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Bohemian

Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Arts Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, James Knight, Bryce Stoepfel, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

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OCTOBER 19-22, 2017

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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October 6 – October 22!

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

The Fires Well, what a strange sensation to see your name in print (“Hell Fire,” Oct. 11). I want to compliment editor Stett Holbrook for his compassionate and friendly tone when stopping to interview me Monday. It is starting to really settle in just how truly devastating the loss is now. We will never be the same, not my neighbors’ lives, not my little pocket neighborhood in ashes near Coffey Park’s own devastation wrought wide,

not nearly all of northwest Santa Rosa or Fountaingrove, and surely not Mark West/Larkfield, where so many of my former beloved students and their families lived, and perhaps not the entire greater community. Take deep breaths once we can breathe again, cherish what we still have, and find the will to move forward to whatever changed future awaits us.

THIS MODERN WORLD

SEANEEN DELONG Santa Rosa

The tragedies besetting our beloved communities this week bring us to the edge of what was previously unthinkable. Our hearts keen for those who’ve lost everything. Our minds grapple with how and why these simultaneously ignited holocaustic events could unfold on our places of home/ground/place so readily, so swiftly, so adeptly. Firepower claimed our hillsides, our homes, our beloved friends, neighbors, colleagues and plant communities and wildlife. We stand shaken, broken and united in the face of our own fragility, our own impermanence.

By Tom Tomorrow

Just one week ago, all was well in our world, and overnight we make this radical shift in our way of life—as if a bomb struck our very wellbeing. Indeed, I imagine war is like this. Scores of evacuees are still clamoring for a shower, a bed, a meal, a warm hug, the smallest of signs of a “normal” day. The things, the people, the services we have such easy access to in “normal” times become our primary quest. Our comforts and conveniences and our status quo has been shaken to its foundations. I am struck by the parallels that exist between evacuees and refugees. At what point does an evacuee become a refugee? Is it when the wind keeps driving and no containment is possible ever? Is it when there is no community left to bring services such as temporary housing, shelter, drinking water, sewer systems, medical services, food? Is the distinction that evacuees can have some semblance of hope that returning to the community is possible, even if the time/ ground/place is different? Today, I’m sending billowing bubbles of love out to all who are displaced by this tragedy in Northern California, and the tragedies in Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico. And I’m including those who are displaced by the wars initiated by our country. And I’m reminded that we cannot cause displacement and reject with closed arms the same refugees we have made through acts of war. Evacuees and refugees, we see you, we feel you, and engage our governments to do right by you. We know you need refuge. We all need refuge.

LINDA STONESTREET Santa Rosa

All affected by the wildfires are in our thoughts and prayers. Sonoma County, please pray the little prayer every day, and for those who know how, the Holy Rosary as well.

MATTHEW R. DUNNIGAN

Rome, Italy

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants

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Our Common Humanity When we return to normalcy, let’s retain some of what the fire taught us BY STETT HOLBROOK

I

f there’s any silver lining to the North Bay fires, it’s the overwhelming outpouring of compassion and volunteerism in support of victims and first responders. In our darkest days, the very best in us came pouring out. As was made painfully clear, fire does not discriminate. We are all equal before the flames. Given the toxicity of national politics, it was refreshing and deeply moving to see how the North Bay responded to the catastrophe. It felt good to do something, anything, to help. Food and clothing drives popped up overnight. Restaurants offered free meals to first responders. People opened their homes to displaced strangers. Local kennels took in homeless animals free of charge. Banners thanking fire fighters went up on freeway overpasses. The question “How are you?” has become much more than a throwaway pleasantry, because, one way or another, we’ve all been affected by the fires, whether or not we lost our homes or loved ones. It could have been any one of us trapped in a burning home with no way out. The horror of the fire revealed our common humanity. America prides itself on its rugged individualism, but in times of crisis like this, it’s clear we are not strong because we stand alone; we are strongest when we depend on each other. The fire revealed that we are rugged dependents who support each other through the worst of times. Eventually, the smoke will clear and fire victims will go about the hard work of rebuilding their lives. There will be talk of a return to normalcy, and that’s good. But let’s hold on to the part of our common humanity awakened by the fires.

NOV 8-12, 2017

Stett Holbrook is the editor of the ‘Bohemian.’ The Bohemian has set up a fund to aid the nonprofits helping fire victims in Sonoma and Napa counties. One hundred percent of the money collected goes to them. Please give what you can at RebuildSonomaFund.org. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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HOMELESS All short- and long-term housing options have to be considered, officials say.

The Displaced Sonoma County’s housing crisis just got a whole lot worse BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he infernos that ravaged Santa Rosa have destroyed 5 percent of the city’s housing stock and caused at least $1.2 billion in damage, as thousands of first responders worked through the week to beat back the stubborn Tubbs, Nuns, Oakmont and Adobe fires.

As evacuees begin to head home this week, the numbers are piling up: More than 4,000 homes and structures burned across the region. Forty-one confirmed dead, 22 of them in Sonoma County, and more than 50 remain missing as the fires continue to burn. There was some pretty good news, too, as the number of missing persons drops day by day and an intense outpouring of public support continues, which has buoyed

spirits as the fires grind on into their second week. Four-hundred-and-one persons remained in emergency shelters as of Tuesday afternoon, said Sonoma County Supervisor James Gore, down from a crisis peak of 5,000. More than 60,000 people were evacuated due to the fires and as of Tuesday, fire officials reported that 36,295 persons had returned to 13,956 houses that escaped the flames.

Tom Gogola

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 1 8-24, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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The county has received 1,969 reports of missing persons since the fires broke out on the early morning of Oct. 9, and has been mainly searching for the missing in homes or what remains of them, while the National Guard has been scouring evacuated and burned-out areas for remains. Twenty-four of those calls were reports filed about missing homeless persons, said Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) spokesman Sgt. Spencer Crum early this week. None of the victims so far identified, he said, was one of the homeless persons that was the subject of a missing-person report. On Tuesday afternoon, SCSO Sheriff Rob Giordano said the number of missing that his department was still looking for was 27; the Santa Rosa Police Department is meanwhile searching for an additional 26 missing persons. Meanwhile, pending a hopeful forecast of rain for Thursday, fire officials were cautiously optimistic early in the week that they’d have 100 percent containment on some, if not all, of the fires by the weekend, ending nearly two weeks of the wind-driven crisis. The civic response to the disaster has been staggering and heart-rending in its scope. The questions now raised by the fire are equally staggering. Against the backdrop of a massive tent city that has sprung up at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds—for the thousands of first responders who have come to Santa Rosa to battle the blazes and secure the city—the unfolding of a housing crises on top of an already extant one and questions about where everyone would go once they fires were out were top priority for officials interviewed over the week. Where is the transitional housing coming from? What’s the fate of the already homeless citizens of Santa Rosa? When can homeowners start to rebuild? For homeowners who have lost everything, now begins the process of filing and settling a claim with their insurance provider. That was a problematic process during the aftermath of Lake County’s Valley fire two years ago, said Lt. Gov. Gavin


What will that look like? The fire, Rabbitt said, could serve as a catalyst for county and city leaders who are “looking for smart, efficient answers” to an affordable-housing question that is now much more complicated. The question for civic leaders, he suggested, was how to rebuild in the face of “a huge economic hit” that the fire will take on the county. Rabbitt said he hoped all cities in Sonoma County would “take a look at the opportunities” the rebuild might afford, as he noted that the county has given more leeway to homeowners on granny units and other second units than cities in the region. The potential for small-home developments in county or urban areas remains an open question, and one of many. Supervisors had a preliminary discussion about the path forward on housing Tuesday. Rabbitt expressed optimism in the face of a potential wintertime spike in homelessness. “I think we have the tools in the county to avoid any crisis,” he said. Rabbitt also noted that the county had reached out to local participants in the short-term rental economy for assistance in providing housing to the displaced. “We are asking people to take places off of Airbnb,” he said. It was not immediately clear how many had done so, he added. To ease with the immediate and imminent housing crunch, officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency were scouting local properties early this week to see where they might bring in some FEMA trailers for the displaced, though officials at the agency said the timeline for their arrival was unclear (see Nugget, p26, for more). They can’t come soon enough, as the fires still burn, as patience wears thin among residents eager to go home, and as many questions remain, some for another day but others of a more immediate urgency. For instance: How many homeless persons died in the fire? It’s not yet known. “The goal is to find the victim that we don’t know about,” said Giordano ) 10 when asked about the

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Newsom in a recent interview at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds command center, and one the state set out to fix. The 2015 conflagration to the north, said Newsom, provided lessons that would be useful moving forward, as he stressed the state’s role on the legal front and in “making sure the private sector is paid off on a timely basis,” when, for example, contractors are hired to rebuild homes and businesses. Sonoma County Supervisor Shirlee Zane approached the lieutenant governor and said, with a friendly pointed finger, “Your Department of Insurance is going to hold the insurance companies liable.” (State Department of Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones was scheduled to meet with fire victims in Napa on Oct. 17.) Newsom said Gov. Jerry Brown’s priority when it comes to the state’s role in rebuilding was to “make sure we are here six months from here,” as he pledged to draw down on all available federal assistance. Sonoma County Supervisor David Rabbitt said supervisors would take up preliminary talks this week about what to do about the thousands of displaced residents who have lost their homes. Sonoma County had an estimated pre-fire homeless population of 2,835, as of May 2017. It just got a lot larger, as approximately 1,300 structures were burned in the residential Coffey Park neighborhood alone this week. Rabbitt expected that an initial outpouring of community support would continue, and residents and businesses would “extend the initial surge of generosity” that has met the first week of the unprecedented regional catastrophe. Rabbitt described the horrifically intensified local housing crisis in terms that were at once sensitive and appreciative of the forward-looking opportunities. The number one priority looking beyond the fire, he said, was getting people out of shelters and back home or into “some kind of transitional housing.”


