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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | OCTOBER 11-17, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.23

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Devastated

Firestorms Ravage the North Bay


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Bohemian

Destination: All in.

Editor

Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor

Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Arts Editor

Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Copy Editor

Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Contributors

Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, Dawn Heumann, James Knight, Ari LeVaux, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

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California’s Finest Casino

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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2017 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Stett Holbrook. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Don’t Forget My heartfelt thanks to the Bohemian for printing E. G. Singer’s thoughtful comments about the Vietnam War documentary (Open Mic, Oct. 4). I couldn’t agree more. After watching it, I have more questions than answers, and that’s a good thing because asking informed questions can lead to healing conversations. If you have veterans in your life who served in Vietnam, consider asking them, “What are some things about your experience that you wish people could understand?” If you

have ‘60s-era anti-war demonstrators in your life, consider asking them, “What are some of the things you feel you were able to accomplish?” If you have Vietnamese friends or family who lived through the war, consider asking them, “What was it like to witness so much conflict and chaos and still survive?” And if you have any ‘60s-era politicians in your life, consider asking them, “What is it like to see how your power affected so many lives?” I’m left with many questions about the anti-war movement. Even after learning about the massacre of civilian lives at

THIS MODERN WORLD

My Lai, I still don’t get how the shift from passionate pleas of “Bring Our Boys Home” to the hatred of yelling, “Baby killers” at these same boys (and girls) happened? Can you imagine the damage it would do to you if you came home from a war you were drafted into and had to face that level of total rejection, already feeling wounded, confused, misled and full of grief? I feel a deep sense of gratitude to all those who survived such turbulent times. For those who managed to work through your personal demons and find some sense of peace, you have made your

By Tom Tomorrow

families, our country and maybe even the world better as a result.

JEREMY JOSEPH

Santa Rosa

It’s Up To Us I am very concerned about the increased jet-traffic noise in Sonoma County. I see subdivisions being built without the infrastructure to support increased growth. I am dismayed that the board of supervisors approved enlarging the Sonoma County airport terminal to accommodate more air travel. In my opinion, the county government is in the devil’s pocket. What happened to individual responsibility to lessen your carbon footprint? I know it is going to be hard to change from the use of fossil fuels. There is little to no government support. It is up to the individual to stay more local, invest in alternate vehicles and change ways to reduce the use of fossil fuels. Do you really want to see the shit hit the fan?

LESLIE MIKULICH

Santa Rosa

Shame Game And shame on you, Kevin (Rhapsodies, Oct. 4), for taking such a narrow approach to an issue that simply reflects what happens when we blame others for our problems. You could just as easily be describing our government and the entities that control it, as well as many departments of law enforcement around the country. Until we find our way to end the wars going on in our own heads and hearts, we will always be plagued by “outside” enemies. This “us vs. them” paradigm has run its course. It has done zip to improve the human condition overall. Simple observation bears this out. The only difference between the past and now is the technology to mess with each other, and then inform us of it all. Doesn't take much to see the folly of that if we continue to put our attention on all the world’s “evils.” Endless war.

CHUCKEE

Via Bohemian.com Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


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Conflagration After the fires, what comes next? BY TOM GOGOLA

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S

anta Rosa and the North Bay at large have been devastated by fires that continues to rage, wreaking unfathomable havoc and destruction in their path, as more than 1,500 homes have been destroyed along with numerous businesses, wineries and other iconic structures.

For now, the stories are about individual acts of self-preservation and selfless heroism, but in coming days the smoke will clear and one day not long from now life will resume along a more routinized pattern of normalcy: PG&E will restore power, students will head back to school, cities and counties will assess the damage and celebrate the first responders under a clear blue sky as they remember the awful firestorms of October 2017. There will be questions, many of them. What could have been done differently to avoid such mayhem? How should Santa Rosa set out to rebuild? What’s the total economic damage to the North Bay? Those questions will be addressed in due course, and as the civic order of the day requires, the city will, one hopes, “emerge stronger than ever” from this disaster. But the urgent and immediate questions pivot on the fact that the city’s homeless population has just exploded. Where will they live as their homes are presumably rebuilt? The average rents in Santa Rosa are already among the highest in the nation, and the price of shelter is about to get a whole lot more expensive as the demand for housing will surely outpace the available local supply. In the immediate short-term, city and county leaders must act urgently to avoid the inevitable plague of unenlightened selfinterest that nearly always attends such disasters. New Orleans after Katrina and in suburban New York after Superstorm Sandy were both plagued by price spikes along multiple fronts: gasoline, bottled water, housing. Santa Rosa struggled to enact rent-control measures last year, thanks to pressure from the real-estate industry which opposed them. The city hasn’t seen anything like the firestorm of price-gouging that awaits once the smoke settles and the evacuation centers empty out. Where will they all go when they’ve no place to go? In the meantime, the Bohemian has established a fund administered by the Silicon Valley Community Foundation to support nonprofits working to get Sonoma and Napa counties back on their feet. Donate online at www.rebuildsonomafund.org. Tom Gogola is news editor of the ‘Bohemian.’

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Dining BETTER BURGERS? The secret to the Impossible Burger is leghemoglobin, which tastes like blood.

No Way!

Impossible Burger goes to the roots to create faux meat

I

have tasted the future of fake meat. Amazingly, it did not suck.

It's been two years since the Impossible Burger finally made its initial debut, after five years of buzz. From the beginning, the Redwood City, Calif.–based Impossible Foods, which makes the plant-based burger, had vowed to do what many considered the impossible: create a faux paddy

that was indistinguishable from the real deal. I’d heard it before, like when you hear a young fighter say they want to be world champion. Good luck with that. A desirable veggie burger is a legit culinary holy grail. Impossible Foods wants you to believe in a plant-based utopia where vegans would no longer have to fake their hamburgasms, and the occasional carnivore might blush a pinker shade of

BY ARI LEVAUX

medium. The company intends to heal the trauma buried in bellies of those who have tried to love a veggie burger, and lubricate the mouths of the most die-hard, unrepentant lovers of meat. The patty is built from a protein-heavy base of wheat, coconut and potato-based ingredients. Crucially, it also contains a plant ingredient that tastes almost exactly like animal blood. This secret weapon is called

leghemoglobin, and it tastes like hemoglobin, the thing in animal blood that carries oxygen to cells. Leghemoglobin is short for “legume-hemoglobin,” and is produced in special nodules on the roots of legume plants like peas and beans. When I first heard about Impossible Burger and leghemoglobin, I went to a neighbor’s garden and, with permission, harvested some pea plants. I located some nodules on the roots; they were pink inside. As I washed them, I wondered if they tasted like blood. And they did. That big metallic flavor. The taste of being punched in the face. Alas, most of us don’t currently live within striking distance of an Impossible Burger outlet. Nor do most of you live within striking distance of tasty animals that can be legally harvested, without taking a negative toll on the environment. So for the moment, most aspiring herbivores remain stuck in the familiar spot between various flavors of mush, some of which can be quite tasty. Today’s recipe is one such mush, an adulterated version of a red curry lentil recipe from the book Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi. If food like this were my only source of protein, I’d probably be OK. This dish doesn’t look or taste anything like meat, nor does it attempt to, which is refreshing. Let’s hope the next Tofurky I see will be at the Smithsonian Museum. But if the Impossible Foods people ever figure out bacon, they can call me ASAP.

Red Lentil Red Curry Start with the meditative process of preparing chile oil. On low heat, saute a small shallot, an inch of ginger and garlic, all sliced, and one star anise, a quartered


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tomato or tomato paste, and whatever kind of chile you’ve got. I used Thai red chile, jalapenos and these weird peppers from the market, cooked in sesame oil. Start with a few tablespoons of oil, but then add another half-cup, and keep on lowest heat for at least half an hour. Then strain. Next, prepare something green. The recipe calls for blanched peas. I had Romanesco and kale belly buttons, so I sauteed them with soy sauce, butter and garlic, and served them as finger foods to dip into the soup. The kale hearts really hung on to it. For the soup, slice a medium or large onion end to end, as thinly as possible, and cook in oil until clear. Add two or so tablespoons of Thai red curry paste (minding the overall heat tolerances of your audience). Cook for a moment, then add several fat sticks of fresh lemongrass. First, pound the lemongrass with a rolling pin, then peel off the tough outer leaves and add them whole. Mince the remains of crushed tender lemongrass hearts. Stir-fry, and then add three kafir lime leaves and a cup of lentils. If you don’t have lime leaf and lemongrass, that’s OK as long as you have good red chile paste, which should contain both of those. (In Missoula, Mont., we have fresh ginger and lemongrass at the farmers market, so your farmers have no excuses!) Add three cups of water and cook on low with the lid on for about 15 minutes, until lentils are completely soft but water hasn't completely steamed away. Fish out the lime leaves and any obvious lemongrass parts, and blend it all with a submersible blender, then add a cup of coconut milk, and two tablespoons each of soy sauce and lime juice. Bring to a simmer briefly. Garnish with your greens, and perhaps cilantro, and some of your chile oil, and serve with a swagger. It is, after all, a fact that they will wow at this dish. Probably more than they would a real beef patty.

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Love Wines Equality Vines has something to celebrate in Guerneville BY JAMES KNIGHT

D

iscriminating palates are quite welcome at Equality Vines, Guerneville’s new tasting room inspired by the causes of justice and equality.

