds to nonprofit organizations helping fire victims recover from fire trauma.

DONATE ONLINE

www.rebuildsonomafund.org


BHS_Boho14_TTC.pdf

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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SHOW STOPPER Flames damaged

many North Bay theaters, but they’re not leaving the stage.

Stage Fright

Santa Rosa theaters suffer financial hit after fires BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

n the early hours of Oct. 9, after word spread that parts of the Luther Burbank Center were on fire, John DeGaetano, artistic director of the LBC’s North Bay Stage Company, could do nothing but wait. When news came, it wasn’t good. Though much of the LBC escaped full destruction, the east end, including the small auditorium NBSC calls home, was a total loss. “The fire got all of our sound and lighting equipment, pretty much everything we’ve been spent years accumulating,” DeGaetano says. Also gone are hundreds of costumes and props stored in a large metal container at the far end of the facility. “There was nothing left of it.” says DeGaetano.

Understandably, the remainder of the company’s season, including its annual Monster Bash and a production of The 1940’s Radio Hour, has been canceled. Meanwhile, nearby Left Edge Theatre managed to escape, although with severe smoke damage. Its planned October run of Bakersfield Mist, and a run of The Santaland Diaries, will still take place, but with altered production schedules. As for the NBSC, DeGaetano says the company had recently announced it was taking a hiatus at the end of this year, in order to devote time to a large collaborative theater project in London. “A lot of people think we were closing up shop, and now most people think we’re done,” says DeGaetano. “But we’re not done. We’re accepting donations to help re-accumulate our equipment. We’re taking some breathing time. But we will be back, serving our community the way we always have.” Not all fire damage is so conspicuous, it turns out. According to Jeff Coté, president of the board at 6th Street Playhouse, the company is in serious financial danger because of the fires. With so many of its regular donors hit directly by the fires, and two of its board members having lost their homes, the company expects to see its contributed income catastrophically slashed. “Not only do we expect contributed income to be down, we feel it’s difficult to even ask local donors for help,” says Coté, who adds that postponing its Oct. 13 opening of Steel Magnolias also took a severe financial toll on the theater. Admitting that the company depends on strong audiences to pay the bills, Coté says the postponement and a cancellation of next month’s drama Two Rooms have left the company in in its worst economic position in years. A fundraising cabaret titled Sonoma Strong: Recovery and Strength Through Song has been scheduled for Nov. 10–12. As for the theater’s upcoming holiday shows, Coté adds, “We need people to come out for White Christmas and Mrs. Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge.”


27 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Film

TO FIGHT THE HORDE Got to wonder how big that line item was for the rights

to use ‘Immigrant Song’ in the latest ‘Thor’ sequel.

Hammer Time

Thor lightens ups BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he idea in Marvel Studios’ sequel Thor: Ragnarok, a comedy of outsized figures punching their frenemies into the next county, is that the God of Thunder (Chris Hemsworth) has been relying too heavily on his invincible hammer, Mjölnar, and his superb head of hair. So of course the former gets smashed and the latter cropped.

In this third installment, Thor’s brother and nemesis Loki (Tom Hiddleston) has spirited away their father, Odin (Anthony Hopkins), king of Asgard, to an old folk’s home on Midgard (Earth). A testy Dr. Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) intervenes. Odin’s daughter, Hela, the god of death (Cate Blanchet), is unloosed. This sooty-eyed Maleficent clone, helmeted with antlers that look like they were designed by Erté, plots to slay the universe; meanwhile, she oppresses the peasantry of Asgard, which we hadn’t really known existed in previous films. Thor: Ragnarok parallels two bad monarchs, as the action switches from Hela’s misrule to the planet of the cruel, fey Grandmaster (Jeff Goldblum, with a goatee of blue paint). He diverts the subjects of his junkyard planet with fights at a million-seat arena; armored like Mars, the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) has been dispatching all comers as a mixedmartial artist. Thor, brought there by a wormhole accident, is caught by a bounty hunter (Tessa Thompson) from his old neighborhood and forced to become a gladiator. Superhero films are best when you have a moment of real fear for the seemingly invincible characters. That doesn’t happen here. Our hero is defiant, even in quiet moments—there’s a fine small scene of the imprisoned Thor chucking pebbles at Loki’s hologram. But director Taika Waititi’s determination to keep it light means that there’s nothing here quite like that moment in The Avengers when it looked as if Tony Stark was about to be marooned in another galaxy. If Hemsworth is tired of playing Thor a fifth time, either he’s showing no evidence of weariness or he’s a better actor than most people say he is. Hemsworth’s stalwartness holds these super-ratpack movies together. ‘Thor: Ragnarok’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.

11/3–11/9

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Starts Fri, June 29th! Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon Mon: NoFri, Shows Tue: (2:50) only DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale Now at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING (12:15 3:30) 7:20 R Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED No 7:20 Wed/Thu: HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

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Band Together Tipping Point fights fire with fire

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BY CHARLIE SWANSON

M

etallica have represented the Bay Area since 1983, and now the heavy metal icons will headline a massive fire relief benefit concert at AT&T Park in San Francisco on Thursday, Nov. 9. The show, dubbed Band Together Bay Area, is hosted by San Francisco–based nonprofit Tipping Point Community. Funds from the event will help lowincome communities recover and rebuild from the North Bay wildfires. Formed in 2005, Tipping Point helps fight poverty in the Bay Area by supporting service organizations working in the areas of housing, education, employment and early childhood development. “There’re just far too many people living in poverty here in a

region where there’s tremendous wealth, and we think that’s got to change,” says Tipping Point founder and CEO Daniel Lurie. “We need to get everybody engaged and involved in giving back.” With a board of directors covering all overhead costs, Tipping Point ensures every dollar donated goes to the community. This month, Tipping Point adds relief work to its to-do list, in response to the North Bay wildfires. “We knew immediately that the members of the community up north most impacted would be low-income individuals and families, and immigrants, both documented and undocumented,” says Lurie. “We wanted to help our neighbors, and we felt like we could bring our experience to support the work going on up there.” Four days after the fires hit, Tipping Point established an emergency relief fund, and Lurie says plans for the upcoming benefit concert began simultaneously. Lurie met with Tipping Point board member and Another Planet Entertainment founder and CEO Gregg Perloff and others from Live Nation to approach artists with Bay Area connections. In addition to Metallica, the bill includes supergroup Dead & Company, featuring Grateful Dead members Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann, Mickey Hart and guitarist John Mayer. Oakland hip-hop star G-Eazy, Berkeley punk group Rancid, platinum-selling songwriter Dave Matthews and Oakland soul man Raphael Saadiq will also perform. Band Together Bay Area is already close to selling out, though Tipping Point is holding the best seats in the house for first responders and those directly affected by the fire. The organization is distributing those tickets to individuals that Lurie says will be honored and appreciated that night. “We wanted to show all our neighbors in the North Bay that the Bay Area’s got your back,” says Lurie. “We’re not going anywhere.” Band Together Bay Area happens on Thursday, Nov. 9, at AT&T Park, San Francisco. 6pm. $69 and up. bandtogetherbayarea.org.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Rainbow Girls

