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Bohemian

Editor

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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2017 NORBAY WINNERS

AWARDS PICK-UP PARTY

JOIN US Wed Aug 16, 5:15pm Santa Rosa’s Courthouse Square

Wednesday Night Market! MC Charlie Swanson, Bohemian Arts & Entertainment Editor

Celebrate with fans and community!

STAY for the Music! McKenna Faith on stage 5:30–6:30 and 7:10–8pm

STANDING OVATION Morty Wiggins’ team at Second Octave is on the hunt for Sonoma County’s first big star, p13.

nb

‘The crayon box aroma is curious, but not funky.’ SW I R L P 1 2 Felta Creek Feud TH E PA PE R P8

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Size Doesn’t Matter

Pay No Attention

A note to Pat Morris (Letters, Aug. 2), who was trying to compare the Bohemian to the Sonoma County Gazette: It’s not how many pages, my friend, but what’s on the pages.

PIETER S. MYERS

Occidental

When Dorothy, Toto, Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion finally get to the Land of Oz, they have to navigate their way to a meeting with the “all-powerful” wizard in his castle. They state their case of wanting his assistance to transport Dorothy back home, but are dismissed rudely by his intimidating image on a screen before them. With an amplified voice, he sets off explosions, fire and smoke, all in an effort to frighten them to flee.

THIS MODERN WORLD

But it is Toto, Dorothy’s pet dog, to the rescue as he pulls back the curtain to show a little man (who can’t possibly be the almighty wizard?), operating the various control panels, wheels, etc., to portray his “image.” Their discovery elicits a most disingenuous response: “Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.” Since Donald Trump has been in office, he has fired staff and had appointees tender their resignations—and even had candidates decide against

By Tom Tomorrow

accepting appointments in his administration. He has managed to frustrate, anger and generally alienate cabinet members, Congress, the nation’s police departments—and let us not forget the Boy Scouts! Yet Mr. Trump’s response seems to be taken straight from the “powerful” Oz’s character and script—pay no attention to what is unfolding at the White House; contrary to what you are seeing, “there is no White House chaos, everything is running fine.” This is becoming a rather bizarre situation as we all scratch our heads and wonder in unison—what is this man not seeing that everyone else is? But what is truly frightening is that the script Mr. Trump may be operating under is not the childhood fantasy of L. Frank Baum, but the George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984, where everything is the opposite of what is seen and heard—in other words, Trump’s own fake news.

E. G. SINGER

Santa Rosa

End of the Road I think that this article may seem logical to some, but to others it is just folly (“Eternity 2.0”, July 12). My supposition is that life is eternal anyway and that much of what we choose to manifest in this lifetime or the next is usually in sync with the metaphor we are currently living out. Mine included. This does not mean that I am in denial of the finality of death as some would choose to believe.

CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN Via Bohemian.com

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


‘Once in a Generation’ Why I want to be your sheriff BY JAY FOXWORTHY

M

y name is Jay Foxworthy and I’m running for Sonoma County sheriff. I believe it’s important that everyone have a better sense of the person behind the badge, especially when that person may be our next sheriff. I’m a local boy, raised in Windsor, sometimes by my mother, but mostly by my grandparents. Much of my childhood was spent in poverty, living with a mentally ill, self-medicating, addict mother who was often in trouble with the law. During times of her incarceration, I was raised by my grandparents, an aunt and, sometimes, foster parents. When I was nine, my mother had a nervous breakdown and I was comforted by a police officer who arrived at the scene. That one moment forever changed the way I saw law enforcement and the positive impact it can have on people. It’s what inspired me to become a cop years later. As a young man, I served three years honorably in the Army, got my degree from Santa Rosa Junior College and graduated from the police academy in 1996. I applied to the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Department, but I couldn’t get hired here as an openly gay man. Instead, I found work as a deputy sheriff in San Francisco, where I’ve spent the last 22 years learning and practicing community policing policies. Today, I live in Santa Rosa with my amazing husband, Bryan, and our two incredible adopted children. We’ve also fostered 15 amazing kids over the last decade. As a result of all of these experiences, I have a unique perspective on the challenges many communities struggle with when it comes to law enforcement. Our next sheriff should represent all of Sonoma County, with respect toward all. That means respecting immigrants and rebuilding community trust, reducing use of force, working with the community on homeless concerns, hiring for diversity, modernizing jail services and adopting cannabis policies that reflect our community’s values. We have a “once in a generation” opportunity to set a new course for our sheriff’s office. As we begin this conversation, I hope you’ll reach out to me at foxworthyforsheriff.com and share your ideas too.

Jay Foxworthy is running for Sonoma County sheriff in the June 2018 election. This is the first in a series of planned Open Mics from declared candidates for sheriff.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Rants

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Paper THE

TROUBLED WATERS Healdsburg’s Felta Creek is one of of the last coho salmon spawning creeks in Sonoma County.

Return to Sender Cal Fire pushes back against logging plan in sensitive Felta Creek area BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) issued a point-bypoint rejection last month of a proposed logging plan on land that crosses Felta Creek in the forested wilds of Healdsburg.

The creek is home to one of the last coho salmon populations in

the Russian River watershed. Ken Bareilles, a 75-year-old Humboldt County businessman, received notice on July 28— the deadline that had been set for approval—that his timber harvest plan had failed to address numerous concerns raised over the proposed 146-acre harvest. In advance of the Cal Fire decision to delay his proposal and send it back for further public review and input from the owner,

Bareilles told the Bohemian that he fully expected the green light from Cal Fire. On July 31, he fired off a sharply worded rejoinder to the Santa Rosa Cal Fire point person on the Felta Creek THP, Dominik Schwab, that raged against the agency’s apparent and, to Bareilles’ mind, surprise turnabout. “Needless to say, I strongly oppose and totally resent your letter which would lead to opening up the [timber harvest

plan] for new and additional public comment and big-time additional delay. . . . Your office has to step up to the plate and do you[r] job, not be intimidated by all the letters from the neighbors, unless they point out some truly significant defect in our proposed THP.” Cal Fire had signaled its apparent approval of the THP well in advance of the July 28 deadline, by which time public comments to the proposal would be reviewed by Schwab. Many of the comments called for a dramatically scaled down logging plan. Schwab’s letter was all the more surprising since the Cal Fire website that tracks progress of timber harvest plans had checked off the “approved” box at least a week before July 28. That led opponents to believe that the project was a done deal. Soon after a Bohemian reporter contacted Cal Fire about the apparent pre-approval of a process that was putatively ongoing, the “approved” box was subsequently unchecked. Opponents from state and federal fisheries management agencies, such as the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Healdsburg locals, have cautioned mightily against a timber harvest plan that they say could undo significant state and federally funded progress made in Felta Creek to restore endangered coho salmon to some level of viability. In recent drought years, Felta Creek has occasionally been the only tributary of Dry Creek to support coho spawning. The Cal Fire letter to Bareilles demanded that he resubmit his timber harvest plan with additional details on how he planned to protect the fish on his land and cited new information that had animated the decision to delay and send back the THP for further tweaks. The agency also requested that he revise a truck-access plan along Felta Creek Road which runs parallel to the creek. In his response to Cal Fire, Bareilles claimed he’d been betrayed by the agency as he reiterated what he called basic facts about the land and his


D EBRI EF ER expertise that USF offers this enterprise.”

This week, the University of California at San Francisco bought the grandfather of certified organic farming in California, Bolinas’ Star Route Farms.

Congratulations were quick in coming from around the Bay Area, from some of the most prominent slingers of organic hash in the country. Alice Waters, the chef, author and founder of the estimable Chez Panisse in Berkeley, noted that “school-supported agriculture is an idea whose time has come” as she praised Weber for continuing the operation and launching an “interactive educational program that can be a model for the rest of the country.”

University spokeswoman Ellen Ryder says the purchase price for the farm was $10.4 million, which included the property, buildings, equipment and business operations. The school will use the 100-acre property as a teaching farm and communityoutreach platform. University president Rev. Paul. J. Fitzgerald says in a statement that the purchase will enable and enhance “USF’s commitment to environmental and social justice,” central tenets of a Jesuit faith. The purchase will save Star Route for future generations of would-be organic farmers, and forever protects a glorious swathe of West Marin from a feared onslaught of development. Star Route founder Warren Weber opened Star Route Farm in 1974 and runs it with his wife, Amy. It provides produce to restaurants and markets around the Bay Area. “We are very pleased and honored that the University of San Francisco will continue the Star Route Farms legacy,” says Weber in a statement. “We hope young people, entry-level farmers, and farmers around the world who struggle with conventional agriculture will learn from the passion and

Traci Des Jardins, the chefowner of Jardinière and Mijita in San Francisco, says she’s been buying Weber’s product for decades as she celebrated the new partnership. “The preservation and continuation of this visionary farm will play an important role in educating new generations,” she says.

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Looking ahead, current operations will continue and Weber’s employees’ jobs are safe, assures the university. Plans include cross-disciplinary research, community education, “and programs focused on nutrition, biodiversity, sea-level rise, and more.” Star Route has indeed come a long way in its pioneering role as California’s first certified organic farm. Weber’s farm started as a five-acre tract that utilized horse-drawn plows and, as the university notes in its announcement, was a pioneer in adopting “production and post-harvest technologies such as precision planters and hydrocooling equipment,” which allowed it to bring the freshest possible product to market. —Tom Gogola

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proposal, not the least of which is that it’s zoned for timber production. The parcel hasn’t been logged since 1994. The Cal Fire decision doesn’t put an end to the proposed plan, and Bareilles’ continues to insist that he is within his rights to harvest on his land—and that he’s already done everything Cal Fire has asked of him as a condition of its approval. In an interview, before receiving Cal Fire’s letter, Bareilles noted that he’d spent tens of thousands of dollars to clean up the 160-acre tract (which he purchased for $2.5 million in 2015) of debris and abandoned cars that he says were left behind by the previous owner. He says he spent between $15,000 and $20,000 to reinforce a bridge so it could bear the weight of dozens of logging trucks. “I’ve made huge improvements on the land,” he says, describing it as a “junkyard” when he bought it. The property is now on the market for $7.5 million, and Bareilles says there’s at least $3 million in timber to be harvested. His plan is to harvest the timber and then sell the land. He has no designs on moving to the property and lives in Eureka. The Cal Fire letter serves to reopen the public comment period for an additional 30 days and also builds in a two-week window for the agency to review additional comments and decide whether Bareilles has addressed the numerous issues highlighted by Schwab and Cal Fire (and the public comments to date). Elected officials, from State Sen. Mike McGuire to Sonoma County Supervisor James Gore, have weighed in with their significant concerns about the THP, now reflected in the Schwab letter of July 28. In the meantime, there is hope that a deep-pocketed do-good buyer will come forward, or that Bareilles will prune-down his proposed harvest to a spotharvest plan targeting individual trees, and perhaps protect the endangered coho’s foothold in the process.


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Dining APPLE JACKS Sonoma County chefs will offer creative takes on apples at this year’s Gravenstein Apple Fair.