The Equality Vines story starts when the landmark Obergefell v. Hodges case was wrapping up in the Supreme Court. As the named plaintiff in the case, which tested state same-sex marriage bans, Jim Obergefell enlisted a New York public relations firm to field the barrage of media attention and interview requests he was receiving. “Our role was as gatekeeper,” says Michael Volpatt, co-owner of Larkin/ Volpatt Communications. “It was a fascinating time, and wonderful to work for such a historic figure.” While vetting petitioners at said gate, Volpatt became interested in wine distributor Matt Grove’s

idea to create a sparkling wine that celebrated the court’s 5–4 decision in favor of recognizing same-sex marriages. Volpatt knew just the vintner to ask about blending a celebratory and inclusive sparkling: Joy Sterling of Iron Horse Vineyards, whose signature Wedding Cuvée was joined by a Rainbow Cuvée in 2014. Debuting on the first anniversary of Obergefell v. Hodges in June 2016, the 2008 Love Wins sparkling rosé ($35) is an appropriately exuberant, deep pink cuvée displaying toasty richness and red berry fruit. To help launch the new tasting room, which opened last month in a cornerstone location in Guerneville (the former Mercantile five-and-dime—alas, it is gone), Jim Obergefell himself mans the bar throughout November, pouring the new Love Wins blanc de blancs ($40), the Decision Pinot Noir ($60) and presumably signing copies of the book, Love Wins: The Lovers and Lawyers Who Fought the Landmark Case for Marriage Equality, also for sale at the tasting room. Each bottle sold contributes a donation to nonprofit organizations including Face to Face of Sonoma County. “I think Jim is an awesome spokesperson for us because his legacy will always live on,” says Volpatt. “He is representative of how far the LGBT people have come.” But there’s still a ways to go for many causes, which is why the brand introduced its next “pillar of equality” this year with the Suffrage Series dedicated to women’s equality. On Nov. 18, League of Women Voters president Chris Carson joins Obergefell to pour wines like the 2016 19th Amendment Sauvignon Blanc ($28), a juicy, green-fruited and grassy “New Zealand–style” savvy made by Alison Green-Doran. Bring any of these wines to your next celebration or Thanksgiving dinner—you can’t help but win. Equality Vines, 16215 Main St., Guerneville. Open daily except Tuesdays, 11am–5pm; Fri–Sat 11am–8pm. Tasting fee, $15. Free tastings Friday, 6–8pm, Labor Day through March. 707.604.5795.


11

Dawn Heumann

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM REDUCED TO ASHES A firefighter hoses down hotspots where a home once stood in the Coffey Park neighborhood.

Hell Fire

Wind-whipped disaster ravages the North Bay BY STETT HOLBROOK AND TOM GOGOLA

D

evastating. Apocalyptic. Unprecedented.

Survivors of Monday’s North Bay firestorms used different words to describe the intensity of the wind-whipped, early-morning blazes that left

much of the North Bay a smoking ruin, took at least 13 lives and left authorities looking for 150 missing people. By Tuesday, the multiple blazes in Sonoma, Napa and Mendocino counties were zero percent contained and more than 20,000 people had been forced to flee their homes

after the worst natural disaster in Northern California history. As of Tuesday afternoon, the fire was threatening the Oakmont Village retirement community and some 5,000 people were still in evacuation centers in Sonoma County—and nobody was being sent back home yet. PG&E

reported that more than 100,000 people were still without power. Sonoma County Sheriff Rob Giordano said his department is “working on damage assessments so we can put people back in their homes” during an afternoon press conference where he stressed safety and patience. By ) 12


Stett Holbrook

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12 Hell Fire ( 11 The Luther Burbank Center’s Left Edge Theatre was a total loss, but the main auditorium suffered minor damage.

Tuesday the death toll across the region had risen to 15, nine in Sonoma County, and more than 50,000 acres were burned in the Tubbs and Atlas fires in the Santa Rosa area and Napa County, respectively. Santa Rosa police and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) were on guard against looters, and the city enacted a dusk-to-dawn curfew; the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office closed access to mandatory evacuation areas and Giordano reported that increased police presence had contributed to “very few calls and no looting.” Fourth Street downtown was a shuttered ghost town as of Monday afternoon,

except for the Chinese restaurant which was serving through the smoky day. It started to come to life again Tuesday, but school was out, the courts were closed and the SMART train was limiting its service. Twenty employees of the SCSO lost their home to the fire, says Giordano. One employee of the Bohemian lost hers. “This is a huge event. This is an enormous fire,” Giordano told reporters. He added that he expected that there “may be a couple more” fatalities in the county. The estimated number of homes, businesses or other buildings destroyed by the multiple fires was at least 2,000.

The Tubbs fire, says Cal Fire spokeswoman Heather Williams, has claimed 571 buildings, 550 residential and 21 commercial. “There are 16,000-plus structures that are [still] being threatened,” she says. That fire started along the Sonoma-Napa County border Sunday night in Calistoga. Its cause is under investigation, Williams says. The damage is numbing in its scope and cruelly democratic in its reach: rich and poor alike have lost everything to Tubbs. Local institutions are no longer: Santa Rosa’s Hilton Sonoma Wine Country Hotel and historic Round Barn in Fountaingrove. Gone. The eastern side of the

Luther Burbank Center for the Performing Arts. A charred ruin. Kaiser and Sutter hospitals evacuated before the approaching flames. Paradise Ridge Winery. Reduced to ash. Downtown Glen Ellen, gutted. Arby’s. Trader Joe’s. K-Mart. Gone, gone and gone. McDonald’s, too. Santa Rosa’s Coffey Lane neighborhood north of Piner Road, lit by embers that jumped Highway 101, was the site of utter devastation. Block after block of middle-class homes surrounding Coffey Park were reduced to smoldering ash. Bohemian contributor Thomas Broderick reports that he evacuated with his uncle early Monday

) 14


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Dawn Heumann

Sebastopol’s Analy High School opened as a shelter Monday morning and quickly filled up.

Dawn Heumann

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14 Hell Fire ( 12

Evacuees from Oakmont arrive at Else Allen High School.

Chimneys and refrigerators were all that were left standing at many homes burned in Monday’s blaze.

morning and faces financial stress along with the loss of his home. He is not alone. Long after firefighters and Sonoma County sheriff deputies worked through the early morning hours to save as many lives as possible, the workingclass neighborhood once adorned with Halloween decorations had come to resemble a burned-out city under military siege. The National Guard has been called in to assist SCSO, says Giordano. The Guard was activated

centers—often without a cell phone or a cell charger. “A lot of it is just confusion,” he said. “I’m glad we can chip away at that number.” All over the region, gas mains roared with perilous open flames and broken water pipes feebly spewed water onto scorched earth as the acrid smoke of incinerated beds, couches, cars, bicycles and lives drifted through the air. Residents shuffled back to the now-unrecognizable Coffey Park neighborhood to survey their losses. They stood

after Gov. Jerry Brown’s state of emergency declaration yesterday; Giordano noted that they have search-and-rescue dogs and other assets. The county has fielded 240 missing persons reports, he said, and has “located 57 people safely.” He encouraged families to contact the county Emergency Operations Center if they have a missing loved one, and attributed much of the concern to the chaos of the moment, with panicked persons leaving their homes and heading to one of 25 evacuation

before chimneys that looked like gravestones in a smoldering cemetery, weeping and taking photos with cell phones. Seaneen DeLong, 57, walked south on Coffey Lane away from the fire with her yowling cat Fritz in a travel carrier. “It was the best neighborhood in the world,” she says. “Now it’s a charred ruin. It looks like a nuclear wasteland.” She was awakened by the fierce winds that sent embers from the Tubbs fire to the east into her


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Dawn Heumann

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432 Aviation Blvd Santa Rosa

neighborhood and was able to get out with her cat and little else. Scott Murray, 60, was heading in the other direction, slowly walking back to check on several properties, a rental unit he owned on Dogwood Lane, his ex-wife’s house around the corner and his home on Vermillion Way. The rental house, the place where he raised his children, burned to the ground. So did everything around it. The absence of familiar visual reference points— and the shock of the devastation— left him disoriented. “It looks like Dresden.”

His wife’s house was also gone and he called to give her the news. Then he trudged across Coffey Park, where it appeared a car had exploded and landed upside down, to check on his home. He expected the worst but suddenly the scene of destruction stopped. Like stepping from black-andwhite into color, the destruction stopped. His home, just a few houses away from piles of ash and twisted metal, was untouched. “Oh my God,” he said, overcome with emotion. “Oh my God. How was my house spared?”

) 16

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16 Hell Fire ( 15

Tom Gogola Tom Gogola

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A fire races down a ridge toward Wild Lilac Lane northeast of the Fountaingrove area.

Fire engulfs a home on Wild Lilac Lane Monday.

Chris Highland, 68, didn’t know what became of his residentialcare facility in Fountaingrove, one of the hardest hit areas of the fire. He was evacuated early Monday morning. He milled around Santa Rosa Fire Station No. 3 near the Coffey Lane catastrophe. “There was fire all around the place. It was unbelievable. It was just solid fire.” On Monday morning, the scene was eerily calm, yet blazingly dangerous at the curving corner of Wild Lilac Lane and Selene Court, east of Fountaingrove and

over a blazing ridge, near the Rincon Valley Christian School off Brush Creek Road. A reporter arrived, following the smoke, and no roadblocks had been established by law enforcement. From a cul-de-sac in this neighborhood of high-priced homes—many with Spanishtile roofs and many burned to the ground—one could watch fires popping up in an almost a 360-degree arc around the region. Mike Alderman came running down Wild Lilac with a big wrench in his hand and sporting

a Red Wing Boots T-shirt. Alderman is a plumber who came to Selene Court to check on his ex-wife, who was fine. He stayed behind to shut down gas lines on homes that had escaped the flames. It seems miraculous that any did escape, and created a jarring juxtaposition against neighbors’ homes that were reduced to smoldering ruins. The gas also ignited small fires which started creeping toward houses that had escaped the flames. Eventually, a small outbuilding went up in flames and

the son of the owner showed up from Sacramento to check out the destruction. He snapped photos on his phone and sent them to his parents, then distributed some water bottles and left. Cal Fire trucks made a few passes through the area over the course of several hours, keeping a watchful eye on this little section of hell, and a California Department of Corrections fire crew was busily fireproofing another house that had escaped the wrath of Tubbs. They scratched dirt around and


17

This fund, established by the Santa Rosa-based North Bay Bohemian weekly newspaper and administered by the Silicon Valley Community Foundation has no administrative overhead and will direct all proceeds to nonprofit organizations doing frontline work to get Sonoma and Napa counties back on their feet. Donate online: www.rebuildsonomafund.org

A car smolders in what was a garage near Coffey Lane Monday morning.

broke out the chainsaws to save the house, which was totally surrounded by destruction and on the neighboring lot. A pool at one destroyed home was filled with water and the lawn furniture and colorful canvas umbrella had escaped the blaze, somehow. Adding to the horrors of Monday night was the fate of the 200 patients who had to be evacuated from Kaiser Permanente and Sutter hospitals. Shawna Marzett, a patient-care technician at the hospital, said

Kaiser was admitting ambulances bearing fire victims until early Monday morning until the fire bore down on them from the hillsides above, and then it was time to evacuate. “Looking through those big glass windows you could feel the heat,” she said. “We had doctors and nurses watching their homes burn while they were helping.” She and the staff went room to room, wheeling out patients with IVs and babies from the intensive care ward and then slapping “empty” signs ) 18

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Dawn Heumann

Help the victims of the devastating Sonoma and Napa fires rebuild their homes, their businesses and their lives.


