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SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | SEPTEMBER 20-26, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.20

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BEAR REPUBLIC ON THE LAKE P11 MOONLIGHT MOVES P12 HOP HOPES P13 ORGANIC BEER? P15 OKTOBERFESTS P19


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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Road Hogs Former Santa Rosa councilmember Gary Wysocky once asked me, “Keith, why do you hate bicyclists?” Of course I responded in the negative. Bicycling is a great way to exercise and get around locally. And I must always include my mantra, “No cyclist or pedestrian should get hit by a motorist.” But I have noticed a disturbing trend, most recently during the Tour de Fuzz

event: competitive bicyclists ride the outer line of the bicycle lane instead of within the lane. Not only is it dangerous, it is simply rude. The county and cities have spent millions of dollars in order to establish a safe space for bicyclists on our thoroughfares, and now, because of state and county law, we must yield an additional three feet of space to them regardless. So it appears we have wasted millions of dollars on these safety improvements because these rude riders are purposely forcing

THIS MODERN WORLD

motorists to give them an additional three feet of space regardless of the existing bike lanes. It’s just ridiculous. We need to stop coddling these idiots and force compliance of the law. And it doesn’t help that law enforcement has “embraced” cycling. It affects their judgment and leaves thousands of dollars on the table that we could be collecting in fines for traffic scofflaws on bicycles. Do I hate bicyclists? No, I do not. I vehemently dislike public rudeness, period. “Share the Road” should apply to

By Tom Tomorrow

all users, less than 5 percent of whom are cyclists.

KEITH RHINEHART Santa Rosa

Get a Haircut We Americans are in a decidedly sour mood about the state of our country. On the verge of war with North Korea and saddled with a much-despised president, it’s easy to succumb to pessimism. It’s time to elevate the mood of my fellow countrymen and countrywomen. These proposed innovations may appear superficial, but they would go a long way toward inspiring people to aspire to a new Golden Age. My ideas, in order of importance: • No more short-shorts with buns hanging out for all to see. • No more torn blue jeans. • No more form-fitting black leggings that graphically depict every curve and/ or lump. • The man-bun has got to go—get a haircut already! Thanks for considering these ideas, which are neither liberal nor conservative—just common sense, something in short supply these days.

DANTE PORTINARI Belvedere

Cheddar and Kudos Awesome to see (“Cowboy Creamery,” Sept. 13)! Keith is the best. We miss him here in Minnesota. Congrats on your new venture in California.

TODD M. SNELL Via Facebook

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants

7

Why I’m running for Sonoma County sheriff BY MARK ESSICK

T

he Sonoma County Sheriff's office needs to get back to basics: put public safety first, make sure we’re fair and accountable, and build partnerships to better engage with the communities we serve.

I've worked for the Sonoma County Sheriff's Office for more than 23 years, starting as a correctional officer in the jail and holding 10 different posts throughout the organization. Having served as both administrative and field services captain, I've been responsible for the day-to-day operations of multiple divisions, managing budgets greater than $50 million and overseeing more than 250 employees who provide public safety around the clock. In 2014, I represented the sheriff's office on the local law enforcement task force. Our charge was to examine the relationship between public safety and the communities we serve and to correct problems with transparency, oversight and community relations. At the same time, I led the personnel and internal affairs units—giving me perhaps more perspective than anyone about what was working and what needed repair. I'm very proud of my work as the founder and director of the Sheriff's Office Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) program. I worked with Sonoma County Mental Health to train peace officers in deescalation and intervention techniques to help those in mentalhealth crisis. More than 400 peace officers in Sonoma County have completed the training, and the program is still active today. Through all of this, I've learned that the ability to listen is the single most important tool we have in public safety—it’s an idea I’m taking very seriously as I kick off a series of town hall meetings throughout Sonoma. Visit my website at markessick.com, or follow me on Facebook for times and locations. My wife and I are proud to call Sonoma County home—it’s where we've raised our children and watched them grow and give back to the community that means so much to our family. We're committed to Sonoma County, and I know you are, too. I'm confident that if we all work together, we can keep Sonoma County a special place to live for another generation. I hope you'll join me. Mark Essick is a captain with the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office and a candidate for sheriff in the 2018 election. This is the second in an occasional series of editorials from the candidates.

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PRETTY AS A PICTURE Critics of Mayor Alan Glabraith say his pro-growth stance puts St. Helena at risk.

Not So Fast

Recall election aims to oust St. Helena mayor Alan Galbraith BY TOM GOGOLA

C

oncerned about rapid development in the small Napa County town, a group of St. Helena citizens has filed paperwork with the city clerk demanding a recall election to remove Mayor Alan Galbraith from office.

Galbraith has been criticized by a group of 25 St. Helena citizens for inadequately addressing concerns over a series of developments, both planned and in the works, that have unfolded over the past year. Those developments include a proposed hotel development on city land, an attempted expansion

of the Culinary Institute of America’s student housing and an expansion of Beringer Vineyards’ footprint in town, says Kathy Coldiron, one of the citizens seeking Galbraith’s removal from office. Another driver for the recall effort was a recent spike in water bills spearheaded by Galbraith,

she says, and approved by the city council. “I’ve lived here for 25 years,” says Coldiron, “and what’s happened in the last few months is unprecedented—this fast-track push on development with very little discussion.” Coldiron says that development issues were typically discussed over a series of meetings, but are now expedited. She says Galbraith has a tin ear to citizen concerns over water security and sewage issues that attend new development projects. Public participation is a hallmark of the St. Helena civic style, says Coldiron. “Then there’s usually some kind of compromise, not always, but at least you were able to be heard, and the pros and the cons were discussed. “The last few months, there’s been a very noticeable difference in the projects that are coming in— there’s no long-term discussion, then approval and then shock.” Reached for comment by phone and email, Galbraith responded by sending the statement he issued when the recall effort was announced on Sept. 6. “I do not welcome a recall effort,” writes Galbraith. “If the voters are dissatisfied with my tenure as mayor, they have an opportunity to elect a new mayor in November 2018. To mount a recall campaign in the middle of my term will be extremely disruptive to the work of the city council, and, even if it succeeds, is unlikely to shorten my term by more than a few months. This does not make good sense and threatens to waste taxpayers’ money on a special election.” The St. Helena City Council’s majority view of the recall effort is to institute some sort of “mediation” process between unhappy citizens and Galbraith, who was elected in 2014 and whose term ends next fall. Councilmember Mary Koberstein also responded to a request for comment from the Bohemian with a statement she issued when it was announced.


Voice when he was elected to the city council in 2016, and now indicates that the city, led by Galbraith, offered a prodevelopment posture to keep the city’s tax revenues flowing, without much of a long-term strategy in place to manage any unforeseen consequences. “What I see is that, in perhaps looking for outside solutions, the day-to-day issues here have been neglected,” Ellsworth says. Those day-to-day issues include strains on the city’s water and sewage systems and a chronic

‘This is an issue that probably we should have seen coming and started to address earlier.’ lack of affordable housing in a town that’s now building hotels for deep-pocketed wine tourists. Ellsworth says he’s been talking with civic leaders outside of Napa County, in Healdsburg and the city of Sonoma, boutique towns facing similar development pressures driven largely by wine tourism. “This is an issue that probably we should have seen coming and started to address earlier, but I think we can still do it,” he says. The particulars of tiny St. Helena, he says, don’t support large corporate wine centers and big hotels. There’s a pair of two-lane roads leading into and out of town, “and if we don’t have more road space—and I don’t want more road space—that’s a limiting factor. For years, we’ve tried to keep this as a small ) 10 agricultural-centric area.

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She’s opposed to the effort and says that “after eight months of council actions on a host of controversial issues, I recognize that these recall proponents, as well as other disparate interest groups, are sometimes disappointed by our process and the results.” Koberstein urged the city to hire a neutral mediator to sort out the competing issues, and notes that “the real cost of this recall will not be measured in dollars spent. The real cost is that we will undoubtedly further divide into opposing camps, and at a time when we face a multitude of decisions that require our collective and thoughtful attention.” Koberstein was joined by councilman Paul Dohring in calling for a mediator. First-term St. Helena councilman Geoff Ellsworth, who ran for and won his seat largely out of his concern for overdevelopment and too many wineries in Napa County, says he’s on board with the mediation plan, after first not being sure whether he supports the recall or not. As a member of Citizens’ Voice St. Helena in 2015, Ellsworth was one of five St. Helenans to sign a letter directed at the first-term mayor Galbraith, a former planning commissioner, announcing that the nonprofit had been formed out of a “concern that in a rush to raise revenue, the city is selling the town’s rural character and our quality of life.” The letter identifies numerous development projects in the hopper and notes that, among other pro-developer gestures, the city’s proposed updated general plan lifted caps on hotel and restaurant development, and “as a result, there is a 70-room hotel under construction next to the Beringer winery.” To stop the flood of development, the letter continued, “will require a coalition of concerned citizens to speak up before it’s too late.” Now that those concerned citizens are speaking up, is it too late? Ellsworth says he left Citizens’


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“Regional development and large-scale projects,” he adds, “should go to places that have the infrastructure to handle that influx of people.” Places like the city of Napa or Vallejo, he says. “We can protect the delicate areas and allow for some growth and balanced development. St. Helena can’t handle the capacity that the city of Napa can.” Ellsworth cites the phenomenon of “urbanization by over-visitation” as a trend that needs to be managed as it descends on quaint localities like St. Helena. In opposing the recall effort, Ellsworth was joined by Susan Kenward of Citizens’ Voice who tells the Bohemian via email that she’s opposed to the recall effort, too, and instead supports a mediation plan between Galbraith and his critics. Speaking for herself and not the organization, which hasn’t yet met to discuss the recall effort, Kenward says, “I think both Mary [Koberstein] and Paul [Dohring] are correct in that mediation is always the best idea. Everyone needs to be heard and their issues validated.” According to Galbraith, a successful recall campaign would shorten his term by only a few months, raising the specter that the effort is a waste of time and money, since it would take place mere months before he is up for re-election. The city clerk has to certify the initial request for a recall election petition, and then the group has to collect about 850 signatures to trigger an election. Coldiron says shaving any time off of Galbraith’s term could serve to stem the tide of development, or at least give pause to some of the proposals. Given the pace of proposed projects and approvals and what’s perceived as Galbraith’s prodevelopment stance, even a few months might make a difference, she says, if Galbraith can be removed from office by next summer. In the meantime, Ellsworth says

he’ll continue to listen and seek compromise, short of removing Galbraith from office. In his eight months on the council, he says, “developing patience for listening has been the most important thing—learning to listen so you can get as much detail and facts to come to some balance where you are trying to listen to both sides.”