Beyond the Pie

Exploring the savory side of Gravensteins BY STETT HOLBROOK

G

ravensteins are hanging heavy in local orchards and appearing in stores as one of the first apples of the season. My favorite way to eat apples is right out of my hand.

There are apple pies and apple tarts, of course—nothing wrong with those desserts, but it’s kind of been done. There’s applesauce, but it’s hard to get very excited about that. What about something less sweet? I’m taking inspiration from

the chefs who will be preparing apple dishes at Sebastopol’s 44th annual Gravenstein Apple Fair, Aug. 12–13. Most of them will be showcasing the savory side of the sweet-tart apples. “If I have one bite of an apple pie, I’m good for a year,” says prolific cookbook author and Sebastopol resident Michele Anna Jordan. “I have much more of a savory palate.” Rather than give Gravensteins the starring role, Jordan says the apples are often best as a counterpoint to other ingredients like pork or chicken. For the Gravenstein Apple Fair, she’s

making a spicy chowder with Gravensteins and radish on top. The soup is layered with smoky flavors from chipotles and smoked ham hocks, goat cheddar cheese and onion. The addition of the Gravenstein apple-radish and a little crème fraîche and Dijon mustard serve to highlight the bigger flavors of the chowder and give it “context,” Jordan says. Rob Hogencamp, owner of Three Leaves Heritage Foods, a prepared-food business in Santa Rosa, used to be the executive chef for Sebastopol’s Ceres Project, a nonprofit that provides meals for people with serious illness. As

such, he’s a fan of the healthful qualities of fermented foods. He loves kimchi but realizes the fermented cabbage and garlicchile paste dish can be too much for some people. To make it more enticing, he’s adding Gravenstein apples and celery to give the dish a sweeter, crunchier bite while still letting the fermented funk shine through. “I like a mix of sweet and sour,” says Hogencamp. Perry Hoffman, executive chef of Healdsburg’s Shed, spent summers at his family’s Apple Farm in Philo and ate more than his share of apples. “I ate a lot of underripe apples and made myself sick on the ride back home,” he jokes. Now he uses slightly underripe apples as his “secret weapon of acidity.” For the apple fair, Hoffman is making trout tartare with Gravenstein apple salsa and farro verde. The bright, tart flavors of the apples take the place of tomatoes and are a great foil for the rich, oily flavor and texture of the trout, he says. “The apples are absolutely wonderful with any kind of fish dish,” he says. Fellow Healdsburg restaurateur Mateo Granados is pairing Gravenstein and shishito peppers in a salad alongside petrale sole. Natalie Goble of Sebastopol’s Handline will serve an applefennel soup with walnut crumb and wild fennel pollen. Of course, after all those savory dishes something sweet is on order. Backyard restaurant’s Mariana Gardenhire will be serving loukoumades (Greek doughnuts) with Gravs and wild honey. In addition to the chefs’ offerings and great cider on tap (see Swirl, p12), the fair is getting all fancy this year with an “artisan tasting lounge.” An extra $20 gets you VIP access to a range of local food and drink, including produce, cheese, breads, wine and more. The theme of the lounge is “In Praise of Pollinators,” so look for honey to play a supporting role alongside all those Gravenstein apples. For more info, visit gravensteinapplefair.com.


11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN |

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Learn about McFarland Springs Trout—a farmed trout using a nearly pure vegetarian diet of algae and plant based products. Discover how they developed a better system for farmed fishing that does not deplete other resources, is beneficial and produces delicious and nutritious product.

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Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the

The Word on Cider Getting funky at the Apple Fair BY JAMES KNIGHT

D

arlene Hayes says she hesitates “to say the f-word” when describing cider. When she explains it, I know exactly what she means, but at first, I’m stumped: “Farmhouse” is all I can come up with.

Maybe that’s because we’re gathered around the kitchen island at Ellen Cavalli’s Sebastopol farmhouse, tasting farmhouse-style MANY NEW ITEMS cider that she and her husband, Scott Heath, just introduced to their Visit cmyk us colors, 1/6 page ad, specs: 4.3438" wide X 3.125" high. pdf file format, 300Shed dpi.lineup of craft ciders. Tilted on Etsy And it’s around that time that a 3 300 X 250 e-news ads on 8/2, 9 and 16. 9K emails each release. chicken casually ambles in and does a lap around us, pecking at the floor. But it isn’t “farmhouse.” “Well . . . ‘funky.’” She’s said it. Hayes, a Sebastopol-based cider educator and author who’s in charge of the Craft Cider Tent at MOCCASINS • FEATHER EARRINGS • UNIQUE JEWELRY • HANDMADE APPAREL • LEATHER GOODS the 2017 Gravenstein Apple Fair, is 707.829.8544 • 851 Highway 116 South, Sebastopol describing a different cider. But is Mon–Sat 9–6, Sun 10–6 • nativeridersarts.com • etsy.com/shop/nativeriders “funky” an off-putting term that’s

better to avoid when talking about craft cider? “In the cider world,” Hayes concedes, “people are generally using it in a favorable way.” Unlike the simple and often sweet flavors of big-brand cider, some American craft cider and traditional European styles may, but not necessarily, display aromas similar to “bretty,” sour beers or even some earthier wines. However, Cavalli says their ciders were tested and came back showing zero brettanomyces yeast. It has more to do with the wild-fermented phenolics of cider apples, she says. Funk or no funk, fair attendees weren’t put off by the selection at last year’s craft cider tent, says Hayes. There wasn’t a drop left by Sunday’s closing time. This year, she’s requested extra cider from an expanded lineup of 15 cider makers from Sonoma, Mendocino and Marin counties. A few ciders I recently tasted: Tilted Shed Gravenstein Honey Cider Apropos to the apian theme of this year’s apple fair, which celebrates pollinators, this special release has a dash of lavender honey from MonteBellaria di California, a south Sebastopol lavender farm and apiary. But it is not honey-sweet: pouring hazy orange-tinted gold, it’s reminiscent of a pile of overripe apples on a cool, fall day—there’s the “funk.” Dry, but showing less tannin than Tilted Shed’s Lost Orchard cider, this is a complex, sour afternoon refresher that’ll inspire you to get back to picking in that orchard after a glass, or two . . . Horse & Plow Hops & Honey Cider Minty hop aroma meets white grapefruit acidity in this not-so-funky, elegant, extra-dryChampagne-style sipper. Golden State Cider Bay Brut Dry Unfiltered Cider The crayon box aroma is curious, but not funky, evocative of a neutral barrelfermented Chardonnay. Gravenstein Apple Fair, Ragle Ranch Regional Park, Sebastopol, Saturday– Sunday, Aug. 12–13, 10am–6pm. Adults, $15; cider tickets, $3. Optional keepsake glass, one ticket; glass of cider, two tickets. Tasting flights of four two-ounce ciders available. 707.837.8896.


NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Photos by Michael Amsler

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High Notes

Morty Wiggins is a musician’s best friend

B

ehind every great rock star, there’s a Morty Wiggins.

In a career that spans more than four decades, Wiggins has worked with and for the biggest names in music as an artist and a record company manager, as well as a concert organizer and promoter. Formerly a VP of Bill Graham

Presents and general manager for A&M Records, Wiggins is now the CEO of Sonoma County–based talent management and promotion and booking agency Second Octave, which represents several local bands and hosts the SOMO Concerts series in Rohnert Park. Working alongside a young and hungry staff at Second Octave, Wiggins revels in sharing his

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

lifetime of experience with a new generation and reflects on how his journey in the industry is tied to the North Bay.

Witness to the Waltz

Born in Toronto to a Canadian father and an American mother, Wiggins spent his childhood moving back and forth between

Toronto and several spots in New York and New Jersey. There was virtually no music in Wiggins’ home, as both his parents were deaf. “I started working in music more as an offshoot from an original interest that I had for theater,” Wiggins says. “I just loved the liveliness of theater.” Coming of age in the ) 14


Wiggins ( 13

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14

BENICIA TUE Sept. 5 & 12 3:30 - 4:15pm Benicia Veterans Hall 1150 First Street VOB (Voices of Beat) 4:15 - 4:45pm Beginners Rhythm Class SANTA ROSA WED Sept. 6 Double Session 4:00 - 5:30pm The Glaser Center 547 Mendocino Avenue New members enroll online at VOENA.org or at rehearsal

Last date to enroll is Sept. 15, 2017 707. 751. 1515

early 1970s, Wiggins made the transition from working in live theater to live concerts, seduced and enamored by what he calls “the alchemy that happens in concerts.” In New York, Wiggins first hooked up with an organization called the College Coffeehouse Circuit, booking and touring with folk-rock bands on college campuses. In 1976, at 19, Wiggins joined a band he was working for on a Midwest tour. From there, he hitchhiked to California and landed in Santa Rosa at the suggestion of the band’s lead singer, whose brother worked in town for IBM. “That’s how I ended up here,” he laughs. “It was a series of events that had nothing to do with me.” Shortly after Wiggins arrived in California, legendary San Francisco concert promoter Bill Graham produced the Last Waltz at San Francisco’s Great American Music Hall on Thanksgiving Day, 1976. Wiggins somehow snagged tickets and sat in the cheap seats for the event, which was a farewell show for iconic outfit the Band and featured guest appearances from Bob Dylan, Neil Young, Ringo Starr and many others. “I was blown away, just blown away,” he says. From the vibrant atmosphere to the incredible Thanksgiving dinner spread, Wiggins took it all in, including seeing Graham running around with a clipboard and wearing white tuxedo tails and a top hat. “That’s when I decided, I’ve got to work with this guy,” says Wiggins. “It took a few years, but I finally got there.” In the North Bay, Wiggins immediately went about organizing shows at the various veterans halls in Sebastopol and Petaluma. A year later, the River Theater in Guerneville became available to lease, and Wiggins brought in acts like John Prine, the Jerry Garcia Band and a young Tom Waits, a big coup for Wiggins. “He was one of the first people I met when I came up in ’79,” says Bill Bowker, the longtime on-air

personality for the Krush radio station. Bowker had relocated to Sonoma County from Los Angeles and was at KVRE when he first worked with Wiggins in promoting shows at the River Theater. “My first meeting with him, he was a guy in overalls and extremely long hair,” Bowker laughs. “But there was something about him. You could tell right off he knew what he was doing. He had a love for music and for artists, and was knowledgeable and caring about the community. I liked that.”

Morty Wiggins worked for Bill Graham, starting out ‘somewhere below the receptionist.’ Wiggins found some success in Sonoma County, but the Bay Area was Graham’s territory, who enjoyed a near monopoly on booking concerts in the region.