Sonoma County folk trio performs new tunes off their forthcoming album, “American Dream,” with Los Angeles songwriter Sarah Summers opening. Nov 5, 8pm. $10-$25. HopMonk Sonoma, 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Supernatural Soiree

Annual costume and dance party features a silent disco with DJ Mancub and DJ 8Ball, performance by Upside Dance Company and fun revolving around the theme of the subconscious id. Nov 3, 9pm. $50. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Wild Thang Music Festival

Fundraiser for the Sonoma County Wildlife Rescue features the Easy Leaves, John Courage, Josh Windmiller, Foxes in the Henhouse, Misner & Smith, Ashley Allred, Soul Fuse and other special guests. Nov 5, 7pm. $15. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

MARIN COUNTY The Cole Porter Society Salutes Motown

The Society’s annual fundraiser sings in tribute to the Temptations, the Four Tops, Marvin Gaye, the Supremes, Mary Wells, Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson and more. Nov 5, 2pm. $65-$95. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.888.8975.

Floating Records Fall Revue

Telegraph Quartet

Mill Valley Chamber Music Society presents the ensemble in a program featuring works

NAPA COUNTY Dennis Quaid & the Sharks

Hollywood star shows off his guitar skills in the rock ‘n’ roll and country soul band, performing as part of Napa Valley Film Festival, with meet and greet available. Nov 7, 7:30 and 9:45pm. $40 and up. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Wine Country Strong

Festival Napa Valley and Boisset Collection present a concert and chef’s picnic honoring the first responders and emergency workers who served the North Bay during the recent wildfires. Reservations required. Nov 5, 2pm. Free. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. festivalnapavalley.org.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Nov 1, Aqus Blues Jam. Nov 2, Aqus Celtic Music Session. Nov 3, the Rivertown Trio. Nov 4, the Farallons. Nov 8, the Aqus Jazz Project. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Nov 5, 6pm, Rosa Folk Club jam session. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Nov 2, Knox Harrington & the Video Artists. Nov 3, DoRian Mode. Nov 4, Deltaphonic. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern Nov 3, Ricky Ray. Nov 4, Willy and friends. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

Cellars of Sonoma

Nov 4, 2pm, Greg Yoder. Nov

Nov 3, 1pm, Feedback piano with Jerry Green. Nov 3, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. Nov 5, 5pm, Blues and R&B jam session. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Crooked Goat Brewing Nov 4, 3pm, Dom Chi and friends. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

BENEFIT SHOW FOR FIRE VICTIMS

Flamingo Lounge

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Nov 3, Konsept Party Band. Nov 4, Midnight Sun Massive. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

ZOSO

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge Nov 4, Awesome Hotcakes. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

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THE IRON MAIDENS

Nov 2, Richard Neil Kaplan. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

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Nov 3, Mariinsky Orchestra with Valery Gergiev and Denis Matsuev. Nov 4-6, “Exhilarating Journey” with Santa Rosa Symphony and guest conductor Mei-Ann Chen. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

WE ARE CURRENTLY OFFERING DISCOUNTS ON DAY RATES.

Healdsburg Library

Nov 8, 5pm, Ancient Future Duet. 139 Piper St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3772.

OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE

HopMonk Sebastopol

Nov 1, Dumpstaphunk and the Melt. Nov 2, Dia de Los Muertos celebration with Dgiin and Locura. Nov 3, Grateful Bluegrass Boys and the Real Sarah’s. Nov 4, the Bloodstones and DJ Mr Element. Nov 6. 707 Love: fire relief benefit. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Enter to Win Trip for 2 to

HopMonk Sonoma

Nov 3, Paul Cataldo. Nov 4, Erica Sunshine Lee. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

plus film tickets

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Wed, open mic night. Nov 2, dance for justice with DJ Val. Nov 3, the Tahoes. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Nov 1, Nate Lopez. Nov 2, the Gentlemen Soldiers. Nov 3, T Luke & the Tight Suits. Nov 4, the Nickel Slots. Nov 5, the Gypsy Trio. Nov 8, Lisa Marie )

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© Scott DW Smith

Independent label hosts performances by Marble Party, Graham Guest, Jeffrey Halford & the Healers and a fashion show by Mill Valley boutique, 7 on Locust. Nov 4, 8pm. $21$36. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

from Beethoven and more. Nov 5, 5pm. $35/18 and under are free. Mt Tamalpais United Methodist Church, 410 Sycamore Ave, Mill Valley. 415.381.4453.

Coffee Catz

bohemian.com

Saturday, Nov 18, 8pm Marin Center, San Rafael

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

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5, 2pm, Craig Corona. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din ner & A Show

Sat

Nov 4

HEART SPACE PRESENTS

Foxes In The Henhouse 7:30

“Elect to Laugh” Nov 5 Will Durst 7:00

Putting the Mock Back in Democracy

Nov 10

Matt Jaffe &

Rancho The Distractions Debut! 8:00 / No Cover Original Rock & Roll

Nov 11 Illeagles Sat

8:30 OU T ! The Bay Area’s Premier S OL D Eagles Tribute Band

Rancho Debut!

Honeysuckle Rogues o Nov 17 Classic Ranch Country t! Fri

“Speakeasy Supper Club” Featuring the Music of Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Count Basie 8:30

Annual

THANKSGIVING DINNER Thursday, November 23

Fri

An Audio/Visual Transformative Experience DOORS 6:30PM ALL AGES Raven (Healdsburg) HeartSpacePresents.com 707-800-9485 Sat Dec 16 "Specializing in producing benefit

Harrison Stafford (Groundation) concerts for non-profits." & The Professor Crew ROOTS REGGAE 21+ DOORS 9PM $20 ADV/$25 DOS Reel Fish Shop & Grill (Sonoma)

Debu

8:00 / No Cover

Nov 18 Lavay Smith’s Sat

Sun Nov 19

Kitaro's “Kojiki and the Universe”

Sun

Fri

Music ( 29

6th Annual Leftover’s Party Nov 24

The Jerry Hannan Band

8:30 Sat 13th Anniversary Holiday Party 25 Nov Bud E Luv 8:30 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Sun Feb 18

Julian Lage Trio 2018 JAZZ * ALL AGES DOORS 6:30PM $30-$50 Raven (Healdsburg)

Sat FEB 24

English Beat

Johnston and friends. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Nov 4, Damage Inc. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Last Record Store

Sonoma Cider

Nov 4, 2pm, Anthony Presti. 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Nov 3, Sharkmouth. 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Lavish Hi-Fi

Nov 2, Jim Caroompas. Nov 3, the Night Crawlers. Nov 4, Left Coast Syncopators. Nov 5, 5pm, Kerry Daly Band. Nov 5, 8:30pm, Sonoma Blues jam. Nov 6, Brandon Eardley. Nov 7, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

First Thursday of every month, 5:30pm, Music for Enjoyment and Pleasure. 402 Moore Lane, Healdsburg. 707.433.9199.