Now that concerned citizens are speaking up, is it too late? The problem in St. Helena, says Coldiron, is that only one side has been represented of late: the prodevelopment side. That dynamic was in full effect, she says, in recent discussions over a property next to the city library that’s owned by the city and has been the subject of intense speculation. “Over the past few years, different ideas have come up and not been resolved—should it be a community center, a hotel, open space? As far as we can see, [Galbraith] is for the hotel.” In his statement opposing the recall effort, Galbraith insists he’s not in the pocket of big developers and is motivated only by his concern for the long-term fiscal health of St. Helena. “There will always be differences of opinion over major policy decisions,” he writes, “but for as long as I have been a public servant here in St. Helena, I have sought to contribute my experience and perspective in ways that serve the long-term interest of the community as a whole.”


BREW WITH A VIEW Bear Republic’s new pub looks out on Roberts Lake in Rohnert Park.

The Bear Roars

Bear Republic’s new location in central Sonoma County is an instant hit BY TESS DUNN

I

pull into the parking lot and nab a spot in front—I can already tell it’s busy at the new Bear Republic brewpub on Robert’s Lake in Rohnert Park. It’s opening night and everybody

has the same idea as me: grab a beer and check out the new place. Bear Republic Brewing Co. opened in 1995 in Healdsburg; Rohnert Park is its second location. After I put my name on the list, the hostess encourages me to head out to the lakefront patio

where I can hear a sea of voices and a band. I open the doors and am immediately enveloped in sound. Bear Republic has put plenty of thought into how to utilize such a large space, and they’ve managed to make it cozy and fun in every corner. On one end of the patio, you’ll

find games; on the opposite side, tables line up in front of an outside bar. In the middle of the patio, a band plays bluegrass underneath giant palm trees. What strikes me most is that everyone looks so happy. Older couples dance along to the band, all the games have players, and nobody seems bothered by the fact that there’s no place to sit. The menu is typical brewpub fare. For starters, I go for the fried calamari ($12), artichoke and spinach dip ($8) and macaroni and cheese ($11). The order of calamari is small, but lightly battered and good. The dip is so creamy it runs off of the chips. The best is the macaroni and cheese. The cheese is thick, and it’s garnished with breadcrumbs and herbs that elevate the dish. For opening night, the only entrée options are pizza and hamburgers. I order Bear Republic’s most popular burger, the Black and Blue ($15). The smoky taste is slightly overwhelming, and I find it hard to taste much else. But Cajun spices and sliced avocado buoy the burger. I also have to taste some of the pizza, so I go with a vegetarian option this time: the Garden Pizza ($14). Like the skimpy calamari, the artichoke hearts, red onions. zucchini and bell peppers on the pizza are few in number but still satisfying. And the beer? Of course I order Robert Lake’s Sunset Wheat ($6 for 16 ounces), a newer addition to the menu. It doesn’t have the citrus and fruit flavors I associate the wheat beer, but leans toward a Racer 5 with a fuller hoppy flavor and a classic wheat finish. Bear Republic is off to a great start. Bear Republic Brewing Co., 5000 Roberts Lake Road, Rohnert Park. 707.585.2722.

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Moonlight Brewing steps into the limelight—sort of BY JAMES KNIGHT

I

n brewing and winemaking, the rhyming rule “low and slow” describes a fermentation that, held to a nice chill, bubbles up at a steady tick-tick-tick pace for many days, if not weeks and months, to retain the delicate aroma of a grape or a style of beer. It might also describe the way Brian Hunt has built Moonlight Brewing Company. “He’s in no rush,” says Shannon Thomas from behind the bar at Moonlight’s tiny taproom. Thomas,

general manager at Moonlight, says that while it’s easy to get caught up in craft-brew fever these days, with everyone else growing at lightning speed, Hunt has instilled a patient, “Let’s think about what we’re doing here” approach to brewing and business, as Moonlight has grown from a one-man-show in a Windsor barn to, well, a small brewery in a Santa Rosa business park that only distributes kegs to a mostly regional Bay Area market. Yet Moonlight’s renown is outsized. Sometime this winter, an expanded space next door will replace this taproom. Sporting a redwood slab bar, it will be open Wednesday through Sunday, and will host a resident food truck. On a recent Saturday, visiting beer fans and boutique winemakers taking a break from crushing grapes across the parking lot file into the little taproom for pints and logo T-shirts, and settle at tables in the improvised beer garden—just a roped-off portion of the brewing facility. Samplers are poured in an attractive row of six five-ounce pilsner glasses, fitted into a wooden tray as heavy as ship’s tackle. Cans and bottles are being talked about, yet are still anathema at Moonlight; the taproom is the only place to grab-and-go ($40 new insulated growler, filled; refills for 64-ounce, $16, 32-ounce, $20) Moonlight favorites like the biscuity, balanced “ESB-ish” Twist of Fate, the fresh and corn-tassel floral Reality Czeck pilsner, the redwood-spiced ale Working for Tips, and the legendary Death & Taxes black lager. Ask about the secret to the beer here—is it that old copper kettle in the back, or fermentationscienced-up traditional English style?—and you’ll hear how Hunt responds to the technical stuff, says Thomas. “He just laughs and hands you a beer—‘What do you think of this?’” Moonlight Brewing Company, 3350 Coffey Lane, Ste. A, Santa Rosa. Open Friday, 4–8pm; Saturday– Sunday, 2–8pm. Pints, $5. 707.528.2537.


Local hops lacking, but not for lack of trying BY JAMES KNIGHT

S

ix feet tall and totally useless, there she stands—or has managed to climb, before giving up. It isn’t that she’s wilted in this summer’s relentless heat; though red and brown may fringe her leaves now in September, they’re still as prickly and deep green as in midsummer—and I should mention here that I only say “she” because the most desirable hops, the fragrant, light-green, conelike flower buds that are used in brewing, are produced by the female Humulus lupulus plant. No letters, please. I suppose it could be a dude. It sure is a dud. When I planted three hop rhizomes in 2015, the other two of which checked out completely this spring, I was hoping for an easy home-grown addition to my homebrew, just like the hop I planted some years ago that kept producing bumper crops of spicy green cones with no input at all, even as my interest in homebrewing waned. I returned to the hobby with better knowledge of the hops used in the English beer styles I wanted to brew—hops like this Golding, which should have grown to 15 feet or more by late July, but didn’t offer me a single cone. Brewmaster Jesus Ceja had high hopes for Saaz, a Central European variety that contributes a spicy character to classic pilsners,

) 14

STOP AND SMELL THE HOPS While hard to grow, locally grown hops have more character, says Fogbelt Brewing co-founder Paul Hawley.

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for HOPS HOPE

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CHARLES M. SCHULZ MUSEUM AND RESEARCH CENTER

Meet Bestselling Author

Dav Pilkey

Meet best-selling and award-winning author/illustrator Dav Pilkey, creator of both the Captain Underpants and Dog Man series, at an epic family event featuring a presentation and live drawing by Pilkey. Pilkey will sign books after both presentations.

Saturday, September 30 10:30 am and 1:30 pm

Create Your Own Cartoons Take a Photo with Dog Man and Captain Underpants Costumed Characters Activities • Prizes • Giveaways

Limited tickets for both presentations will be available online at schulzmuseum.org and in person at the Schulz Museum starting September 20 at 11:00 am. Tickets are NOT required for Mr. Pilkey’s book signings, which are scheduled for 11:00 am and 2:00 pm.

2301 Hardies Lane Santa Rosa, CA 95403 (707) 579-4452

schulzmuseum.org

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Heather He he Irwin I wi

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Thursday, September 28, 2017 7 pm Arlene Francis Center Moderated Mode ted by b

99 Sixth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95401

Columnist for Sonoma West Publishers

For more info: jonah.raskin@sonoma.edu

Jonah Raskin

BEER

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when he established a 20-foot-tall hop trellis at Carneros Brewing Company. Having 15 years experience brewing pilsner styles around the world for AnheuserBusch, Ceja knew where to get a quality hop: a ranch on the U.S.Canadian border. The first year, the hops grew well. The next few, not so well. Finally, they had to rethink the project. It wasn’t the growers—it was the hops, and the climate wasn’t to their liking. Now Carneros Brewing is replanting with varieties better suited to California. Good news: maybe I don’t have to blame myself for that dismal Golding? “I’ve torn out as many as I’ve planted,” says Paul Hawley, cofounder of Fogbelt Brewing Company in Santa Rosa. Hawley planted a quarter acre of hops on his family’s property in Healdsburg, which is mostly in vineyards. Like wine grapes, hops thrive in the temperate climate of Northern California. But results may vary because of their sensitivity to chill hours and day length—and with some varieties, those results are nil. Hawley has had no luck with Centennial, for instance, a variety he describes as “very tricky.” In major hop-growing regions like eastern Oregon and Washington state, notes Mike Stevenson, president of the NorCal Hop Growers Alliance, hops get more daylight hours during summer solstice, exactly when they need it to set a big crop. But while they get twice the yield in Washington state, the payoff for North Bay growers is in uniquely flavorful hops. “It’s still thought of as a commodity,” Hawley says of the role of the hop in brewing. “But really it is not—it’s more like grapes. It’s going to change depending on where and how you grow it.” The popular Cascade hop, for instance, tends to show citrus and pine aromas when grown in Washington, notes Stevenson. In Sonoma, adds Hawley, “the Cascade is more floral.” Even then, the Cascade grown at

his hop yard has a distinctly melon note compared to others, according to Hawley. Samples of Fogbelt’s saison, pale ale and IPA brewed in advance of their wet hop festival in early September did, indeed, show more tropical fruit notes than typically bitter or “hoppy” aromas. “It’s not about hitting you in the face with hops,” says Hawley. “It’s more about experiencing the aroma and flavors.”

‘I suppose it could be a dude. It sure is a dud.’ The Alliance formed in 2016 to help share hop-growing knowledge over a few beers. Dues-paying members include more than a dozen farmers with more than 50 plants, hobbyists and owners of related businesses. A collaboration with the organic chemistry program at Sonoma State University is helping them to dial it in further by analyzing samples of alpha acids in hops grown in different soils. A sandy, well-draining soil is best for growing hops, say Hawley and Stevenson, and while the outlook isn’t always entirely hopeless for finicky varieties, they name three foolproof choices for the home grower: Cascade, Chinook and Columbus. Another good bet, California Cluster, was found growing wild along the Russian River. Having been left to its own devices after the hop industry abandoned the region in the 1950s, this wild sister is particularly well adapted to the climate. But it’s hard to locate. And don’t forget to allow plenty of room for the hop to grow up to 15 feet—if you’ve got high hopes.