Started from the Bottom

“I was hitting this glass ceiling, so I applied for a job at Bill Graham Presents, and they hired me,” recounts Wiggins. “Somewhere right below the receptionist’s position.” Between schlepping in the office and running lunch-order errands, Wiggins started at the bottom and worked his way up through sheer conviction, eventually signing and managing bands for the company. His first signing at Bill Graham Presents was the Neville Brothers in the early 1980s, and he helped usher the New Orleans R&B icons into the decade by landing them a spot on Huey Lewis & the News’


15 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

History Takes Time Continue here…

MAKING MUSIC Morty Wiggins’ team at Second Octave turned an industrial

massive U.S. tour and brokering a record deal with the Rounder/ EMI label. From there, Wiggins’ roster of acts over the years would include Gin Blossoms, Sheryl Crow and others. Wiggins credits Graham’s unwavering support for helping him succeed. “First of all, he had incredible musical taste,” says Wiggins. “He was definitely one of those largerthan-life guys. In most cases, he was the biggest celebrity in the room.” Professionally, Wiggins describes Graham as a dedicated entrepreneur. “He was very concerned about the customer experience,” says Wiggins. “If someone sent a letter in complaining about this or that at a concert, Bill took it seriously and would find out what the cause was.” In addition to managing bands, Wiggins joined Graham on the road for the Amnesty International tour, even bringing the event to Delhi, India. For that concert, Wiggins and the team had to truck gear in from

Hungary, some 3,000 miles away. “With all the people at Bill Graham Presents there was definitely a bond,” he says. While working with the company, Wiggins made friends with engineer, producer and longtime Petaluma resident Jim Stern. “Morty was always very professional, very honest, a great heart and a great humanist. He’s quite a mover and shaker in the industry, I think,” says Stern, whose own 45-year career includes building and running Fantasy Studios in Berkeley in the 1970s and recording artists like Van Morrison, who joins Stern in the studio next month for a new album. When Graham died in a helicopter crash in 1991 at the age of 60, Wiggins was a VP at his company and one of those who bought the company from his estate. Meanwhile, he’d developed a relationship with A&M Record Company through his work with Graham’s company. He took a job as an executive with A&M in 1996 and moved to Los ) 16

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space in Rohnert Park into the SOMO Village Events Center.

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16 Wiggins ( 15 Angeles about six months before Bill Graham Presents was sold to SFX Entertainment, which later became Live Nation. Wiggins is still on the board of the Bill Graham Memorial Foundation. Throughout it all, Wiggins eschewed the egomania that often comes with “being in the room,” as he describes it, when milliondollar meetings are taking place. “I like to think that I wasn’t that identified with power, and that’s why I was able to walk away from that aspect of the business,” says Wiggins. “But I could see, and I got a little taste of why people hold on to power and why they don’t want to give it up.”

Changing Times

At the turn of the century, the music industry changed, and Wiggins saw the former cash cow A&M fold in the wake of Napster and file sharing. “Even though they saw it coming, no one wanted to make the transition and give up the money and the power,” Wiggins says. Whereas his work at Bill Graham Presents involved developing artists and taking time to hone success, companies like A&M demanded quarterly results. “Selling albums is not like selling vacuum cleaners,” says Wiggins. “You could see there was no climate for anyone to say, ‘Well, we need to transition [to digital], so we’re going to take a hit for a few years.’ No one had any tolerance for that.” When A&M Records ceased operations in 1999, Wiggins moved back to the Bay Area with his family and ran 33rd Street Records and Bayside Distribution, both of which were owned by mega-retailer Tower Records. Since the dawn of digital music, Wiggins has seen the musicindustry revenue model change from buying music to using music as a vehicle for advertising online, like the ads that pop up on Youtube or in between songs on streaming services like Pandora. “The whole treatment of the music has become secondary,” says Wiggins. “Like music should

NEXT GEN Like Bill Graham before him, Morty Wiggins enjoys bringing young people into the music business.

be free and ubiquitous so that we can make money off the technical side of it or the advertising side of it. And it rubs a lot of people the wrong way that music is not at the forefront. And to this day, that’s kind of a drag.”

New Octaves Tower Records went the way of A&M in 2006, liquidating and closing all of its U.S. stores. Wiggins found himself starting over, and he was determined to build a new company in the North Bay. “I love Sonoma County; I hope I never have to leave again. I love the beauty of it, the culture, the progressive politics. I think it’s an evolved place,” says Wiggins. Wiggins also loves the music scene. He teamed with music licensing and sales guru Steve Senk to form Second Octave in Sonoma County, first to book jazz and blues acts in the region. The scope quickly expanded to booking and managing an

eclectic array of Bay Area rock, folk and indie acts like rootsreggae group Sol Horizon, soul swingers Royal Jelly Jive, songwriter the Sam Chase and laidback rockers the Coffis Brothers. “We’re trying to break an act out of Sonoma County,” says Wiggins. “And we’re determined to do so. Just like Austin or Seattle or other markets that bands have popped out of, because there’s a scene or a sound in that city, I think that can happen in Sonoma County.” And he’s got a plan to do it. “I have my ‘big three’ for acts that I want to work with,” says Wiggins. “First and foremost, they have to be great live. They have to have a star onstage and they have to have great songs, or at least the potential for great songs. We’ve been working with some of these bands for two or three years, and it’s a long runway, but we see progress.” Through his work in Second

Octave, Wiggins has also connected with a new generation of music professionals in the North Bay, including North Bay Hootenanny founder Josh Windmiller, who is Second Octave’s production designer. Second Octave’s marketing team, director Bryce Dow-Williamson and assistant director Isabelle Garson, are also North Bay natives who cut their teeth booking and/or promoting local shows on their own. “It’s been so interesting to work with [Wiggins] because there’s so much wealth [of experience],” says Dow-Williamson. “There’s one wall in the office that’s entirely full of his platinum albums, gold albums and Grammys, and he brings them in because he knows there’s a value to the younger bands he’s working with to see that.” The display also inspires the young staff, though DowWilliamson notes that Wiggins is dedicated to building Second


Ro sa

Always moving forward. sctransit.com

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For more info, visit secondoctave.com and somoconcerts.com.

ty g n in ou t c aC e n om n n o o C S

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“Morty is very into bringing in new, young people into the business, just like Bill [Graham] did,” says Jim Stern. “He’s mentoring young professionals and building a pretty good business here for them.” Three years ago, when Second Octave again expanded its scope and began holding a series of concerts at the SOMO Village Events Center in Rohnert Park, Wiggins did so with input and ideas from his young staff. The industrial space was turned into a sustainably powered 3,000-capacity outdoor venue that often combines headlining musical acts with local talent onstage, and features art and food

17

Sa nt a

‘We’re trying to break an act out of Sonoma County and we’re determined to do so.’

vendors in the courtyard for a pop-up festival vibe. This year’s SOMO Concert schedule opened with the venue’s first sold-out event, a double bill of reggae with Dirty Heads and SOJA. The rest of the season includes the upcoming Sonoma County Blues & Arts Festival with Blues Hall of Fame headliner Charlie Musselwhite on Aug. 19. SOMO Concerts will also host the annual Earlefest, a benefit for Santa Rosa’s Earl Baum Center for the Blind, in September, with headliners Los Lobos and the Funkendank Oktoberfest beer and music extravaganza in October. Each of these shows is also packed with North Bay bands on the bill. “Everything that he does is at a high level, and it shows,” says Stern. “I think he’s brought a dynamic thrust of the music industry into Sonoma County. Not that we don’t have a lot of people who are professionals on a high level, but he’s added a lot to the ambiance of the community and the viability of the music business in this area.” Bowker and veteran talent booker Sheila Groves-Tracey have worked alongside Wiggins and the Second Octave staff on the blues fest and the Earlefest for the past two years, and Bowker says that Wiggins’ commitment to music is as strong as ever. “It’s a calming influence to have him around,” says Bowker. “You feel everything’s going to be all right if you’re working with him. It’s good that he’s in our court.” Bowker also commends Second Octave’s young staff and says that Wiggins is a natural mentor. “Under his guidance, they can learn the right way.” In his laidback way, Wiggins says he’s the lucky one to be able to share his experiences with the next wave of North Bay music professionals. “You know, I’m on the tail end of my career,” he laughs. “I’m in my 60s, and no one in their 60s should be in the music business—it’s ridiculous.”

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Octave with a balance of professionalism and mutual respect. “Morty is always asking, ‘How can I help you?’” adds Garson. “He treats you as someone who’s working for him, but also as his peer, which is electrifying because I know what he’s done.” “I never thought I would get an opportunity to work in the entertainment industry staying in Sonoma County,” says Garson, who handles Second Octave’s social media accounts, digital marketing and the SOMO Concerts box office. “The whole concept behind the company is that they’re mentoring young Sonoma County professionals on how to be music executives.”


18 NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

S A N TA R O S A

CALISTOGA

WINDSOR

N A PA

Animated Anniversary

Vintage Gala

Go Wild

Get Lucky

The nonprofit organization Napa County Landmarks is dedicated to the preservation of historic architectural treasures throughout Napa County, including those on wheels. This weekend’s third annual Vintage Trailer Hitch Up looks back in time to the kitschy world of classic travel trailers from the ’30s to the ’60s, such as a 1947 Vagabond and a rare 1937 Covered Wagon. As you tour the rigs, live music, food trucks and good old American craft beers revel in yesteryear on Saturday, Aug. 12, at Bothe State Park, 3801 St. Helena Hwy., Calistoga. 11am. $20; $15 for kids 12 and under; $8 parking fee. Advance tickets recommended. 707.255.1836.

Northern Sonoma County’s Notre Vue Estate Winery & Vineyard offers sweeping views of the vineyards, but few get the chance to see for themselves, until now. This weekend’s Forever Wild Tour de Cru opens the estate’s wide-open spaces to the public for an adventure-filled day of hiking, biking and wine. The morning gets physical, as participants get to explore the estate’s diverse terroir and variety of grapes. After you work up a sweat, relax at the winery’s crush pad with winetasting, lunch and live music. The event is open for both beginners and experienced outdoors enthusiasts on Sunday, Aug. 13, 11010 Estate Lane, Windsor. 8am. $35– $75; VIP tickets $90. 707.433.4050.

Last year, Napa’s Lucky Penny Productions theater company introduced a local theatrical reading experience when they debuted Lucky Shorts, a short-story performance festival. That inaugural event was so well received, the company is at it again, offering the second annual short-story performance this weekend. Authors from Napa, Sonoma and Solano counties submitted dozens of short stories, and Lucky Penny has selected nine family-friendly works to take to the stage for a lively afternoon of original works on Sunday, Aug. 13, at Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 2pm. $15; kids 16 and under are free. 707.266.6305.

The most colorful museum in the North Bay, the Charles M Schulz Museum, is marking its 15th Anniversary with a day of creative talks and cartoonish fun. The day’s highlights include a conversation with graphic novel writer and artist Jeff Smith, whose groundbreaking series Bone redefined the comics industry, much in the way that Peanuts evolved the comic strip. Other authors and artists are also on hand to demonstrate their work and share their insights, like Jarrett Krosoczka, New York Times bestselling creator of Star Wars: Jedi Academy. Visitors will get exclusive goodies on Saturday, Aug. 12, at the Charles M. Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 10am. 707.579.4452.

DARK STARS Swedish rockers Dungen perform twice in the North Bay, including soundtracking the world’s oldest animated feature film, ‘The Adventures of Prince Achmed’ at Gundlach Bundschu Winery in Sonoma. See Concerts, p24, and Film, p28.