Displaced ( 9

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potential for “unknown unknown” missing persons. Santa Rosa chief of police Hank Schreeder said the ripple effect the fire will have on the city’s pre-fire homeless population remains to be seen. The SRPD devotes significant patrol time to checking in on areas around the city where the homeless tend to congregate. Those patrols include areas of Cleveland Avenue that were destroyed by the fire. In light of overflowing demand for shelter beds and intense pressure on local social services agencies and nonprofits that serve the poor and vulnerable, what’s to become of the pre-fire homeless of Santa Rosa as the nights grow colder and the fires are at last extinguished? “I wish I knew where we are going to be on that,” Schreeder said. The looming uncertainty is a common thread as the damage is tallied and the ash settles. There was good news for local homeless advocates when a group of between 40 and 50 homeless camped out in the Fountain Grove area were able to escape the flames, but Jennielynn Holmes-Davis, director of shelter and housing at Catholic Charities of Santa Rosa, said “we’re not clear yet” when it comes to a tally of the homeless. “We were already in a homeless and housing crisis when this happened, and it will be interesting to see what happens next,” said Holmes. She warned about two waves of housing nightmares facing fire victims. One is in the short term, when the evacuation centers start to close down “and people start heading home, and we’ll see who is without recourse” said Holmes. The bigger wave of desperation will be in six months, she said, as disaster assistance runs out and fire victims enter the real estate market—only to find themselves priced out of it. “This happened in the foreclosure crisis—they entered the rental market, and then they got pushed out into homelessness,” Holmes said. “I think that may happen even faster here. People who have not been homeless in the past

are facing homelessness,” she said. (Ironically, it was only in June, that the county lost some $600,000 in emergency grant money for an unpopular sleep-in-your-car program for the homeless, which Catholic Charities participated in.) Now, said Holmes, all short- and long-term housing solutions have to be considered, including tinyhouse communities within incorporated urban areas of the county. She said that as leaders sort through the new housing normal in Sonoma County, it will be a while before homeless advocates will track everyone down in their circles—and that there may be unknown homeless still in the ashes that nobody will ever know about. “We’re definitely worried about that,” she said. Many of the clients her organization works with do tend to fall off the radar. “We don’t see them for a while; they go out of town or out of the county. It’s going to take a long time to find out who is truly missing and who is dislocated for the moment.” The health issues that attended the fires are magnified for people who were already living outdoors, and oftentimes under and around highway underpasses. “Last week, we were very worried about people living outdoors and being exposed to this,” said Holmes, who adds that “these are people already at a high risk for respiratory disease, and COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease] and asthma are common among this population already.” Through it all, the emergent mantra being proffered by officials, for all citizens of Sonoma County, is please be patient. Even when the fires are out, it may be days or weeks before some people will be allowed back into heavily damaged areas. There will be checkpoints and escorts, even for homeowners whose domiciles may have survived amid the surrounding wreckage of their neighbors’ homes—a common and jarring visual juxtaposition of destruction and blind luck that is one of the hallmarks of the great and terrible North Bay fires of 2017.


11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN |

FIRE-RAVAGED AREAS NEED YOUR HELP Help the victims of the devastating Sonoma and Napa fires rebuild their homes, their businesses and their lives. This fund, established by the Santa Rosa-based Bohemian weekly newspaper and administered by the Silicon Valley Community Foundation has no administrative overhead and will direct all proceeds to nonprofit organizations doing frontline work to get Sonoma and Napa counties back on their feet.

DONATE ONLINE

www.rebuildsonomafund.org

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Help us Rebuild Sonoma County


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L

ast week, even as they nervously watched ribbons of smoke streaming down the ridge of the Mayacamas Mountains toward the valley below, Napa Valley winery owners were already pitching in to help their neighbors.

On Thursday, Hall Wines owners Craig and Kathryn Hall offered to put up as much as $100,000 for the North Bay Fire Relief fund. As of Monday, the campaign pulled in another $100,000. Supporting nonprofit organizations providing emergency relief to wildfire victims, the fund is administered locally by the Redwood Credit Union Community Fund. The St. Helena winery will match contributor donations one-to-one (much like the matching donations familiar to public radio listeners—remember when, only a month ago, radio pledge drives were among our more grinding

campaigns of endurance?). Find the link to donate at the Hall Wines website or Facebook page. Going bigger, California’s megafamily-winery E&J Gallo has promised to pony up $1 million for American Red Cross California Wildfires Relief Fund, the Community Foundation of Sonoma and the Napa Valley Community Foundation. Meanwhile on the north side of Sonoma Plaza, which was evacuated when the fire threatened to sweep down from Lovall Valley Road, the Hall’s WALT Wines has opened for winetasting—all fees donated to fire relief. 380 First St. W., Sonoma. 707.933.4440. In Healdsburg, town leaders and businesses plan to agree upon a citywide tasting room donation effort in the coming weeks. Those who can think as far out as Nov. 18 can put Sonoma Cider’s 100 percent benefit music festival on the calendar. Bands include the Highway Poets, Timothy O'Neil, Second Line, Token Girl and Frobeck. If it’s the harder stuff you’re hankering for—and who’d blame you—Sebastopol’s Spirit Works Distillery worked over the weekend to bottle 35 cases of cask-strength “Sonoma Strength” wheat whiskey. At over 116 proof, this tipple is strong—Sonoma strong. All proceeds from each $79 bottle benefit local funds, including North Bay Fire Relief and the Sonoma County Resilience Fund. “We started selling it before we even finished bottling it,” says Spirit Works co-founder Timo Marshall, who cooked up the benefit bottle idea with staff members. The distillery will be open regular hours, Wednesday–Sunday, 11am– 5pm, at 6790 McKinley St. #100 (in the Barlow), Sebastopol. 707.634.4793. And since just making it through the past two weeks is cause for celebration, charity-driven Breathless Wines is popping the corks on their North Coast bubbly through November to offer a complimentary glass of sparkling wine to their Sonoma County neighbors who want to come in and share stories. “With this, and the holidays, we are going to need it,” says co-founder Sharon Cohn. 499 Moore Lane, Healdsburg. Thursday–Tuesday, 11am–6pm. 707.395.7300.


13 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 8-24, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

The Terrifying New Normal We’re living in a new climate with new dangers BY STETT HOLBROOK

FIREPOWER An Aero Flite RJ85 tanker drops fire retardant on the Oakmont fire in Sonoma County.

A

s I walked among the embers of what was the Coffey Park neighborhood Monday morning, my eyes burning from the smoke as I watched weeping residents gazing at where their homes once stood, I was shocked not only by the devastation, but by the fact that a wildfire could reach so far into the city. I thought wildfires were supposed to stay in wildlands, not move into subdivisions with busy intersections, schools and restaurants. Of course, fires don’t follow any such rules, but if this working-class neighborhood could fall victim to a wildfire raging down the hills like a flood, what neighborhood is safe?

Indeed, Coffey Park was outside of the city’s “very severe” hazard zone. As the Los Angeles Times reported Sunday, that meant homes were exempt from regulations to make them more fire-resistant. It’s not clear how such precautions would have protected the neighborhood from the early-morning firestorm. More than 1,200 homes were incinerated in a matter of minutes.

I don’t see this as city or state negligence, but as a chilling testament that we live in a different era of fire danger. The climate has changed and so have the risks. This is the terrifying new normal. parking PG&E power lines may have pulled the trigger on last week’s catastrophic fires, but evidence shows that climate change built the weapon and aimed

S

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NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 1 8-24, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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VULNERABLE Fires near Hood Mountain threatened power lines.