15

organic beers on the shelves at Whole Foods.

Hole in the Market Why the dearth of organic beer? BY JAMES KNIGHT

T

he refrigerated beer aisle at the Whole Foods Market in Coddingtown is so generous, it spills over into a refrigerated endcap around the corner, and is even bookended with a taproom. This, where America shops for healthful, wholesome, and organic foods, is surely where the most comprehensive selection of certified organic craft beer can be found, so let’s start shopping.

After some searching, here it is: Eel River IPA from Fortuna, Calif., bears a green and white USDA organic seal on the carton. And— that’s it. There are dozens, maybe hundreds of beers here: fun, fruity beers; serious, traditional beers; bourbon-barrel beers and light session beers. Corona and Coors

Light are here. Where are the organic beers? Surely, the healthconscious and environmentally aware customers of this natural grocery store chain, particularly in this Northern California market, must be asking the same question every day. “Not so much,” says a beer department manager, while pointing out that there are, indeed, a few more organic beers in the endcap— Samuel Smith fruit ales and a porter, which are from England. She says that people tend to shop by brand or style here, and they aren’t as concerned about organic beer as they are about gluten-free beer, which is prominently displayed with six brands. Fine, so shoppers feel good just stepping in the door of a namebrand organic food chain but take a pass when it comes to purchasing organic—who knew? The selection is only marginally better at locally owned natural foods markets, however. And customers ) 16

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LONELY LAGERS Fortuna’s Eel River Brewing is one of the few


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are not asking for more. “Not as often as I would like,” laments Mandy Reilly, grocery buyer at Community Market in Sebastopol. “But the organic options we have are some of our topselling varieties, so that speaks to the customer base we have at our store,” Reilly adds. Community Market carries organic beer from Eel River and Butte Creek, although distribution for the latter is spotty (taglined “The Official Beer of Planet Earth,” it doesn’t make it out of Ukiah when owner Mendocino Brewing Co. puts its core lineup first). One of the reasons for the limited selection is somewhat circular, Reilly speculates: unlike other grocery categories, which may display conventional and organic options side by side, the beer aisle doesn’t suggest the choice in the first place. “They really don’t think about it,” says Reilly, “because they don’t see an option.” Consumers are more worried about GMO in their foods, according to Reilly. Thus far, the market for barley hasn’t been lucrative enough for the cropscience industry to come up with approved GMO barley. Even so, “it’s definitely something people should be aware of,” says Reilly, “if you’re concerned about where your food comes from. Alcohol is digested by your body more readily than anything else, so you’re getting maximum potency there.” Organic wine has also gained little traction in the market, but unlike wine, which benefits from a level of sulfite above 10 parts per million (prohibited in organically certified wine), craft beer does not typically have any added preservatives other than hops. The struggle for market traction is clearly a frustration for Daniel Del Grande, owner and brewmaster of Bison Brewing in Berkeley. “Consumers in Sonoma, Napa and Marin have been pretty pricesensitive,” says Del Grande, who founded the organic brewery in 1997. “Once I get my beer on the shelf, they don’t seem to be willing to pay for organic beer,

so frankly it’s been rotated out because consumers don’t buy it.” Del Grande sells his lineup (which includes a double Simcoe IPA called Kermit the Hop, a chocolate stout, and a red ale with rye and caraway) in at least eight states, and in Whole Foods in some markets, but other stores looked at the metrics recently— pre-Amazon sale—and decided to bump Bison. Not because they’re unsympathetic, but because they aren’t meeting the metrics. What are the metrics? “You need to sell three or four cases a week to stay on the shelf,” says Del Grande. He’d sell that much if, for example, 32 people in Petaluma bought one six-pack every other week. “So the bar is pretty low.” Priced a dollar or two higher than other craft brew at $10.99 to $12.99 per six-pack, Bison beers do sell better on discount but, Del Grande adds, “I can’t keep my beer on discount and run a nonprofit.” The irony is that organic beer has a much greater impact on the environment than organic tomatoes, according to the brewer. “If people knew the impact of organic agriculture through organic beer, they wouldn’t pay extra for organic tomatoes; they’d shift all their money to organic beer.” Besides the health aspects that drive so many consumer choices—who ever thinks about the pesticides used to control mites and mildew on hops?—Del Grande points to the environmental and ag-system benefits when a household buys 52 six packs of organic beer per year, creating demand for a farmer to convert 1,800 square feet to organic farming. The beer itself doesn’t suffer for lack of choices. Del Grande says that today he’s got plenty of certified organic malts, specialty malts and hops to choose from— like the beer, they just cost more. Should environmentally concerned beer drinkers make the money-to-mouth connection any time soon, says Del Grande, “I can triple my output tomorrow.”


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Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

ELECTRIC BOOGALOO Veteran Nashville rockers Los Straightjackets perform the last backyard concert at KRSH in Santa Rosa on Thursday, Sept. 21. See Clubs & Venues, p24. RUTHERFORD

N A PA

C O TAT I

GLEN ELLEN

Musical Destination

Imagine History

Shining Bright

Fresco Films

Napa Valley Wine Train’s inaugural ‘Rock the Rails’ concert series is midway through a season of dynamic live performances paired with a round-trip tour aboard the train to a rotating winery venue. This month, the series moves to Grgich Hills Estate and presents superstar Sheila E in concert. The Bay Area native and acclaimed singer and percussionist is fresh off the release of her new soulpop album, Iconic: Message 4 America. Opening the show is Juan and Peter Michael Escovedo's All Star Band—Sheila E’s brothers. Dinner aboard the train sets the mood on Thursday, Sept. 21, at Wine Train station, 1275 McKinstry St., Napa. 5pm. $99 and up; $79 for concert only. winetrain.com.

Napa-based artist, author and Notre Dame de Namur University instructor Rick Deragon’s new book, ‘Fire in the Year of Four Emperors,’ may be a work of fiction, but its attention to detail and densely layered political intrigue is so spot-on that it makes the story—about four Roman generals vying for power in the year 69 A.D.—feel like it really happened. Published this summer, Fire in the Year’s vividly realized characters experience a sprawling scope of adventures that hooks the reader and sets the table for a larger saga. Deragon reads from Fire in the Year of Four Emperors on Friday, Sept. 22, at Napa Bookmine, 964 Pearl St., Napa. 6pm. Free. 707.733.3199.

Longtime Sonoma County musician Bobby Jo Valentine is known for his pop melodies and emotionally resonant lyrics, and his latest album, Maybe Stars, is no exception. The songwriter delves into his own personal path toward spiritual peace and weaves inspiring tales about following your dreams and listening to your heart on the new album. He spreads the love with an album-release show this weekend. Valentine’s full band—Dennis and Ruthie Haneda and David Fairchild— plus special guests Amie Penwell, Amy Hogan and John Roy Zat join him for the show on Saturday, Sept. 23, at Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati. 8pm. $10. 707.795.7868.

The 31st annual Wine Country Film Festival pairs diverse international and independent feature-length and short films, the picturesque setting of Sonoma Valley, and engaging seminars and culinary experiences featuring special guests from the world of film and food. This year’s schedule includes a spotlight on an array of topics, like Iranian films, food and wine, “eco cinema” and more, with events like a storytelling master class from director and cinematographer Patrick Morell. This year also boasts Films al Fresco, screenings under the stars, Friday, Sept. 22, to Sunday, Sept. 24, at Quarryhill Botanical Garden, 12841 Hwy. 12, Glen Ellen. Passes start at $75 for locals. wcff.us/2017.

—Charlie Swanson


local breweries, German food and tunes by Polkageist West. The family-friendly event is free, but with basic and VIP food and drink packages available. Saturday, Oct. 14, CIA at Copia, 500 First St., Napa. ciaatcopia.com. Cotati Oktoberfest Fun is the name of the game in the 11th annual Cotati Oktoberfest, which includes activities like wiener dog races, the tankard hoist, yodeling, a costume contest and more. Saturday, Oct. 14, La Plaza Park, West Sierra Avenue and Old Redwood Highway, Cotati. cotati.org.

KEGGER WEATHER October in the North Bay offers no shortage of Oktoberfest events.

October Suds

Local beer festivals offer different takes on a Bavarian tradition BY CHARLIE SWANSON

A

utumn in the North Bay means Oktoberfest events galore, lederhosen not required. The longtime Bavarian beer festival is transformed into funky and fresh events in Sonoma and Napa counties that highlight our foamingover beer scene served with live entertainment.

Oddtoberfest St. Helena’s independent order of Odd Fellows debuts the inaugural Oddtoberfest with a mix of sumptuous food, local beers and music that embraces harvest time’s simple pleasures. Saturday, Sept. 30, at Odd Fellows Hall #167, 1352 Main St., St. Helena. sh-oddfellows.org.

the Calistoga Inn. To mark the occasion, the inn opens its doors for an old-school Bier Fest with music from Americano Social Club, wood-fire-grilled meats and NVBC’s array of pilsners, ales and porters. Sunday, Oct. 1, Calistoga Inn, 1250 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga. calistogainn.com.

Bier Fest Twenty seventeen marks the 30th anniversary of the Napa Valley Brewing Company, brewed and sold exclusively in

Oktoberfest at CIA Copia The Culinary Institute of America’s newest campus hosts its first Oktoberfest with a spotlight on

Lagunitas Beer Circus The popular Lagunitas Beer Circus returns to Petaluma for more “freaktacular” high-flying acrobats, sideshow acts and burlesque ribaldry. This year, Lagunitas has chosen Petaluma’s Phoenix Theater as the recipient of the Beer Circus’ proceeds, supporting the longtime independent venue and its role as a teen service provider. Saturday, Oct. 21, SonomaMarin Fairgrounds, 175 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma. lagunitas.com/ beercircus. Fünkendänk Oktoberfest SOMO Village’s second Fünkendänk Oktoberfest blends the latest craft-beer trends with groovy tunes. The fünk and dänk refers to the festival’s offerings of sour beers and hop-heavy ales. There will also be European lagers, served unfiltered from wooden kegs for classic-beer fans. The funk also comes from musical headliners the Motet, a bootyshaking outfit nearly 20 years in the making. New Orleans jam band superstars Dragon Smoke, San Francisco party-starters Afrolicious and North Bay bands Frobeck, the Pulsators and Saffell also perform. Saturday, Oct. 21, at SOMO Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Drive, Rohnert Park. somoconcerts.com.