Local Barrel

Nov 5, 5pm, Joe Clopton. 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433.

Main Street Bistro

Nov 1, Willie Perez. Nov 2, Eric Wiley. Nov 3, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Nov 4, Yancie Taylor. Nov 5, Tumbleweed Soul. Nov 7, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

2018 SKA* ALL AGES DOORS 7:30PM $35 ADV/$38 DOS Raven (Healdsburg)

Murphy’s Irish Pub

HeartSpacePresents.com 707-800-9485 Presenting music that gives hearts the space to heal, connect and be happy!

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room

Nov 3, the Cork Pullers. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Nov 4, 5pm, T Luke & the Tight Suits. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Nov 1, Money Mark and the Mattson 2. Nov 3, acoustic evening with Parachute and Austin Plaine. Nov 4, HIRIE with Nattali Rize and Clear Conscience. Nov 7, Gondwana. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Sat 11⁄4 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $10–-$15 • All Ages

IrieFuse & Native Elements

Benefit for North Bay Fire Victims proceeds to Redwood Credit Union Fire Relief Fund Sun 11⁄5 • Doors 11am ⁄ FREE • All Ages Free Brunch Show with Plage Boys Sun 11⁄5 • Doors 4pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages Free Brunch Show with Sol Horizon Thu 11⁄9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $30–$67 • All Ages

The Phoenix Theater

Nov 3, Standoff with the Earlylight and Mad Elizabeth. Nov 4, the Black Dahlia Murder with the Zenith Passage and Exhumed. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Live Dead ‘69

Fri 11⁄10 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $25–$30 • All Ages

The Abyssinians feat

Bernard Collins

with

Reggae Angels

Sat 11⁄11 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $22–$25 • All Ages

Tal Wilkenfeld

Sun 11⁄12 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $21 • All Ages NorCal Fire Relief Fundraiser with

John Craigie & Paige Clem

HANDY JIM

Thu 11⁄16 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–-$20 • All Ages The Crooked Jades + Rainy Eyes Benefit For North Bay Fire Relief Fri 11⁄17 • 2 Shows • Doors 6:30 & 9:30 $ 32–$37 • All Ages Grammy Award Winning

• carpentry/painting • seismic retrofit • structural work • stucco/concrete • gutter cleaning • roofing

Sat 11⁄18 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $12–-$14 • All Ages Making Movies + Suena Tron

FAR WEST RESTORATION & CONSTRUCTION

Rebirth Brass Band

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

707.280.4891 • FarWestConstr.com Jim Kennedy CA License #751689

Rock Star University House of Rock

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap

Nov 2, 6:30pm, Justin Brown. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Wed, 6pm, open mic session. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Redwood Cafe

Nov 2, Ray Wylie Hubbard. Nov 3, Timothy O’Neil Band. Nov 4, the Soul Section. Nov 5, 5pm, Gypsy Kisses. Nov 6, West Coast Songwriters. Nov 7, Rock Overtime student performance. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Spancky’s Bar

Nov 3, Joose. Nov 4, Ancestors Wrath with Fear the Fiasco and EveryDayFreak. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

19 Broadway Club

Nov 1, Damon LeGall Band. Nov 2, Small Change Romeos. Nov 3, 5:30pm, Danny Montana and friends. Nov 3, 9pm, First Friday reggae with Broken Silence Sound System. Nov 4, 5:30pm, Michael Brown and friends. Nov 4, 9:30pm, Aaron Pearson Band with Guilty Pleasure. Nov 5, 6pm, 19 Broadway Good Time Band. Nov 5, 9pm, Elvis Johnson’s blues jam. Nov 6, open mic. Nov 7, Blues Champions. Nov 8, Soulbillies. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Nov 1, Todos Santos. Nov 2, John Roy. Nov 7, Swing Fever. Nov 8, Ricky Ray. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Nov 2, Country Line Dancing. Nov 3, Michael Capella Band. Nov 4, the Muddy Roses. Nov 6, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Nov 7, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Nov 1, the Weissmen. Nov 2, Fog Swamp. Nov 3, Alpha Rhythm Kings. Nov 4, Barnyard Hammer. Nov 5, Matt Bolton. Nov 6, open mic. Nov 7, the Bad Hombres. Nov 8, the New Sneakers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Whiskey Tip

Rancho Nicasio

Nov 3, the Melt. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Windsor Library

Nov 8, 7pm, Ancient Future Duet. 9291 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.838.1020.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Nov 3, About Face. Nov 4, PaPa’s BaG: A James Brown Experience. Nov 5, Stratify. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Nov 2, Sabor Dominicano. Nov 3, Los Compas del Sabor. Nov 4, DJ party. Nov 5, Banda Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato

Nov 2, Dr Montgomery. Nov 3, Neon Velvet. Nov 4, Lender with Sunhunter and Magic in the Other. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Nov 1, Susan Copperman Quartet. Nov 8, Kelly Peterson Band. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin Country Mart

Nov 5, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with Hobo Paradise.

Nov 4, UndocuFund fire relief with Foxes in the Henhouse. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Nov 3, SwingSet. Nov 4, Charles Wheal Band. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Nov 2, Lau. Nov 3, Doc Kraft & Company. Nov 4, Black Cat Zydeco. Nov 5, 5pm, Julio Bravo & Salsabor. Nov 7, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Nov 2, Ryan Zimmerman. Nov 3, Tracy Sirota. Nov 4, Gramps the Vamp. Nov 5, Bay Station Band. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Spitfire Lounge

First Thursday of every month, the North Bass DJ night. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Nov 2, Mill Valley Friends of Parks and Recreation fundraiser with Mustache Harbor. Nov 4, fire relief benefit


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CRITIC’S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

with IrieFuse and Native Elements. Nov 5, 5pm, Sol Horizon. Nov 6, Crossroads Music School concert. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Nov 1, Free Peoples. Nov 2, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Nov 4, Grant Farm. Nov 5, 12:30pm, Instrument Musical Chairs Brunch. Nov 5, 7:30pm, Midnight North. Nov 7, Kitchen Dwellers with Horseshoes & Hand Grenade. Nov 8, Honky Tonk Blues Night with Koolerator. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Nov 1, noon concert with RossoRose Duo and Ian Scarfe. Nov 3, Sha Sha Higby. Nov 5, 5:30pm, Sunday Sessions with Nathan Bickart. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Nov 1, Jeff Campbell. Nov 4, John Vicino. Nov 8, Vince Costanza. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Nov 3, Latin Nights with DJ Jose Miguel. Nov 4, Divided Heaven with Brian Marquis. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Nov 4, Westerly. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

JaM Cellars

Nov 3, Serf & James. 1460 First St, Napa. 707.265.7577.