Fire Climate ( 13 it right at the North Bay. And we remain under the gun. From the most destructive hurricane season on record to the devastating fires still burning in the North Bay, the reality is becoming devastatingly clear: the climate has changed and the conditions for fires will intensify. It was just two years ago that that the Valley fire exploded in the parched hills of Lake, Napa and northern Sonoma counties, burning 76,000 acres and 1,350 homes and killing three. Northern California’s 15 concurrent fires have scorched 220,000 acres, burned an estimated 5,700 structures and caused at least 40 deaths, making them the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in California history.

“That’s the way it is with a warming climate, dry weather and reduced moisture,” said Gov. Jerry Brown in a press conference last week. “These kinds of catastrophes have happened, and they are going to continue to happen.” Wildfires in California are a fact of life. Fire plays an important ecological role in the chaparral and conifer forest ecosystems of the North Bay. Problems arise when people choose to live in those fire-prone environments. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection and local fire departments mandate property owners carve out a ring of defensible space to help defend against wild fires. But there was little chance fending off windwhipped fires of such intensity and speed.

“We know that Northern California’s climate has changed,” says Noah Diffenbaugh, a climate scientist at Stanford University, “and we’re in a climate that’s different than when a lot of what we have on the landscape was designed and built.” Climate plays an important role in wildfire risk, but it’s not the only influence, says Diffenbaugh. Human elements such as ignition, forest management and where and how we build also play a role, he says. Climate change is the biggest human element of all. “Climate sets the stage, and we have strong evidence that the global warming that’s already happened has increased wildfire risk in the western United States through the effects of temperature drying the landscape,” he says. “For this particular event,

we can really see the impacts of heat. We had record hot conditions during the drought. We had record high temperatures that coincided with record low precipitation that created the most severe drought on record that killed tens of millions of trees. Those record drought conditions were followed by extremely wet conditions this winter that were again followed by record hot conditions.” Rising temperatures also lead to less snowfall in the Sierra and earlier melting of that snow, Diffenbaugh says, meaning there is less runoff available during the hot, dry days of fall. In California, Diffenbaugh says, low precipitation levels are twice as likely to produce drought if they coincide with warm conditions. “Overall, we’ve seen a


n an essay on the North Bay fires called the “The Devil in Wine Country” to be published in the London Review of Books, Mike Davis, author of Ecology of Fear: Los Angeles and the Imaginations of Disaster, admits he’s “an elderly prophet of doom” as he laments “the hopelessness of rational planning in a society based on real estate capitalism.” “We’ll continue to send sprawl into our fire-dependent ecosystems with the expectation that firefighters will risk their lives to defend each new McMansion,” he writes, “and an insurance system that spreads costs across

I

all homeowners will promptly replace whatever is lost.” Santa Rosa Mayor Chris Coursey says he’s thought about how the city might rebuild to be more resilient, but with the fire still blazing and people’s lives at risk, now is not the time for that. “I’m not there yet,” he said after a press briefing at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds. Ann Hancock, executive director of Santa Rosa’s Center for Climate Protection, says that when the time is right, she hopes the conversation centers on reducing the impacts of climate change. “It’s not too early to start thinking about that, so long as the people who are suffering are taken care of,” she says. As a trained public health professional, Hancock is a strong advocate for prevention. “Prevention is where we have the best opportunity for impact with the lowest cost.” Local measures such as better forest management and more defensible space are worthy, but her organization is focusing on bringing down the greenhouse gas emissions that helped get us into this crisis. “It’s is a wholesale systemic change and that’s overwhelming for most people to think about, and yet we have to.” hen the North Bay rebuilds, Heinberg calls for building great resiliency into local infrastructure— redundant electric and water systems, larger inventories of food and supplies—that can better withstand future disasters. Knowing that climate change is exacerbating the risks, he says the region should deepen its investment in mass transit, zero-energy buildings and clean energy. “Ultimately, though, what all this suggests is we need to build differently, change our patterns of living and build a lot more resilience into our whole society, because we unquestionably have more disasters on the way of different kinds, not just wildfires. “We in California have the opportunity to see the handwriting on the wall and make some changes.”

W

15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 8-24, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

doubling in frequency of drought in California in recent decades.” The east-to-west Diablo winds that fanned the flames, reaching hurricane strength at higher elevations, may also be pegged to climate change, Diffenbaugh says. Richard Heinberg, a fellow at the Post Carbon Institute, a nonprofit think tank focused on climate change and sustainability issues, lives in Santa Rosa and was evacuated the first night of the fire. His house was spared. While the links between climate change and wildfires can be indirect, he says the impacts of a warming climate on California are clear. Heinberg says research shows that increased CO2 in the atmosphere leads to rapid but less viable plant growth. More fuel for fire. “It’s almost like we’re growing junk food with more CO2 in the atmosphere,” he says. On a larger scale, he says data shows that California is moving into a hotter and drier climate. “The 20th century was a wet spell for California,” he says. City officials say Santa Rosa will rebuild and will be “better than before.” But better in what way? Better prepared for future wildfires? Better built to reduce the CO2 emissions that contributed to the perilous state we’re in? Or will better just mean bigger? While Gov. Brown admirably sounds the climate change alarm, it’s not keeping pace with the explosive conditions on the ground.

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Crush CULTURE

THE WEEK’S EVENTS: A SELECTIVE GUIDE

S A N TA R O S A

Cult Community The ongoing CULT Film Series had lined up an October filled with Halloween goodness, but last week’s fires shifted the focus of the series from fun to fundraising. This week, CULT teams up with Hot 101.7 radio station to present 1987’s horror-comedy gem Blood Diner, screening at the Roxy 14 with director Jackie Kong in attendance and featuring an afterparty at Bibi's Burger Bar. All ticket sales will benefit victims of the fires, so arrive early and fill the theater for a cathartic evening of thrills and chills on Friday, Oct. 20, at Roxy 14 Stadium, 85 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $15. 707.525.8909.

SEBASTOPOL

Healing Energy Every summer, the Peacetown concert series mixes music and positive energy for weekly love fests in Sebastopol. This week, the organizers behind the series, specifically the Mr. Music Foundation, which also provides music programs in local schools, are gathering together for a special day-long Peacetown Fire Benefit. The event promises to include music, dancing, laughter and healing for those affected by the fires. Admission is free, though monetary donations will be gladly accepted for the Redwood Credit Union Fire Fund. Food, beer, fine wine and a silent auction will also raise funds on Saturday, Oct. 21, at the Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St., Sebastopol. 2pm. Free. 707.508.5449.

N A PA

Musical Relief As the smoke clears, Napa County’s artistic community is beginning to rally. Such is the case with singer-songwriter Shelby Lanterman, who is organizing the Napa Strong: Benefit Concert, featuring an array of local talent. The all-day event features performances by Ordinary Sons, Dirty Cello, the Sorry Lot and a ton of other songwriters. All proceeds from the door go to Napa Valley firefighters and a tip jar and silent auction will benefit the Napa Valley Disaster Relief Fund for victims of the fire. Come support Napa on Sunday, Oct. 22, at Billco’s Billiards, 1234 Third St., Napa. 1pm. $5. 707.226.7506.

S A N TA R O S A

Laugh & Give Back Notice a theme here: Sonoma County improvisation and standup group Evil Comedy was prepping their second annual HaHaHalloween event when fires swept through the region last week. Now, the comedy extravaganza is proceeding as a benefit for victims of the recent fires in Sonoma and Napa counties. First responders will get in for free and the proceeds for the event will be donated to support relief efforts. In addition to a lineup of local comedians, the event will have beer and wine on hand and a silent auction. Evil gives back on Sunday, Oct. 22, at the Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $10. 18 and up. 707.528.3009.

—Charlie Swanson

BEGIN AGAIN Bestselling author Amy Tan reads from and speaks about her new memoir, ‘Where the Past Begins,’ at Dominican University in San Rafael on Oct. 23. See Lectures, p24.


BIG-SCREEN RELIEF The documentary ‘Dolores’ screens as part of Movies to Benefit Fire Relief & Healing.