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Arts Ideas

19


CONSTELLATIONS

Stage Eric Chazankin

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O N E R E L AT I O N S H I P, INFINITE POSSIBILITIES

BIG BANG ‘Grace’ artfully probes the causes and effects of gun violence.

N O R T H B AY P R E M I E R E

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Pro Choice

Two new plays examine faith and science BY DAVID TEMPLETON

W

e make thousands of decisions every day, never knowing when a seemingly innocuous choice—grabbing coffee at Starbucks (where the future love of our life is standing in line) or Peet’s (where a runaway car is about to crash through the door)—could have lifechanging repercussions. Speaking of choices . . . Right now, at two different theaters, a pair of superbly crafted, deeply humane, brain-twisty shows has opened, each examining the headspinning flexibility of fate, and each staged and performed by artists working at the top of their game: Craig Wright’s Grace at

Main Stage West in Sebastopol (directed by John Craven); and Nick Payne’s Constellations (Juilet Noonan, director) in the Studio at 6th Street Playhouse in Santa Rosa. In Craig Wright’s Grace, the show begins in the aftermath of a shocking act of unpremeditated gun violence. The story then rewinds (more or less literally) to 45 days earlier, as we witness the decisions and mistakes, large and small, made by a financially tenuous born-again couple (Ilana Niernberger and John Browning), their agnostic scientist next-door neighbor (Sam Coughlin) and an irascible German pest exterminator (John Craven), who keeps showing up to spray for bugs. Highly intelligent and cleverly designed (with kudos to sound engineer Doug Faxon and light designer Missy Weaver), Grace is a show that hangs out in your mind and heart long after the final shot has stopped ringing in our ears. Rating (out of 5): The same could be said (without the guns) of Constellations. Staged in the round, as a smart, breezy, 75-minute theatrical dance of words and ideas, the play follows a physicist (Melissa Claire) and an organic beekeeper (Jared Wright) through a series of overlapping, slightly varied scenarios. They meet, they don’t meet, they have a terrible first date, they have a great first date, they break up, they stay together, and on and on. Every choice sets in motion a series of alternative conclusions. Beautifully acted, movingly staged, Constellations also lingers long after, as we are forced to contemplate all the possibilities that might have been, had we only made a different choice. ‘Grace’ runs Thursday–Sunday through Sept. 24 at Main Stage West, 104 N. Main St., Sebastopol. Thursday– Saturday, 8pm; 5pm matinees, Sunday. $15–$30. 707.823.0177. ‘Constellations’ runs weekends through Sept. 24 at 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W. Sixth St. Thursday, 7:30pm; Friday–Saturday, 8pm; Sunday, 2pm. $16–$26. 707.523.4185.


9/22–9/28

MVFF40

Honorable

Brad’s Status 11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-8:45

R

Viceroy’s House

NR

10:30-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30

Rebel in the Rye

PG13

10:45-1:15-3:45-6:15-8:40

Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge NR 10:15-12:45-3:15-6:00-8:15

The Fencer NR 11:00-6:15 Wind River R 1:15-8:30 Trip to Spain NR 3:45pm MAMA MIA Jennifer Lawrence’s tranquil life is upended in Darren Aronofsky’s disconcerting psychological horror film.

551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

Face Time

A little ambiguity would help ‘Mother!’ BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

S

cene after scene in Mother!, we peer into Jennifer Lawrence’s eyeballs in tight closeup, as if we were ophthalmologists. Lawrence has been accused of overacting before, but with the camera this close, it’s director Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan) whose imprisons her.

Every bad thing that happens in this psychological horror film— rather, everything that’s probably going to turn out bad—follows with a cut to Lawrence so she can react to it. We know exactly how she feels at every moment. Some ambiguity would have spiced this Kafka fable that does a backflip into religious allegory. It’s a Repulsion–style study of the walls closing in. Mother (Lawrence) is rebuilding a rambling farm house. Her husband, twice her age, is called “Him” (Javier Bardem), a poet walled in by serious writer’s block. (This tactic of stripping the characters of the names isn’t necessarily pretentious; it often occurred in silent films.) One evening, a guest calls, unknown to Mother but slightly known by Him. The man (Ed Harris) is a boorish orthopedic surgeon, a smirking bastard who smokes in the house, even after he’s been requested to stop. Him can’t get enough of the pushy man of medicine and goes off hiking and talking with him. Later, the doctor’s unnamed wife (Michelle Pfieffer) arrives and makes herself completely at home— Lawrence, a pillar of strength in most roles, looks helplessly miffed. Emulating the midnight-movie look of his first movie, Pi, Aronofksy films in grainy Super-16mm blown up to full size. Some elements of the bizarre stick to the viewer—hallucinations of protoplasm, rot and blood, the sensual treatment of gobs of plaster in Mother’s trowel, studied until they look like chocolate mousse on a desert trolley. But the ever tighter camera overexposes Lawrence’s face. You’re reduced to spending an hour or so counting the moles on her neck in this perplexing pyschodrama. ‘Mother!’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.

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Schedule for Friday, September 22 – Thursday, September 28

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Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd

Schedule for Fri, June 22nd•- Salads Thu, June Bruschetta • Academy Paninis Soups • 28th Appetizers Award “Moore Gives •Her BestNominee Performance 8 Great BeersBest on Tap + Wine by theFilm! Glass and Bottle Foreign Language

In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 (1:15THE 4:00) 6:45 9:30 R RR JONESES (12:30) 2:45 5:00 7:20 9:45 (12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestRActor! “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:45 6:45 9:45 PG-13 (1:00 4:00) 7:00 9:50 R Picture! THEAward SECRET OF KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday Limited Engagement! If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

MOTHER!

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE

TWO TRAINS RUNNIN’ ONCE

ONCE 8 Academy Noms Including (12:50 2:55 Award 4:50) 7:20 9:15 NR PRODIGAL SONS

(1:00) 3:10 R Best Picture, Best5:20 Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) NR No 9:10 Tue or Thu Sun:9:10 No (2:55) Tue:Show No 7:20 MILK “Haunting and Hypnotic!” – Rolling Stone “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek

THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (12:30 (1:10) 2:45 5:00) 7:15NR 9:30 PG 4:30 7:30 (1:30) 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award4:00 Noms Including “★★★1/2!(1:20 AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA 4:10) 6:50 9:35 R Today

IT FROST/NIXON (2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” NR Limited Engagement! DOLORES (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine REVOLuTIONARY ROAD (12:45 2:50 5:00) 7:15 9:25 “Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times Sun: No (12:45) Tue:7:00 No (5:00) (1:15) 4:15 9:30 R or 9:25 THE GHOST WRITER

Kevin Jorgenson presents the California Premiere of

RIVERFLICK PuRE:WIND A BOuLDERING (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

Michael Moore’s Feb5:10) 26th at 7:159:50 R (12:30 2:50 7:30 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROuS

SICKO MOVIES IN THE MORNING MAN IN AMERICA BEACH RATS Starts Fri, June 29th!

Starts Fri,Sun June 29th! Fri, Sat, &7:30 Mon 9:45 PAPERS DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow PENTAGON (12:40 3:00 5:15) R Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! AM CHANGELING (1:30 4:10) 7:10 9:45 R10:20 Venessa Redgrave Meryl Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH AND CHONG’S 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED ArtSHORTS House Theater Celebration 10:45 AM HEY WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm &2pm Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS (Sun Only) Starts Fri, June 29th! Sun, Sep 24 Only!

STRONGER

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NT LIVE: YERMA Sat, Sep 30

10am

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Film

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Fri sep 22 byRds of a featheR 8pm/Dancing/$10 saT bobby Jo Valentine sep 23 cd Release 8pm/$10 aDv/$15 Dos Thu the bloodstones sep 28 8pm/Dancing/$10

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open belly

saT sep 30 with nathalie tedRick 8:30pm/$10 Tue patRick sweany ocT 3 8pm/$10 Thu tsonoMa ocT 5 8pm/Dancing/$5 Fri cheap date 13, pi Jacobs ocT 6 8pm/Dancing/$10 saT Johnny allaiR & ocT 7 Julia haRRell 8:30pm/$10 sun pee wee ellis funk band ocT 8 8pm/Dancing/$20 aDv/$25 Dos Fri Jon Gonzales & faMily ocT 13 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

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+ MATT JAFFE & THE DISTRACTIONS $10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

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Sat

Dallas Craft and Tommy Rox & Friends Oct 7 King James

The Songs of James Taylor and Carol King 8:30 ncho Fri Sharp Blues Band RDaeb ut! Oct 13 B 8:00 / No Cover

Oct 14 Revolver Beatles and More! 8:30 Sat

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Fri

SUN, NOVEMBER 5

Sat

Brian Reed

Stephen Stills & Judy Collins

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7:45 Swing Dance Lessons with Oct 20 Joe & Mirabai

Stompy Jones 8:00 Oct 21 Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys Sun

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PUSHING BOUNDARIES Seattle’s

dream-pop band Lemolo make their North Bay debut thanks to Frontier Room.

New Frontiers Local advocates make space for new artists

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

F

rom garage to gallery space to countywide pop-up experience, creative advocate the Frontier Room has evolved within the North Bay’s arts and music scene to give room to underground acts with curated live experiences outside the norm. This month, the Frontier Room hosts rising Seattle indie-pop band Lemolo in a free show at Sonoma Cider on Sept. 27, with Santa Rosa songwriter John Courage opening the show. The Frontier Room is headed by South Bay native and former pro-skateboarder Adam Crew, who moved to Santa Rosa five years ago. “I knew I was going to be

coming back to the West Coast,” says Crew. “I always had a lot of longtime friends who lived here.” Crew moved into a house in Santa Rosa’s Luther Burbank neighborhood, though upon arrival he says he felt a lack of diversity in the local music and art scene. So he did something about it. “I never thought I would be trying to run a venue,” says Crew. “But, basically, I turned my garage into the first edition of the Frontier Room.” Crew built a stage and set up his garage into a social club that hosted art shows and low-key concerts. In 2014, Crew teamed with musician and drum instructor Jesse Wickman, who was running Atlas Studios in Santa Rosa’s South of A arts district, to turn that studio space into a gallery under the Frontier Room name. While that space only lasted a year, the Frontier Room became synonymous in Sonoma County with dynamic, inclusive events that blended art and music from both touring bands and local artists. These days, Crew continues to look for a permanent brickand-mortar location to revive the Frontier Room, though he still works with a select group of venues to put on pop-up events. In addition, he’s taken the Frontier Room to the frontiers of the internet. “We’ve turned into a digital voice for an underground community,” he says. The Frontier Room’s support for the local scene also includes trying to bring bigger musical acts to town, such as Lemolo, who make their Sonoma County debut this month. Formed and fronted by songwriter Meagan Grandall, Lemolo crafts ethereal dream-pop gems that walk the line between quiet reflections and dance-floor jams. Lemolo’s current New Songs and Spaces tour sees the band performing brand-new material. “I encourage people to come early, says Crew, “and engage with likeminded people.” Lemolo performs on Wednesday, Sept. 27, at Sonoma Cider, 44-F Mill St., Healdsburg. 6pm. Free. All ages. thefrontierroom.org.