Larry Robinson

GUITAR AS CANVAS Larry Robinson planned to teach classical guitar, but it was guitar building that called to him.

Best Inlaid Plans Master guitar artist Larry Robinson shares his craft in new book BY TESS DUNN

A

drilling mistake in 1975 changed the course of Larry Robinson’s life.

Robinson was a few weeks into a new job building guitars. “I drilled right through two basses, and my boss said, ‘Put an inlay in it and we’ll cover it up, refinish it and call it custom.’” It was his first introduction to inlays, and Robinson was hooked. More than 40 years after this “accident,” I drive to the

hinterlands of Sonoma County, eventually reaching a small, nondescript trailer. Stepping through the door of Robinson’s home studio feels like traversing the mythical looking glass: this is where the magic happens. Art adorns the walls, musical amplifiers are everywhere and a desk is covered in tools. A fan labors to cool the air in the cramped space where Robinson works at his craft. Inlays—artwork that is carved into the wood of guitars and other

string instruments and then filled with materials such as shell, metal or plastic—require meticulous attention to detail, and planning is critical. Robinson’s art is in the details. “I try to be really precise and exact. I’m not necessarily obsessed, but I’m careful.” “Larry has a true passion for inlay, and it shows in his work,” says David J. Marks, a woodworker and friend of Robinson who lives in Santa Rosa. “He wants to pursue techniques and visions that are the most

intricate and complex that I’ve ever seen.” Tom Ribbecke, a woodworker from Healdsburg, says, “Larry’s work is extraordinary because he always pushes the artistic envelope. He sees things in a way that I don’t—I’m so impressed constantly. Sometimes I’m so moved by what he does, I have to sit down.” Born in Connecticut, Robinson was accepted into the Hartford Conservatory performing arts school but did not finish. He planned on becoming a classical guitar teacher, but when he hired someone to build a custom guitar for him in 1972, he was so entranced by the process that ultimately the luthier taught him how to build his own instrument. Three years later, Robinson set out for California to visit a friend, landing in San Francisco, where he was hired at Alembic to build guitars for the likes of Fleetwood Mac and Led Zeppelin under Rick Turner. (Rick Turner Guitars is now in Santa Cruz.) It was here that the fateful accidental drilling took place. When Turner left to start his own company, Robinson went his own way. He worked at Modulus Graphite, a bass guitar company in San Francisco, but soon grew tired of the commute. In 1984, Robinson left his job, determined to fully support himself in Sonoma County through his own inlay creations. He quickly made a name for himself. “I had a lot of people asking me to be an apprentice,” Robinson says, “but I’m just not that focused on teaching people with that method.” In 1994, he published The Art of Inlay. Now in its third edition, the book is “basically a how-to,” Robinson says, “an instruction manual that has all the eye-candy you could want.” In May, Robinson released his second book, The Invisible ) 20

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Arts Ideas

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A Gala Fundraiser for 6th Street Playhouse hosted by owners John &Jennifer Webley

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Guitars ( 19

Hollywood At The Historic Mcdonald Mansion

Party with Star

FU N CTIO N A L A RT

Chris Noth

Jewelry by Roost

20

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Line: When Craft Becomes Art. Featuring seven artists involved in the creation of custom instruments—including himself, Marks and Ribbecke—the book explores definitions of art and craft. In the book, Robinson reflects on the emotions invoked by his work at a guitar show where one of his creations, dubbed “Meet the Beetles” (an acrylic instrument with real beetles layered inside it), triggered strong reactions. “Some people hated [it] and some loved it. Few were neutral . . .” Compared to The Art of Inlay, Robinson says The Invisible Line is “more philosophical. There are few instances where people will tell you how they did something. It’s more about an attitude.” He adds, “[Art] permeates every little aspect of our lives. I wanted to give people a look from our perspective.” Marks agrees. “It’s a lifestyle. We’re eating, breathing and living this stuff all day long, every day. Your life is revolving around what you love to do.” Robinson recognizes that any definition of art is entirely subjective. “If anything has been solved by this book, it’s that nobody can tell you what [art] is and what it isn’t.” Ribbecke adds. “We’re not fixing people’s hearts, we’re not solving war and peace in the Middle East. We’re scratching a creative itch and making the planet a little bit of a better place.” When asked about the legacy he hopes to leave behind, Robinson quotes Frank Zappa: “I don’t care, I’m going to be dead.” But his dedication to each guitar contradicts that sentiment. “If this is the last inlay that I ever do, my life will be judged upon it. My quality remains consistent.” He says he’s “trying to make the world more beautiful—and trying not to step on too many toes along the way.” But Robinson isn’t finished yet. “Every time I try to get out of this business—and I have, on occasion—somebody comes along and gives me a nice job to get back into it again.”


REMEMBER WHEN Berkeley’s famed Gilman Street helped launch many great bands, including Green Day (pictured), Operation Ivy and Rancid.

Turn It Up

East Bay punk scene gets its due in new doc BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

I

f there were a more thorough account of secondwave punk than Corbett Redford’s documentary Turn It Around: The Story of East Bay Punk, would you even be able to sit through it? The film covers about 30 years and about a thousand bands, from the kids to the elders. Surprisingly varied musicians mounted the small stage at the 924 Gilman Street space in Berkeley. Though alcohol-free and with an unofficial ban on major-label bands, this nonprofit venue still draws performers from around the world. Turn It Around is narrated in a skeptical sort of voice by Iggy Pop. If there are no stars, there are recurring figures. One was Tim Yohannan, publisher of the zine Maximum RocknRoll. Yohannan was a Berkeley Maoist who felt that punk heralded the revolution to come. Larry Livermore, writer and a founder of Lookout! Records, captured the sounds of the times. Throughout this film are the still photos of Murray Bowles, who caught hundreds of images of this underground movement. The East Bay punk scene was full of escapees from nowherevilles, all the way up to the Sacramento River and beyond—all those gloomy refinery towns between Berkeley and Crockett. Homely El Sobrante is described as a chunk of Kansas that a whimsical deity transplanted to the Bay Area. Yet “El Sob” was the cradle of Green Day, the one band that really hit the jackpot. Turn It Around is executive-produced by Green Day, but don’t believe the rumor that this film credits the band with inventing East Bay punk. The auteurs of American Idiot were, for a time, Gilmanites and Lookout! recording artists. Green Day’s rise provokes the shocking sight of Jello Biafra saying something nice about a band that made millions: “I’m just glad that someone from the scene had success carried out on their own terms.” ‘Turn It Around: The Story of East Bay Punk’ opens Aug. 11 at Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St., Sebastopol. 707.525.4840. A Q&A following the Aug. 11, 7:30pm show includes director Corbett Redford, the Phoenix Theatre’s Tom Gaffney, KWTF’s Ben Saari and Tsunami Bomb’s Dominic Davi.

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Film

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Kansas— Leftoverture 40th Anniversary Tour

(1:00 Romatic, 4:00) 6:45 PG-13 (2:15) 7:209:35 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Mysterious, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

MON, SEPTEMBER 11

Steve Winwood

THE BIG SICK

THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, No PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat,7:15 No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu (11:50 2:10 4:40) 9:45Thu R WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award4:00 Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

THE FROST/NIXON GLASS CASTLE REVOLuTIONARY ROAD ATOMIC BLONDE

“Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (12:00 2:30 5:05) 7:30 R (1:15) 4:15 7:00 9:309:55 R THE GHOST Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15Final PG-13 Week!

MAUDIE PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK Michael Moore’s Feb 26th at 7:15 (1:30)Thu, PG-13 Wed: 3:30 only THE MOST DANGEROuS SICKO MOVIES MORNING MANIN INTHE AMERICA PG-13

THE DARK TOWER

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri, Sat, Sun Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE&PENTAGON PAPERS Advance Tickets On Sale at Box (12:45 3:00 5:15) 7:30Now 9:40 No Office! Passes 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! NUTTY BY NATURE 10:20 AM CHANGELING Venessa Redgrave Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH (12:20 2:35 AND 4:50) 7:05 9:20 PG 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEY WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION SHORTS (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING Lincoln Center Theater presents 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

NUT JOB 2:

For Tickets and Information go to:

shakespeareinthecannery.com/tickets

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

FALSETTOS

Thu, Aug 10 7pm • Sat, Aug 12 10am


Rock Charley Peach Vocalist Kaylene Harry’s powerful pipes front this hard-hitting and recently revamped power-rock outfit out of Santa Rosa (pictured). charleypeachband.com. Hip-Hop Above Average Young and high-rising MC writes raps and plays video games, matching his lightning quick hand-eye coordination with a silver tongue that’s steadily maturing. soundcloud.com/aboveraps.

Meet the Winners

R&B The Soul Section The eightpiece rhythm and blues revue boasts a veteran core of players who draw from influences like Otis Redding and the Meters. thesoulsection.com.

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

Jazz Cabbagehead We recently caught up with the improvisational sextet and fell in love with their spontaneous energy and advanced musicianship. Now is the perfect time to get in the cabbage patch for yourself. cabbageheadmusic.com.

North Bay readers name top talent

O

ur annual NorBay Music Awards got beefed-up this year with a whopping 21 categories, including new spots for venues, festivals and more. The readers have spoken and the winners are: Blues The Dylan Black Project Soulful band of veteran musicians is a fixture at community concerts and gets the crowds moving with up-tempo rhythms and scorching solos. thedylanblackproject.com. Country Ammo Box New Southern rock and country outfit featuring members of Bay Area party band Notorious is already making noise on the scene. ammoboxband.com. Americana The Rhythm Rangers Led by songwriter and multiinstrumentalist Kevin Russell, the Rhythm Rangers perform timeless and laid-back Americana musings that never fail to please. kevinrussellmusic.com. Folk Oddjob Ensemble Accordionist Kalei Yamanoha

Indie The Highway Poets The North Bay’s longtime favorite DIY band has been hard at work on their new album, Chasing Youth, slated for release next month. highwaypoetsmusic.com. Reggae Sol Horizon North Bay purveyors of roots reggae and world music are favorites at local festivals and beyond. solhorizon.com.

and shares a spiritually connected message. ekishola.com. Acoustic Nate Lopez The instrumental solo guitarist makes the most of his eight-string guitar for dynamic melodies and inviting atmospheres. natelopez.com. Singer-Songwriter Dave Hamilton Hamilton has been playing music for nearly 40 years in the North Bay, perfecting an award-winning mix of folk and Americana. davehamiltonfolkamericana.com. DJ (Live) Joshua BluegreenCripps Musician, event producer and DJ, Joshua BluegreenCripps does it all—and does it with a passion for local projects. partyevententertainment.com. DJ (Radio) Bill Bowker Longtime North Bay radio host is a champion of the blues and the arts both onair at the Krush and in real life, coorganizing the Sonoma County Blues Festival on Aug 19. krsh.com. Open Mic Tuesday Open Mic at Brew The weekly gathering of musicians, poets, comedians and others that join in the open mic at Brew is quickly gaining momentum. brewcoffeeandbeer.com. Venue or Club HopMonk Tavern With three North Bay locations, the HopMonk Tavern’s family of venues can’t be beat for outdoor entertainment. hopmonk.com.