October Fires

Dawn Heumann

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | OCTO BE R 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18 Hell Fire ( 17

A bitter end to the 2017 vintage BY JAMES KNIGHT rieving the loss of wine is no frivolity in a time like this, when you consider the dreams and long years of work that built the wineries and vineyards damaged and lost in the fires that swept through Napa and Sonoma wine country this week, not to mention the livelihoods of the many residents employed in the business of making wine—even the good memories that wine lovers have of spending time at these places and the moments shared with their wines.

G

The lively Coffey Lane neighborhood burned to the ground in a matter of minutes.

on the rooms when everyone was safely out. In about two hours, the hospital was empty. “Kaiser did an amazing job getting people out,” she said. Patients from Kaiser and Sutter were bused to Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital and neighboring facilities. A hospital spokeswoman reported that about 170 patients had come through with fire-related injuries by Tuesday, far lower than anticipated. Most were treated for minor burns or smoke inhalation and released, though a dozen patients had more significant burns and four had to be transferred to burn centers. On Monday night around rush-hour, Highway 101 was choked with smoke and traffic, and dozens of lights blazing atop ambulances were headed north on the highway into the pop-up inferno zone. The firestorm was prompted by very low humidity (11 percent) and very high wind gusts. The wind had died down Monday, but Tuesday forecasters warned that offshore winds were picking up

again and would blow 25 to 30 miles an hour from the northeast on Tuesday night. Williams at Cal Fire says firefighters have “worked diligently at the southern end of the fires,” to build defenses to prepare for the windy prediction. Vice President Mike Pence was in Sacramento on a previously scheduled trip and he gave a press conference on Tuesday focused on the fire and the federal response. President Trump had just approved a disaster declaration, which means funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are on the way. Pence spoke for many when he highlighted the work of first responders. “Cal Fire is inspiring the nation, and we stand with them with great admiration and appreciation.,” the vice president said as he assured the North Bay that “more assets are on the way.” There are currently at least 600 fire personnel and 84 engines fighting the Tubbs fire, with assets drawn from the Cal Fire mutual-aid ranks of San Diego to the Oregon border.

And after the day that I spent rototilling some semblance of a fire break while watching two plumes advance on either side of my family’s property, I have to report that a still-cool glass of rosé wine was quite welcome. This is what we know so far about the wineries affected by the blaze: Paradise Ridge Winery, opened in 1994 by Walter and Marijke Byck and beloved for its views, sunset winetastings, Nagasawa historical exhibit, and sculpture garden, has been destroyed. The newly designated Fountaingrove District was hit particularly hard by the fire as it swept from Calistoga over the hill and through Santa Rosa neighborhoods. Just below, winemaker Adam Lee says that Siduri survived. “A minor miracle,” Lee reports. “Things burned on all sides of it.” The big custom-crush operation Punchdown Cellars, where many small wineries get their start in the business, remarkably is still standing amid a scene of devastation in North Santa Rosa, according to Suzanne Hagins of the organic-focused Horse & Plow. “Not sure the fate of the wines currently fermenting,” says Hagins, “but it sure seems unimportant in the face of all this.” On Silverado Trail in Napa Valley, photos of Signorello Estate Winery document that it went up in flames. In nearby Napa’s Stags Leap District, staff reports that White Rock Vineyards is gone, while an initial report of the loss of historic Stags’ Leap Winery was not correct. As of Tuesday, wine associations were hesitant too. “We’ve all been collectively concerned with each others’ well-being and property,” says Stags Leap District Winegrowers Association director Nancy Bialek, in a statement. “There has been much texting but damage has not been fully assessed as the Trail is closed. I do know vintners fought through the night to fend off flames and evacuate all.” Separate fires threatened the grassy slopes of the Carneros district. “Right now the fires remain in Carneros, and we won’t know the impact of the fires until we can assess the damage,” says Carla Bosco, Carneros Wine Alliance board chair. “Our two local fire crews, Carneros and Schell-Vista, have been amazing in protecting Carneros and we are grateful for their diligent work. We are ready to help those in need when we get the clearance to go back in.” It’s worth mentioning that while some have said that vineyards are a natural firebreak, it depends on whether the soil was tilled under or not—and other factors. St. Francis Winery reported that fire damaged some vineyards, while the winery stands. Early reports that picturesque Chateau St. Jean was burned were not correct. Meanwhile, the Nuns fire still threatened to jump the ridge back toward Napa on Tuesday afternoon.


WORD NERD ‘Basically I never really know what’s going to happens,’ says Sarah Vowell.

Vowell Sounds

Incurable papyrophiliac headlines inaugural Spoken Word Fest BY DAVID TEMPLETON

‘I

love paper,” says Sarah Vowell, lingering on the word “love” just a tad longer than most people would find comfortable. Her emphasis suggests a connection that extends beyond mere appreciation or respect, and strays into something akin to a deeply emotional relationship.

“It’s true. It’s a relationship. Books are my first love,” she affirms. “Books are where I found refuge as a kid. I love books. So I love paper.” First rising to fame as the teller of astonishing true stories on National Public Radio’s This American Life, Vowell now regularly reads aloud from her bestsellers like The Wordy Shipmates or Lafayette in the Somewhat United States. Her distinctly recognizable voice has

even been heard as Violet, the invisible girl, in Disney-Pixar’s The Incredibles. This weekend, Vowell will be headlining the inaugural Wine Country Spoken Word Fest, taking the stage on Saturday night at the Mystic Theater, to regale fans with her off-the-cuff Mensa-nerd verbalism and dry observations about the state of the world. Her appearance is part of an all-star evening that includes West Virginia storyteller

Bil Lepp and Los Angeles actorpoet Steven Connell. Asked what exactly she’ll be talking about, Vowell says she’s not entirely sure. She imagines she will read from one or more of her books, will probably discuss something happening in the news and will basically wing the rest. “It’s very improvisational, what I do,” she says. “I always think I know what I’m going to talk about, but then I tend to edit and change as I go. I’ll probably read from one of my books. I do tend to do that. I read, and then I interrupt myself. Then I fight valiantly against my own interruptions. And then I read some more. And then I take questions. I love taking questions. That’s the most spontaneous part of what I do. Basically, I really never know what’s going to happen.” As a writer who’s appeared all over the country, Vowell has learned that different parts of the U.S. respond differently to what she says. For example, on the West Coast, audiences tend to hiss and boo when she mentions the name of some contemporary figure they find repellent. Once she got over her initial assumption that West Coast audiences were hissing at her, she’s now come to appreciate the hissing, to a degree. “It’s a good problem to have, the freedom to hiss public figures whom you oppose,” says Vowell. “It’s a very accessible and lowtech form of social expression, hissing is. Though it’s a bit less articulate than the type of discourse that usually gets me excited. “That sense of freedom to hiss,” she continues, “to express yourselves through sounds—it filters down into your West Coast college students, too. Though they tend to want to talk a lot also, and not just hiss. West Coast students are definitely ) 20

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Arts Ideas

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Spoken Word ( 19

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more verbally rambunctious than East Coast students. East Coast students tend to just sit there and smile and silently seethe.” Vowell allows that talking about history onstage requires a balance of historical accuracy and humor. Her public appearances tend to be a lot funnier than her books. “Not that my books don’t have a lot of humor,” she says. “They do. But they’re history, right? There are whole chunks about genocide and slavery and unspeakable horrors. So when I’m doing an event like the one in Petaluma, I tend to focus on those stories that have a lot of humor, that have a little more razzledazzle. “Because sometimes I do need to be entertaining,” she says, adding, “In my books, though, I reserve the right to be a drag.” Which brings us back to the subject of paper. “It’s appropriate somehow,” she says, “to communicate about history on actual paper, which, let’s face it, is going to be history sooner or later.” E-readers are replacing books, she points out. Many people prefer to get their news online than in an actual newspaper. Asked if there is a way to save print, and papers and magazines for the future, Vowell grow silent. “Oh, I’m sure there is,” she finally says. “I hope there is. But if it has anything do with the internet, I’m not sure I approve. I’m an old-fashioned person who still believes in things like the letter to the editor. I believe in well-written news stories and solid reporting and news bureaus all over the world. I don’t even think newspaper photos need to be in color. “From where I stand,” says Vowell, “color photos are a little too newfangled for me.” The inaugural Wine Country Spoken Word Festival runs Friday–Sunday, Oct. 13–15. Sarah Vowell appears at the Mystic Theatre (with storyteller Bil Lepp and poet Steven Connell) on Saturday, Oct. 14, at 7:30pm. Single tickets, $15–$55; weekend pass, $140; VIP pass, $250. davepokornypresents.


CONTROVERSIAL HISTORY

‘Thomas and Sally’ may be MTC’s most polarizing play to date.

When Tom Met Sally MCT dazzles with Jeffersonian love story

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

’ll have to think about it.”