Concerts SONOMA COUNTY Earle Fest

Los Angeles legends Los Lobos headlines the annual benefit for the Earle Baum Center of the Blind, with support from local favorites California Honeydrops, Tift Merritt, Timothy O’Neil Band and others. Sep 23, 3pm. $55. SOMO Village Event Center, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, somoconcerts.com.

Lemolo

honky-tonk group made of veteran musicians Bobby Black, Mark Holzinger and others. Sep 23, 8pm. $20. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Sheila E

Dine aboard the Napa Valley Wine Train before enjoying a headlining set of music from the famed percussionist and singer as part of the “Rock the Rails” music series. Sep 21, 5pm. $99 and up. Grgich Hills Estate, 1829 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford, winetrain.com.

Seattle dream-pop band fronted by songwriter and musician Meagan Grandall plays as part of their New Songs & Spaces tour. Sep 27, 6pm. Free. Sonoma Cider, 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Clubs & Venues

Television

Sep 22, Collaboration with David Scott. Sep 23, Blues Radio. 95 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.576.7765.

Influential ‘70s New York City proto-punks take the stage in a historic redwood barn. Sep 27, 6:30pm. $45. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

MARIN COUNTY Leyla McCalla

New Orleans musician performs a Haitian and Creole infused indie-folk rock. Sep 26, 8pm. $17-$19. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

New Century Chamber Orchestra

British violinist Daniel Hope leads the orchestra in “New Horizons,” a program that includes a world-premiere violin concerto by Alan Fletcher. Sep 24, 3pm. $29-$61. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael, ncco.org.

Whistlestock

Fourth annual benefit concert gets into a Summer of Love spirit with performances by Jesse Colin Young and Pure Prairie League. Sep 24, 12pm. $69-$129. Marin Fairgrounds, Marin Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael.

NAPA COUNTY Redhawk Western Swing Band Dance to the jump-jiving

SONOMA COUNTY A’Roma Roasters

Annie O’s Music Hall

Sep 23, Sheena Gee and David Gideon. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Aqus Cafe

Sep 20, West Coast Songwriters Competition. Sep 22, the Buckeye Boys. Sep 23, bluegrass and old time music with Tito. Sep 27, Desi and the Mish. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

The Big Easy

Sep 20, Detroit Disciples. Sep 21, Pick & Pull. Sep 22, Santeria. Sep 23, the Four Inch Studs. Sep 24, Seventh Avenue. Sep 26, Rivertown Trio. Sep 27, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Blue Heron Restaurant & Tavern

Sep 24, 2pm, the Zins. 25300 Steelhead Blvd, Duncans Mills. 707.865.2261.

B&V Whiskey Bar & Grille

Sep 22, Train Wreck Junction. 400 First St E, Sonoma. 707.938.7110.

Cellars of Sonoma

Sep 23, 4pm, John Pita. Sep 24, 2pm, Craig Corona. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Crooked Goat Brewing Sep 23, 3pm, Craig Corona. 120 Morris St, Ste 120, Sebastopol. 707.827.3893.

Flamingo Lounge

Sep 22, Groovy Judy. Sep 23, California Groove. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Forestville Club

Sep 23, Memory Lane Combo. 6250 Front St, Forestville. 707.887.2594.

Gale’s Central Club

Sep 21, Sheena Gee and David Gideon. 106 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.0118.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

Sep 23, the Rusty String Express. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036. Sep 23, Los Tigres Del Norte. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery Sep 26, Foxygen. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Sep 20, Songwriters in the Round. Sep 21, 4:30pm, Tuesday Social Club Band. Sep 22, Ronstadt Brothers. Sep 23, Trapeze Worldwide. Sep 27, G Jones. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Sep 22, 5pm, Michael Bloch. Sep 22, 8pm, Jimbo Scott. Sep 23, 1pm, Liv Lombardi. Sep 23, 8pm, Wendy DeWitt. Sep 24, 1pm, Billy D. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

BR Cohn Winery

Brewsters Beer Garden

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Sep 21, 5pm, Bourbon & Bluegrass with Festival Speed. Sep 22, 5pm, the Melt. Sep 23, 3pm, Transistor Rodeo. Sep 24, 3pm, Van Goat.

BENEFIT CONCERT WEEKEND for ANOVA SCHOOL

FOR AUTISM AND LEARNING DIFFERENCES to build a much needed playground!

FRIDAY, SEPT 29

FAITHFULLY

Wed, open mic night. Sep 22, Gabby Lala with Snow Angel and Killer Kaya. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478. )

24

100% of ticket sale proceeds go to ANOVA

RELIVING THE GLORY DAYS OF JOURNEY with VSquared SATURDAY, SEPT 30

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A TRIBUTE TO EARLY VAN HALEN, THE DAVID LEE ROTH ERA with VSquared FRIDAY, OCT 20

METAL SHOP THE PREMIER 80’S ROCK EXPERIENCE! with The Butlers

Green Music Center

Sep 23, Stephanie Ozer Trio with Peter Barshay and Kendrick Freeman. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Sep 24, 2pm, Ricky Montijo. 15000 Sonoma Hwy, Glen Ellen. 707.938.4064.

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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEP TE M BE R 20 -26, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Sep 21, 6pm, Los Straitjackets with Marshall Crenshaw. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.0707.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Sep 20, Ragtag Sullivan. Sep 21, Friends the Band. Sep 22, the String Rays. Sep 23, Brothers Prince. Sep 24, Parlor Tricks. Sep 27, Mitch Woods & His Rocket 88s. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Local Barrel

Sep 23, 8pm, the Budrows. Sep 24, 5pm, Gypsy Trio. 490 Mendocino Ave #104, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5433.

Main Street Bistro

Sep 21, Eric Wiley. Sep 22, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. Sep 23, Brulee. Sep 24, Willie Perez. Sep 26, Mac & Potter. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Sep 22, DJ MGB. Sep 24, 4pm, Barbara Olney and friends. Sep 24, 9pm, DJ MGB. Sep 25, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. Sep 25, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Monroe Dance Hall

Sep 23, DJ Steve Luther and Zydeco Band. 1400 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.529.5450.

Montgomery Village Shopping Center Thu 9⁄21+Fri 9/22 • Doors 7-8pm ⁄ 27- 32 • All Ages Petty Theft Tom Petty Tribute Sun 9/24 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20-$25 • All Ages Willie Watson + Bedouine Mon 9/25 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $10-$12 • All Ages Y La Bamba + Lila Blue Tue 9/26 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17-$19 • All Ages Leyla McCalla + Olivia Davis Thu 9/28 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages $

FREE Show with Koolerator Jon Korty (of Vinyl & Soul Ska)

feat

with Special Guests

Fri 9/29 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27-$32 • 21+

Foreverland

14 Piece Tribute to Michael Jackson

Sat 9/30 • Doors 10am ⁄ $12-$22 • All Ages

Little Folkies Family Band featuring

Sep 21, 5:30pm, Unauthorized Rolling Stones. Sep 23, 12pm, Sun Kings. Sep 24, 1pm, Vernelle Anders. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

$

GOOSE G GANDER September 24

SCOTT THOMAS

FROM RINGSIDE

Irena Eide

Sun 10/1 • Doors 4pm ⁄ $10-$15 • All Ages

Moonalice

Thu 10/5 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $60-$65 • 21+

Robert Earl Keen

Tue 10/31 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $30-$35 • 21+

Dumpstaphunk

with Jazz Mafia Horns 2nd Annual Dumpstaween Celebration www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

1–4pm Every Sunday this Summer thru 9/24 NO COVER Live music, cocktails & food outside in our garden @goosegandernapa

1245 Spring St, St. Helena 707.967.8779

Mystic Theatre & Music Hall

Sep 22, Agent Orange with the Happys and Year Zero. Sep 23, the Grain and Avocado Sundae. Sep 24, Los Amigos Invisibles with La Misa Negra. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.775.6048.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Sep 24, Simrit in concert. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Oliver’s Tavern off the Green

Sep 22, 11am, Donny Mederos and Levi Lloyd. Sep 23, 4pm, Saffell. 9230 Old Redwood Hwy, Windsor. 707.687.2050.

Penngrove Pub

Sep 22, Sheena Gee and David Gideon. Sep 26, the Sticky Notes. 10005 Main St, Penngrove. 707.664.8018.