Napa Valley Roasting Company

Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeff Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

River Terrace Inn Nov 3, Johnny Smith. Nov 4, Timothy O’Neil. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Nov 2, Delphi Freeman Trio. Nov 3, Dennis Johnson & the Mississippi Ramblers. Nov 4, Chris Cain Blues Band. Nov 8, Mike Greensill with Denise Perrier. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Susie’s Bar

Wed, Open Mic Night with Randy Foisy. 1365 Lincoln St, Calistoga. 707.942.6710.

Kings of the Night Black Dahlia Murder is metal at its heaviest Unrelenting and unapologetic, the Black Dahlia Murder is a band that has defined the modern heavy metal era with seven pummeling albums over the course of 16 years.

Named for the infamous unsolved murder that gripped Los Angeles in 1947, the Michigan-based band regularly charts on the U.S. Billboard 200, peaking as high as 31 with the 2011 album Ritual, a rare feat for a band most often classified as death-metal. Mixing melodic, lightning-fast guitar riffs from founding guitarist Brian Eschbach with the volcanic growls and phantasmal screams of lead vocalist and frontman Trevor Strnad, the Black Dahlia Murder recently unleashed their eighth studio album, Nightbringers, to the universal praise of critics and the band’s legion of fans. Moody and intricate, Nightbringers expressively shifts through several frequencies of extreme metal and sears into the listener’s ear at a breakneck pace over the course of nine nefarious tracks. Currently on a tour that crisscrosses the continent, the Black Dahlia Murder make their only Bay Area appearance with a North Bay concert this weekend hosted by the Sonoma County Metal & Hardcore group and featuring other heavyweight bands like the Zenith Passage, Exhumed and Aberration. The Black Dahlia Murder shreds on Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St., Petaluma. 6pm. $26–$30. 707.762.3565.—Charlie Swanson

Treatment Pro a s o R gr a ta n a m S GET YOUR LIFE BACK! Do you or someone you care about rely on prescription or opioid pain medication or heroin to get through the day? Ask the following questions: • Have they ever given up activities to use them? • Are they spending more time on activities to get them? • Have they ever used them despite negative consequences? If the answer to any of these questions was YES, they may have unintentionally become opioid dependent. Help might be closer than you think.

For more information on opioid dependence and its treatment, please call

707-576-0818 or visit www.srtp.net

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B, Santa Rosa


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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LBC REOPENS MONDAY, NOV. 6 #SONOMASTRONG

New Shows Tickets On Sale Friday, Nov. 3 at 10am!

On Sale Now

Want your tickets early? Become a member! For as little as $75, you can get early notification of new shows and advance purchase opportunities for a full year. Join online at lutherburbankcenter.org/join

Patrons can still purchase tickets online while the Center is closed. Ticket fees for future performances will be waived until the Center reopens on Monday, November 6.

Online Only

SU NDAY, D ECEMBER 17

TUES DAY, JANUARY 23

S AT U R DAY, N OVE MBER 1 1

SUNDAY, NOV EM BER 1 9

THU R SDAY, FEBRUA RY 15

S ATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24

S U NDAY, NOVE MB E R 2 6

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29

707.546.3600 | lutherburbankcenter.org Luther Burbank Center for the Arts gratefully acknowledges generous support from

The Ernest L. & Ruth W. Finley Foundation


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RECEPTIONS

Mon-Fri, noon to 5; Sat-Sun, 10 to 5. 707.579.4452.

Chroma Gallery Nov 2

Dominican University, “Nigel Poor: The San Quentin Project,” archive mapping and typology project displays alongside sculptures by Andrea Bacigalupo. 5pm. 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440.

Nov 3

Arts Guild of Sonoma, “ Zaza Fetterly Solo Show,” arts guild member and sculptor is the featured artist for the month of November. 5pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. Blasted Art Gallery, “Somewhere Else,” installation by Bill Shelley and Chris Beards. 5pm. Art Alley, South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.888.1026. BackStreet Gallery, “The Wise Fool,” Santa Rosa artist Cade Burkhammer’s works, based on the Tarot deck, reflect his feelings on the modern world. 5pm. Behind 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.568.4204.

Nov 4

Artisans’ Co-op, “Artisan’s Co-op Jewelry Showcase,” gallery-wide show and sale features custom designs in various media. Noon. 17175 Bodega Hwy, Bodega. 707.876.9830.

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY Art Museum of Sonoma County Through Nov 26, “Unpacked,” exhibit includes contemporary works from private collections in Sonoma and Napa counties. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Buddha’s Palm Tattoo Gallery Through Nov 1, “Three Artists Collaborate,” prolific Portland artist Sam Roloff teams with Bay Area artists Shawn Webber

Calabi Gallery, “After the Fire,” exhibit features poignant photography by Penny Wolin and a selection of international artwork. 4pm. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. 707.781.7070.

Through Nov 4, “Secret Identities,” exhibit delves into the art of concealment with masks, paintings, drawings, photographs, sculpture and video. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Red Shoes Gallery, “Favorites,” original pastels and more from Riley Street students. 5pm. 1040 Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.592.4949.

Glaser Center

Nov 5

Headlands Center for the Arts, “Fall Project Space Exhibitions,” artists in residence show off their season of works. 4pm. 944 Fort Barry, Sausalito. 415.331.2787.

Nov 7

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, “Inspired by Textures,” multimedia group show is juried by Emily Dvorin and Bonnie Himberg. 5:30pm. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Nov 7

Throckmorton Theatre, “A Break in the Battle,” art installation from Ronie Dalton features large-scale canvas images that depict individual tattoos, quotes and portraits of US soldiers and their families. 5pm. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

and Joseph Paul Lichnovsky on a series of paintings that unites their styles. 313 Main St, Sebastopol. Tues-Wed and FriSat, noon to 8; Sun, noon to 4. 707.829.7256.

Charles M Schulz Museum Through Nov 6, “A Friendship Like Ours,” rediscover enduring duos, from Peppermint Patty and Marcie to Snoopy and Woodstock, featured in “Peanuts” in this exhibition of original comic strips. Nov 8-May 21, “AAUGH! The Language of Peanuts,” explore the familiar expressions and catchphrases found throughout “Peanuts.”2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa.

Through Nov 30, “Unraveling Threads: The Mexican Indigenous Textile Project,” photographic prints highlight Mexican indigenous people, their customs and textiles. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381.

Graton Gallery

Through Nov 5, “Gather,” nature-based mixed-media show features Marylu Downing, Susan Miron, Leslie Zumwalt and others. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Nov 18, “Bill Shelley & Shelley Spira Burns,” dual exhibit features Shelley’s Berlin-inspired drawings and Burns’ geologically informed stone sculptures. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE ARTS & DANCE

November 2-12

MAN

EQUALS

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Events

MAN

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through Nov 19, “Emerging Artists Show,” fourth annual exhibit features high school and college-age artists. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Healdsburg Senior Center

Through Nov 28, “Healdsburg Gems,” several pastel landscape paintings are inspired by the region’s sights. 133 Matheson St, Healdsburg.