I give away little in revealing the final line of Thomas Bradshaw’s button-pushing world premiere Thomas and Sally. One could argue that the whole point of the play is summed up in those words, cautiously uttered by a contemporary college woman, Ellen (Rosie Hallett), who’s just been told a whopper of a story by Simone, her roommate (Ella Dershowitz). Simone is a descendent of the illicit union between American founding father Thomas Jefferson (an excellent Mark Anderson Phillips) and his inherited slave Sally Hemings (Tara Pacheco, magnificent), and she

‘Thomas and Sally’ runs Tuesday– Sunday through Oct. 22 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $20-$58. 415.388.5208

21 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Stage

sees Jefferson and Hemings’ “relationship” as a kind of mindblowing, against-all-odds love story. Ellen is not so sure. The tale begins years before the birth of Sally, one of several children born to Jefferson’s father-in-law, John Wayles, and his slave Betty Hemings. It’s that little-known fact— that Sally Hemings was the halfsister of Thomas Jefferson’s wife— that first inspired Bradshaw to tackle the project, unearthing scores of other challenging historical details along the way. “Challenging” might not be big enough a word. Though relatively breezy and light in tone, Thomas and Sally is proving to be MTC’s most polarizing play to date. Expertly directed by MTC’s artistic director Jasson Minadakis, the epic endeavor— lasting just over two-and-a-half hours—frequently dazzles, with marvelous work from its technical artists, skillful performances from a first-rate ensemble and a plot structure that is as cleverly designed as the sets and costumes - including the aforementioned collegedormitory framing device. Taken along with Bradshaw’s tendency to put contemporary words (“Wow!”) into the mouths of 18th-century figures, the framing device is an effectively Brechtian ploy. The presence of Ellen and Simone—who freely discuss sex, race and history, debating elements of the story, while occasionally donning costumes to enter the action—constantly roots the play in the realm of questions and context, encouraging careful thought over quick emotional response. As a result, Bradshaw’s bold foray into American history is often more intellectually gripping than it is emotionally engaging. Then again, given the fiery and acrimonious emotions the play has inspired by those who’ve yet to see it, I suspect that’s just the point. Rating (out of 5):

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Film

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DON’T WANT TO GROW UP Three mischievous kids find adventure in

Sean Baker’s ‘The Florida Project’

Roadside Attractions Everything is vibrant, even the squalor, in ‘The Florida Project’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

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Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! CHANGELING (12:05 2:25AND 4:45) CHONG’S 7:20 Glenn 9:4510:20 R AM Venessa Redgrave Meryl Streep Close CHEECH 10:40 AM RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 AM Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pm 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Starts Fri,(Sun JuneOnly) 29th!

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ean Baker’s The Florida Project is bursting with fun, squalor and tragedy. It’s shaggy, with what looks like rough-cut editing at times, and it’s seemingly been released under its working title. His subject is the adventures of a passel of kids in Kissimmee, not so far from the expensive gates of Disney World, a minimum-wage, subtropical holiday land. Baker positively blasts the screen with color, with Florida sunsets flamboyant enough to dement a parrot. Consultants from Technicolor worked on this, and it shows. Baker’s last film, Tangerine, was shot on a cellphone; the visuals here are more than payback for the limits of that kind of photography.

The Florida Project repays a big-screen viewing to see the low angle shots of berserk vernacular buildings. Giant oranges, frozen custard stands, a wizard’s 30-foot-tall head emerging from a warehouse full of Disney knockoffs—these images revive the feeling of being a kid. Moonee (Brooklynn Prince), age six or so, is a long-term tenant with her mother in the grape-sherbet-colored Magic Castle Motel. It’s an adventure exploring the roadside attraction highway lands, or running around with her new pal from downstairs. Everything is exciting: the sightseeing helicopters close enough to buzz the motel, the swamp nearby with the shopping cart sticking out of it, or the fluorescentcolored plastic goodies cramming the aisles in a 99-cent store. The focus is on the kids, as in a crane shot of Moonee and the little terrorists she hangs with running through the balconies. They’re Jancey (Valeria Cotto) and the third-grad boy Scooty (Christopher Rivera), a chronic mischief-maker who tries to play it urbane. Those who were raised in a bit of squalor themselves can agree that Baker has perfectly depicted the highs and lows of being a running-wild kid. It’s all fun and games until someone calls Social Services. ‘The Florida Project’ is in limited release.


Music

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DAMAGE INC NEW HORIZONS Sebastopol’s official reggae band rise to greater

musical heights with new album.

Let the Sun Shine Sol Horizon release new album with hometown show BY CHARLIE SWANSON

F

or nearly two decades, Sebastopol’s roots-reggae veterans Sol Horizon have represented their origins with a fusion of world beats and funky rhythms, as well as a commitment to environmental ethics. This month, the group unveils its fourth album, Under the Sun, with a concert at HopMonk Tavern in Sebastopol on Saturday, Oct. 14. Formed in 2000, Sol Horizon’s current lineup developed six years ago. Fronted by vocalist Michael Litwin, the core of the group is guitarists Clayton Hunt and Alexei Brown, drummer Paul Spina, bassist Aron Parks, vocalist Julie Kenworthy and keyboardist (and part-time manager) Dan Swezey. “The band definitely has deep roots in west Sonoma County,” says Swezey. “I’ve only been in the band six years, but I’ve seen multiple generations of fans, parents and kids. There’s a lot of history.” A regular winner of Best Reggae Band in the Bohemian’s NorBay Awards, Sol Horizon is so beloved that Sebastopol’s city council declared them the official reggae band of the town nearly a decade ago. “I don’t think it’s changed,” laughs Swezey. Philosophically, Sol Horizon is rooted in environmental conservation. Litwin works for Permaculture Artisans in Sebastopol. Swezey says that Litwin has attracted like-minded individuals to the band, like himself, a marine biologist at the Bodega Marine Laboratory. “The band has a sophisticated message of conservation and building community around a respect for nature,” says Swezey. The new material on the band’s forthcoming album, Under the Sun, reflects that message in it’s lyrics. Recorded at In the Pocket Studio in Forestville, Under the Sun was also engineered by Grammy winner Isha Erskine, whose list of credits include Ziggy Marley and Maroon 5. Under the Sun makes its debut when Sol Horizon perform this weekend with longtime friends DJ CivilianSound and DJ Subtle Mind. “It’s one for the hometown crowd,” Swezey says. “It’s going to be a great night of gratitude.” Sol Horizon plays Saturday, Oct. 14, HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 9pm. $20. 707.829.7300.

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NEW SHOWS: ON SALE FRIDAY, OCT 20 AT NOON

Members Buy Early! JOIN TODAY: lutherburbankcenter.org/join SUN, DEC 17

Easton Corbin

THU, FEB 15

Johnny Mathis The Voice of Romance Tour 2018

THU SOUL GREASE OCT 12 8pm/Dancing/$10 FRI JON GONZALES & FAMILY OCT 13 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 SAT MIDNIGHT SUN MASSIVE OCT 14 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 THU HURRICANE HARVEY BENEFIT OCT 19 Clothing donations appreciated FRI SOULFUSE OCT 20 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

Note: These listings were assembled before the outbreak of the fires; please check venue websites for updated information.

Oct 14, the Gentlemen Soldiers with the Bumblin’ Bones and Half People. 705 Laurel Ave, El Verano. 707.935.0611.

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Spiritualized

DAVID & LINDA LAFLAMME

SAT IT’S A BEAUTIFUL DAY OCT 21 8:30pm/$15 TUE BLACK UHURU OCT 24 8pm/Dancing/Reggae/$25 Adv/$30 DOS THU OCT 26 FRI OCT 27

Music

Crooked Goat Brewing

MEMORY LANE COMBO 8pm/Dancing/$5

SANG MATIZ

8:30pm/Dancing/$12 ADV/$15 DOS

SAT ROCKIN’ JOHNNY BURGIN OCT 28 8:30pm/Blues/Dancing/$10

GATOR NATION HALLOWEEN

TUE OCT 31 CONCERT AND A COSTUME PARTY 8pm/Dancing/$10

RESTAURANT & MUSIC VENUE CHECK OUT THE ART EXHIBIT VISIT OUR WEBSITE, REDWOODCAFE.COM 8240 OLD REDWOOD HWY, COTATI 707.795.7868

SAT, FEB 24

English musician Jason Pierce’s longtime outfit blurs the lines between garage rock and experimental art-rock with a constantly evolving lineup and sound. Oct 16, 6pm. $45. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Wine Country Ragtime Festival

Nationally known performers Larisa Migachyov, John Partridge, Nick Arteaga and others perform in the familyfriendly event. Oct 14, 11am. Free admission. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

MARIN COUNTY

Jake Shimabukuro

Marin Music Festival

ON SALE NOW!

Rancho

SAT, OCTOBER 28

Creating S-Town: A New Way to Tell a Story, An Evening with

Second annual showcase of Marin talent features Bautista, Buckaroo Bonet Band, the 7th Sons and Transistor Rodeo. Oct 14, 11am. Free. Marin Rod & Gun Club, 2675 Francisco Blvd E, San Rafael, sresproductions. com.

Parachute Days Fall Concert

Brian Reed

West Marin creative collective behind last summer’s Parachute Days returns with music by Alex Bleeker and friends, the Haggards, Luke Temple and others. Oct 14, 3pm. $30-$35; kids $7. Love Field, 11191 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Pt Reyes Station, parachutedays.com.

SUN, NOVEMBER 5

Stephen Stills & Judy Collins

SAT, NOVEMBER 11

Air Supply

Jackie Ryan THU, DEC 14

Rancho

Under the Streetlamp: Hip to the Holidays

Rancho

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

Marin-based jazz vocalist, who has been compared to the greats of the genre, is accompanied by famed jazz pianist Larry Vuckovich. Oct 15, 4pm. $20. Mill Valley Community Church, 8 Olive St, Mill Valley. 415.388.5540.