The Phoenix Theater

Sep 22, the Honey Toads and the Blind Bandits. Sep 23, Jimmy Eat World and Man with a Mission. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Sep 21, 6:30pm, Emily Hamilton. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Redwood Cafe

Sep 20, Irish set dancing. Sep 21, Lee Tafari. Sep 22, David Byrd & Byrds of a Feather. Sep 23, 3pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Sep 23, 8pm, Bobby Jo Valentine album release show. Sep 24, 3pm, old time fiddle jam. Sep 24, 6pm, Irish jam session. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Sep 23, Rubber Soul. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Weekend at Bernie’s. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Sep 20, pro blues jam. Sep 21, Jimmy Smith Band. Sep 22, the Hot Licks. Sep 23, Carmen Jones. Sep 24, 11:30am, Sunday brunch with Diamond Jazz. Sep 24, 6:30pm, James Harman Band with MSA. Sep 27, the Fenix Band. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Sat, DJ party. Sun, Banda Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato

Sep 24, 6pm, Poor Man’s Whiskey and Brian Belknap. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Sep 23, Andy T & Alabama Mike. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Sep 20, Just Friends. Sep 27, Shaky Hand String Band. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

19 Broadway Club

Sep 23, Out of the Blue. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Sep 20, the Acrosonics. Sep 21, Plan Be. Sep 22, 6:30pm, Bruce Gordon. Sep 22, 8pm, Solid Air. Sep 23, 5:30pm, Full Circle. Sep 23, 8pm, Rubber Soul. Sep 24, 5pm, Jon Shannon Williams. Sep 24, 8:30pm, Sonoma blues jam. Sep 25, Brandon Eardley. Sep 26, American Roots Night. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Sep 22, Tommy Odetto. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Taco Chido

Sep 22, 5:30pm, Emily Lois. 57 Montgomery Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.890.5046.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Sep 21, Country Line Dancing. Sep 22, Moonlight Rodeo. Sep 23, Diamond Ridge Band. Sep 24, Sunday Funday BBQ with the Highway Sisters. Sep 26, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Sep 20, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. Sep 21, Koolwhip. Sep 22, 5:30pm, Damir & Derek. Sep 22, 9:30pm, LMO-415 birthday bash with the Stonies and Nugget King. Sep 24, 2pm, Connie Ducey and friends. Sep 24, 8pm, the River City Band. Sep 25, open mic. Sep 26, Eddie Neon blues jam. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Sep 21, Michael LaMacchia Band. Sep 22, Michael Aragon Quartet. Sep 23, Joe Tate & the Blue Monday Band. Sep 24, Timothy O & Co. Sep 25, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Sep 27, Wabi Sabi and friends. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Sep 20, Con Quimba. Sep 22, Eric Markowitz Trio. Sep 23, Marcos Sainz Trio. Sep 24, Jeff Denson’s Open Sky Trio. Sep 26, Ken Cook. Sep 27, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Sep 23-24, 12pm, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. 25200 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.935.4700.

Sep 20, J Kevin Durkin. Sep 21, Deborah Winters. Sep 26, Wanda Stafford. Sep 27, Lorin Rowan. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Whiskey Tip

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Viansa Winery

Sep 22, Two Peace with Northern Lights. Sep 23,

Sep 20, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. Sep 21, KZ & the


25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BE R 20 -26, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

LIKE A FOX Indie-rock duo Foxygen mix eccentric compositions with glam-pop sensibilities when they play Gundlach Bundschu Winery in Sonoma on Tuesday, Sept. 26. See Clubs & Venues, p23. Robbers. Sep 22, La Mandanga. Sep 23, Junk Parlor. Sep 24, Chrissy Lynne and friends. Sep 25, open mic. Sep 26, Fresh Baked Blues. Sep 27, the New Sneakers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Rancho Nicasio

Sep 22, the Beer Scouts. Sep 24, 4pm, Staggerwing. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Sep 22, Lady D. Sep 23, Moonglow Trio. Sep 24, Lilan Kane and James Harman. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Sep 21, Toque Tercero flamenco night. Sep 22, MSA Jazz night with Remy LeBeouf. Sep 23, Benefit for Texas with Jesse Kincaid Band and Harmonic Law. Sep 23, 12:30pm, Lau and friends. Sep 24, 5pm, Candela with Edgardo Cambon. Sep 26, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Sep 21, Mike Sopko and Ryan Scott Long. Sep 22, Divided Heaven. Sep 23, Pamela Parker’s Fantastic Machine. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Sep 21-22, Petty Theft. Sep 24, 11am, Redwood Rodeo. Sep 24, 8pm, Willie Watson and Bedouine. Sep 25, Y La Bamba.

19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Terrapin Crossroads

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Sep 20, Nathan Moore Band. Sep 21, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Sep 22, Top 40 Friday dance party with the Rowan Brothers. Sep 23, Merriewood’s Men. Sep 24, 3:30pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh and friends. Sep 24, 7:30pm, Mark Karan and friends. Sep 26, Rattlebox. Sep 27, Magic in the Other. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Sep 20, 12pm, Ian Scarfe. Sep 22, Peter & Will Anderson Jazz Trio. Sep 23, 3pm, Music Beyond Borders with Ian Dogole. Sep 23, 8pm, Richard Howell & Sudden Changes. Sep 24, 3pm, Larry Vuckovich’s Vince Guaraldi Tribute Quintet. Sep 24, 5pm, Kimrea’s Pro Showcase. Sep 27, 12pm, Friedrich Edelman and friends. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Sep 22, Todos Santos. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY

Sep 22, Serf & James. Sep 23, Noema. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards Sep 23, Jon Shannon Williams. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Sep 21, Salty Dawgs. Sep 22, People of Earth. Sep 23, Walter Hand & the Blue Hand Band. Sep 24, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Goose & Gander Sep 24, 1pm, Scott Thomas from Ringside. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Napkins Bar & Grill Sep 22, DJ Carl. Sep 23, DJ Aurelio. Sep 24, 12pm, acoustic brunch with Doug Houser. Sep 26, 6pm, Gentlemen of Jazz. 1001 Second St, Napa. 707.927.5333.

River Terrace Inn Sep 21, Craig Corona. Sep 22, Dan Martin. Sep 23, Smorgy. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Beringer Vineyards

Silo’s

Blue Note Napa

Sep 20, Wesla Whitfield & Mike Greensill. Sep 21, Jeff Oster. Sep 22, the Rhythm Method Four. Sep 23, 8 Track Massacre. Sep 24, Peter & Will Anderson Jazz Trio. Sep 27, Wesla Whitfield & Mike Greensill. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Sep 23, 12:30pm, Carlos Herrera. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

Sep 20-21, Nicolas Bearde. Sep 22, Sammy Miller & the Congregation. Sep 23, Rivvrs. Sep 26, Michael Kaeshammer.

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Arts Events

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEP TE M BE R 20 -26, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

RECEPTIONS Sep 22

Healdsburg Senior Center, “Healdsburg Gems,” several pastel landscape paintings are inspired by the region’s sights. 6pm. 133 Matheson St, Healdsburg.

Sep 23

Atlas Coffee Company, “J.Party Showcase,” local artist displays work before traveling to Europe, with a pop up shop of other zines, clothing and cassettes. 7pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1085. Healdsburg Center for the Arts, “Art Trails Preview Show,” get an advanced look at works by participating artists of this year’s Sonoma County Art Trails event. 5pm. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. 707.431.1970.

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Galleries SONOMA COUNTY 6th Street Playhouse

Through Sep 24, “Laughing Matters,” juried show curated by Christie Marks has a sense of humor, at the Studio Gallery. 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

Calabi Gallery

Through Sep 24, “Gallery Group Show,” featuring Calabi Gallery’s contemporary artists and selections from its vintage collection. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Chroma Gallery

Through Sep 27, “Sightings,” juried photography show aims the lens at life’s often overlooked textures, patterns and juxtapositions. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Hopscotch Gifts & Gallery, “Jordan Celso: Large Scale Abstracts,” solo show by Laytonville artist features large acrylic abstracts paintings, silk scarves and metal prints. 5pm. 14301 Arnold Dr, #2A, Glen Ellen. 707.343.1931.

Graton Gallery

Paul Mahder Gallery, “Ann Wolff Glass Works,” the artist displays imaginative works in her preferred medium. 6pm. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

Through Sep 24, “Portraits of Petaluma Pioneers,” look back in time with visually rich portrait of Petaluma’s residents circa 1850-60. 20 Fourth St, Petaluma. Wed-Sat, 10 to 4; Sun, noon to 3; tours by appointment on Mon-Tues. 707.778.4398.

Sebastopol Senior Center, “Senior Center Art Show,” local awardwinning artist Alice Larsen and local plein air painter Nancy Sanchietti show their works. 2pm. 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Sep 27

Senior Wing at Finley, “Watercolors Squared,” compilation of paintings by four Sonoma County water-media artists display varied interpretations of the world. 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Through Sep 24, “Anything Goes,” juried exhibition runs concurrently with the annual Cigar Box show. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Petaluma Historical Library & Museum

Russian River Art Gallery

Through Sep 28, “Small Art Works,” members of the gallery co-op show their small pieces. 16357 Main St, Guerneville. Daily, 10 to 6. 707.869.9099.

Senior Wing at Finley

Through Sep 21, “Fun Pun,” artist Sharona “ChaCha” Tracy presents an interactive show of sculptures made from found objects. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Through Sep 30, “Regina Saura Solo Show,” the artist displays

paintings that are whimsical, bold and sophisticated. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Jessel Gallery

Through Sep 30, “Open Studios Napa Valley Preview,” view an original piece of art created by each participating artist in the upcoming open studios tour. 1019 Atlas Peak Rd, Napa. Daily, 10 to 5. 707.257.2350.

Comedy San Francisco Comedy Competition SemiFinals Rising Bay Area comedians compete. Sep 23, 8pm. $46. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Stephen B

Standup star has been seen on Comedy Central. Sep 23, 8pm. $20. Trek Winery, 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

Dance Magic Men Live

Striptease stage show for the ladies. Sep 24, 7pm. $25 and up. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville. 707.944.9900.

Events 6th Street Playhouse Gala Fundraiser

Actor Chris Noth appears at the gala, with specially catered dinner, drinks, auctions and tours of the historic grounds. Sep 23. McDonald Mansion, 1015 McDonald Ave, Santa Rosa, 6thstreetplayhouse.com.

All Hallow’s Art Fest

Over 30 artists show and sell their Halloween-themed art works and collectibles. Sep 23, 9am. $5. Hermann Sons Hall, 860 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9962.

Autumn Equinox Sound Healing Ceremony

Rise with the sun in this seasonal ceremony and


CannaBiz, Legally

Better know the ins and outs of the cannabis business in a program featuring knowledgeable speakers. Sep 23, 9am. $200. Friedman Event Center, 4676 Mayette Ave, Santa Rosa, frigolaw.com.

CASSINI: The True Lord of the Rings

Planetarium show looks at the satellite sent to Saturn to explore the planet’s ring system. Sep 22-23. SRJC Planetarium, Lark Hall, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.527.4465.

Crush Camp

Harness your inner winemaker for a day of activity with Passaggio Wines owner Cindy Cosco. Space is limited, RSVP recommended. Sep 23, 10:30am. $45-$55. Passaggio Wines, 22020 Carneros Vineyard Way, Suite 2, Sonoma. 707.934.8941.

Designer Trunk Show

Find quality fashions from talented local designers with an eye toward hand dyed, natural and sustainable fabrics. Sep 24, 11am. Free admission. West County Herb Company Annex, 3641 Main St, Occidental. 707.495.4860.