Punk One Armed Joey There’s a melodic quality to Petaluma punks One Armed Joey that calls to mind ’80s bands like NOFX in the best way—fun, fast, catchy and cool. onearmedjoey.bandcamp.com.

Promoter Josh Windmiller The founder of North Bay Hootenanny is once again recognized for producing events and showcasing local music in projects like the new Out There Tapes compilation featuring over a dozen bands from the North Bay. northbayhootenanny.com.

Metal 2 Minutes to Midnight Summoning the power of Iron Maiden, this tribute act has the chops it takes to rock like the British metal heads they emulate. facebook.com/pg/ norcalmaiden707.

Music Festival Railroad Square Music Festival Not even a downpour of hail (in June!) could take the fun out of this popular summer event in Santa Rosa’s lively railroad square. railroadsquaremusicfestival.com.

Electronica Eki Shola The synthesized sounds of solo pianist and performer Eki Shola is influenced by her world travels

The NorBay Awards will be handed out at Santa Rosa’s Wednesday Night Market on Aug. 16 at 5pm.

23 Wed 8/9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $30–$67 • All Ages

Celebrating the life of Jerry Garcia

with Live Dead ‘69 Thu 8/10 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–$20 • All Ages Shinyribs with The Bitter Diamonds Fri 8/11 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$32 • 21+ Tainted Love The Best of the 80’s Live! Sun 8/13 • Doors 2pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages

Crossroads Free Summer Music Festival

feat Mark Karan, Michael LaMacchia 310, Book of Birds & more

Mon 8/14 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $12–$15• All Ages Jason Eady with Jackie Bristow Thu 8/17–Sat 8/19 • ⁄ $40–$45 • 21+

Steve Kimock & Friends

3-Night Residency Sun 8/20 • Doors 11pm ⁄ FREE • All Ages Free Brunch Show with

Evan Lanam and the Live Oaks

Sun 8/20 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $22–$27 • All Ages The Abyssinians feat Bernard Collin with Ridgway Fri 8/25 • Doors 6:30pm ⁄ $37–$42 • 21

Girls Rock/CWM (SWIM) Benefit Concert

feat Shannon and the Clams, Dirty Cello,

Killer Queens, Brandy Robinson Levingston, Mattea Overstreet, Shirlee Temper, CallBox & more T BA www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU AUG 10 •LEVI’S WORKSHOP EVERY 2ND AND 4TH THURSDAY WITH SPECIAL GUEST BILL NOTEMAN 8PM / 21+ / $10 FRI AUG 11 • PACIFIC SOUNDRISE AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT AUG 12 • THE RECEDERS AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SUN AUG 13 • SUNDAY FUNDAY BBQ SHOW SERIES THE COFFIS BROTHERS & THE MOUNTAIN MEN $20 SHOW + BBQ / $10 SHOW ONLY CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

leads this Vaudevillian string band and produces an eclectic array of traditional folk. oddjobensemble.com.


Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

Concerts

SONOMA COUNTY Dr John & the Nite Trippers

Enjoy an afternoon of blues on the lawn with the New Orleans legend and special guest opener Elvin Bishop. Aug 13, 2pm. $25 and up. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Samantha Fish

Upcoming rock guitarist and singer performs as part of her “Chills & Fever” tour. Aug 10, 8pm. $20-$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.3145.

lE V I L O Y D

V O L KE R ST R I F LE R

T i c ke ts a t : S O M O CO N CE RT S . CO M Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

Aug 11 Buck Nickels and Loose Change Fri

thu captain paisley Aug 10 8pm/Dancing/$5 fri stand up coMedy! Aug 11 8:30pm/$10/18+ thu faRgo bRotheRs Aug 17 8pm/Dancing/$10 fri afRo funk expeRience Aug 18 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 sAt sideMen featuRing Aug 19 peteR welkeR 8:30pm/$10 thu honey b & the cultiVation

Aug 24 8pm/Dancing/$10 fri Aug 25 sAt Aug 26

zulu speaR

8:30pm/Dancing/$10 Adv/$12 DOS

thugz

8:30pm/Dancing/$10 tue stoning giants Aug 29 7:30pm/$5 thu fRobeck Aug 31 8pm/Dancing/$10

MaRk huMMel’s golden

sAt sep 2 state/lone staR ReVue 8:30pm/Dancing/$15

RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

Sat

8:00 / No Cover

Aug 12 Shana Morrison 8:30 Fri

Aug 18 Todos Santos

Cantina Americana 8:00 / No Cover e D a nc Rolling Stones 8:30 Party!

Aug 19 Unauthorized Sat

Overcommitments Aug 26 The Rock and Funk Dance 8:30 Sat Sat

A Special Hawaiian Dinner Show Sep 9 An Intimate Evening with

Willie K

8:30

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

BBQS ON THE LAWN 2017

OU Tplus Aug 13 Asleep at theSWheel OL D Sun

Lipbone Redding Sun Aug 20 Petty Theft Sun Aug 27 Pablo Cruise Sun Sep 3 Chuck Prophet & The Mon

!

Mission Express plus Maurice Tani

Sep 4 Sons of Champlin Sun Sep 10 “Uncle” Willie K Sun Sep 17 Soul Ska/Beso Negro

BBQ online ticketing at www.ranchonicasio.com Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Aqus Cafe

Aug 9, the Aqus Jazz Project. Aug 11, the Cork Pullers. Aug 12, Aaron English and Elizabeth Hareza. Aug 16, West Coast songwriters competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arlene Francis Center

Aug 12, the Freak Accident with the Connies and Shark in the Water. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

Bergamot Alley

Aug 12, Midtown Social. Aug 15, the Pine Needles. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

The Big Easy

Mark Karan, Michael LaMacchia, Book of Birds and others perform. Aug 13, 2pm. Free. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Aug 10, Major Powers & the Lo-Fi Symphony with Tin Whiskers. Aug 11, the Reverend Shawn Amos and Parnell. Aug 12, the Grain with Saffell. Aug 13, Seventh Avenue. Aug 15, the Restless Sons. Aug 16, Clark Williams. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Dungen

Brewsters Beer Garden

MARIN COUNTY

THE BLUES DEFENDERS

Commanders. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Crossroads Summer Music Festival

Swedish rock band plays in a redwood grove somewhere in Marin, with support from Oakland’s Once & Future Band. Location revealed after ticket purchase. Aug 12, 2pm. $30. The Shadows, private property, Nicasio, dungen-music.com.

NAPA COUNTY Emilio Solla

Argentina-born and New Yorkbased pianist and composer is one of the most outstanding musicians in the tango-jazz genre. Aug 13, 7pm. $10-$20. Blue Note Napa, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Music in the Vineyards Month-long, nationally acclaimed chamber music festival showcases the finest classical musicians in the picturesque settings of Napa’s wineries and venues. Through Aug 27. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa, musicinthevineyards.org.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Annie O’s Music Hall Aug 9, Friendship

Aug 10, Bluegrass & Bourbon with Aaron Redner and friends. Aug 11, Fly by Train. Aug 12, the Beer Scouts. Aug 13, the Shots. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.2514.

Hood Mansion Lawn

Aug 11, 7pm, Funky Fridays with the Dylan Black Project. 389 Casa Manana Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.833.6288. funkyfridays.info.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Aug 9, Sonny Landreth. Aug 10, Misner & Smith with Hollis Peach and Ismay. Aug 11, Green Light Silhouette. Aug 12, Saritah and Soul Majestic. Aug 15, open mic. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Aug 11, 5pm, King Willow. Aug 11, 8pm, Erica Sunshine Lee. Aug 12, 1pm, Craig Corona. Aug 12, 8pm, Peace of G. Aug 13, 1pm, Kyle Williams. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Ives Park

Aug 9, 5pm, Pepperland and Bohemian Highway. Aug 16, 5pm, Annie Sampson and Haute Flash Quartet. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol, peacetown.org.

KRSH

Aug 10, 6pm, Kingsborough with Lungs and Limbs. 3565 Standish Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.588.0707.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Cellars of Sonoma

Aug 12, John Pita. Aug 13, 2pm, Craig Corona. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Aug 9, Lipbone Redding. Aug 10, Siren & Steel. Aug 11, Jeffrey Halford. Aug 12, the Movers. Aug 13, Jimbo Scott. Aug 16, Erica Sunshine Lee. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Cooperage Brewing Co

Main Street Bistro

Aug 12, Electric Funeral with Lord Mountain and Ursa. 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787.

Cornerstone Sonoma Aug 13, 12pm, Ricky Ray. 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.933.3010.

Flamingo Lounge

Aug 11, the Igniters. Aug 12, Orquesta Taino. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Graffiti

Aug 11, the Peter Welker Sextet. 101 Second St, Petaluma. 707.765.4567.

Green Music Center

Aug 10, Jake Owen. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Guerneville Community Church Aug 13, 2pm, Allways Elvis.

Aug 9, Ginetta’s Vendetta Jazz Trio. Aug 10, Susan Sutton. Aug 11, Brulee. Aug 12, the Rhythm Drivers. Aug 13, George Heagerty. Aug 15, Mac & Potter. Aug 16, Willie Perez. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Aug 11, DJ MGB. Aug 12, the River City Band. Aug 13, DJ MGB. Aug 14, 5pm, Lithium Jazz. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Montgomery Village Shopping Center

Aug 10, 5:30pm, Foreverland. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room Aug 12, 5:30pm, T Luke & the Tight Suits. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.


Pellegrini Wine Company

River Theater

707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Aug 10, 6:30pm, Billy D. Aug 12, 6pm, Dom DeBaggis. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

+ DANNY CLICK

$25/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:30/21+

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Aug 12, the Fitch Mountaineers. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sonoma Cider

Aug 11, the Highway Poets. 44-F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Sonoma Speakeasy

Aug 10, King Daddy Murr and Prince of Thieves. Aug 11, 6:30pm, Bruce Gordon. Aug 11, 8pm, the Acrosonics. Aug 12, 5:30pm, Full Circle. Aug 12, 8pm, Left Coast Syncopators. Aug 13, 5pm, Brandon Eardley. Aug 13, 8:30pm, Sonoma blues jam. Aug 15, American roots night. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Spancky’s Bar

Aug 12, Sound House. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Theatre Square

Aug 13, 3:30pm, Obsidian Sun. 151 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma, theatre-district.com.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Aug 10, Levi’s Workshop. Aug 11, Pacific Soundrise. Aug 12, the Receders. Aug 13, Sunday funday BBQ with Coffis Brothers & the Mountain Men. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Viansa Winery

Aug 12, 12pm, Pacific Standard. Aug 13, 12pm, Justin Brown. 25200 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.935.4700.