NAPA COUNTY www.ranchonicasio.com

Take Me to the River

Memphis soul and R&B revue

features William Bell, Bobby Rush and Charlie Musselwhite. Oct 13, 8pm. $40-$60. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

VOENA

Benefit concert will help the choir get to Carnegie Hall next year. Includes pre-show wine reception and post-show meet and greet. Oct 15, 2:30pm. $40-$60. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Oct 11, Aqus Jazz Project. Oct 13, Hooper & Sloss. Oct 14, Blue Seven. Oct 15, 2pm, Gary Vogensen & the Ramble Band. Oct 18, West Coast songwriters competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Oct 15, 6pm, Rosa Folk Club jam session. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

The Big Easy

Oct 11, Wednesday Night Big Band. Oct 12, Brooker D & the Mellow Fellows. Oct 13, the Mallet Brothers Band with Domenic Bianco. Oct 14, Left Coast Syncopators. Oct 15, Seventh Avenue. Oct 17, Spike Sikes. Oct 18, Fly by Train. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern Oct 11, Mike and Patrick. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

BR Cohn Winery

Oct 15, 2pm, the Deadlies. 15000 Sonoma Hwy, Glen Ellen. 707.938.4064.

Brewsters Beer Garden Oct 12, bluegrass and bourbon with Emily Bonn & the Vivants. Oct 13, Two Lions. Oct 14, Joe Valley Band. Oct 15, New Copasetics. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

Coffee Catz

Oct 13, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Oct 14, 3pm, Brandon Eardley. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

El Verano Inn

First Presbyterian Church

Oct 13, 8pm, North Bay Sinfonietta with Jennifer Sills. by donation. 1550 Pacific Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.528.8884.

Flamingo Lounge

Oct 13, Fat Change Truckin’ Band. Oct 14, Santa Rosa Salsa birthday bash. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club

Oct 13, Eric Lindell. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge Oct 14, Three for Silver. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall Oct 11, 2pm, Instrumental Repertory Recital. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Green Music Center Weill Hall

Oct 11, the Commanders from the USAF Band of the Golden West and SSU Jazz Orchestra. Oct 12, SSU Faculty Jazz Ensemble. Oct 14, Symphonic Wind Ensemble & Concert Band. Oct 15, 3pm, Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble. Oct 18, 2pm, Vocal Repertory Recital. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Guerneville Library

Oct 14, Gravenstein Mandolin Ensemble. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Oct 13, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Oct 14, Sol Horizon album release party. Oct 16, Monday Night Edutainment with Christafari. Oct 18, Songwriters in the Round. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Oct 13, Matt Santry. Oct 14, 1pm, Ira Wolf. Oct 14, 8pm, Matt Bradford. Oct 15, 1pm, Anthony Presti. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Oct 14, Anne Sajdera Trio with Peter Barshay and Dillon Vado.


25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Oct 14, Sharkmouth. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Oct 11, Jason Bodlovich. Oct 12, Solid Air. Oct 13, Hot Grubb. Oct 14, Just Friends. Oct 15, Mendonesia. Oct 18, Royal Deuces. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

The Laugh Cellar

Oct 14, 7pm, Acoustic Soul. 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.282.9319.

Main Street Bistro

Oct 12, Sam Peoples and Lynne Billig. Oct 13, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Oct 14, Rhythm Drivers. Oct 15, Eric Wiley. Oct 17, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Oct 13, DJ MGB. Oct 14, Stone Peoples Medicine. Oct 15, 4pm, Barbara Olney and friends. Oct 16, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Oct 16, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Monroe Dance Hall

Oct 13, West Coast Swing Party. Oct 14, Iko Ya Ya Zydeco Band. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room

Oct 14, 5:30pm, In This Valley. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Oct 13, TAUK featuring Klozd Sirkut. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Oct 14, Celtic concert with Lisa Lynne and Aryeh Frankfurter. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Oct 12, 6:30pm, Alec Fuhrman. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Wed, 6pm, open mic session. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Redwood Cafe

Oct 12, Soul Grease. Oct 13, Jon Gonzales & Family. Oct 14, Midnight Sun Massive. Oct 15, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Oct 16, Open Mic with DJ Loisaida. Oct 18, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Oct 14, “Grateful Dead Experience” with the Schwag and Jimmy Tebeau. 16135 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.8022.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Oct 11, the Acrosonics. Oct 12, King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. Oct 13, 6:30pm, Bruce Gordon. Oct 13, 8pm, Backtraxx. Oct 14, 5:30pm, the Marks Brothers. Oct 14, 8pm, Staggerwing. Oct 15, 5pm, T Luke. Oct 15, 8:30pm, Sonoma blues jam. Oct 16, Brandon Eardley. Oct 17, American Roots Night. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Oct 13, Frankie Bourne Band. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Oct 12, Levi’s Workshop. Oct 13, Johnny Tsunami & the Hurricanes. Oct 14, Weekend at Bernie’s. Oct 15, 5pm, bluegrass jam. Oct 16, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Oct 17, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip

Oct 13, Zombie Prom preHalloween bash. Oct 14, Richie Rich. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY Angelico Hall

Oct 15, 3pm, Chiara String Quartet. Dominican University, 50 Acacia Ave, San Rafael. 415.457.4440.

Fairfax Library

Oct 18, 7pm, songs of Scotland & Ireland with Margaret Miles. 2097 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Fairfax. 415.453.8092.

Fenix

Oct 11, pro blues jam. Oct 12, Groovality. Oct 13, SONA. Oct 14, Wall Street. Oct 15, Daria Jazz. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

Oct 12, Country Line Dancing. Oct 13, ADD/C and Hacksaw. Oct 14, Charley Peach. Oct 15, 5pm, John Doe and Anna Tivel. Sold-out. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

19 Broadway Club

Oct 11, Low Flying Birds. Oct 12, Loose with the Truth. Oct 13, 5:30pm, No Filler. Oct 13, 9:30pm, Lender with Sunhunter. Oct 14, 5:30pm, Agents of Change. Oct 15, 4pm, Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Oct 15, 8pm, Miles Ahead Group. Oct 16, open mic. Oct 18, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Oct 11, Wabi Sabi and friends. Oct 12, Marshall Rhodes Band. Oct 13, Michael Aragon Quartet. Oct 14, Darryl Rowe Band. Oct 15, Migrant Pickers and friends. Oct 16, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Oct 17, open mic. Oct 18, Robert Elmond Stone and friends. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Old St Hilary’s Landmark

Oct 15, 4pm, Toney Rocks. 201 Esperanza, Tiburon. 415.435.1853. Oct 12, Passion Habanera. Oct 13, Nick Culp Trio. Oct 14, Walter Earl Trio. Oct 15, Jeff Denson’s Open Sky Trio. Oct 17, Ken Cook. Oct 18, J Kevin Durkin. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

FRI, Oct 13, 7:00pm sonomalaughfest.com

ghoStBuSteRS MON, OCt 16, 7:00pm $10

WItChIe Poo halloween Show Oct 21,22, 28 & 29 2:00pm

haunted Wine Country

Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR AWARD WINNING BABY BACK RIBS. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN, PORK OR BEEF TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU OCT 12 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY 8PM / 21+ / $10 FRI OCT 13 • JOHNNY TSUNAMI AND THE HURRICANES AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT OCT 14 • WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Oct 11, Rivertown Trio. Oct 12, San Geronimo. Oct 17, Wanda Stafford. Oct 18, Relatively Dead. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Oct 11, the New Sneakers. Oct 12, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Oct 13, Attila Viola & the Bakersfield Boys. Oct 14, the Eleven. Oct 15, Grateful Sundays. Oct 16, Billy D’s open mic. Oct 17, the Bad Hombres. Oct 18, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Oct 13, the B Sharp Blues Band. Oct 14, Revolver. Oct 15, 4pm, Todos Santos. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

Oct 11, Tom Finch Trio. Oct 18, Matt Herrero and friends. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Oct 13, 6pm, Charged Particles. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.524.2800.

Marin Country Mart

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Oct 12, Obstinate Ostinato. Oct 13, Chick Jagger. )

Oct 13, 6pm, Friday Night Jazz with Missing Man Quartet.

Sonoma Laugh FeSt

Oct 2 & 3 7:00pm

Osteria Divino

25

Sebastiani Theatre

Sausalito Seahorse

26

Wed 10/11 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $15-$20 • All Ages B and the Hive w/Lender Benefit for Victims of North Bay Wild Fires Thu 10/12 • Doors 7:30pm ⁄ $35-$40 • All Ages

The Manzarek Rogers Band

Roy Rogers, Kevin Hayes, Steve Evans feat special guest: Jim

Fri 10/13 • Doors 8pm ⁄

$

Pugh

45-$50 • All Ages

THE FAMILY STONE

feat Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees and original founding members of Sly & The Family Stone, Jerry Martini and Greg Errico featuring Phunne Stone

Thu 10/19 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $35– $40 • All Ages

Tim Flannery & The Lunatic Fringe

Wed 10/25 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25 - $40 • All Ages

Antibalas

Fri 10/27 & 10/28 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $42 - $47 • 21+

GATORATORS

feat Dave Malone (The Radiators), Camile Baudoin (The Radiators), Mitch Stein (CRYPTICAL), Reggie Scanlan (The Radiators) & Eric Bolivar (Anders Osborne) + Special Guests

Sun 10/29 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $30 - $35 • All Ages

Sly & Robbie & The Taxi Gang feat Bitty McLean

Tue 10/31 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $30-$35 • 21+ Dumpstaphunk with Jazz Mafia Horns 2nd Annual Dumpstaween Celebration www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

brownpapertickets.com

the schwag.com • $ 20 • 707.869.8022

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

River Theater


BY TONY TACCONE AND BENNETT COHEN BASED ON THE NOVEL BY SINCLAIR LEWIS PREMIERED AT BERKELEY REPERTORY THEATRE - FALL 2016 DIRECTED BY LESLIE MCCAULEY

OCTOBER 6 - 15

NEWMAN AUDITORIUM SANTA ROSA JUNIOR COLLEGE STUDENT G

TICKETS: $12 - $18 BOX OFFICE: 707.527.4307 ONLINE: theatrearts.santarosa.edu ERNMEN T OV

SEMBLY AS

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | OCTO BE R 1 1-17, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Kristine Condon

26

Recommended for age 14 and above. Contains adult content and nudity.