National Acrobat & Martial Artists of the People’s Republic of China

Acrobatic troupe wows with innovative high-flying stunts and superior techniques. Sep 24, 3pm. $25 and up. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Preserving Sonoma Valley Party

Valley of the Moon Alliance brings together live music, libations, burger bar, silent auction and community spirit. Sep 23, 12pm. $30-$35. Kenwood Plaza Park, 200 Warm Springs Rd, Kenwood, votma.org.

Revolution Ride & Festival

One part cycle-a-thon, one part celebration with food, wine and post-ride professional massages raises money for sports and recreational programs for people with physical disabilities and visual impairment. Sep 23, 6:30am. $50 and up. Trentadue Winery, 19170 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 510.225.7035.

Santa Rosa Toy & Comic Con

The fifth annual convention includes special guests Nichelle Nichols and Walter Koenig from the original “Star Trek” as well as celebrity panels, exhibits, and dozens of toy, anime, comic book and other vendors. Sep 23. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Sundays on Sherman

Enjoy live music and lots of food and family activities by local restaurants and organizations. Sep 24, 11am. Free. City Green, 901 Sherman Ave, Novato, novato.org.

The Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival Friday night gala and weekend of music, family-fun activities, artists displaying their works, beer and wine garden and more. Sep 22-24. Sonoma Plaza, First St E, Sonoma. valleyofthemoonvintagefestival.org.

Wings, Wine & Wetlands Fundraiser for the Laguna center features interactive fun, fine dining, auctions and more. Sep 24, 3pm. $125. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Film Elizabeth Blue

NAMI Solano County and Napa Citizens for Mental Health host a pre-release screening of the new film about a woman living with mental illness. Sep 21,

5:30pm. $15. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena. 707.963.9779.

Italian Film Festival

The fest offers great films, both comedy and drama, from Italy. Sat, Sep 23, 5:30 and 7:45pm and Sun, Sep 24, 4 and 6:30pm. $16/$120 full series. Marin Center Showcase Theatre, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, italianfilm.com.

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complimentary brow wax with appointment

Love & Basketball

Romantic drama marks an autobiographical debut from writer and director Gina Prince Bythewood. Fri, Sep 22, 7pm and Sun, Sep 24, 4pm. Sonoma Film Institute, Warren Auditorium, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 707.664.2606.

Petaluma Cinema Series

Petaluma Film Alliance screens silent-film era Hollywood satire “Show People,” featuring cameos by Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks. With live piano score by Frederick Hodges. Sep 27, 6pm. $5$6/$45 season pass. Carole L Ellis Auditorium, 680 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma, petalumafilmalliance.org.

Jewelry by Roost

Fundraising gala gets into the Jack London spirit as the Winery Ruins are transformed into the famous Heinold’s Saloon that the author frequented in his time. Sep 23, 6pm. $200. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

All-day jamboree and showcase of the Arlene Francis Center features favorite local performers and artists, hands-on classes, workshops and opportunities to help restore the center. Sep 24, 2pm. by donation. Arlene Francis Center, 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

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Songs of the Klamath

Local songwriter Ismay premieres her short documentary about her exploration of the connection between the arts and environment. Sep 23, 6:30pm. $15 and up. David Yearsley River Heritage Center, 100 East D St, Petaluma. 707.290.6723.

Wine Country Film Festival

Feature-length and short films of every genre are presented throughout Kenwood and Glen Ellen, with “Films al Fresco” outdoor screenings, live appearances by industry specialists and workshops. Sep 22-24. $25 and up. Quarryhill Botanical Gardens, 12841 Hwy 12, Glen Ellen, wcff.us/2017/.

Food & Drink

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Wine country celebrates LGBTQ human rights with wine and food pairings, silent auction and dance party. Sep 23, 5pm. Trione Winery, 19550 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.8100.

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celebration in the spa’s gardens. Sep 21, 8am. Free. Osmosis Day Spa, 209 Bohemian Hwy, Freestone. 707.823.8231.


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NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | SEP TE M BE R 20 -26, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Tour the vineyards and sip your favorite Champagne and wine with delicious food pairings. Sep 23. $25. Korbel Champagne Cellars, 13250 River Rd, Guerneville. 707.824.7000.

The Great Grape Study Get acquainted with Bordeauxstyle blends. Sep 21, 5pm. $15. Back Room Wines, 1000 Main St, Napa. 707.226.1378.

Harvest Celebration Dinner

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Lectures Curious About Travel to Antarctica?

Harvest Stomp

Trading Horses & Lies

celebration of Spanish culture includes estate wines paired with food, live music and sweeping views of the Carneros region. Sep 23, 6pm. $95. Artesa Winery, 1345 Henry Rd, Napa. 707.224.1668.

Ram’s Gate Harvest Celebration

The winery opens its doors to share the views, wines and more with the public. Sep 24, 4pm. $150. Ram’s Gate Winery, 28700 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.721.8700.

Taste of Place 150 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.765.1715 212 Corte Madera Town Ctr, Corte Madera 415.924.1715 louisthomas.com

Join the movement for sustainable restaurants with a meal that’s carbon neutral. Sep 27, 6pm. $160. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Diana Saint James, owner of Dimensions in Travel Discover, gives options for experiencing the continent. Sep 25, 10:30am. Corte Madera Library. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Heritage Night at Artesa

Fall Arrivals!

Zero Foodprint Dinner

Wine reception, three-course meal and stunning views ring in the season of bounty. Sep 23, 5:30pm. $150. Gloria Ferrer Caves & Vineyards, 23555 Hwy 121, Sonoma. 707.996.7256. Enjoy BBQ and wine in the courtyard, cheer on or get in the largest grape stomp in the country, dance to live music on the crush pad and more. Sep 22, 6:30pm. $125. Castello di Amorosa, 4045 N St Helena Hwy, Calistoga. 707.967.6272.

H e a l d s b u r g

Pub, 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Chef Perry pairs Russian Riverbased Davis Family wines with a four-course dinner. Sep 21, 7pm. $115. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

Tiburon Taps Beer Festival

Fourth annual festival features over 70 craft brews, local restaurant food samplings and live music. Sep 23, 1pm. $20-$45. Shoreline Park, 311 Paradise Dr, Tiburon, tiburontaps.org.

Whiskey & Cheese Tasting

Prohibition Spirits and Bohemian Creamery come together to pair small-batch whiskeys with cheese. Sep 22, 6:30pm. $42. Murphy’s Irish

Talk explore the ways in which American men conducted themselves in the marketplace of horses, in concurrence with the museum’s equine display. Sep 21, 6pm. $15. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Readings Arlene Francis Center Sep 26, 6:30pm, “The New Wild West” with Blaire Briody. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa 707.528.3009.

Book Passage

Sep 20, 1pm, “The Twelve Mile Straight” with Eleanor Henderson. Sep 20, 7pm, “The Best of Us” with Joyce Maynard. Sep 21, 7pm, “Big Love” with Scott Stabile. Sep 23, 11am, “It’s Your Body...Ask!” with William Goodson. Sep 23, 4pm, “Living a Spiritual Life in a Material World” with Anna Gatmon. Sep 23, 5pm, “Stolen Secrets” with LB Schulman. Sep 24, 1pm, “The 30-Day Vegan Challenge” with Colleen Patrick-Goudreau. Sep 24, 4pm, “He’s Always Been My Son” with Janna Barkin. Sep 24, 7pm, “Get Savvy” with Kathleen Buckstaff. Sep 25, 7pm, “The Energy Medicine Yoga Prescription” with Lauren Walker. Sep 26, 12pm, “Forest Dark” with Nicole Krauss, a literary lunch event. $55. Sep 26, 4pm, “The Antlered Ship” with Dashka Slater. Sep 26, 7pm, “Young Jane Young” with Gabrielle Zevin. Sep 27, 7pm, “The Far Away Brothers” with

Lauren Markham. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

The Culinary Institute of America at Copia

Sep 24, 4pm, “Wine Country Women of Napa Valley” with various authors, new cookbook launches with panel discussion, food and wine and special guests. 500 First St, Napa 707.967.2530.

Flamingo Resort Hotel

Sep 27, 6pm, Whodunnit Dinner with Charlaine Harris, mystery author talks, with dinner served. $70. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa 707.545.8530.

Napa Bookmine

Sep 22, 6pm, “Fire in the Year of Four Emperors” with Rick Deragon. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Sep 22, 7pm, “50 Cent Poems” with Stephen Fowler. Sep 24, 2pm, “The Right Story at the Right Time” with Marianna deCroes. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental 707.874.9392.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books Sep 22, 4pm, “Moxie” with Jennifer Mathieu. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Sep 22, 7pm, “The Best of Us” with Joyce Maynard. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

Sep 23, 7pm, “The Far Away Brothers” with Lauren Markham. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Theater Chicago

Broadway’s classic musical about the legendary city, set in the Roaring Twenties, comes to Napa. Through Sep 24. $28$39. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Constellations

Universal exploration of love and truth makes its North Bay premiere. Through Sep 24. $18$28. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.523.4185.

The Elephant Man

Curtain Call Theatre presents


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CRITIC’S CHOICE

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | SE P T E M BER 20 -26, 2017 | BOH EMI A N.COM

the dramatic story of a severely deformed man who lived in Victorian-era England. Through Sep 23. Russian River Hall, 20347 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.849.4873.

Grace

Main Stage West opens the season with the tragicomedy that explores human assumptions about how God, goodness, faith and causality operate in the cosmic machinery. Through Sep 24. $15-$30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Love’s Labour’s Lost

Marin Shakespeare Company’s 28th annual summer festival offers a masterpiece of wordplay set at Oxford at the turn of the century. Through Sep 24. $10-$37. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael, marinshakespeare.org.

Man of La Mancha

Epic musical about Miguel de Cervantes, the playwright of Don Quixote, mixes romance, humor and tragedy. Through Sep 24. $25-$45. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Shakespeare Napa Valley sets the romantic fantasy in modern day Napa. Sep 2224, 7pm. Free. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa, shakespearenapavalley.org.

Rumors

Neil Simon’s classic farce follows four couples who hear wildly different versions of the same event. Through Sep 24. $21-$27. Novato Theater Company, 5240 Nave Dr, Novato. 415.883.4498.