History Museum of Sonoma County

Through Nov 30, “Día de Muertos,” exhibition combines traditional and modern takes on the artistic Mexican holiday. Through Nov 5, “Equine Epochs,” exhibit examines the history of horses in Sonoma County. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.579.1500. )

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Nov. 8-12 Who do you think you are? WRONG! A Cabaret-Style Exploration of Identity & War By Bertolt Brecht I Directed by Judy Navas

Tickets $5-$17 I web.sonoma.edu/tix I SSU Theatre Arts

Written by Bertolt Brecht Directed by Judy Navas Translated by Gerhard Nellhaus


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Journey Center

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Through Nov 10, “Imaginary Voyage,” local artist Gerald Huth paints the human figure as a means of expression. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. MonFri, 9 to 5; weekend hours by appointment. 707.578.2121.

Paul Mahder Gallery

Through Nov 5, “Ann Wolff Glass Works,” the artist displays imaginative works in her preferred medium. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

Sebastopol Gallery

Through Nov 26, “Let’s Talk About Trees,” mixed-media art Jeremy Joan Hewes combines photographs and acrylics paintings to depict trees and nature landscapes. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Senior Wing at Finley

Through Nov 6, “Watercolors Squared,” compilation of paintings by four Sonoma County water-media artists display varied interpretations of the world. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown

Through Nov 10, “Migration,” group show exploring the theme of movement displays in 1337 Gallery. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bay Model Visitor Center

432 Aviation Blvd Santa Rosa

707.528.CLUB (2582) www.airportclub.com

Thank you for your continued support! Voted Best Health Club

Through Nov 11, “Perspectives,” Andres Faulkner’s paintings are heavily influenced by Northern California locales. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Community Media Center of Marin

Through Nov 30, “TRANSFRONTERIZA,” photographer John Pike offers a glimpse into the city of Tijuana as guided by members of the transgender community. 819 A St, San Rafael. 415.721.0636.

Desta Art & Tea Gallery

Your Home Away From Home more than a health club…it’s a way of life

cardiovascular & strength training • award-winning 50+ programming • nutrition & weight management • childcare & kids fitness • bootcamp & zumba • massage & salon services basketball & volleyball • racquetball & tennis • pilates & yoga • indoor cycling pickleball • climbing wall • 3 pools • steam room & hot tubs

Through Nov 13, “Predicament or Crossroads,” featuring works by Michael Kerbow, Stephen C Wagner and Robert Cantor that speaks to current affairs. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6. 415.524.8932.

‘THE WISE FOOL’ Tarot-inspired work from Cade Burkhammer debuts in Santa Rosa’s SOFA arts district this week. See Receptions, p33. Gallery Route One

Through Nov 5, “Hungry Ghost,” group show tells stories of longing and resilience, with Linda MacDonald’s paintings of giant redwoods and Steven Hurwitz’s new photographs also on display. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

The Image Flow

Through Nov 22, “Alternative Process Photography Exhibition,” juried exhibition feature 40 artists working with a wide variety of historical and analog photographic printing processes. 401 Miller Ave, Ste A, Mill Valley. 415.388.3569.

St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery Through Nov 9, “Quietly Unsettled,” recent paintings by Vancouver-based artist Ross Penhall stylize forms and exaggerate contrasts. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Napa Valley Museum

Marin Society of Artists

Through Nov 12, “Bittersweet Harvest: The Bracero Program 1942-1964,” bilingual history exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution examines the experiences of Mexican-American manual workers and their families, with a companion exhibit developed by Napa Valley College. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

MarinMOCA

Comedy

Through Nov 4, “Poetry & Music, member art show celebrates the link between the visual and verbal with poems accompanied by artworks. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561. Through Nov 19, “AbstrAction,” juried exhibit pushes the boundaries of abstract art. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. WedFri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

Robert Allen Fine Art

Through Nov 30, “Under, Over & Out,” new works on canvas by Victoria Ryan. 301 Caledonia

Cosmic Comic Swami Beyondananda

Experience mind-expanding comedy with Steve Bhaerman. Pre-registration required. Nov 4, 7pm. $45. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.


Elect to Laugh

Laugh Your Bingo Off!

Oakland comedian Krista Fatka hosts an evening of standup and bingo. Nov 4, 7:30pm. $28. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.282.9319.

Steve Hytner

Best known as the character Kenny Bania on the TV show “Seinfeld,” the veteran standup comedian performs in Marin. Nov 3, 7:30pm. $20-$25. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. marincomedyshow.com.

Team Trivia Contest

Jeopardy style questions, songs and visuals hosted by comedian Clark Peterson. Fri, Nov 3, 7pm. $3. The Club at McInnis Park, 350 Smith Ranch Rd, San Rafael. 415.492.1800.

Alma del Tango Studio Tuesdays, Lindy Hop & East Coast Swing Dance. Wednesdays, Tango 1 & 2. 167 Tunstead Ave, San Anselmo 415.459.8966.

Hermann Sons Hall

Mondays, 7pm. through Dec 11, International Folk Dance Class, dances from Romania, Bulgaria, Serbia, Greece, Turkey and more. $7/$65. 860 Western Ave, Petaluma 707.762.9962.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium

Nov 2, 7:30pm, Swan Lake, presented by the Russian Grand Ballet. $25-$62. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.473.6800.

Raven Theater

Thurs, Nov 2 and Sat, Nov 4, Dancing with the Stars at the Raven, local celebs and professionals pair up for this audience-voted performance. Donations can be directed to benefit Sonoma County fire relief. $10-$45. 115 North St, Healdsburg 707.433.3145.

Events Bodega Land Trust 25th Anniversary

Community dinner, silent auction, live entertainment and more

Día de los Muertos Community Celebration

Sonoma Community Center displays its annual public altar, with food, drinks and kids activities. Nov 1, 6pm. Free. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Dia de los Muertos at Courthouse Square Join in creating a sacred space to remember, honor and celebrate loved ones who have crossed over. Nov 1-2. Courthouse Square, Third Street and Mendocino Avenue, Santa Rosa, latinoserviceproviders.net.

MarinMOCA’s Open Studios

Forty-five artists open their workspace and share their creative process in the weekend event. Nov 4-5, 11am5pm. Free. MarinMOCA, 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137.

North Bay Fire Relief Food Drive

Sausalito Woman’s Club, in support of the SF/Marin Food Banks, accept nonperishable food items (no glass containers) for the victims of the North Bay fires. Nov 8, 10am. Sausalito Woman’s Club, 120 Central Ave, Sausalito. 415.332.2700.

Salmon Creek ArtWalk Enjoy a beachside stroll through the open studios of 20 working artists and see their latest creations in a variety of media. Nov 4-5, 10am. Free. Salmon Creek Village, Highway 1 and Bean Avenue, Bodega Bay. 707.875.9609.

Santa Rosa Doll & Toy Show

Collectors and experts can exchange information about antique, vintage, modern and miniature doll makers and artists. Nov 5, 10am. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa.