MISNER & SMITH

+ HOLLIS PEACH, ISMAY

$10/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:30/21+

FRI AUG 11

GREEN LIGHT SILHOUETTE + INDUVIN

$10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SAT AUG 12

Taking Shape

SARITAH, SOUL MAJESTIC

Green Light Silhouette gets out of the garage Ever since Weezer’s frontman, Rivers Cuomo, wrote lyrics about 12-sided dice and unraveling sweaters on the band’s platinum-selling 1994 debut album, nerds have found a place in alternative rock and pop-punk music.

Now, I’m not calling Santa Rosa indie band Green Light Silhouette nerds, but their own debut album, The Mind Suggests Less Knowing, does have a song all about Han Solo’s adventures in the Stars Wars saga. The song, “Alderaan,” is one of 10 tracks on the band’s new LP, coming out this week with an album-release show in Sebastopol. Made up of guitarists Neal Mckenzie and Nick Yanez, bassist Ryan Macauley and drummer Joel Heun, Green Light Silhouette have been working on the new album for more than four years. With an obvious tip of the hat to their childhood favorites, like Weezer and pop-punk icons Green Day, Green Light Silhouette blend fast rhythms and distorted electric guitars with the hooks of early indie bands like the Pixies. And when the group isn’t making references to Stars Wars and video games, they wear their hearts on their sleeve with all the appropriate angst and agony that comes with coming of age in suburbia. Green light Silhouette release The Mind Suggests Less Knowing on Friday, Aug. 11, at HopMonk Tavern, 230 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol. 8pm. $10; 21 and over. 707.829.7300.—Charlie Swanson

+ CO-BILL, BETTER TOGETHER WEST COAST SUMMER TOUR $10–13/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

MON AUG 14

Windsor Town Green

Aug 10, 6pm, Boys of Summer.

701 McClelland Dr, Windsor, townofwindsor.com.

) 26

RAMBLIN’ JACK ELLIOT AUGUST 18 2017

DOORS OPEN AT 7:30 / 21+ TICKETS: $35 AT THE DOOR OR $ 30 PRE-SALE BROWNPAPERTICKETS.COM

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT FEAT

SAFETY ORANGE

DJ GREEN B (COO-YAH LADEEZ)

(SUBLIME TRIBUTE) FRI, SEPT 1 / 9PM / $10

$10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED AUG 16

SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND SERIES (EVERY 3RD WEDNESDAY)

+ ADAM KNIGHT, SARA RODENBURG, BLUE DORIA, JOSHUA SPEARS

$8/DOORS 7:30/SHOW 8/ALL AGES

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

★★★★★★★★★★★★★ FULL BAR / OVER 21 ONLY

707.869.8022 MMEF THEATER RESTORATION

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

SATURDAY IRIEFUSE, CLEAR CONSCIENCE $HORT, DJ JACQUES AUG 19 DOLLAR REGGAE/ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

GOOSE G GANDER

SUNDAY

SATURDAY

DAVID COOK

THURSDAY

TALKING DREADS

AUG 26

August 20

AUG 31

August 27

SEP 1

PA FURNACE LONESOME LOCOMOTIVE

JUDITH OWEN FEAT THE

LEGENDARY LELAND SKLAR AUG 20 FUNK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

August 13

FRIDAY

POP/ROCK• DOORS 7PM • 21+

REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

AKAE BEKA (FKA MIDNITE) REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

MARTY O'REILLY

SATURDAY

THE DIVA KINGS

SUNDAY

AMY HELM

SUNDAY

ANA POPOVIC

September 3

1–4pm Every Sunday this Summer thru 9/24 NO COVER Live music, cocktails & food outside in our garden @goosegandernapa

Whiskey Tip

Aug 12, eNegative and MSG. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

OPENING FOR

THU AUG 10

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

Aug 11, Hour of Tower. Aug 12, Petty Theft. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

DANNY MONTANA & GUESTS

SONNY LANDRETH

Aug 10, Captain Paisley. Aug 13, 3pm, Celtic fiddle music. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Rio Nido Roadhouse

presents

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI WED AUG 9

Redwood Cafe

Aug 11, the Blues Defenders pro jam. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

16135 Main St, Guerneville 95446 ★★★★★★★★★★★★★

1245 Spring St, St. Helena 707.967.8779

SEP 2 SEP 3 SEP 6

MARTIN BARRE OF JETHRO TULL

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

FEAT MIKE SALIANI BAND BLUES• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

9/8 Hell's Belles, 9/9 Royal Jelly Jive w/ Sol Horizon & El Radio Fantastique, 9/10 Shaggy, 9/13 Les Nubians “Up Close & Personal Tour”, 9/14 An Evening with Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra, 9/16 The Highway Poets w/ Kingsborough and John Courage Trio, 9/21 Jim Avett plus The Highway Women

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Aug 12, 12pm, Blues in the vineyard with MT & the Wolves. 4055 West Olivet Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8680.

★★★★★★★★★★★★★ JERRY KNIGHT’S HISTORIC

CRITIC’S CHOICE


26

Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 9 -1 5, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Aug 9, pro blues jam with Wayne “Guitar” Sanders. Aug 11, Nzuri Soul. Aug 13, 11:30am, Sunday brunch with Acoustic Embers. Aug 13, 6:30pm, Yolanda Rhodes. Aug 15, Hella Fitzgerald. Aug 16, pro blues jam. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

Aug 11, Choppin’ Broccoli. Aug 12, Charley Peach. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Aug 16, Fly by Train. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin Art & Garden Center

Aug 10, 5pm, Highway Poets. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

Mill Valley Depot Plaza Aug 9, 6:30pm, Jamie Clark Band. Aug 16, 6:30pm, Dave and Reed Fromer. 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.1370.

19 Broadway Club

Aug 9, Festival Speed Bluegrass. Aug 10, Sticky’s Backyard. Aug 11, 5:30pm, Pepa & Edgar. Aug 11, 9pm, Love Jet. Aug 12, 5:30pm, Clement Thomas Grey. Aug 12, 9pm, the On Ups with Loosely Covered. Aug 13, Sweet City Blues with Donna Spitzer. Aug 14, open mic. Aug 15, PB & the Jam. Aug 16, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

Aug 11, Michael Aragon Quartet. Aug 12, Art Khu Trio. Aug 13, Doug Nichols and friends. Aug 14, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Aug 15, open mic. Aug 16, Sun Hunter and Harmonic Law. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Oak Plaza at Northgate

Aug 11, 6pm, San Francisco’s Ultimate Tribute to Journey. 5800 Northgate Mall, San Rafael. 415.479.5955.

Osteria Divino

Real Food. Real People.®

Aug 9, Joan Getz with Chris Huson. Aug 10, Passion Habanera. Aug 11, David Jeffrey’s Jazz Fourtet. Aug 12, Jake Leckie Trio. Aug 13, Brian Moran Duo. Aug 15, Ken Cook. Aug 16, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Aug 9, Lorin Rowan. Aug 10, Ricky Ray. Aug 15, Wanda Stafford. Aug 16, Rusty String Express. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Aug 9, the New Sneakers. Aug 10, Mark’s Jam Sammich. Aug 11, Stymie & the Pimp Jones Love Orchestra. Aug 12, Ann Halen. Aug 13, Thieves of Reason. Aug 15, the Bad Hombres. Aug 16, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue 5-year anniversary. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Piccolo Pavilion

Aug 13, 5pm, Bubba’s Taxi. Redwood and Corte Madera avenues, Corte Madera. 415.302.1160.

Rancho Nicasio

Aug 11, Buck Nickels & Loose Change. Aug 12, Shana Morrison. Aug 13, 4pm, BBQ on the lawn with Asleep at the Wheel and Lipbone Redding. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Aug 11, Wall of Rhythm. Aug 12, Tracy Rose Trio. Aug 13, Brian Campbell Trio. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books Aug 11, 6pm, Akira Tana and the Secret Agent Band. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.524.2800.

Sausalito Seahorse

Wed, Milonga with Marcelo Puig and Seth Asarnow. Aug 11, Revenant album release show. Aug 12, Void Where Prohibited. Aug 13, 5pm, Orquesta la Moderna Tradicion. Aug 15, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 9, Live Dead ‘69. Aug 10, Shinyribs. Aug 11, Tainted Love. Aug 14, Jason Eady and Jackie Bristow. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Tennessee Valley Cabin Aug 11, 6:30pm, Juke Joint. 60 Tennessee Valley Rd, Mill Valley. 415.388.6393.

Terrapin Crossroads

Aug 9, Grahame Lesh and friends perform the music of the Mother Hips. Aug 10, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Aug 11, Top 40 Friday dance party. Aug 12, 2pm, Bouncing Around the Backyard with Phil Lesh &

the Terrapin Family Band. Aug 13, 3:30pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh and friends. Aug 13, 7:30pm, Midnight North. Aug 14, Grateful Mondays with Scott Law. Aug 16, Elliott Peck and friends. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Aug 13, 5pm, Songwriter’s Circle. Aug 14, Summer Singing Workshop. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

Aug 11, Plausible Deniability Band. Aug 12, Chime Travelers. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards Aug 12, 12:30pm, David Ronconi. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

Blue Note Napa

Aug 9, Parlor Social. Aug 10, the Oakland Stroke. Aug 13, 12:30pm, gospel brunch with Jackie Tolbert Gospel Ensemble. Aug 15, Silverado Pickups. Aug 16, Paula Harris and the Nate Ginsberg Trio. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Aug 11, Mike Annuzzi. Aug 12, LoWatters. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant Aug 12, Jinx Jones & the Kingtones. Aug 13, DJ Aurelio. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337.

Goose & Gander

Aug 13, 1pm, PA Furnace. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

River Terrace Inn

Aug 10, Nate Lopez. Aug 11, Craig Corona. Aug 12, Johnny Smith. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Aug 9, Wesla Whitfield & Mike Greensill. Aug 10, Miss Moonshine with Serf & James. Aug 11, Purple Haze. Aug 12, Garage Band 101 for adults. Aug 13, 2pm, Doug Houser. Aug 16, Wesla Whitfield & Mike Greensill. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.

Veterans Memorial Park

Aug 11, 6:30pm, the Singer & the Songwriter with the Grain and the Billy Martini Show. 850 Main St, Napa, napacitynights. com.


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RECEPTIONS Aug 9

Finley Community Center, “Fun Pun,” artist Sharona “ChaCha” Tracy presents an interactive show of sculptures made from found objects. 5pm. 2060 W College Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3737.

Aug 11

Art Works Downtown, “Waking Dreams,” Angelique Benicio’s paintings, sculpture and video evoke the fantasies of Grimm’s fairy tales. 5pm. 415.451.8119. Falkirk Cultural Center, “Fall 2017 Juried Exhibition,” see some of the best artwork from local artists in the beautiful Falkirk Mansion. 6pm. 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael. 415.485.3438.

Aug 12

Bubble Street Gallery, “Marge Margulies,” pottery master displays and demonstrates. Reception, Aug 12 at 4pm. 565 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.339.0506. Cooperage Brewing Co, “Faces with Character,” conceptual photographer Dan Quinones shows the prints from his new portrait series. 3pm. 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa. 707.293.9787. Gallery Route One, “Box Show 2017,” fantastical works of art that begin with a plain wooden box are on display in the 18th annual show. 3pm. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. 415.663.1347.