World of Huerta Alexander Valley Film Festival turns into fire-relief benefit BY CHARLIE SWANSON

S

ince its inception three years ago, the Alexander Valley Film Society and its annual film festival, led by executive director Kathryn Hecht, has dedicated itself to community engagement and cultural enrichment. This year’s third annual Alexander Valley Film Festival

was set to be the largest festival yet for the film society, with diverse films and documentaries scheduled to screen in Cloverdale, Geyserville and Healdsburg beginning from Oct. 19 to Oct. 22. Those plans drastically changed last week when the Pocket fire tore through the North Bay, engulfed a large part of Geyserville and sent people in those northern Sonoma County communities scrambling,

including Hecht. Through the smoke and the panic, Hecht remained focused on the festival and announced this week that the society has shifted plans and will now host Movies to Benefit Fire Relief & Healing, adapting the film festival to serve as a fundraiser for relief and recovery from the fires. “It was a decision we made very carefully, very thoughtfully,” says Hecht. “We knew it was important

to show up for the community with the strengths we had to offer.” Hecht says all proceeds from the event will support the Community Foundation of Sonoma County’s Resilience Fund, and the Alexander Valley Film Society is seeding the donation effort with over $44,000 in contributions from the society’s board of directors, sponsors and local donors. Originally slated to feature some 40 screenings, the new schedule is slightly pared down but will still include several of the festival’s film selections offered with a “pay what you can” option. “We know movies provide an escape, we know there is incredible comfort in gathering with the community in time of crisis,” says Hecht. “We can provide a physical space and a spiritual space for people to connect with one another, to spend time with their community and help their community by doing so.” Movies to Benefit Fire Relief & Healing opens on Thursday, Oct. 19, with the biographical documentary Dolores screening at Alexander Valley Hall in Geyserville. The film, about farmworker union organizer Dolores Huerta, is an inspiring look at an often under-recognized activist who persisted through police beatings and gender bias in the 1950s. The screening includes dinner from Carrie Brown of Healdsburg’s Jimtown Store and potluck dessert. “It’s a real privilege to turn this festival around and make this into an event for the people,” says Hecht. Information on ticket sales and reservations is at avfilmsociety.org/ tickets, or call 866.811.4111.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 8-24, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Ideas

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Show Times

Sonoma County theater affected by wildfires BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

he show, as they say, must go on. In Sonoma County, that maxim has been slightly adjusted due to the theateroblivious wildfires. Here’s a roundup of how our local theater companies have been affected, and which shows are going on as planned and which are postponed.

6th Street Playhouse (Santa Rosa) Steel Magnolias’ delayed opening will take place Friday, Oct. 20. The playhouse has reportedly become a temporary shelter, taking in a number of displaced cast members. Cinnabar Theater (Petaluma) The

comedy-drama Quartet opened last Friday as planned, despite the displacement of some cast members and the loss of lighting designer Wayne Hovey’s Santa Rosa home. Left Edge Theater (Santa Rosa) Located in a wing of the fire-damaged Luther Burbank Center, Left Edge Theater’s black box space remains intact, though it did suffer extensive smoke and water damage, and the company has therefore postponed its Nov. 3 opening of the comedy Bakersfield Mist. The play will be rescheduled for later in the season. Lucky Penny Theater Company (Napa) The opening of The Crucible, by Arthur Miller, originally scheduled for Oct. 20, has been postponed until Oct. 27. Main Stage West (Sebastopol) The one-woman show Mary Shelley’s Body (written by yours truly) was postponed, and will now debut Thursday, Oct. 19. Two Saturday matinees, at 2pm, have been added to the run on Oct. 21 and 28. Roustabout Theater (Santa Rosa) Also based at the LBC, Roustabout lost its costume storage area to the flames. The company is currently rehearsing offsite, and expects to return to the LBC’s Carston Cabaret room on Nov. 5. Santa Rosa Junior College The SRJC’s theater department canceled its final weekend of the drama It Can’t Happen Here. The college’s Nov. 17 opening of Disney’s The Little Mermaid, to be staged at Maria Carrillo High School, will take place as planned. Sonoma Arts Live (Sonoma) Following the postponement of its opening weekend, the classic drama The Rainmaker is expected to open this Thursday, Oct. 19, at Andrews Hall in the Sonoma Community Center. Spreckels Theater Company (Rohnert Park) Spamalot—with its timely anthem “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life”—opened its planned three-week run last Friday. Director David Yen stepped in, script in hand, for cast member Riz Gross, hospitalized due to burns suffered when escaping the fire. Her home was lost in the blaze.


Film

19 FU N CTIO N A L A RT

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Friday, October 20 – Thursday, October 26

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd

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In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling

Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ VICTORIA AND ABDUL A MIGHTY HEART

(1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 RR (12:00 2:20 4:45) THE JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:007:10 7:209:40 9:45PG-13

MARK FELT:

(12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 RActor! 2 Academy Award THE MANBest WHO

“A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER BROUGHT DOWN THE Past!” WHITE Painterly Work Of Decades – HOUSE LA (12:20) 2:45 5:10 7:30 9:45 R Times

LA2:45 VIE5:10 EN 7:30 ROSE (12:20) 9:45 R

Fri, Oct 20th 3:45 7pm 6:45 Q&A 9:45 with PG-13 co-author (12:45) John O’Connor and5:00 Joan Felt9:00 in attendance (1:00) 3:00 7:00 NR (12:45) 3:45Noms 6:45Including 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET OF KELLS 10 Academy Best Picture!

SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE

SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:35) Could Make9:30 This (12:05 2:15 7:00 PG-13 4:00 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

GEOSTORM

ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including

Jewelry by Roost

PRODIGAL SONS (1:00) 3:10 7:30 9:40 R Best Picture, Best5:20 Actor & Best Director! (1:10 6:45 PG-13 (2:20) 9:10 4:00) NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu MILK “Haunting and Hypnotic!” – Rolling Stone “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

BLADE RUNNER 2049

THE GIRL THE TATTOO (12:15 3:30) 7:00 NoShow Passes Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, No Thu PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat,R No 6:45 6:45 Show Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 4:00 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

MARSHALL

SMOKE JUMPERS Everyone wants to cheer firefighters—even when

the acting is bad.

Brave Hearts

You can love firefighters and still dislike this movie BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he North Bay is primed to admire the heroism of firefighters. Their job gets worse every year, and no praise is worthy enough for them. And, sadly, along comes Only the Brave, with its unimaginative title—a true story of loss, easily predictable from seeing the name “Jennifer Connelly” in the credits. As the actress Sylvia Sidney once said about the weepy parts she had, Connelly should have been paid by the tear.

It’s the story of the Granite Mountain Hotshots, a team dropped in to dig firebreaks and set off controlled burns in the Yarnell Hill fire near Prescott, Arizona, in 2013. Miles Teller is the rookie McDonough, called Donut, the town loser given the chance for redemption by the chief, Eric Marsh (Josh Brolin). At home, there’s strife between Marsh and his horse-rescuing wife Amanda (Connelly): she wants a kid; he doesn’t want to leave a kid orphaned by fire. Happily, Connelly isn’t given the line “If you go fight that fire, I might not be here when you get back.” (It’s actually “You live in a glass box labeled ‘Break in case of fire’!”) In glimpses, we see the Connelly of the days before she became a weeping Madonna; she’s a lithe horsewoman and she looks good in a cowboy hat. Visually, the two work well together, what with Brolin having one of the best chins in the business. Director Joseph Kosinski has worked with Disney and the upcoming sequel to Top Gun. He went with the latter hyperproactive style—lots of butt baring, classic rock and ball-busting. The fires are fierce, but they come late in the film. Meanwhile, Kosinski fattens a lean narrative coda with failed poetry. Only the Brave’s script is so weak it makes Brolin and others look like secondgeneration movie stars putting their feet up, instead of the top-drawer actors we know they can be. ‘Only the Brave’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.

FROST/NIXON (12:10 2:40 5:10) 7:40 10:05 PG-13 (2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!”

(12:00) 9:50 R THE MOUNTAIN BETWEEN US – Slant5:00 Magazine REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

“Deliciously unsettling!” Times (1:30PARIS, 4:10) 7:10 9:45 PG-13 JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA (1:15) 4:15 7:00 9:30 R (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

THE presents GHOST Kevin Jorgenson the WRITER California Premiere of

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Music

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Local bands contribute to benefit compilation BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

f all had gone according to plan, fun-loving punk band and Santa Rosa natives Decent Criminal would be celebrating the Oct. 13 release of their excellent new LP, Bloom, with a free show at the Last Record Store this weekend. Those plans changed last week when fires swept through the region. “It’s bittersweet to be releasing an album this week,” says Tristan Martinez, frontman of Decent Criminal. “It was like, how could we put out a record and be excited when all our friends and families have lost their homes?’ It’s insane.” Though Martinez currently lives in Long Beach, his heart is still in Santa Rosa, and he has agonized over the last week while watching

the disaster unfold from afar. “We’ve been waiting for updates online, talking with my parents, trying to find out everything we can,” says Martinez, whose parents live near Piner and Fulton roads in Santa Rosa, and were evacuated Oct. 9. On Oct. 10, the band met to discuss their plan to play in Santa Rosa on Saturday, Oct. 21, which they ultimately cancelled. Then they came upon an idea to give back. “We felt like we wanted to do what we could as a band to raise funds and benefit victims,” says Martinez. The band spoke with their Milwaukee-based record label, Dodgeball Records, and offered the idea of a benefit compilation album. Dodgeball Records owner Chris Messer immediately agreed. The album, For Santa Rosa, is online now and all proceeds will go to relief for victims of the Tubbs fire. “We put the word out [about the compilation], and had a lot of great responses from everybody wanting to be a part of it,” says Martinez. Sonoma County bands featured on the compilation include indiepop outfit Self Care, fronted by Santa Rosa songwriter Ryan Michael Keller, local rockers Argentivas, alt-punks Green Light Silhouette, veteran Forestville pop-punk band Bracket, old-school punks M Section, new-school punks Brown Bags and selfdescribed “wine punks” Sciatic Nerve, whose own self-titled debut album came out on Oct. 13 as well. The compilation will also feature bands from across the country including Off With Their Heads, Smoking Popes, Boss’ Daughter, Showoff and more. Many of the tracks on the album are unreleased or yet-to-bereleased, including Decent Criminal’s track, “Rocks,” which was recorded during the Bloom sessions. Incidentally, many of the tracks on Bloom were written at Manzanita Studios near Coffey Park in Santa Rosa. “A lot of us grew up in that neighborhood,” says Martinez. “It’s crazy to think that all the memories there are now just that—memories. It’s so sad.” More info at dodgeballrecords. bandcamp.com/music.