SOFA First Friday Open Studios

Meet the artists where they create, with refreshments and music. Fri, Nov 3, 5pm. SOFA Arts District, 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

St Helena Harvest Festival

Daylong event begins with

a fun run and pet parade, then features live music, kids carnival, wine and food, arts and crafts and more. Nov 4. Downtown St Helena, Main St, St Helena, cityofsthelena.org.

33 Arts Open Studios

Meet artists in the community, with music, refreshments, art for sale and love letters to Santa Rosa. Nov 4-5, 10am. Free. 33 Arts, 3840 Finley Ave, Bldg 33, Santa Rosa. 415.601.5323.

and Ssu Snow Club

present Warren Miller’s

Pre-Party! Free admission

for NorCal Film release “Line of Descent”

Field Trips Birding for Beginners

Stewards of the Coast & Redwoods hosts an introductory event for those interested in bird watching. Nov 4, 7am. $20. Sonoma Coast State Beach, Highway 1, Bodega, stewardscr.org.

Whale Watch Volunteer Training

Learn how to assist the public in viewing the annual Pacific gray whale migration. Nov 4, 9:30am. Free. Bodega Head, East Shore Road, Bodega Bay, stewardscr.org.

© Scott DW Smith

Dance

celebrate two and a half decades of preserving the landscape. Nov 4, 5:30pm. $20. McCaughey Hall, 17184 Bodega Hwy, Bodega, bodegalandtrust.org.

Film Body Heat

Northern California Writers presents “A Night at the Movies” series with a guest speaker introducing and discussing the classic film. Nov 7, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

Winter starts with Warren Miller

Bugs

Danish filmmaker Andreas Johnsen is on hand for a Q&A and screening of documentary that examines and learns from the 2 billion people who eat insects. Nov 5, 4:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

Chicken People

Documentary on the competitive world of champion chicken breeders screens in returning CinemaBites series, pairing chef-prepared bites with foodie films. Nov 6, 5pm. $45. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

CULT Film Series

Tribute to Harry Dean Stanton screens ‘80s favorites “Repo Man” and “Pretty

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wed Nov 15 4:20–7:30

with live band at Lagunitas Petaluma Tap Room 1280 N McDowell Blvd Petaluma

We will show some of his daredevil movies. Enjoy a clip of the 2017 film “Line of Descent” HUGE RAFFLE GIVEAWAY— 3 tickets for $5 Tickets sales support SSU Snow Club. PRIZES INCLUDE: • Film tickets for Nov 18 NorCal Film premiere • Film DVDs • Squaw Valley ski trip and lodging for 2 • Hydration packs • Snow apparel

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Will Durst puts the mock in Democracy. Nov 5, 7pm. $15-$20. Rancho Nicasio, 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | NOV E M BE R 1-7, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Wine & Painting Class

in Pink” in a double bill. Nov 2, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

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Italian Film Festival

Every Monday 6:30PM

( 35

The fest offers great films, both comedy and drama, from Italy. Sat, Nov 4, 5:30 and 7:45pm. $16/$120 full series. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, italianfilm.com.

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Documentary filmmaker Iara Lee Skypes in for a discussion following the film about indigenous porters who ascend the dangerous mountain. Nov 2, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.454.1222.

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Series presents Jewish themed films from around the world; screening next Australian doc “On the Banks of the Tigris” on Thursday and Hungarian post-war drama, “1945” on Tuesday. Thurs, Nov 2, 7:30pm and Tues, Nov 7, 1 and 7:30pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

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OUTwatch Wine country’s LGBTQI film festival screens entertaining and thought-provoking feature-length films and documentaries, with a special opening night in Sonoma as well. Nov 2-5. $10 and up. Third Street Cinema Six, 620 Third St, Santa Rosa, outwatchfilmfest.org.

Petaluma Cinema Series Petaluma Film Alliance screens the 2017 meditation of love, loss and eternity, “A Ghost Story,” with pre-film lecture and post-show discussion. Nov 8, 6pm. $5-$6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, petalumafilmalliance.org.

Food & Drink Back Room Blow Out Visit and taste with three local vintners and one wine importer. Nov 3, 5pm. Back Room Wines, 1000 Main St, Napa. 707.226.1378.

Burgess Cellars 45th Anniversary

Family-owned winery parties with a library tasting of two dozen vintages and delicious cuisine stations. Nov 3, 7pm. $145. Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, 738 Main St, St Helena, burgesscellars.com.

Carneros Supper Club

Enjoy a collection of seasonally inspired dishes, live music and outdoor games. Proceeds benefit the Napa Valley Community Foundation Disaster Relief Fund. Nov 3, 6pm. $125. Carneros Resort & Spa, 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 888.400.9000.

First Friday at Fog Crest Vineyard

Join in a toast to Sonoma County, its local residents and all those who have come from near and far to help our communities during the devastating fires. Nov 3, 5pm. Fog Crest Vineyard, 7602 Occidental Rd, Sebastopol. 707.829.2006.

Ghost Supper

A special evening of remembrance for loved ones who have passed on includes food, stories and ceremony. Nov 4, 6pm. Free. Pt Reyes National Seashore, Red Barn Classroom, Bear Valley Road, Olema, ptreyes.org.

Howell Mountain Harvest Celebration

Experience wines from 30 Howell Mountain wineries, gourmet small bites from winery chefs and a silent auction. Nov 4, 1pm. $75-$100. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Olive Harvest Celebration & Lunch

Festivities include a Champagne reception, olive oil tasting, and three-course meal fresh from the garden. Space is limited, RSVP required. Nov 4, 10am. $125. Jordan Vineyard & Winery, 1474 Alexander Valley Rd, Healdsburg. 800.654.1213.

Shots of Knowledge

Enjoy a discussion and tasting as a team of educators and distillers looks at whiskey through the lens of science and engineering. Nov 3, 6pm. $25. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

Sonoma Bar Battle

Local drink slingers come together to show off their pours in cocktail competitions to earn the title of “Sonoma’s Best bartender.” Nov 4, 6pm. $40-$45. Sonoma Veterans Memorial Hall, 126 First St W, Sonoma. 707.938.4105.

Sonoma Extra Virgin Festival

Olive oil and food producers share their wares and offer samples, with live music and lots of wine. Nov 4, 11am. $20. BR Cohn Winery, 15000 Sonoma Hwy, Glen Ellen. 707.938.4064.

Lectures Bay Smart

Save the Bay manager Katy Zaaremba discusses combating the effects of sea level rise, protecting shorelines against flooding and making cities “Bay Smart.” Nov 2, 1pm. Free. Outdoor Art Club, 1 W Blithedale Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.2582.

Combatants for Peace Grassroots activist movement in Israel and Palestine talks about moving from violence to nonviolence. Nov 8, 7pm. Congregation B’nai Israel, 740 Western Ave, Petaluma.