IT CAN’T HAPPEN HERE is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York

SRJC THEATRE ARTS AD FOR THE BOHEMIAN Ayurvedic IT CAN’t HAPPEN HERE Wednesday, October 4, & Wednesday, October 11 PUB DATESIndian Head 4.3438 wide x 4.8438 high (1/4” square) Newman Auditorium

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI FRI OCT 13 DANNY CLICK AND THE HELL YEAH'S! + ELLIOTT PECK

$10/DOORS 7:30/SHOW 8:30/21+

SAT OCT 14

SOL HORIZON + CIVILIANSOUND!

$20/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

• relief from tension headaches, & sinusitis • improves mobility in neck & shoulders

Spitfire Lounge

Margery Smith

CMT# 62066

707.536.1797 margerysmith.massagetherapy.com

COMEDY OPEN MIC (EVERY 3RD SUNDAY)

MON OCT 16

THE WBLK DANCEHALL MASSIVE

CHRISTAFARI BERFDAY BASH @ MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT $10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED OCT 18

SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND SERIES (EVERY 3RD WEDNESDAY) PETE STRINGFELLOW, MIMI PIRARD, CHRIS HAUGEN, KATE MAGDALENA

$8/DOORS 7 /SHOW 7:30/21+

FRI OCT 20

THE PALMER SQUARES + DJ TRUE JUSTICE FEAT VOCAB SLICK

$15/DOORS 9/SHOW 10/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

Oct 14, 12:30pm, Lau and friends. Oct 14, 8pm, Wobbly World with Freddy Clarke. Oct 15, 5pm, Mazacote with Louie Romero. Oct 17, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Oct 12, Vivian Cook. Oct 13, the Well Known Strangers. Oct 14, Matt Jaffe & the Distractions. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

SUN OCT 15

FREE/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/18+

Music ( 25

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Massage

707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

FISH-EYED FUNK New York rock-fusion band TAUK push the envelope of instrumental music on Friday, Oct. 13, at Mystic Theatre & Music Hall in Petaluma. See Clubs & Venues, p25.

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

Eco Green Certified

Second Thursday of every month, DJ Romestallion. Second Friday of every month, DJ Beset. 848 B St, San Rafael. 415.454.5551.

Sweetwater Music Hall Oct 11, B & the Hive. Oct 12, the Manzarek Rogers Band. Oct 13, the Family Stone with Phunne Stone. Oct 14, Joe Satriani. Oct 15, Huey Lewis & the News. Sold-out. Oct 16, San Francisco Airship celebrates Bob Weir’s 70th birthday. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads Oct 11, Victoria George Band. Oct 12, Elliott Peck and friends. Oct 13, Kate Gaffney Band. Oct 14, Dan Lebowitz birthday celebration. Oct 15, Ramble on Rose with Midnight North and Phil Lesh. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Oct 11, noon concert with Florestan Trio. Oct 12, Jon Stickley Trio. Oct 15, 5pm, Sunday Sessions Songwriter’s Circle. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards

Oct 14, 12:30pm, David Ronconi. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

Blue Note Napa

Oct 11, Davell Crawford. Oct 12, Makana. Oct 13-14, the Rippingtons. Oct 17, the Incubators Trio. Oct 18, B & the Hive. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Oct 13, Afrolicious. Oct 14, Ryan McCaffrey. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Oct 14, Dirty Cello. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Oct 14, Jinx Jones & the King Tones. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Fairwinds Estate Winery

Oct 14, 12pm, Papa Joe & the New Deal. 4550 Silverado Trail N, Calistoga, 877.840.6530.

JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre Oct 11, the Led Zeppelin Experience. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater

Oct 14, 5pm, Repin and the Russian Romantics. Oct 15, 4pm, USAF Band of the Golden West. Free. 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Napa Valley Roasting Company Fri, jammin’ and java with Jeff Johnson. 948 Main St, Napa. 707.224.2233.

Pacifico Restaurante Mexicano Fri, live mariachi music. 1237 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga. 707.942.4400.

River Terrace Inn

Oct 12, Johnny Smith. Oct 13, Kristen Van Dyke. Oct 14, Smorgy. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Oct 11, 5pm, Mike Greensill with Lisa Lindsley. Oct 12, Robert Foley Band. Oct 13, Papa Joe & the New Deal. Oct 14, Neon Velvet. Oct 15, 2pm, Sundays on the plaza with French Oak. Oct 18, 5pm, Mike Greensill with Denise Perrier. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

St. Clair Brown Winery Oct 14, Barnyard Hammer. 816 Vallejo St, Napa. 707.255.5591.


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RECEPTIONS Oct 13

Art Works Downtown, “Migration,” group show exploring the theme of movement displays in 1337 Gallery. 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.451.8119. Community Media Center of Marin, “TRANSFRONTERIZA,” photographer John Pike offers a glimpse into the city of Tijuana as guided by members of the transgender community. 7pm. 819 A St, San Rafael. 415.721.0636. Stafford Gallery, “Visions d’Vine,” exhibiting portraits of harvest by acclaimed Impressionistic painter Craig Nelson. 6pm. 105 Plaza St, Ste A, Healdsburg. 415.317.7812.

Oct 14

Bay Model Visitor Center, “Perspectives,” Andres Faulkner’s paintings are heavily influenced by Northern California locales. 1pm. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871. Caldwell Snyder Gallery, “Quietly Unsettled,” recent paintings by Vancouver-based artist Ross Penhall stylize forms and exaggerate contrasts. 5pm. 1328 Main St, St Helena. 415.531.6755. MarinMOCA, “AbstrAction,” juried exhibit pushes the boundaries of abstract art. 5pm. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.506.0137. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, “Magna Fide (The Great Belief),” David Ligare’s paintings, influenced by GrecoRoman antiquity, are shown alongside “Forge & Stone,” featuring sculpture by contemporary California women artists. 6pm. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.939.SVMA.

Galleries

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | O CTO BE R 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Arts Events Tues-Fri, 10 to 4; Sat-Sun, 1 to 4. 707.829.4797.

Stones Throw

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery

Through Oct 14, “Gallery Group Show,” featuring Calabi Gallery’s contemporary artists and selections from its vintage collection. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

City Hall Council Chambers

Through Oct 19, “Jessica Jacobsen: Woven,” collection of drawings and paintings that are mindful, attentive and protective. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery One

Through Oct 23, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through Oct 22, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

My Daughter the Framer Through Oct 22, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 637 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. Daily, 10 to 5:30. 707.542.3599.

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Oct 21, “Tidal Response,” art and science intersect through a series of artworks depicting coastal environments, particularly Sonoma County. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

Sebastopol Center for the Arts

Through Oct 22, “Sonoma County Art Trails Preview Exhibit,” see works from every artist involved in the annual Art Trails open studios tour. 282 S High St, Sebastopol.

Through Oct 22, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 8278 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. Tues-Sat, 11am to 5:30pm. Sun, Noon to 5pm. 707.242.6669.

University Art Gallery

Through Oct 15, “SSU Art Studio Faculty Exhibition,” 13 members of the art studio faculty are represented. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

MARIN COUNTY Marin Society of Artists Through Oct 14, “The Golden State,” features works from artists throughout California. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

The Studio Shop

Through Oct 15, “Six Decades of Painting,” Roland Petersen shows works from his long and celebrated career in art. 244 Primrose Rd, Burlingame. MonFri, 10am to 6pm; Sat, 10am to 5:30pm 650.344.1378.

NAPA COUNTY di Rosa Center for Contemporary Art

Through Oct 15, “Based on a True Story,” exhibition illuminates the hidden stories and connections of Northern California art history spanning the last six decades. 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. Wed-Sun, 10 to 6. 707.226.5991.

Comedy Durst Case Scenario

Will Durst performs a benefit for West Marin Standing Together, a community response to the 2016 presidential election. Oct 14, 7pm. $15. Dance Palace, 503 B St, Pt Reyes Station, 415.663.1075.

Jim Short

Standup veteran

) 28

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Ready to complete your degree?

We think the best way to find out if a program is right for you is to hear about it firsthand - so please join us at an info session.

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is a former winner of the San Francisco International Comedy Competition. Oct 14, 8pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. marincomedyshow.com.

Sonoma Laughfest

Third annual comedy festival expands to include shows at Luther Burbank Center in Santa Rosa and Raven Theater in Healdsburg. Oct 13-15. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. sonomalaughfest.com.

The Trouble with Scott Capurro

Standup star presents a provocative new show. Oct 13, 8pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Events Asti Tour de Vine

Tenth annual bicycle ride through the vineyards of Northern Sonoma County is hosted by the Rotary Club of Cloverdale. Oct 14, 7am. $40$85. Asti Winery, 26150 Asti Rd, Cloverdale, 707.894.2541.

Biketoberfest Brewfest & Bike Expo

$5. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa, 707.492.3198.

Cotati Oktoberfest

German food, fresh craft brews, traditional Oktoberfest music, polka dancing, and hilarious contests. Oct 14, 12pm. Free admission. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati, cotati.org.

Garrison Keillor

Consummate storyteller and host of “A Prairie Home Companion” presents a new solo show, “Just Passing Through,” filled with humor and inspiration. Oct 13, 7:30pm. $40 and up. Green Music Center Weill Hall, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

North Bay Singles Party

Single women are invited to meet a roomful of bachelors who are superior to Donald Trump! Oct 15, 4pm. $10. Doubletree Hotel, 1 Double Tree Dr, Rohnert Park, 707.584.5466.

Old Hollywood with Jackie Ganiy

Dress as classic or current Hollywood stars and enjoy tea and stories with the author and historian. Oct 14, 6pm. $60. Tudor Rose Tea, 733 Fourth St, Santa Rosa.

Santa Rosa Mystic Fair

Annual bicycle festival and brewfest features 30 beers from 20 brewers and live music from the Pulsators, Panoramic Highway and Tony Magee. Oct 14, 11am. Free admission. Fair-Anselm Plaza, 765 Center Boulevard, Fairfax, biketoberfestmarin.com.