Aug 16

Sebasopol Library, “Pentimento,” exhibit features multimedia works by local artists Alan Azhderian, Phyllis Grannis and Greer Upton. 6pm. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. 707.823.7691.

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY 33 Arts

Through Aug 21, “Beyond Recognition,” paintings by Jack Vernon. 3840 Finley Ave, Bldg 33, Santa Rosa. 415.601.5323.

Art Museum of Sonoma County

Through Aug 27, “Eye Fruit: The Art of Franklin Williams,” show of unconventional art from the introspective and innovative 20th-century artist is curated by noted art historian Susan Landauer. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through Aug 28, “Jennifer Whitfield Exhibition,” awardwinning artist shows her mixed-media works, including her latest water color and pastel creations. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

Calabi Gallery

Through Aug 19, “Forty Years of Ray Jacobsen,” a retrospective of the Sonoma Valley artist. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

City Hall Council Chambers

Through Aug 24, “Jim Davidson: Globe Trotter,” Sonoma County photographer shows images of everyday life from around the world. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Graton Gallery

Through Aug 20, “Stormy Weather,” politically charged paintings by Mylette Welch and sculptures by the late Richard Benbrook resist and protest against today’s toxic political climate. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery

Through Aug 16, “Beneath the Sea Ice,” exhibit features paintings from Lily Simonson’s three-month trip to Antarctica. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center Through Aug 29, “FAUNA,” paintings and mosaics by Stacey Schuett display in Heron Hall. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Neon Raspberry Art House

Through Aug 13, “Moon Glow,” Rebekah Erev’s original gouache paintings use abstract cultural symbolism to invoke commonality and obscurity in our everyday experience of the divine. 3605 Main St, Occidental. Sat-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.874.2100.

ReFrame Gallery

Through Aug 13, “Hidden in Plain Sight,” photographer Sara Downing’s debut solo exhibit charts her unconventional path toward expression. 6790 McKinley St Ste 180, Sebastopol. 707.861.3476.

Sebastopol Senior Center

LET’S GET AWKWARD Comedian, writer, actor and total weirdo Demetri Martin performs his standup at the Uptown Theatre in Napa on Aug 12. See Comedy, below.

Through Aug 30, “Senior Center Art Show,” local artists Virginia Fenley and Cheryl Traendly show their vibrant works. 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Area Jewry,” photo essay exhibition shows the diverse local community through intimate portraits. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Steele Lane Community Center

Throckmorton Theatre

Through Aug 10, “North Bay Industries Activity Center Showcase,” see mixed-media works from adults living at the Rohnert Park Rehabilitation Center. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum

Through Aug 13, “Art We Wear,” exhibit shows decorated clothing of the counterculture expression from the 1960s to now. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

MarinMOCA

Through Aug 13, “Light,” artist member group show explores light in several mediums, while “Intertwined” exhibits of woven glass by artists-in-residence Demetra Theofanous and Dean Bensen. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

Osher Marin JCC

Through Aug 25, “This Is Bay

Through Aug 27, “Driven to Extinction” exhibition of works by San Francisco sculptor Cynthia Jensen. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Villa Marin

Through Aug 30, “Waterworks,” Marin County Watercolor Society’s group show interprets water through visuals and textures. 100 Thorndale Dr, San Rafael. 415.492.2408.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Through Aug 16, “Melissa Chandon & Matt Rogers,” two California artists display in a joint exhibition of recent paintings. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Napa Valley Museum

Through Aug 20, “Sound Maze,” interactive installation created by composer and inventor Paul Dresher includes a dozen original musical

instruments to experience. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Desi Comedy Fest

Indian-born comedians Arish Singh and Abhay Nadkarni headline a showcase of standups from South Asian communities. Aug 15, 8pm. $17-$22. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. desicomedyfest.com.

Will Durst

Standup veteran’s new solo “Durst Case Scenario,” is a comedic exploration of the time of Trump. Aug 12, 8pm. $30. Main Stage West, 104 N Main St, Sebastopol. 707.823.0177.

Gabriel Iglesias

Popular standup star celebrates 20 years of comedy on his “Fluffy Mania” tour. Aug 11, 7:30pm. $25 and up. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Demetri Martin

Standup star has been seen on his own Comedy Central show and appears in his current “Let’s Get Awkward” tour. Aug

12, 8pm. $35-$60. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Science Fiction & Science Comedy

Standup comedian and cartoonist Mike Capozzola and self-proclaimed science comedian Brian Malow appear. Aug 10, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Standup Comedy at Laugh Cellar

Comedians Yayne Abeba, Jill Maragos and others take the stage. Aug 12, 7pm. $20. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa. 707.282.9319.

Events BI Olympics

Becoming Independent hosts Olympic-style event with 60 athletes competing in individual and team sports at Bailey Field. Aug 11, 11am. Santa Rosa Junior College, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 1.800.564.SRJC.

CAPFest

Annual fundraiser for Sloan House and Harold’s Home women’s shelters

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Charles M Schulz Museum 15-Year Anniversary

Jeff Smith, creator of awardwinning graphic novel “Bone,” headlines an all-day cartooning celebration with several special guests, prizes and goodies. Aug 12, 10am. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

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Outdoor antique market features vintage, retro and antique furniture, decor, clothing, jewelry, housewares and more. Crepes and live music add to the ambiance. Sun, Aug 13, 9am. Free admission. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, goldengateshows.com.

Greek & Middle Eastern Food Festival

Eat, drink and enjoy traditional Mediterranean food and music in this 11th annual festival. Aug 12-13, noon. Free admission. St. George Orthodox Church, 7311 College View Dr, Rohnert Park. 707.583.3992.

Napa Town & Country Fair

Fair is themed “Wheels & Squeals!” and features carnival rides, farm activities, exhibits and other fun. Aug 9-13. $10$13/kids and under are free. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa. napavalleyexpo. com.

Roller Derby

The local Resurrection Roller Girls go head-to-head with Derby Republic in a rolling bout of action. Aug 12, 6:45pm. $5$12. Cal Skate, 6100 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert Park.

Sonoma County Fair

The fair’s theme of “Holidze” is highlighted, with concerts, carnival, hall of flowers, art, livestock and wine country horse racing. Through Aug 13. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.545.4200.

Sonoma County VegFest

Celebration of compassionate, healthy and environmentally responsible living includes

speakers, food and drink, vendors, cooking demos and more. Aug 12, 11am. $5/ kids 13 and under are free. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, socovegfest.org.

Film

Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol. 707.525.4840.

Food & Drink Festival Gastronomico Salvadoreno

Swedish rock band Dungen provides a heavy soundtrack to the screening of the oldest surviving animated feature film in the world. Aug 13, 6pm. $23. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Tribute to the Salvadorian gastronomy and Salvadorian restaurants in Northern California features exotic specialty dishes, beers and drinks from El Salvador. Aug 13, 10am. $20-$30. Lagoon Park, Marin Civic Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

Culture Clash

Gravenstein Apple Fair

The Adventures of Prince Achmed

Tiburon Film Society presents the documentary on generations of immigrants and their differing experiences in the United States. Aug 10, 6:30pm. Free. BelvedereTiburon Library, 1501 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon. 415.789.2665.

Darker Side of Oz

Eleventh annual screening event matches film with music. Aug 12, 8:30pm. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Dashi Journey

Documentary follows Tokyo chef Shinobu Namae’s quest to visit the source of two ingredients that make up dashi: kombu (seaweed) and katsuobushi (cured bonito). Aug 13, 3pm. $25. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg. 707.431.7433.

The Misfits

Arthur Miller-penned, and John Huston-directed, 1961 drama marked the final completed film for both Clark Gable and Marilyn Monroe. Aug 14, 7pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma. 707.996.9756.

Saltwater Buddha

Summer film and discussion series welcomes author Jaimal Yogis for a screening of the film based on his book. Aug 16, 6:30pm. Free. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.785.8177.

Turn It Around: The Story of East Bay Punk

Iggy Pop narrates documentary about the Bay Area’s punk music history with a central focus on Berkeley’s 924 Gilman Street music collective. Screening features special guests in Q&A. Aug 11. Rialto

Celebrate all things apple at this popular event that includes live music on two stages, arts and crafts vendors, local food, wine, cider and beer, children’s corner, chef’s tent and much more. Aug 12-13, 10am. $10-$15. Ragle Ranch Park, 500 Ragle Rd, Sebastopol, farmtrails.org.

Inglenook Harvest Party Inglenook’s courtyard transforms into an Italian Street Festival, complete with traditional food stations and live entertainment. Aug 12, 7pm. $180. Inglenook Winery, 1991 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford. 707.968.1161.

Summer Wine Tasting & Cornhole Tournament

Carneros Wine Alliance invites the community to this inaugural event. Aug 12, 4pm. $40. Liana Estates, 2750 Las Amigas, Napa. 707.963.3600.

For Kids City Kids Festival

Event features food, games, crafts and distributes filled school backpacks to children in need, grades K-8. Preregistration is required for the backpacks. Aug 12, 10am. Juilliard Park, 227 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.578.1830.

Comic Camp

Learn to create your own cartoon characters and worlds with cartoonist Barbara Golden. Through Aug 10. $125. Petaluma Arts Center, 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. 707.762.5600.


Fencing Adventure for Kids

Lectures Curator’s Lens

Lunchtime art talk gives a behind-the-scenes look at conceptual art in the Bay Area with a panel of experts. Aug 11, 11:30am. $5. di Rosa, 5200 Sonoma Hwy, Napa. 707.226.5991.

Lou Dillon: Harness Racing Queen

Learn about the Santa Rosa born and bred horse who became a champion and later traveled to Europe and Russia on exhibition. Aug 11, 6:30pm. $15. History Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500.

Readings Book Passage

Aug 12, 4pm, Jack London Short Story Read Aloud, with docent Doc Stull. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen 707.938.5216.

Point Reyes Books

Aug 13, 6pm, “Show Her a Flower, a Bird, a Shadow” with Peg Alford Pursell. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Aug 11, 7pm, “The Marriage Pact” with Michelle Richmond. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Aug 11, 7pm, “Grace Without God” with Katherine Ozment. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Sonoma County Fairgrounds

Keith Moon: The Real Me

Theater The 39 Steps

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books

6th Street Playhouse produces a new adaptation of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Aug 10-Sep 2. Shakespeare in the Cannery, 3 West Third St, Santa Rosa, shakespeareinthecannery.com.

Healdsburg Shed

Aug 10, 2pm, Luminarias, an afternoon of bilingual storytelling with Salvadoran/ American Children’s Author René Colato Laínez. Free. Aug 12, 2pm, “In Full Flower” with Gemma Ingalls. 25 North St, Healdsburg 707.431.7433.

Ross Valley Players presents the 2005 farcical version of the classic Hitchcock mystery. Through Aug 20. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, rossvalleyplayers.com.