Love & Wisdom through the Qur’an, the Hadiths & the Bible Series of classes provide a resource for people of all religious backgrounds to deepen their own spiritual practice. RSVP required. Sun, Nov 5, 1pm. $60-$175. Institute for Sufi Studies, 14 Commercial Blvd, Ste 101, Novato. 415.382.7834.

Opera Guild Preview

Prepare for San Francisco Opera’s upcoming performances of “Manon” with a lecture by Timothy Flynn, chair of performing arts at Olivet College. Nov 6, 7:30pm. $10. The Redwoods, 40 Camino Alto, Mill Valley. 415.456.7872.

Owls: Spies in the Sky Sausalito resident Robert


The Revolution Will Be Sung

Multimedia presentation offers a view of history by exploring the role of music in the social change movement. Nov 6, 7pm. by donation. Peace & Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.575.8902.

Setting the Fall Table Workshop helps you create organic floral arrangement for upcoming festivities. Nov 5, 1:30pm. $90. Garden Valley Ranch, 498 Pepper Rd, Petaluma, gardenvalley.com.

Speed Learn Conversational Spanish

Nov 4, 5pm, “Murder in SaintGermain” with Cara Black. Nov 6, 7pm, “Writing as a Path to Awakening” with Albert Flynn DeSilver. Nov 7, 6pm, “Collecting Evolution” with Matthew J James. Nov 8, 6pm, “Kitchen Creativity” with Karen Page. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Corte Madera Library Nov 8, 7pm, “Passion Projects for Smart People” with Michael Wing. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera 707.924.6444.

Finesse The Store Nov 4, 3pm, “Roland G Henin: 50 Years of Mentoring Great American Chefs” with Thomas Keller and Roland G Henin, a cooks with books event, includes bites and bubbles. $90. 6540 Washington St, Yountville 707.363.9552.

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books

Ongoing class offers the basics to help you learn the language. Mon, 1pm. through Dec 18. Free. San Rafael Library, 1100 E St, San Rafael. 415.485.3323.

Nov 4, 2pm, “The Ballet Lover” with Barbara L Baer. 106 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Tedx Sonoma County

Nov 2, 6:30pm, “Bringing It Home” with Gail Simmons, a cooks with books event, includes dinner. $115. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur 415.927.3331.

Lecture series offers an afternoon of learning from those among us who are pushing the limits. Nov 4, 1pm. $25-$45. Jackson Theater, Sonoma Country Day School, 4400 Day School Place, Santa Rosa. 707.284.3200.

Readings Aqus Cafe

Nov 6, 6:15pm, Rivertown Poets, with Kim Shuck, poet laureate of San Francisco, and Lee Slonimsky, followed by open mic. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

Book Passage

Nov 1, 7pm, “Two kinds of Truth” with Michael Connelly. Nov 3, 7pm, “Way of Zing” with Mark Nelson and Bill Silver. Nov 4, 1pm, “Wine Country Women of Napa Valley” with various authors. Nov 4, 4pm, “Thanksgiving” with Melanie Kirkpatrick. Nov 5, 4pm, “The Vegan Way” with Jackie Way. Nov 6, 7pm, “The Water Will Come” with Jeff Goodell. Nov 8, 7pm, “Not What I Expected” with Bokara Legendre. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Book Passage By-the-Bay

Nov 1, 6pm, “Amazon Wisdom Keeper” with Loraine Van Tuyl.

Left Bank Brasserie

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall Nov 2, 7pm, “Otherworld” with Jason Segal, hosted by Copperfield’s Books. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma 707.775.6048.

Napa Bookmine at Oxbow Nov 5, 12pm, “Marielle in Paris” with Maxine Rose Schur and Jeanne de Sainte Marie. 610 First St, Shop 4, Napa. 707.726.6575.

Napa Main Library Nov 2, 7pm, “America the Anxious” with Ruth Whippman, hosted by Napa Bookmine. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

Novato Copperfield’s Books Nov 3, 6pm, “The Nutcracker” with Marin Ballet. 999 Grant Ave, Novato 415.763.3052.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Nov 5, 3pm, “Kitchen Creativity” with Karen Page. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Nov 6, 7pm, “Ageless Soul” with Thomas Moore. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Theater Chicago Broadway’s longest-running American musical comes to Novato. Through Nov 12. $12$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

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Reach the Bay Area Staycationers!

The Crucible Arthur Miller’s seminal drama about the Salem witch trials echoes modern-day issues of hysteria and social persecution. Through Nov 5. $22-$32. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

The Gumshoe Murders Get a Clue Productions presents a new murder-mystery dinner theater show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception. Reservations required. Sat, Nov 4, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor. getaclueproductions.com.

Man Equals Man Sonoma State University’s theater arts department presents the Bertolt Brechtwritten drama, directed by Judy Navas. Nov 8-12. $10-$17. Ives Hall room 119, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.4246.

Steel Magnolias Six very different women in a small Louisiana town share friendship and heartache in this acclaimed play. Through Nov 5. $20-$33. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Two Big Mouths A tapestry of storytelling, memoir and music about growing up Jewish, growing old and growing wiser. Nov 4, 7pm. $10-$18. Congregation Shomrei Torah, 2600 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.578.5519. 20,000 circulation: East Bay | Sacramento | San Francisco | San Jose | Marin | Sonoma | Napa

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Timineri explores the relationship between humans and owls, with Trill, a western screech owl, and others on hand. Nov 3, 7pm. Free. Sausalito Library, 420 Litho St, Sausalito. 415.289.4121.


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s it a co-op grocery or a cannabis dispensary? Sebastopol’s Solful is a bit of both. Solful is the city’s second dispensary, and it represents two trends emerging in the cannabis industry: the boutiquification of the cannabis shopping experience and brand-name farms that focus on sustainable agriculture. “We really wanted a place that felt normal,” says co-founder and CEO Eli Melrod. By normal, he means “nonintimidating,” and wholesome even, like going to your local independent grocery store. Melrod says he opened the business because he wanted a place he could recommend to his friends and family. He says his father suffers from pancreatic cancer and has benefited from the use of cannabis.

“I’ve been a huge believer in the medical benefits,” he says. The dispensary is done up in wood and earth tones that make it look like a Hayes Street clothes boutique rather than the heavily fortified pot shops of old. There are T-shirts, tote bags and baseball hats for sale, along with a variety of cannabis products. What, no wheatgrass bar? As for the cannabis, Melrod says he visited more than 50 farms in Sonoma, Mendocino and Humboldt counties to find growers that met his standards. “We handpicked farmers that were doing things that were kind of special,” he says, calling it “muddy-shoe sourcing.” That includes farmers like biodynamic cannabis pioneer Mike Benziger of Glen Ellen’s Glentucky Family Farm, and Alpenglow Farms’ Craig Johnson, a Humboldt County cannabis producer with a focus on regenerative agriculture. Flower testing is done at Hayward’s ISOaccredited Harrens Lab. “In the same way that you’d rather buy a locally grown, organic tomato from a farmers market than one shipped in from hundreds of miles away, we’re giving our community access to a highly curated selection of amazing, locally produced products that they would unlikely find on their own,” says Melrod. Solful has been in development since 2015. Sebastopol’s planning commission and city council approved of the business with unanimous votes earlier this year. The business holds a grand opening Nov. 5 from 11am to 5pm. Benziger and Johnson will be on hand, as well as Sebastopol artist Patrick Amiot, who created one of his signature works of junk-art for the store. Ten percent of all proceeds from the event will go to the Redwood Credit Union’s fire victim relief fund. Solful is at 785 Gravenstein Hwy. S. Go to solful.com for more information.