Note: Due to fires, listings may change. Check venues for updated information.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY City of Caterpillar

Virginia punk legends hit the stage with newly reformed Santa Rosa band Litany for the Whale, local favorites Sabertooth Zombie and brand new girl group Holy Wood. Oct 21, 7pm. $15. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Mike Love

Reggae’s rising star makes music full of healing and inspiration. Oct 19, 8:30pm. $17. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Peter Serkin

Distinguished pianist’s performances and recordings have been lauded worldwide for decades. Oct 20, 7:30pm. $35 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

MARIN COUNTY Antibalas

Brooklyn-based collective has perfected an expressive Afrobeat sound over its nearly two decades of touring. Oct 25, 8pm. $25-$30. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Fairfax Irish Festival

Seventh annual music fest features nearly 30 artists and bands at venues throughout the area all weekend Oct 20-22. 19 Broadway Club, 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax, fairfaxirishfestival.com.

North Mississippi Allstars

Siblings Luther and Cody Dickinson lead the longtime Southern blues-rock outfit for a rollicking night of jams. Oct 19, 8pm. $22. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY Boz Scaggs

The acclaimed songwriter performs the hits and fan

favorites from his many classic albums over two nights. Oct 19-20, 8pm. $65 and up. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Oct 18, West Coast songwriters competition. Oct 20, Robbie Elfman. Oct 21, Whitherward. Oct 22, 2pm, Allen Early. Oct 25, Bluegrass and Old Time Music. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center Oct 20, Audiobahn with Vespertine Orchestra and Vintage Crush. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Oct 18, Fly by Train. Oct 19, the Rock and Roll Rhythm Review. Oct 20, the Melt with Mike Saliani Band. Oct 21, Go by Ocean. Oct 22, Smokehouse. Oct 24, Jaydub & Dino. Oct 25, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Brewsters Beer Garden Oct 19, bluegrass and bourbon with Festival Speed. Oct 20, the String Rays. Oct 21, Blithedale Canyon. Oct 22, the Fabulous BioTones. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

Guerneville Library

Oct 21, 2:30pm, Tezkatlipoka Aztec Dance & Drum. Oct 25, 5pm, Vellamo. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Oct 18, Songwriters in the Round. Oct 20, the Palmer Squares. Oct 23, Monday Night Edutainment with Xander. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

Hotel Healdsburg

Oct 21, Chris Amberger Trio with Grant Levin and Rodney Raukus. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Oct 20, DJ Ricki. Oct 21, Howlo-ween Hoopla hosted by the Tiny Pitbull. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Oct 18, Royal Deuces. Oct 19, Whitherward. Oct 20, Dodgy Mountain Men. Oct 22, the Shots. Oct 25, Sista Otis. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

Oct 19, Cantor Roslyn Barak. Oct 20, Music, Theatre Arts & Dance Showcase. Oct 22, 2pm, Navarro Trio. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Oct 18, 2pm, Vocal Repertory

ZOSO

SATURDAY, DEC 16 THE WORLD’S ONLY FEMALE TRIBUTE TO IRON MAIDEN

THE IRON MAIDENS ROCKSTAR UNIVERSITY WOULD LIKE TO INVITE YOU TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR TOP NOTCH RECORDING STUDIO WE ARE CURRENTLY OFFERING DISCOUNTS ON DAY RATES. CALL 707.694.1785 OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE RSURECORDINGSTUDIO.COM FOR DETAILS

Oct 19, Susan Sutton. Oct 20, Don Olivet Jazz Trio. Oct 21, Vernelle Anders. Oct 24, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Many Rivers Books & Tea

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room

Oct 21, Buck Thrifty. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

SATURDAY, DEC 9 THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE

Main Street Bistro

Flamingo Lounge

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

DAMAGE INC

Oct 21, 2pm, Decent Criminal and Brown Bags. 1899-A Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.1963.

Oct 19, “The Garden of Music” with Dominic Schaner. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.829.8871.

Oct 20, Project 4 Band. Oct 21, Funky Dozen. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

SATURDAY, NOV 4 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA’S TRIBUTE TO METALLICA

Last Record Store

Crooked Goat Brewing Oct 21, 3pm, John Courage. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

21

Oct 21, 5:30pm, T Luke & the Tight Suits. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Treatment Pro a s o R gr a ta n a m S GET YOUR LIFE BACK!

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Oct 20, Red Fang with Once and Future Band. Oct 21, Petty Theft with the Kenneth Brian Band. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Newman Auditorium

Oct 22, 4pm, Santa Rosa Junior College chamber music series presents the Telegraph Quartet. SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4372. )

22

Do you or someone you care about rely on prescription or opioid pain medication or heroin to get through the day? Ask the following questions: • Have they ever given up activities to use them? • Are they spending more time on activities to get them? • Have they ever used them despite negative consequences? If the answer to any of these questions was YES, they may have unintentionally become opioid dependent. Help might be closer than you think.

For more information on opioid dependence and its treatment, please call

707-576-0818 or visit www.srtp.net

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B, Santa Rosa

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Music

Recital. Oct 22, HUDSON. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.


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THU BENEFIT CONCERT FOR OCT 19 SONOMA FIRE VICTIMS 7:00pm/Clothing donations encouraged/Afro Funk Experience and The Messengers/Amadou FRI SOULFUSE OCT 20 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 Donation to Sonoma County fire victims

SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND SERIES (EVERY 3RD WEDNESDAY)

$8/DOORS 7 /SHOW 7:30/21+

FRI OCT 20

THE PALMER SQUARES

+ DJ TRUE JUSTICE FEAT VOCAB SLICK

MON OCT 23

SAT DAVID & LINDA LAFLAMME OCT 21 IT’S A BEAUTIFUL DAY 8:30pm/$15

THU OCT 26

TUE OCT 24 THU OCT 26 FRI OCT 27

$15/DOORS 9/SHOW 10/21+

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT XANDER (MONDIAL AFRIQUE) $10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

SHOOK TWINS

+ JERRY JOSEPH (SOLO)

FRI OCT 27

CIRQUE DU SEBASTOPOL

10TH ANNIVERSARY EXTRAVAGANZA SAT OCT 28

8pm/Dancing/$5

SANG MATIZ

8pm/Dancing/$10 THU RAY WYLIE HUBBARD NOV 2 8pm/Dancing/$20 ADV/$25 DOS

CIRQUE DU SEBASTOPOL

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

MEMORY LANE COMBO

AND A COSTUME PARTY

$15–25/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

8pm/Dancing/Reggae/$25 Adv/$30 DOS

TUE GATOR NATION OCT 31 HALLOWEEN CONCERT

WITH ROYAL JELLY JIVE + SAMVEGA

$15–40/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

BLACK UHURU

8:30pm/Dancing/$12 ADV/$15 DOS SAT ROCKIN’ JOHNNY BURGIN OCT 28 8:30pm/Blues/Dancing/$10

$12–15/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:45/21+

CHARLES THE FIRST, INI

Occidental Center for the Arts

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI WED OCT 18

WITH RANDOM RAB + VNDMG,

224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Oct 21, the Larry Stefl Group. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

10TH ANNIVERSARY EXTRAVAGANZA

Music ( 21

RESTAURANT & MUSIC VENUE CHECK OUT THE ART EXHIBIT VISIT OUR WEBSITE, REDWOODCAFE.COM 8240 OLD REDWOOD HWY, COTATI 707.795.7868

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show Fri

7:45 Swing Dance Lessons with Oct 20 Joe & Mirabai

Stompy Jones 8:00 Sat Oct 21 Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys Western Swing, Rockabilly 8:30 Sun The Legendary Oct 22 Commander Cody and His Modern Day Airman A Rare Touring Performance 7:00 Sat

Foxes In The Henhouse 7:30 Sun Nov 5 Will Durst 7:00 Putting the Mock Back in Democracy Nov 4

“Election Relief”

Fri

Nov 10

Rancho Debut! The Distractions 8:00 / No Cover

Matt Jaffe &

8:30 Nov 11 Illegals The Bay Area’s Premier Sat

Sat

Eagles Tribute Band

Nov 18

Rancho Debut!