Fifth annual event includes alternative healing and holistic vendors, arts and handmade crafts, performances and more. Oct 14-15. Free. Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave, Santa Rosa, santarosamysticfair.com.

Blind Scream Haunted House

Thirtieth annual celebration of Norwegian heritage includes Viking-era reenactments, modern art and pottery, traditional foods and more. Oct 14, 10am. Free admission. Sons of Norway Hall, 617 W Ninth St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1080.

Two terrifying haunted-house experiences under one roof get you in the mood for Halloween. Through Oct 31. $15-$35. SOMO Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, blindscream.com.

Cassini: The True Lord of the Rings Planetarium show looks at the satellite sent to Saturn to explore the planet’s ring system. Through Oct 14. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4465.

Cirque de Napa

Share the Care hosts a fundraising event for Napa Valley seniors, themed “The Power of Age” and featuring over 50 vendors offering services for seniors, food, refreshments and entertainment. Oct 14, 10am. $3-

Vikingfest

Wine Country Spoken Word Festival

Inaugural event features both local and nationally renowned authors, poets, comedians and spoken word artists of all genres performing throughout downtown Petaluma. Oct 13-15. Hotel Petaluma, 106 Washington St, Petaluma, davepokornypresents.com.

Film Bless Their Little Hearts Billy Woodberry’s 1984 film about the devastating effects

of underemployment on a family gets a newly restored print. Fri, Oct 13, 7pm and Sun, Oct 15, 4pm. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.2606.

Film & Fork

Watch the new drama “Battle of the Sexes,” based on the famous 1973 tennis match, and enjoy a meal at Cindy’s Backstreet Kitchen. Oct 16, 5pm. $50. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.9779.

Haunted Wine Country Local documentary filmmaker Tom Wyrsch follows up his 2016 film “Haunted Sonoma County” with a new spooky exploration of the North Bay’s ghostly history. Oct 13. Summerfield Cinemas, 551 Summerfield Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.528.4222.

In Pursuit of Silence

New film travels the globe to explore the impact of noise on our lives. Filmmakers Patrick Shen and Brandon Vedder appear on Monday, and the film’s sound team from Skywalker Ranch appears Tuesday for discussions. Oct 16-17, 7:15pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Jewish Film Festival

Twenty-second annual series presents Jewish themed films from around the world; screening next the recent French drama “Fanny’s Journey.” Oct 17, 1 and 7:30pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Cult film gets a proper latenight screening with audience participation. Oct 13, 11pm. $10. The Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St, Petaluma, 707.762.3565.

Food & Drink Chips & Sips

Napa Golf Course and Falcor Winery team up for a golf workshop and tasting. Oct 15, 12pm. $30. Kennedy Park, 2296 Streblow Dr, Napa.

Cochon Volant BBQ Pop-Up

Chef Rob Larman of Cochon Volant BBQ and winemaker Michael Muscardini host the

evening. Oct 12, 5:30pm. $85. Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room, 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 707.933.9305.

Oct 18, 8:30am. Free. Marin Community Foundation, 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato, unitedmarinrising.org.

Drink Pink

UFO Lecture Series

Taste new Rosato wines and support breast cancer awareness, as half the proceeds go to St Joseph Health Regional Cancer Care’s Breast Center. Oct 14, 1pm. Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room, 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 707.933.9305.

Oktoberfest at CIA Copia

Inaugural fest features local brews, German fare, live music and more. Oct 14, 12pm. Free admission. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa, 707.967.2530.

Ramen Gaijin Pop-Up Sebastopol restaurant shows in Healdsburg for a night of spicy Thai dishes. Oct 17, 5pm. Bergamot Alley, 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, 707.433.8720.

Seven Styles of Cheese Cheese expert Janet Fletcher leads a class. Oct 15, 1pm. $65. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

The Speak Cheesy

Fairfax Theatre Company presents a theatrical evening of cheese and wine pairing. Oct 13, 7pm. $30. Fairfax Women’s Center, 46 Park Rd, Fairfax, 415.456.5652.

Lectures Luminarias

Healdsburg Literary Guild hosts Thomas Pinney, author of “The City of Vines,” for a talk. Oct 12, 7pm. $15. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

Peter H Raven Lecture Series

Historian and author Andrea Wulf discusses her “New York Times” bestseller, “The Invention of Nature: Alexander Von Humboldt’s New World.” Oct 13, 5:30pm. Quarryhill Botanical Gardens, 12841 Hwy 12, Glen Ellen, 707.996.3166.

Race Matters Dialogue & Educational Series Several presenters speak on healthcare. Oct 13, 2pm. Free. Marin Health & Wellness Center, 3240 Kerner Blvd, San Rafael, unitedmarinrising. org. Several presenters speak on jobs and economics.

Learn about Planet Serpo, 39 light years from Earth, and the human/alien exchange program with host UFO Jim and researcher Len Kasten. Oct 16, 7pm. $5-$10. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, 707.938.4626.

Readings Book Passage

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Oct 17, 4pm, “Timeless: Diego and the Rangers of the Vastlantic” with Armand Baltazar. Oct 18, 4pm, “How to Be an Elephant” with Katherine Roy. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Readers’ Books

Oct 11, 7pm, “Romance of Elsewhere” with Lynn Freed. Oct 12, 7pm, “Pop-Up Shakespeare” with Reed Martin. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

Oct 11, 7pm, “Americana” with Bhu Srinivasan. Oct 12, 7pm, “The Mothers” with Brit Bennett. Oct 14, 4pm, “The Mindful Vegan” with Lani Muelrath. Oct 14, 7pm, “When It’s Over” with Barbara Ridley. Oct 15, 1pm, “Draw the Line” with Kathryn Otoshi. Oct 15, 4pm, “The Present Parent Handbook” with Timothy Dukes. Oct 16, 7pm, “Survivor Cafe” with Elizabeth Rosner. Oct 17, 7pm, “The Romance of Elsewhere” with Lynn Freed. Oct 18, 7pm, “Not Quite a Genius” with Nate Dern. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Oct 14, 2pm, “William Shakespeare’s the Force Doth Awaken” with Ian Doescher. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Book Passage By-the-Bay

Oct 14, 3pm, “Spiritual Graffiti: Finding My True Path” with MC Yogi. $50, includes book. 2801 Yulupa Ave, Suite C, Santa Rosa 707.696.4382.

Oct 11, 6pm, “A Taste of Paris” with David Downie, in conversation with Kimberley Lovato. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

College of Marin Library Oct 13, 1pm, “Bob Marley & the Wailers: The Ultimate Illustrated History” with Richie Unterberger. 835 College Ave, Kentfield 415.485.9475.

Healdsburg Shed

Oct 11, 7pm, “Project Drawdown” with Paul Hawken, RSVP required. Free. 25 North St, Healdsburg 707.431.7433.

Napa Bookmine

Oct 17, 7pm, “Zero Avenue” and “Because I Wanted to Write You a Pop Song” with Dietrich Kalteis and Kara Vernor. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Napa Main Library

Oct 12, 7pm, “America the Anxious” with Ruth Whippman. 580 Coombs St, Napa 707.253.4070.

Novato Copperfield’s Books

Oct 13, 7pm, “Well Nourished” with Andrea Lieberstein. 999 Grant Ave, Novato 415.763.3052.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books Oct 12, 7pm, “Writing as a Path to Awakening” with Albert Flynn DeSilver. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Oct 14, 7pm, “Ageless Soul” with Thomas Moore. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Soul Yoga

Theater ASWANG

Dramatized song cycle is performed in celebration of Filipino American History Month and inspired by Philippine mythical creatures. Oct 15, 5pm. Free. Green Music Center Schroeder Hall, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

The Gumshoe Murders Get a Clue Productions presents a new murdermystery dinner theater show about a 1940s detective caught in a web of deception. Reservations required. Fri, Oct 13, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions.com.

It Can’t Happen Here

SRJC Theatre Arts department presents the stage adaptation of Sinclair Lewis’ satirical 1935 novel about fascism taking


Degree completion

The Little Prince

Hybrid Saturday B.A. Liberal Studies @ SSU

College of Marin drama department presents the heartwarming tale based on the book by Antoine de Saint Exupéry. Through Oct 15. $10$20. College of Marin James Dunn Theatre, 835 College Ave, Kentfield, 415.485.9385.

Designed for the working adult.

Mary Shelley’s Body The famed author of “Frankenstein” explores her past and legacy in this one-woman play written by “Bohemian” contributor David Templeton, making its world premiere. Oct 13-29. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.823.0177.

The Rainmaker

Sonoma Arts Live presents the Depression-era drama about one eventful day in a droughtridden town. Oct 13-29. $22-$37. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, 707.938.4626.

StoryNights

Performers, actors, comics and writers take to the mic for a night of personal stories told live. Oct 18, 7:30pm. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Surprise Party

New script by playwright Ron Nash is read by Ross Valley Players’ alternative works committee. Oct 15, 7pm. $10 donation. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

33 Variations

Two characters, separated by 200 years, each come to terms with life and make time stand still in this acclaimed play. Through Oct 15. $12-$22. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale, 707.829.2214.

Thomas & Sally

Marin Theatre Company opens its season with the world premiere of award-winning playwright Thomas Bradshaw’s drama about Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings, the enslaved woman who mothered six of his children. Through Oct 22. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

29

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Laugh Out Loud Sonoma Laughfest takes over the county

Featuring standup comedy stars, hilarious improvisation groups and imaginative sketch shows, Sonoma Laughfest turns three this year. Created by actress-producer Brooke Tansley and actress-writer Kristen Rozanski, the festival is moving from its old digs at the Sonoma Community Center to feature shows at three historical venues throughout the county. “We wanted to include more of Sonoma County,” says Tansley. “Especially after feedback from folks hoping that we'd start doing shows closer to them.” Each evening boasts three varied one-hour long shows with 30-minute breaks in between. On Friday, Oct 13, the Laughfest kicks off in Sonoma at the Sebastiani Theatre, featuring comedy-inspired live art created onstage by Sonoma artist Jill Valavanis. Next, the festival moves to Santa Rosa for a night at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts on Saturday, Oct. 14. Finally, the fun comes to Healdsburg for a packed finale at the Raven Theater on Sunday, Oct. 15, that includes popular Seattle sketch team Villains, and beloved comedy team Erin & MeLissa (pictured) among others. Tansley also promises to keep the experience intimate and engaging for North Bay audiences. “I'm looking forward to seeing people happy,” says Tansley. “Laughter is such a simple yet essential thing.” For more information and tickets, visit sonomalaughfest.com.—Charlie Swanson

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@ bohemian.com, or mail it to:

NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Classes meet one Saturday per month, as well as weekly reading, writing, and online seminars.