Sideways

Left Edge Theatre presents the world premiere of a new stage adaptation of the popular book and Academy Awardwinning screenplay. Through Oct 1. $25-$40. Left Edge Studio Theatre, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

River Song

Ismay debuts new film in Petaluma When she’s not writing dynamic Americana music, Petaluma’s Avery Hellman—who performs under the name Ismay—is likely to be found working her ranch or riding horses on extended travels throughout the American West. Last summer, Ismay combined her passion for song and travel in a month-long trip along the Klamath River, running over 200 miles between southern Oregon and Northern California, which she documents in the new short film, “Songs of the Klamath: Exploring the Connections Between the Arts and Environment.” Also an avid environmentalist, Ismay ruminates on the importance of the relationship between nature and creativity in “Songs of the Klamath.” The film grew out of an initial project wherein Ismay wrote original songs and took photographs while trekking through the wilderness. With the aid of a grant by Creative Sonoma, she recently completed the film and will premiere it at a fundraiser for Friends of the Petaluma River. “Songs of the Klamath” screens with live performances by Ismay and Quiles & Cloud on Saturday, Sept. 23, at David Yearsley River Heritage Center, 100 East D St., Petaluma. 6:30pm. $15 and up. songsoftheklamath. brownpapertickets.com.—Charlie Swanson

The Spitfire Grill

Sonoma Arts Live presents the mystical small-town musical, directed by Michael Ross. Through Sep 24. $22$43. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, sonomaartslive.org.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian.com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY

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fter public outcry nixed a plan that would have brought four brick-and-mortar cannabis dispensaries to unincorporated West Marin County, the board of supervisors is now pushing out an ordinance that would render the county’s cannabis business a delivery-only affair. But the revised ordinance is still not good enough, says Amos Klausner, a San Geronimo resident who opposed the dispensaries and now opposes pot delivery, too, which he says would create crime, traffic and other public-safety issues for the unincorporated parts of the county. Among other issues, Klausner is concerned about cannabis warehouses, which he says would be a magnet for crime in a part of the county with scant law enforcement resources. “We don’t have a police force out here; we have sheriff who rolls by once a day,” says Klausner, a

45-year-old native New Yorker who has lived in Marin County for two decades. Klausner uses medical cannabis and says that he gets his product mostly from the Harborside dispensary in Oakland. He hopes and expects that the latest ordinance under consideration will have an ample public hearing. The main issue for him is that the county seems intent on shunting whatever cannabis businesses do develop in the post–Proposition 64 landscape into West Marin. “San Rafael has a robust police force,” he says, “and we have nothing. If everyone’s got it, then I’m OK with it, but you can’t force it upon a small group of people.” Many towns in Marin County have passed laws to keep storefront cannabis out of their communities. The notable exception is Fairfax, which again has an operating dispensary, the Marin Alliance for Medical Marijuana, which opened in 1996, was shut down by the feds in 2001 and reopened in June. The irony of Marin County’s conservatism in the face of the cannabis legalization initiative Proposition 64 is not lost on Klausner. But neither is the associated crime that comes along with big grows, he adds, citing a raft of gruesome and pot-related crimes that have sprung up in Mendocino County in recent years. Brian Bjork, the founder and owner of Marin Herbals, which delivers medical cannabis throughout the county, counters that “safety is not any more of an issue in delivery than in a storefront.” Bjork would like to have a storefront operation and says the county should allow them. Bjork, a 35-year-old Marin County native who has been in the medical-cannabis business for a decade, notes the irony of a self-identified “progressive” county that gave rise to the 420 movement and the Grateful Dead, but has emerged as one of the more cannabis-wary counties in the region.


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) Psychologists say most people need a scapegoat—a personification of wickedness and ignorance onto which they can project the unacknowledged darkness in their own hearts. That’s the bad news. Here’s the good news: The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to neutralize that reflex and at least partially divest yourself of the need for scapegoats. How? The first thing to do is identify your own darkness with courageous clarity. Get to know it better. Converse with it. Negotiate with it. The more conscientiously you deal with that shadowy stuff within you, the less likely you’ll be to demonize other people. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

If the weather turns bad or your allies get sad or the news of the world grows even crazier, you will thrive. I’m not exaggerating or flattering you. It’s exactly when events threaten to demoralize you that you’ll have maximum power to redouble your fortitude and effectiveness. Developments that other people regard as daunting will trigger breakthroughs for you. Your allies’ confusion will mobilize you to manifest your unique visions of what it takes to live a good life.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) “If at first you don’t succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.” declared comedian Steven Wright. My Great Uncle Ned had a different perspective. “If at first you don’t succeed,” he told me, “redefine the meaning of success.” I’m not a fan of Wright’s advice, but Ned’s counsel has served me well. I recommend you try it out, Gemini. Here’s another bit of folk wisdom that might be helpful. Psychotherapist Dick Olney said that what a good therapist does is help her clients wake up from the delusion that they are the image they have of themselves. CANCER (June 21–July 22) What is home? The poet Elizabeth Corn pondered that question. She then told her lover that home was “the stars on the tip of your tongue, the flowers sprouting from your mouth, the roots entwined in the gaps between your fingers, the ocean echoing inside of your ribcage.” I offer this as inspiration, Cancerian, since now is a perfect time to dream up your own poetic testimonial about home. What experiences make you love yourself best? What situations bring out your most natural exuberance? What influences feel like gifts and blessings? Those are all clues to the beloved riddle “What is home?” LEO (July 23–August 22) You’re most likely to thrive if you weave together a variety of styles and methods. The coming weeks will be a highly miscellaneous time, and you can’t afford to get stuck in any single persona or approach. As an example of how to proceed, I invite you to borrow from both the thoughtful wisdom of the ancient Greek poet Homer and the silly wisdom of the cartoon character Homer Simpson. First, the poet: “As we learn, we must daily unlearn something which it has cost us no small labor and anxiety to acquire.” Now here’s Homer Simpson: “Every time I learn something new, it pushes out something old.”

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VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Filmmakers often have test audiences evaluate their products before releasing it to the masses. If a lot of viewers express a particular critique, the filmmaker may make changes, even cutting out certain scenes or altering the ending. You might want to try a similar tack in the coming weeks, Virgo. Solicit feedback on the new projects and trends you’ve been working on—not just from anyone, of course, but rather from smart people who respect you. And be sure they’re not inclined to tell you only what you want to hear. Get yourself in the mood to treasure honesty and objectivity. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) The poet e. e. cummings said, “To be nobody-but-yourself—in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else—means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.” On the other hand, naturalist and writer Henry David Thoreau declared, “We are constantly invited to be who we are,” to become “something worthy and noble.” So which of these two views is correct? Is fate aligned against us, working hard to prevent us from knowing and showing our authentic self? Or is

BY ROB BREZSNY

fate forever conspiring in our behalf, seducing us to master our fullest expression? I’m not sure if there’s a final, definitive answer, but I can tell you this, Libra: In the coming months, Thoreau’s view will be your predominant truth.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

“When you do your best, you’re depending to a large extent on your unconscious, because you’re waiting for the thing you can’t think of.” So said Scorpio director Mike Nichols in describing his process of making films. Now I’m conveying this idea to you just in time for the beginning of a phase I call “Eruptions from Your Unconscious.” In the coming weeks, you will be ripe to receive and make good use of messages from the depths of your psyche. At any other time, these simmering bits of brilliance might remain below the threshold of your awareness, but for the foreseeable future they’ll be bursting through and making themselves available to be plucked.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Author Barbara Ehrenreich has done extensive research on the annals of partying. She says modern historians are astounded by the prodigious amount of time that Medieval Europeans spent having fun together. “People feasted, drank, and danced for days on end,” she writes. Seventeenth-century Spaniards celebrated festivals five months of each year. In 16thcentury France, peasants devoted an average of one day out of every four to “carnival revelry.” In accordance with current astrological omens, you Sagittarians are authorized to match those levels of conviviality in the coming weeks.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Kittens made French emperor Napoleon III lose his composure. He shook and screamed around them. Butterflies scare actress Nicole Kidman. My friend Allie is frightened by photos of Donald Trump. As for me, I have an unnatural fear of watching reality TV. What about you, Capricorn? Are you susceptible to any odd anxieties or nervous fantasies that provoke agitation? If so, the coming weeks will be a perfect time to overcome them. Why? Because you’ll be host to an unprecedented slow-motion outbreak of courage that you can use to free yourself from long-standing worries. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) “The brain is wider than the sky,” wrote Emily Dickinson. “The brain is deeper than the sea.” I hope you cultivate a vivid awareness of those truths in the coming days, Aquarius. In order to accomplish the improbable tasks you have ahead of you, you’ve got to unleash your imagination, allowing it to bloom to its full power so it can encompass vast expanses and delve down into hidden abysses. Try this visualization exercise: Picture yourself bigger than the planet Earth, holding it tenderly in your hands. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

I got an email from a fan of Piscean singer Rihanna. He complained that my horoscopes rarely mention celebrities. “People love astrological predictions about big stars,” he wrote. “So what’s your problem? Are you too ‘cultured’ to give us what we the people really want? Get off your high horse and ‘lower’ yourself to writing about our heroes. You could start with the lovely, talented and very rich Rihanna.” I told Rihanna’s fan that my advice for mega-stars is sometimes different from what it is for average folks. For Piscean mega-stars like Rihanna, Justin Bieber, Ellen Page and Bryan Cranston, for example, the coming weeks will be a time to lay low, chill out and recharge. But non-famous Pisceans will have prime opportunities to boost their reputation, expand their reach and wield a stronger-than-usual influence in the domains they frequent.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

SE P T E M BE R 20 -26, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Home Health Care, Inc., a locally owned private health care agency is currently hiring an RN to join our team. This is a 32–40 hr per week position. SOME WEEKENDS A MUST. Current RN license required, home care experience a plus, but will train right candidate. Visit us at 4983 Sonoma Hwy Suite E, Santa Rosa, or call 707.538.0679

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What’s More Local than being Employee-Owned? Justin Recommends OLIVER’S OWN

Sangiovese

Meet Justin Bowman

Wine Department Manager, Cotati & Employee Owner of Oliver’s Market

A tremendous value, this wine really at its price point. It has of strawberry and cherry up front, with undertones of dried fruit and supple tannins on the finish. Juicy with structure.

Over delivers luscious notes

Enjoy!

2015, Sonoma County. Red Label. Oliver’s Market is pleased to feature our own private label wines this week. Reflecting our commitment to local products and producers, the wines are sourced and made right here in Sonoma County. As everyone knows, at Oliver’s, “Local means Sonoma County,” which is great because the only appellations you’ll see on our labels are our region’s finest. Take a real sip of Sonoma County with Oliver’s Own Private Label wines.

Real Food. Real People People.® Oliver’s Market is now aN employee-owned Company

9230 Old Redwood Highway • Windsor • 687-2050 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123 | 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530

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September 20-26, 2017