Lavay Smith’s

“Speakeasy Supper Club” 8:30

Annual Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday, November 23 Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Oct 19, 6:30pm, Joe Endoso. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Redwood Cafe

Oct 18, Irish set dancing. Oct 19, ThornRose. Oct 21, It’s a Beautiful Day. Oct 22, 3pm, Old Time Music Fiddle Jam. Oct 22, 6pm, Irish jam session. Oct 23, open mic with DJ Loisaida. Oct 24, Black Uhuru. Oct 25, Pop-Up Jazz Jam with Debra Anderson. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Oct 22, Oktoberfest benefit for Dogma Animal Rescue. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Rock Star University House of Rock Oct 20, Metal Shop and the Butlers. 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

Sebastopol Community Center

Oct 21, 7pm, “the Songs of Joni Mitchell” with Allyson Paige. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol. 707.823.1511.

Spancky’s Bar

Oct 20, Tommy Odetto’s birthday show. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Oct 20, the Risky Biscuits. Oct 21, the Dream Farmers. Oct 23, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Oct 24, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

MARIN COUNTY College of Marin Kentfield Campus

Oct 19, 7:30pm, Golden Gate Brass Band. 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9576.

Fairfax Library

Oct 18, 7pm, songs of Scotland & Ireland with Margaret Miles. 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

Fenix

Oct 20, Miles Schon Band. Oct 21, the Tazmanian Devils. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

Oct 20, Pp Rocks and Haulin Oats. Oct 22, 5pm, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott and Jeffrey Martin.

Oct 18, Matt Herrero and friends. Oct 25, Danny Uzi and Darren Nelson. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

19 Broadway Club

Oct 19, Koolwhip. Oct 20, 5:30pm, Todos Santos. Oct 20, 9pm, Damn Near Halloween festival with DAGO Muzik. Oct 22, Christopher Hawley. Oct 23, open mic. Oct 24, Eddie Neon blues jam. Oct 25, Void Where Prohibited. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Oct 18, Robert Elmond Stone and friends. Oct 19, Michael LaMacchia Band. Oct 20, Michael Aragon Quartet. Oct 21, Michael LaMacchia Band. Oct 22, Naughty Field Mice. Oct 23, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Oct 24, open mic. Oct 25, singer songwriter showcase. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Oct 18, J Kevin Durkin. Oct 19, Ian McArdle Trio. Oct 20, Barrio Manouche. Oct 21, James Henry & Company. Oct 22, Pedro Rosales y Con Quimba. Oct 24, Michael Fecskes. Oct 25, Sebastian Monreal Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Oct 18, Relatively Dead. Oct 19, Deborah Winters. Oct 24, Panama Jazz Trio. Oct 25, Lorin Rowan. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Oct 18, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. Oct 19, Modern Monsters. Oct 20, Sucker MCs. Oct 21, Culann’s Hounds. Oct 22, Liquid Green. Oct 23, Billy D’s open mic. Oct 24, Fresh Baked Blues. Oct 25, the New Sneakers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Oct 20, Stompy Jones. Oct 21, Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys. Oct 22, Commander Cody. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Oct 19, Toque Tercero flamenco night. Oct 20, the 7th Sons. Oct 21, 12:30pm, Lau and friends. Oct 21, 8pm, Rolando Morales and Carlos Reyes. Oct 22, 5pm, Candela with Edgardo Cambon.

Oct 24, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Sweetwater Music Hall

Oct 19, Tim Flannery & the Lunatic Fringe. Oct 23, Skyway Man with Dan Juan and Big Kitty. Oct 24, Bread & Roses benefit with Matthew Curry, the Steepwater Band and Birdseed. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Oct 18, Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band with Luther and Cody Dickinson. Oct 19, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Oct 20, Top 40 Friday with Achilles Wheel. Oct 22, 12:30pm, Scott Law’s Bluegrass Dimension. Oct 22, 7:30pm, the Casual Coalition. Oct 25, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Oct 21, Tommy Igoe Groove Conspiracy. Oct 22, 5pm, Sunday Sessions featuring Kimrea’s Pro Showcase. Oct 25, noon concert with MUSA. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Oct 20, Aint Misbehavin. Oct 21, Amy Wigton. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Andaz Napa

Oct 18, Vince Costanza. Oct 21, David Ronconi. Oct 25, John Vicino. 1450 First St, Napa. 707.687.1234.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards

Oct 21, California Zephyr. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Fairwinds Estate Winery

Oct 21, 12pm, Whiskey and Honey. 4550 Silverado Trail N, Calistoga, 877.840.6530.

The Groezinger Estate

Oct 22, 11am, “Music on the Lawn” with Foxtails Brigade. 6481 Washington St, Yountville. 800.351.1133.

River Terrace Inn

Oct 19, Jason Bodlovich. Oct 20, Craig Corona. Oct 21, Smorgy. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Oct 18, 5pm, Mike Greensill with Denise Perrier. Oct 19, Don Bassey and friends. Oct 20, Second Street Band. Oct 21, Guitarzilla. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.


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Note: Due to fires, listings may change. Check with venues for updated information.

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY The Art Wall at Shige Sushi

Through Oct 29, “Claude Smith: Prints, Drawings & Paintings,” longtime Sonoma County artists presents an eclectic show that touches on themes of music, Taoist philosophy and the artistic process. 8235 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Tues-Sat, 11:30am to 2pm; Tues-Thurs & Sun, 5:30 to 9pm; Fri-Sat, 5:30 to 9:30pm. 707.795.9753.

City Hall Council Chambers

Through Oct 19, “Jessica Jacobsen: Woven,” collection of drawings and paintings that are mindful, attentive and protective. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Finley Community Center

Through Oct 26, “Short Stories: A Group Exhibition,” Sonoma County artists come together and present new works in a variety of media. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. Mon-Fri, 8 to 6; Sat, 9 to 11am. 707.543.3737.

Gallery One

Through Oct 23, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through Oct 22, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

Healdsburg Shed

Through Oct 30, “Food Sovereignty, No to GMO Project” exhibition of posters from Mexican artist Francisco

Toledo is inspired by the international food movement and agrarian reform. 25 North St, Healdsburg. 7 to 7, event times vary. 707.431.7433.

IceHouse Gallery

Through Oct 28, “The Pond Series,” Adam Wolpert’s collection of 70 paintings looks at one scene in different seasons for a mesmerizing journey. 405 East D St, Petaluma. 707.778.2238.

My Daughter the Framer Through Oct 22, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. Daily, 10 to 5:30. 707.542.3599.

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Oct 21, “Tidal Response,” art and science intersect through a series of artworks depicting coastal environments, particularly Sonoma County. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Through Oct 29, “El Dia de Los Muertos,” featuring Bay Area Latino artists Sammy Sanchez Monter, Angela Byron, Nestor Torres and David Tafoya. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Redwood Cafe

Through Oct 30, “October Art Exhibition,” curated by Eolah Bates. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Open daily. 707.795.7868.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Oct 22, “Sonoma County Art Trails Preview Exhibit,” see works from every artist involved in the annual Art Trails open studios tour. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Stones Throw

Through Oct 22, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 8278 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Tues-Sat, 11am to

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 8-24, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Arts Events 5:30pm. Sun, Noon to 5pm. 707.242.6669.

MARIN COUNTY Book Passage

Through Oct 31, “Altered Book Sculptures,” Emily Marks’ contemporary art based on classic literature displays in the gallery. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera. Daily, 9am to 9pm. 415.927.0960.

Cavallo Point Lodge

Through Oct 30, “Wonder & Awe,” renowned artist and award-winning filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg shows his 2D and 3D moving images, created as fine art for digital screens. 601 Murray Circle, Sausalito. 415.339.4700.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through Oct 26, Essence of Water,” juried by Kay Carlson and Stephen Ehret, the show features several artists diving into the watery subject. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Tiburon Town Hall

Through Oct 31, “Patricia Leeds: Parallel Thoughts,” Marin artist shows works that explore the creative process in encaustic on paper and digital painting. 1505 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon.

NAPA COUNTY Napa Valley Museum

Through Oct 29, “The Migrant Series,” Colorado artist Don Coen’s stunning largescale portraits of migrant workers makes its West Coast premiere in the Main Gallery. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

Sofie Arts

Through Oct 29, “A Sky as Long as California: Seven Nearby Stars,” group show features works by Will Ashford, Christine MacDonald, Nancy Willis, Tony Spiers and others. 1407 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.341.3326.