Info Session October

14

Saturday

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Rachel Carson Hall 14, SSU

$5 parking pass required in SSU general lots

sonoma.edu/exed/libs susan.mcfeeters@sonoma.edu

707.664.2601

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hold in a democratic society. Through Oct 15. $10-$18. Newman Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.527.4307.


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s a doctor specializing in integrative naturopathic oncology, I see many patients suffering from breast cancer. Many of them are curious whether medicinal cannabis can potentially help them in their cancer treatments. My answer, in many cases, is “Yes!” Medicinal cannabis can be an ally in an integrative approach to cancer and coping with and combating the side effects of conventional cancer-fighting therapies. Although research into medicinal cannabis is still in its early stages, the signs are promising. Most studies have taken place overseas, with only a handful of human trials in epilepsy and multiple sclerosis; to date, there are no human trials of medicinal cannabis and breast cancer. Nonetheless, pre-clinical data and empirical clinical observations present compelling evidence that medicinal cannabis with cannabinoid (CBD) can

have a positive effect on people undergoing conventional treatment for breast cancer. Most medicinal cannabis research has focused on CBDs and our endocannabinoid system, which functions as a series of neurolipids and receptors that communicate mood, appetite and sensations of pain. Endocannabinoids can profoundly affect our physiology and the way we feel. The most studied and established roles for CBD therapies include relieving pain and easing chemotherapyinduced nausea and vomiting. It has also been shown to reduce sleeplessness, anxiety, depression and constipation. Moreover, cannabinoids can be used to optimize and treat multiple symptoms, thereby reducing the need to take so many pharmaceutical medications. In addition to easing the negative side effects of chemotherapy, studies show that CBDs can fight against breast cancer tumors by reducing the inflammatory pathways that increase tumor growth. Conventional anti-tumor drugs may work better in a person’s system as well with CBDs. I have seen this myself in my practice. My breast-cancer patients report the reduction of nausea, vomiting and neurological symptoms, especially during that dreaded time known as “the nadir,” a week or so after the start of a chemotherapy cycle. Cannabinoids can also help them better digest broths and foods to rebuild their strength and health. Of course, it is no panacea. Some report feelings of dizziness, nausea or having their heart race after using cannabis. I tell my patients that they must consult with their oncologist or primary-care physician to see if CBD is right for them. Moses Goldberg, ND, practices at the Integrative Medical Clinic of Santa Rosa. Contact him at docmoses.com.


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) In his book The Logic of Failure, Dietrich Dorner discusses the visionaries who built the Aswan Dam in Egypt. Their efforts brought an abundance of cheap electricity to millions of people. But the planners didn’t take into account some of the important effects of their innovation. For example, the Nile River below the dam no longer flooded its banks or fertilized the surrounding land every year. As a result, farmers had to resort to chemical fertilizers at great expense. Water pollution increased. Marine life suffered because of the river’s diminished nutrients. I hope this thought will motivate you to carefully think through the possible consequences of decisions you’re contemplating. I guarantee that you can avoid the logic of failure and instead implement the logic of success. But to do so, you’ll have to temporarily resist the momentum that has been carrying you along. You’ll have to override the impatient longing for resolution. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Are you primed to seek out new colleagues and strengthen your existing alliances? Are you curious about what it would take to infuse your best partnerships with maximum emotional intelligence? From an astrological perspective, the next nine weeks will be a favorable time to do these things. You will have opportunities to deepen your engagement with collaborators who cultivate integrity and communicate effectively. It’s possible you may feel shy about pursuing at least one of the potential new connections. But I urge you to press ahead anyway. Though you may be less ripe than they are, their influence will have a catalytic effect on you, sparking you to develop at an accelerated rate.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “I was satisfied with haiku until I met you,” Dean Young tells a new lover in his poem “Changing Genres.” But Young goes on to say that he’s no longer content with that terse genre. “Now I want a Russian novel,” he proclaims, “a 50-page description of you sleeping, another 75 of what you think staring out a window.” He yearns for a story line about “a fallen nest, speckled eggs somehow uncrushed, the sled outracing the wolves on the steppes, the huge glittering ball where all that matters is a kiss at the end of a dark hall.” I bring Young’s meditations to your attention, Gemini, because I suspect that you, too, are primed to move into a more expansive genre with a more sumptuous plot. CANCER (June 21–July 22) Statistical evidence suggests that Fridays falling on the 13th of the month are safer than other Fridays. The numbers of fires and traffic accidents are lower then, for example. I find this interesting in light of your current situation. According to my analysis, this October’s Friday the 13th marks a turning point in your ongoing efforts to cultivate stability and security. On this day, as well as the seven days before and seven days after, you should receive especially helpful clues about the future work you can do to feel even safer and more protected than you already do. LEO (July 23–August 22) Too much propaganda and

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not enough real information are circulating through your personal sphere. You’re tempted to traffic in stories that are rooted more in fear than insight. Gossip and hype and delusion are crowding out useful facts. No wonder it’s a challenge for you to sort out the truths from the half-truths! But I predict that you will thrive anyway. You’ll discover helpful clues lodged in the barrage of bunkum. You’ll pluck pithy revelations from amidst the distracting ramblings. Somehow you will manage to be both extra sensitive and superdiscriminating.

VIRGO (August 23–September 22) A journalist named Jenkin Lloyd Jones coined the term “Afghanistanism,” which he defined as “concentrating on problems in distant parts of the world while ignoring controversial local issues.” I want to urge you Virgos to avoid engaging in a personal version of Afghanistanism. In other words, focus on issues that are close at hand, even if they seem sticky or prickly. Don’t you dare let your attention get consumed by the dreamy distractions of faraway places and times. For the foreseeable future, the best use of your energy is here and now.

BY ROB BREZSNY

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) “I am more interested in human beings than in writing,” said author Anaïs Nin, “more interested in lovemaking than in writing, more interested in living than in writing. More interested in becoming a work of art than in creating one.” I invite you to adopt that perspective as your own for the next 12 months, Libra. During this upcoming chapter of your story, you can generate long-lasting upgrades if you regard your life as a gorgeous masterpiece worthy of your highest craftsmanship. SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Scorpio actress Tara Reid told the magazine Us Weekly about how her cosmetic surgeries had made her look worse than she had been in her natural state. “I’ll never be perfect again,” she mourned. I bring this up in the hope that it will inspire you. In my astrological opinion, you’re at a tuning point when it’s crucial to appreciate and foster everything about yourself that’s natural and innate and soulfully authentic. Don’t fall sway to artificial notions about how you could be more perfect than you already are.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

I didn’t go to work today. I woke up late, lingered over a leisurely breakfast and enjoyed a long walk in the autumn woods. When I found a spot that filled me with a wild sense of peace, I asked my gut wisdom what I should advise you Sagittarians to attend to. And my gut wisdom told me that you should temporarily escape at least one of your duties for at least three days. (Escaping two duties for four days would be even better.) My gut wisdom also suggested that you get extra sleep, enjoy leisurely meals and go on long walks to spots that fill you with a wild sense of peace. There you should consult your gut wisdom about your top dilemmas.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) A snail climbed to the top of a big turtle’s shell as it was sleeping under a bush. When the turtle awoke and began to lumber away in search of food, the snail was at first alarmed but eventually thrilled by how fast they were going and how far they were able to travel. “Wheeee!” the snail thought to itself. I suspect, Capricorn, that this little tale is a useful metaphor for what you can look forward to in the coming weeks. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “If these years have taught me anything, it is this,” wrote novelist Junot Díaz. “You can never run away. Not ever. The only way out is in.” That’s your plucky wisdom for the coming weeks, Aquarius. You have arrived at a pivotal phase in your life cycle when you can’t achieve liberation by fleeing, avoiding or ignoring. To commune with the only kind of freedom that matters, you must head directly into the heart of the commotion. You’ve got to feel all the feelings stirred up by the truths that rile you up. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

J. Allan Hobson is a scientist of sleep who does research at Harvard. He says we dream all the time, not just at night. Our subconscious minds never stop churning out streams of images. During the waking hours, though, our conscious minds operate at such intensity that the lower-level flow mostly stays subliminal. At least that’s the normal state of affairs. But I suspect your dreamgenerator is running so hot right now that its stories may leak into your waking awareness. This could be disconcerting. Without the tips I’m giving you here, you might worry you were going daft. Now that you know, I hope you’ll tap into the undercurrent to glean some useful intuitions. A word to the wise: The information that pops up won’t be logical or rational. It will be lyrical and symbolic, like dreams.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

O CTO BE R 1 1-17, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Michael Papenburg

Keysight Technologies has the following Advanced R&D Software Engineer available in Santa Rosa, CA: Advanced R&D Software Engineer (ADRCWCA) - Create Windows, Linux, and VxWorks services to query the instrument firmware for Asset Management information. Submit resume by mail to: Keysight Technologies

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What’s More Local than being Employee-Owned? Kevin

Meet Kevin Villeda Produce Clerk, Windsor

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favorite here season!

My time of year is . Winter squash is in My favorite one is spaghetti squash, in the oven, then sautéed in a pan with alba mushrooms and herbs.

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Muelrath Ranch

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1936 as a dairy in Bodega Bay, is

a real working ranch. They added the Santa Rosa location in 1946, where they still farm today growing pumpkins, gourds, winter squash & sunflowers.

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