Broadway Under the Stars

Transcendence Theatre Company’s summer series presents “Fascinating Rhythm,” filled with spectacular music and dance featuring Broadway performers. Through Aug 20. $45 and up. Jack London State Park, 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen, TTCsonoma.org.

Fairy Worlds

The Farce Awakens

“Star Wars” parody features original songs and lots of laughs. Through Aug 13. by donation. Redwood Theatre Company Studio, 440 Moore Lane, Healdsburg, redwoodtheatrecompany.com.

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Aug 9, 7pm, “Science in the Soul” with Richard Dawkins. $32. Aug 10, 7:30pm, “Traveling with Ghosts” with Karen Joy Fowler and Shannon Leone Fowler. Aug 11, 8pm, “Bound to Freedom” with Lisa Kristine. Aug 12, 6pm, Frommer Guides 60th Anniversary Celebration with Pauline Frommer. Aug 12, 8pm, “How to Be a Travel Writer” with Don George. Aug 14, 7pm, “The Good Daughter” with Karin Slaughter. Aug 15, 7pm, “The Quiet Child” with John Burley. Aug 16, 7pm, “The Education of a Coroner” with John Bateson. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Aug 11, 7pm, “On Her Majesty’s Frightfully Secret Service” with Rhys Bowen. 106 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Hilarity ensues when a British demolition expert visiting a rural Georgia fishing lodge learns a series of bizarre revelations about his fellow lodge guests. Suggest for mature audiences. Through Aug 13. $12-$22. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale. 707.829.2214.

Award-winning playwright and performer Ann Randolph fuses her trademark irreverent observations with audience participation in a transformative theatrical experience. Aug 12, 7pm. $35. O’Hanlon Center for the Arts, 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.4331.

Through Aug 13, Redwood Writers at the Sonoma County Fair, authors of every genre appear daily to sell, sign and read from their published works. redwoodwriters.org. 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa.

29

The Foreigner

Stage show captures the the turmoil and excitement of the wildest drummer in rock and roll. Aug 11-Sep 10. $20$35. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, keithmoontherealme.com.

Lucky Shorts

Short stories written by local authors are performed by Lucky Penny actors. Aug 13, 2pm. $15. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa. 707.266.6305.

Private Lives, Private Lies

North Bay playwright Dianna L Grayer’s original play about the struggles and joys of eight LGBTQ characters plays for one weekend only. Aug 12-13. $20$25. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg. 707.433.6335.

The Three Musketeers

Marin Shakespeare Company’s 28th annual summer festival presents a swashbuckling adventure adapted from the novel. Through Aug 27. $10-$37. Forest Meadows Amphitheatre, 890 Belle Ave, Dominican University, San Rafael, marinshakespeare.org.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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s the law stands now, wine and cannabis cannot be produced on the same licensed property. Nor can a winetasting room sell cannabis. But folks are working on changing that. This past Thursday’s Wine & Weed Symposium at the Hyatt Vineyard Creek in Santa Rosa attracted a sold-out crowd of more than 200 attendees from the wine and cannabis industries. The event, organized by the Wine Industry Network, will go down as a historic meeting of the minds. “I’ve been waiting most of my life to see these two groups come together,” said Hezekiah Allen, executive director of the California Growers Association, a cannabis industry trade group. Lay a map of the North Bay’s wine country over a map of cannabis country, and you’ll see a great deal of overlap—and revenue potential. But that overlap is only theoretical. The thicket of state

laws and pesky federal prohibition prevent any joint ventures. While there is certainly a lot of money to be made in the booming cannabis market, Allen stressed that it won’t come without work. “The biggest misconception is that this is easy money,” he said. Because of the cost of getting the 18 required state and local licenses, he estimates 70 percent or more growers will stay in the black market or find something else to do. California’s cannabis industry is conservatively valued at $7 billion, and that’s before recreational sales hit the market next year. The state’s grape crop is pegged at about $5 billion, while the total value of the state’s agriculture is $42.7 billion. “Now that cannabis is a regulated crop, it is going to be the big gorilla in the room,” said state Sen. Mike McGuire in opening remarks to the symposium. While he extolled the quality of Northern California cannabis, McGuire said bringing the industry under regulation is going to take a while. The state has until Jan. 1, 2018, to create its regulatory apparatus, but he freely admits they’ll miss that goal. “It’s impossible. It’s just too big of an industry.” He says it will probably be five years before all the kinks are worked out. But the likely delay did nothing to kill the buzz in the room. The crowded vendor tables in the lobby revealed how easy it may be to integrate the two industries. Wineindustry vendors selling labeling, water testing, soil amendments and wine-cave services were ready to offer their products and services to dope growers. One cannabis entrepreneur predicted that the wine industry will soon own the cannabis industry. “They have the land,” he said darkly. But, he added, the wine industry doesn’t know how to grow weed and will need to partner with cannabis industry to realize their, yes, joint potential.


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) I hope you’re making wise use of the surging fertility that has been coursing through you. Maybe you’ve been reinventing a longterm relationship that needed creative tinkering. Perhaps you have been hammering together an innovative business deal or generating new material for your artistic practice. It’s possible you have discovered how to express feelings and ideas that have been halfmute or inaccessible for a long time. If for some weird reason you are not yet having experiences like these, get to work! There’s still time to tap into the fecundity. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano defines “idiot memory” as the kind of remembrances that keep us attached to our old self-images, and trapped by them. “Lively memory,” on the other hand, is a feisty approach to our old stories. It impels us to graduate from who we used to be. “We are the sum of our efforts to change who we are,” writes Galeano. “Identity is no museum piece sitting stock-still in a display case.” Here’s another clue to your current assignment, Taurus, from psychotherapist Dick Olney: “The goal of a good therapist is to help someone wake up from the dream that they are their self-image.”

GEMINI (May 21–June 20)

Sometimes, Gemini, loving you is a sacred honor for me—equivalent to getting a poem on my birthday from the Dalai Lama. On other occasions, loving you is more like trying to lap up a delicious milkshake that has spilled on the sidewalk, or slow-dancing with a giant robot teddy bear that accidentally knocks me down when it suffers a glitch. I don’t take it personally when I encounter the more challenging sides of you, since you are always an interesting place to visit. But could you maybe show more mercy to the people in your life who are not just visitors? Remind your dear allies of the obvious secret—that you’re composed of several different selves, each of whom craves different thrills.

CANCER (June 21–July 22) Liz, my girlfriend when I was young, went to extreme lengths to cultivate her physical attractiveness. “Beauty must suffer,” her mother had told her while growing up, and Liz heeded that advice. To make her long blonde hair as wavy as possible, for example, she wrapped strands of it around six empty metal cans before bed, applied a noxious spray, and then slept all night with a stinky, clanking mass of metal affixed to her head. While you may not do anything so literal, Cancerian, you do sometimes act as if suffering helps keep you strong and attractive— as if feeling hurt is a viable way to energize your quest for what you want. But if you’d like to transform that approach, the coming weeks will be a good time. Step One: Have a long, compassionate talk with your inner saboteur.

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LEO (July 23–August 22) Each of us comes to know the truth in our own way, says astrologer Antero Alli. “For some it is wild and unfettered,” he writes. “For others it is like a cozy domesticated cat, while others find truth through their senses alone.” Whatever your usual style of knowing the truth might be, Leo, I suspect you’ll benefit from trying out a different method in the next two weeks. Here are some possibilities: trusting your most positive feelings; tuning in to the clues and cues your body provides; performing ceremonies in which you request the help of ancestral spirits; slipping into an altered state by laughing nonstop for five minutes. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Would you scoff if I said that you’ll soon be blessed with supernatural assistance? Would you smirk and roll your eyes if I advised you to find clues to your next big move by analyzing your irrational fantasies? Would you tell me to stop spouting nonsense if I hinted that a guardian angel is conspiring to blast a tunnel through the mountain you created out of a molehill? It’s OK if you ignore my predictions, Virgo. They’ll come true even if you’re a staunch realist who doesn’t believe in woowoo, juju or mojo. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) This is the Season of Enlightenment for you. That doesn’t necessarily mean you will achieve an ultimate state of divine grace. It’s not a guarantee that you’ll be

BY ROB BREZSNY

freestyling in satori, samadhi or nirvana. But one thing is certain: Life will conspire to bring you the excited joy that comes with deep insight into the nature of reality. If you decide to take advantage of the opportunity, please keep in mind these thoughts from designer Elissa Giles: “Enlightenment is not an asexual, dispassionate, head-in-the-clouds, nails-in-the-palms disappearance from the game of life. It’s a volcanic, kick-ass, erotic commitment to love in action, coupled with hard-headed practical grist.”

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Some zoos sell the urine of lions and tigers to gardeners who sprinkle it in their gardens. Apparently the stuff scares off wandering house cats that might be tempted to relieve themselves in vegetable patches. I nominate this scenario to be a provocative metaphor for you in the coming weeks. Might you tap into the power of your inner wild animal so as to protect your inner crops? Could you build up your warrior energy so as to prevent run-ins with pesky irritants? Can you call on helpful spirits to ensure that what’s growing in your life will continue to thrive?

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

The fates have conspired to make it right and proper for you to be influenced by Sagittarian author Mark Twain. There are five specific bits of his wisdom that will serve as benevolent tweaks to your attitude. I hope you will also aspire to express some of his expansive snappiness. Now here’s Twain: 1. “You cannot depend on your eyes when your imagination is out of focus.” 2. “Education consists mainly in what we have unlearned.” 3. “It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.” 4. “When in doubt, tell the truth.” 5. “Thunder is good, thunder is impressive; but it is lightning that does the work.”

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) “My grandfather used to tell me that if you stir muddy water it will only get darker,” wrote I. G. Edmonds in his book Trickster Tales. “But if you let the muddy water stand still, the mud will settle and the water will become clearer,” he concluded. I hope this message reaches you in time, Capricorn. I hope you will then resist any temptation you might have to agitate, churn, spill wine into, wash your face in, drink or splash around in the muddy water. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) In 1985, Maurizio Cattelan quit his gig at a mortuary in Padua, Italy, and resolved to make a living as an artist. He started creating furniture, and ultimately evolved into a sculptor who specialized in satirical work. In 1999, he produced a piece depicting the Pope being struck by a meteorite, which sold for $886,000 in 2001. If there were ever going to be a time when you could launch your personal version of his story, Aquarius, it would be in the next 10 months. That doesn’t necessarily mean you should go barreling ahead with such a radical act of faith, however. Following your bliss rarely leads to instant success. It may take years (16 in Cattelan’s case). Are you willing to accept that? PISCES (February 19–March 20) Tally up your

physical aches, psychic bruises and chronic worries. Take inventory of your troubling memories, halfrepressed disappointments, and existential nausea. Do it, Pisces! Be strong. If you bravely examine and deeply feel the difficult feelings, then the cures for those feelings will magically begin streaming in your direction. You’ll see what you need to do to escape at least some of your suffering. So name your griefs and losses, my dear. Remember your near-misses and total fiascos. As your reward, you’ll be soothed and relieved and forgiven. A Great Healing will come.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

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