Comedy HaHaHalloween Treat yourself to a spooktacular night

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ANIMAL HEALING ARTS Holistic Veterinary Medicine Integrative Wellness Care Over 21 years experience

Dr. Lisa Pesch 5430 Commerce Blvd., Suite 1K, Rohnert Park AnimalHealingArts.net • 707.584.PETS (7387)


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of standup, improv and sketch comedy that benefits victims and first responders of fires in Sonoma and Napa Counties. Oct 22, 7:30pm. $10. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa, $10-$20.

Rush Hicks

The imperial clown comic gives his fool’s perspective on politics, circus, religion, burlesque, love and life. Oct 22, 8:30pm. $15. Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Howie Mandel

Veteran standup comedian and television personality takes the stage. Oct 21, 8pm. $60-$80. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Events Blind Scream Haunted House

Two terrifying haunted-house experiences under one roof get you in the mood for Halloween. Through Oct 31. $15-$35. SOMO Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, blindscream.com.

Sonoma County Art Trails

Enjoy the abundance of creative talent in Sonoma County by visiting the professional studios of more than 170 artists. Maps and catalogs available at sonomacountyarttrails.org. Through Oct 22. Sonoma County, multiple locations, Sonoma.

St. Helena Harvest Festival

Daylong event begins with a fun run and pet parade, then features live music, kids carnival, wine and food, arts and crafts and more. Oct 21. Downtown St Helena, Main St, St Helena, cityofsthelena.org.

Witchie Poo Halloween Extravaganza Annual variety show, featuring cast of Witchie Poo Players ages four years and up, includes a costume parade at intermission and prizes. Oct 21-22, 2pm. $8-$10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Film Beetlejuice

Tim Burton’s lively comedy screens. Oct 21, 7:30pm. $8. Rio

Theater, 20396 Bohemian Hwy, Monte Rio. 707.865.0913.

Blood Diner

“First they greet you, then they eat you” in this special screening of the ‘80s horror gem, featuring Q&A with director Jackie Kong and afterparty. Oct 20, 7pm. $15. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.525.8909.

Demain (Tomorrow)

Award-winning documentary shows how community actions can have a meaningful impact on climate change. Fri, Oct 20, 7pm and Sun, Oct 22, 4pm. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

and, of course, tons of beer to taste benefits the Phoenix Theater. Oct 21, 12pm. $40. Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds, 175 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

For Kids Kids Halloween Extravaganza

Enjoy snacks, a costume contest and other Halloweenthemed fun. Oct 21, 4pm. Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books, 138 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.2618.

Lectures

Jewish Film Festival

Twenty-second annual series presents Jewish themed films from around the world; screening next the series’ short films program. Oct 24, 1 and 7:30pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Petaluma Cinema Series

Petaluma Film Alliance screens Mike Nichols’ 1967 masterpiece “The Graduate” for a 50th anniversary celebration, with pre-film lecture and post-show discussion. Oct 18, 6pm. $5$6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, petalumafilmalliance.org.

Victoria & Abdul

Film about the true unexpected friendship between Queen Victoria’s (Judi Dench) and Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal), a young clerk from India, screens with a pop-up Indian dinner. Oct 23, 5pm. $30. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Food & Drink Italian Heritage Dinner

Chef Peter Janiak presents a menu of traditional Italian fare and revamped classics that will pair with Italian varietal wines. Oct 21, 6pm. $125. Seghesio Family Vineyards, 700 Grove St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3579.

Lagunitas Beer Circus Two stages of big-top entertainment, costume contests, midway games

Amy Tan

Bestselling author speaks at the Institute for Leadership Studies’ fall leadership lecture series in partnership with Book Passage. Oct 23, 7pm. $40. Angelico Hall, Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440.

Birding: A Great Hobby Presentation by Anne Kelley introduces participants to one of the world’s most popular hobbies. Oct 21, 9am. Richardson Bay Audubon Center, 376 Greenwood Beach Rd, Tiburon. 415.388.2524.

CO$T Taxpayer Forum

California taxpayer advocate Jon Coupal speaks on recent legislation that could skyrocket taxes and fees on essential services in Marin. Oct 19, 7pm. $15 donation. Corte Madera Community Center, 498 Tamalpais Dr, Corte Madera.

Food Systems, Communities & You

Prominent environmental activist Nikki Silvestri gives a presentation as part of SRJC Petaluma’s programming around the theme of “Food Justice and Regeneration.” Oct 19, 1:30pm. Free/$4 parking. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 415.392.5225.

League of Women Voters of Sonoma County Meeting

Director of Sonoma County health services Barbie Robinson speaks on the current health situation in the county. Oct 21, 1pm. Bennett Valley Senior Center, 704 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa.


Race Matters Dialogue & Educational Series

Van Jones

CNN commentator opens the 14th season of the Institute for Leadership Studies’ fall leadership lecture series in partnership with Book Passage. Oct 22, 4pm. $40. Angelico Hall, Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440.

Readings Book Passage

Templeton, making its world premiere. Through Oct 29. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Napa Main Library

Monty Python’s Spamalot

Oct 25, 7pm, “The Far Away Brothers” with Lauren Markham. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

Peju Winery

Oct 19, 6:30pm, “A Grandfather’s Lessons” with Jacques Pépin. $145. 8466 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford 707.963.3600.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Oct 18, 4pm, “How to Be an Elephant” with Katherine Roy. Oct 20, 7pm, “Sip” with Brian Allen Carr. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Oct 18, 7pm, “Not Quite a Genius” with Nate Dern. Oct 20, 7pm, “The Cherry Pickers” with Gregory C Randall. Oct 21, 1pm, “Becoming Myself” with Irvin Yalom. Oct 21, 4pm, “Wonder Girls” with Paola Gianturco. Oct 21, 7pm, “Shards of a Broken Mystery” with Shira Marin. Oct 22, 1pm, David St John and Susan Terris in conversation. Oct 23, 7pm, “Before You Know It” with John Bargh. Oct 24, 4pm, “The Wolf, the Duck & the Moose” with Mac Barnett. Oct 24, 7pm, “Mercy For Animals” with Nathan Runkle. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Readers’ Books

Book Passage By-the-Bay

Oct 19, 5:30pm, “Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel” with Carl Safina. 76 Albert Park Ln, San Rafael 415.453.1000.

Oct 21, 4pm, Meditation on the theme of water with Teri Glass and others. Oct 24, 6pm, “Natural Feasts” with Ellla Mills. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Oct 21, 1pm, “Dork Diaries Book 12: Tales from a Not-So-Secret Crush Catastrophe” with Rachel Renée Russell. Free. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa 707.579.4452.

College of Marin Library Oct 24, 7pm, “Censored 2018” with Susan Rahman and Project Censored. 835 College Ave, Kentfield 415.485.9475.

Left Bank Brasserie

Oct 20, 12:30pm, “A Grandfather’s Lessons”with Jacques Pépin. $145. 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur 415.927.3331.

Napa Copperfield’s Books

Oct 21, 2pm, “Pumpkin Spice

Oct 19, 7pm, “All Systems Go!” with Robert Adams and Brian Narelle. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Oct 20, 7pm, “Strange Contagion” with Lee Daniel Kravetz. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Community Center

Oct 20, 7pm, “A Mind at Home with Itself” with Byron Katie. $32. 390 Morris St, Sebastopol 707.823.1511.

WildCare

Theater Cabaret

Ross Valley Players present the rollicking Broadway musical, directed by mountain Play veteran James Dunn. Through Oct 22. $16-$32. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.456.9555.

Chicago

Broadway’s longest-running American musical comes to Novato. Oct 19-Nov 12. $12-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Mary Shelley’s Body

The famed author of “Frankenstein” explores her past and legacy in this one-woman play written by “Bohemian” contributor David

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Several presenters speak on jobs and economics. Oct 18, 8:30am. Free. Marin Community Foundation, 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato, unitedmarinrising.org.

Secrets” with Hillary Homzie. Oct 23, 4pm, “Mr. Lemoncello’s Great Library Race” with Chris Grabenstein. 3740 Bel Aire Plaza, Napa 707.252.8002.

Spreckels Theatre Company Presents the musical parody of the King Arthur legend adapted from the film “Monty Python and the Holy Grail.” Through Oct 29. $18-$30. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park. 707.588.3400.

Quartet

Wickedly funny play is all about art, age and the human spirit. Through Oct 29. $15$35. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

The Rainmaker

Sonoma Arts Live presents the Depression-era drama about one eventful day in a droughtridden town. Oct 19-29. $22-$37. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.938.4626.