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) America’s Civil War ended in 1865. A veteran from that conflict later produced a daughter, Irene Triplett, who is still alive today and collecting his pension. In the coming months, I foresee you being able to take advantage of a comparable phenomenon, although it may be more metaphorical. Blessings from bygone times, perhaps even from the distant past, will be available to you. But you’ll have to be alert and know where to look. So now might be a good time to learn more about your ancestors, ruminate exuberantly about your own history, study the lives of your dead heroes and maybe even tune in to your previous incarnations. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“I wasn’t in the market to buy a Day-Glo plastic fish from a street vendor,” testified a witty guy named Jef on Facebook, “but that’s exactly what I did. The seller said he found it in someone’s trash. He wanted 50 cents for it, but I talked him up to a dollar. The best part is the expression on the fish’s face. It’s from Edvard Munch’s The Scream.” I bring this testimony to your attention, Taurus, because I feel it’s good role-modeling for you. In the coming days, I bet you won’t know exactly what you’re looking for until you find it. This prize may not be highly valued by anyone else but you. And it will amuse you and be of use to you in just the right ways.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Where are Chinese gooseberries grown? In New Zealand. What is a camel’s hairbrush made of? Squirrel fur. When England and France waged their Hundred Years’ War, how long did it last? One hundred and sixteen years. When do Russians celebrate their October Revolution? In November. Trick answers like these are likely to be a recurring theme for you in the coming weeks, Gemini. That’s why I advise you to not be a master of the obvious. CANCER (June 21–July 22)

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In accordance with the astrological omens, I recommend you indulge in any or all of the following exercises. 1. Dedicate an entire day to performing acts of love. 2. Buy yourself flowers, sing yourself a song and tell yourself a story about why you’re so beautiful. 3. Explain your deeply felt opinion with so much passion and logic that you change the mind of a person who had previously disagreed with you. 4. Make a pilgrimage to a sacred spot you want to be influenced by. 5. Buy a drink for everyone in a bar or cafe.

LEO (July 23–August 22) “Dear Rob: I saw a photo of you recently, and I realized that you have a scar on your face. I hope you don’t mind me telling you it resembles an ancient Mayan hieroglyph that means ‘Builder of Bridges for Those Who Are Seeking Home.’ Did you know this? If so, do you think it’s an accurate title for what you do?—Renegade Leo Scholar.” Dear Scholar: Thanks for your observation. I don’t know if I fully deserve the title “Builder of Bridges for Those Who Are Seeking Home,” but it does describe the role I’m hoping to play for Leos. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for your tribe to clarify and cultivate your notion of home. VIRGO (August 23–September 22)

Author Clarissa Pinkola Estés encourages us to purge any tendencies we might have to think of ourselves as hounded animals, angry, wounded victims, leaky vessels aching to be filled or broken creatures yearning for rescue. It so happens that now is a perfect time for you to perform this purgation. You have maximum power to revise your self-image so that it resounds with more poise, self-sufficiency and sovereignty.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) I used to scoff at people who play the lottery. The chance of winning big is almost nil. Why not invest one’s hopes in more pragmatic schemes to generate money? But my opinion softened a bit when the planet Jupiter made a lucky transit to an aspect in my personal horoscope. It really did seem like my chances of winning the lottery were unusually high. I started dreaming about the educational amusements I’d pursue if I got a huge influx of cash. I opened my mind to expansive future possibilities that I had previously been closed to. So even though I didn’t actually get a windfall during this favorable financial phase, I was glad I’d entertained the

BY ROB BREZSNY

fantasy. In alignment with current astrological omens, Libra, here’s the moral of the story for you: Meditate on what educational amusements you’d seek if you had more money.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

In the early stages of Johnny Cash’s development as a musician, his mother hired a coach to give him singing lessons. But after a few meetings, the teacher counseled him to quit. Johnny’s style was so unique, the seasoned pro thought it better not to tamper with his natural sound. I hesitate to offer you comparable advice, Scorpio. I’m a big believer in the value of enhancing one’s innate talents with training and education. On the other hand, my assessment of your destiny between now and October 2018 impels me to offer a suggestion: It may be useful for you to give some credence to the perspective of Johnny Cash’s voice coach. Make sure you guard and revere your distinctiveness.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

I used to nurture a grudge against Tony Pastorini. He was the high school math teacher who kicked me out of the extracurricular Calculus Club because my proofs were too “intuitive and unorthodox.” The shock of his rejection drove me away from a subject I had been passionate about. Eventually, though, I came to realize what a good deed he had done. It would have been a mistake for me to keep specializing in math—I was destined to study literature and psychology and mythology—but it took Pastorini to correct my course. Now, Sagittarius, I invite you to make a similar shift of attitude. What debt of gratitude do you owe a person you have thought of as a source of frustration or obstruction?

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) In the lore of ancient Greek mythology, the god Prometheus stole fire from his fellow deities and sneakily gave it to us humans. Before our patron provided us with this natural treasure, we poor creatures had no access to it. As I gaze out at your possibilities in the coming months, Capricorn, I foresee you having Promethean inclinations. Your ability to bestow blessings and spread benevolence and do good deeds will be at a peak. Unlike Prometheus, however, I don’t expect you’ll get into trouble for your generosity. Just the opposite! AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Here’s a parable you may find useful. An armchair explorer is unexpectedly given a chance to embark on an adventure she has only read and dreamed about. But she hesitates on the brink of seizing her opportunity. She asks herself, “Do I really want to risk having ragged reality corrupt the beautiful fantasy I’ve built up in my mind’s eye?” In the end she takes the gamble. She embarks on the adventure. And ragged reality does in fact partially corrupt her beautiful fantasy. But it also brings her unexpected lessons that partially enhance the beautiful fantasy. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

“A game of chess is usually a fairy tale of 1,001 blunders,” said chess grandmaster Savielly Tartakower, a Pisces. “It is a struggle against one’s own errors,” he added. “The winner of the game is the player who makes the nextto-last mistake.” I think this is excellent counsel during the current phase of your astrological cycle, Pisces. It’s time to risk bold moves, because even if they’re partly or wholly mistaken, they will ultimately put you in a good position to succeed in the long run. Here’s a further point for your consideration. Remember the philosopher Rene Descartes’ famous dictum, “Cogito ergo sum”? It’s Latin for “I think, therefore I am.” Tartakower countered this with, “Erro ergo sum,” which is “I err, therefore I am.”

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

NOV E M BE R 1-7, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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