Steel Magnolias

Six very different women in a small Louisiana town share friendship and heartache in this acclaimed play. Through Nov 5. $20-$33. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

StoryNights

Performers, actors, comics and writers take to the mic for a night of personal stories told live. Oct 18, 7:30pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Thomas & Sally

Marin Theatre Company opens its season with Thomas Bradshaw’s drama about Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings, the enslaved woman who mothered six of his children. Through Oct 29. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.5208.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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outdoor crops. Some cannabis in greenhouses survived, but it may be tainted with ash. “It was the beginning of the fire right there in Nuns Canyon, and [the farm] got hit very hard, just as the surrounding neighbors did.” The company rented the property and it was insured. Pearson says he plans to rebuild. In the meantime, he had to lay off all but seven of his 22 employees. He’s working on disaster relief and internal financial assistance for those workers. Hezekiah Allen, executive director of the California Growers Association cannabis trade group, said last week that 23 farms had been damaged, 21 of them lost entirely. He said most of the losses came in Sonoma County. His organization was working with state legislators to create an insurance program, but the work wasn’t done yet. “It was all about to happen.” Santa Rosa’s CannaCraft lost 15 greenhouses around Santa Rosa, about 5,000 plants. In a dramatic rescue, staffers trudged up near Hood Mountain as the fire raged to salvage what they could from greenhouses. The company will be testing the cannabis to see whether it’s been contaminated. As devastating as their losses were, the company opened its offices to other cannabis businesses displaced by the fire. It donated $100,000 worth of products to area dispensaries and is serving as a regional headquarters for the Red Cross. The company may also host FEMA trailers for displaced residents. “We see the industry coming together as a community,” says company founder Dennis Hunter. When the time comes, he hopes city and county officials will consider tax relief or other assistance for cannabis companies impacted by the fire. The California Growers Association has established a recovery fund for victims of the fire at tinyurl.com/ ydd3lp7t.


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Astrology For the week of October 18

ARIES (March 21–April 19) “I am my own muse,” wrote painter Frida Kahlo. “I am the subject I know best. The subject I want to know better.” Would you consider trying out this perspective for a while, Aries? If so, you might generate a few ticklish surprises. You may be led into mysterious areas of your psyche that had previously been off-limits. You could discover secrets you’ve been hiding from yourself. So what would it mean to be your own muse? What exactly would you do? Here are some examples. Flirt with yourself in the mirror. Ask yourself impertinent, insouciant questions. Have imaginary conversations with the person you were three years ago and the person you’ll be in three years. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“Happiness comes from getting what you want,” said poet Stephen Levine, whereas joy comes “from being who you really are.” According to my analysis, the coming weeks will bear a higher potential for joy than for happiness. I’m not saying you won’t get anything you want. But I do suspect that focusing on getting what you want might sap energy from the venture that’s more likely to thrive: an unprecedented awakening to the truth of who you really are.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Sigmund Freud was a medical doctor who laid the groundwork for psychoanalysis. Throughout the 20th century, his radical, often outrageous ideas were a major influence on Western culture. When Freud was 50, he discovered a brilliant psychiatrist who would become his prize pupil: Carl Jung. When the two men first met in Vienna in 1907, they conversed without a break for 13 consecutive hours. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you could experience a comparable immersion sometime soon: a captivating involvement with a new influence, a provocative exchange that enchants you, or a fascinating encounter that shifts your course. CANCER (June 21–July 22) In the next 12 months, I hope to help you track down new pleasures and amusements that teach you more about what you want out of life. I will also be subtly reminding you that all the world’s a stage, and will advise you on how to raise your self-expression to Oscar-worthy levels. As for romance, here’s my prescription between now and October 2018: The more compassion you cultivate, the more personal love you will enjoy. If you lift your generosity to a higher octave, there’ll be another perk, too: you will be host to an enhanced flow of creative ideas. LEO (July 23–August 22) Are you interested in diving down to explore the mysterious and evocative depths? Would you be open to spending more time than usual cultivating peace and stillness in a sanctuary? Can you sense the rewards that will become available if you pay reverence to influences that nurture your wild soul? I hope you’ll be working on projects like these in the coming weeks, Leo. You’ll be in a phase when the single most important gift you can give yourself is to remember what you’re made of and how you got made. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Louisa May Alcott wrote a novel titled A Long Fatal Love Chase, which was regarded as too racy to be published until a century after her death. “In the books I read, the sinners are more interesting than the saints,” says Alcott’s heroine, Rosamund, “and in real life, people are dismally dull.” I boldly predict that in the coming months, Virgo, you won’t provide evidence to support Rosamund’s views. You’ll be even more interesting than you usually are, and will also gather more than your usual quota of joy and self-worth—but without having to wake up even once with your clothes torn and your head lying in a gutter after a night of forlorn debauchery. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) A woman I know, Caeli La, was thinking about relocating from Denver to Brooklyn. She journeyed across country and visited a prime neighborhood in her potential new headquarters. Here’s what she reported on her Facebook page: “In the last three days, I’ve seen three different men on separate occasions wearing sundresses. So this is definitely the right place for me.” What sort of signs and omens would tell you what you need to do to be in the right place at the right time, Libra? I urge you to be on the lookout for them in the

BY ROB BREZSNY

coming weeks. Life will be conspiring to provide you with clues about where you can feel at peace, at home and in the groove.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Simon & Garfunkel released their first album in October 1964. It received only a modest amount of airplay. The two musicians were so discouraged that they stopped working together. Then Bob Dylan’s producer Tom Wilson got permission to remix “The Sounds of Silence,” a song on the album. He added rock instruments and heavy echo to Simon & Garfunkel’s folk arrangement. When the tune was re-released in September 1965, it became a huge hit. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I suspect you’re now at a point comparable to the time just before Tom Wilson discovered the potential of “The Sounds of Silence.”

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

“Consider how hard it is to change yourself,” wrote author Jacob M. Braude, “and you’ll understand what little chance you have in trying to change others.” Ninety-nine percent of the time, I’d advise you and everybody else to surrender to that counsel as if it were an absolute truth. But I think you Sagittarians will be the exception to the rule in the coming weeks. More than usual, you’ll have the power to change yourself. And if you succeed, your self-transformations will be likely to trigger interesting changes in people around you. Here’s another useful tip, also courtesy of Jacob M. Braude: “Behave like a duck. Keep calm and unruffled on the surface, but paddle like the devil underneath.”

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) In 1969, two earthlings walked on the moon for the first time. To ensure that astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed there and returned safely, about 400,000 people labored and cooperated for many years. I suspect that in the coming months, you may be drawn to a collaborative project that’s not as ambitious as NASA’s, but nevertheless fueled by a grand plan and a big scope. And according to my astrological calculations, you will have even more ability than usual to be a driving force in such a project. Your power to inspire and organize group efforts will be at a peak. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) I predict your ambitions will burn more steadily in the coming months, and will produce more heat and light than ever before. You’ll have a clearer conception of exactly what it is you want to accomplish, as well as a growing certainty of the resources and help you’ll need to accomplish it. Hooray and hallelujah! But keep this in mind, Aquarius: As you acquire greater access to meaningful success—not just the kind of success that merely impresses other people—you’ll be required to take on more responsibility. Can you handle that? I think you can. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

What’s your top conspiracy theory? Does it revolve around the Illuminati, the occult group that is supposedly plotting to abolish all nations and create a world government? Or does it involve the stealthy invasion by extraterrestrials who are allegedly seizing mental control over human political leaders and influencing them to wage endless war and wreck the environment? Or is your pet conspiracy theory more personal? Maybe you secretly believe, for instance, that the difficult events you experienced in the past were so painful and debilitating that they will forever prevent you from fulfilling your fondest dream. Well, Pisces. I’m here to tell you that whatever conspiracy theory you most tightly embrace is ready to be disproven once and for all. Are you willing to be relieved of your delusions?

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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Dear Oliver’s Market Customers, We are saddened by the devastating losses our community has sustained, and hope that you and your loved ones are safe. As much as we try to be otherwise, we are still at a loss for words. Our hearts are breaking for our employees, our customers, and our communities who have lost so much. You are invited to join us in supporting local fire victims. In addition to our $10,000 contribution to the North Bay Fire Relief Fund, Oliver’s Market will match all customer donations up to $25,000. 100% of all donations will go directly to victims to serve both immediate and long-term needs. Our employees who are able have been working tirelessly to remain open and provide the community with food, water and a sense of normalcy. We continue to operate with limited staff and resources, but are powering through to serve our customers to the best of our ability. The sense of community we are experiencing right now is a beautiful counterpoint to all that is tragic right now. Our sense of community is rising to new heights. There is a long journey ahead, but we know that together we will rebuild and be stronger than ever before.

Real Community.

– Together We Are –

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October 18-24, 2017