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Bohemian

LOCAL Alternative

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288

to the Big Banks

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NOT behaving like a Wall St. bank for 56 years!

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Not-for-profit financial co-op that delivers all the conveniences, savings, loans … but none of the remorse

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NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2017 Metrosa Inc.

Cover photo by Rory McNamara. Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.


3 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN |

12 New Shows! Tickets On Sale Friday at Noon | Members Buy Early! Join today: 707.546.3600 | lutherburbankcenter.org/membership

New Shows 2018

10/20

Tony Bennett

1/7

Kris Kristofferson

10/28

Creating S-Town: A New Way to Tell a Story: An Evening with Brian Reed

1/28

Whose Live Anyway

11/22

Live Nation presents Trevor Noah

1/31

Rodney Strong Vineyards Dance Series: Pilobolus

11/26

Dwight Yoakam

2/8

An Evening with Michael Pollan

11/29

Mannheim Steamroller by Chip Davis

4/24

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Rodney Strong Vineyards Dance Series: 11TH Annual Posada Navideña

Rodney Strong Vineyards Dance Series: Versa-Style Dance Company

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The Price is Right Live

Tickets On Sale Friday at Noon!

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Colbie Caillat

9/23

8/26

Seven Things I’ve Learned: An Evening with Ira Glass

42ND Annual San Francisco Comedy Competition Semi-Finals

10/6

Icon Concerts Presents Jo Koy

9/7

The Gipsy Kings featuring Nicolas Reyes and Tonino Baliardo

12/1 – 12/3

Transcendence’s Broadway Holiday Spectacular

9/8

Kansas—Leftoverture 40TH Anniversary Tour

2018

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Left Edge Theatre presents Sideways

9/11

Steve Winwood

9/15

Masters of Illusion— Believe the Impossible

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Psychic Medium and Author John Edward

New Shows Added throughout the Year! All performances take place in the Ruth Finley Person Theater unless otherwise noted.

Thank You to O ur Ge ne r ous S ponsor s:

The Ernest L. & Ruth W. Finley Foundation

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2017


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 2-8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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THANK YOU

EYE OF THE NEEDLE For some of Shotsie Gorman’s tattoo clients, ink can be a form of therapy, p13.

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The Nugget p30 Classified p31 Astrology p31


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Doctor’s Confession to Petaluma

Twenty-nine years ago something happened to me that changed my life forever. Let me tell you my story.

I was studying pre-Med in college, in hopes of becoming a medical doctor. Things were looking up, and life was good, until things took a turn for the worse. I began to have terrible back and stomach problems. For a young guy, I felt pretty rotten. My back hurt so badly that I had a hard time even concentrating in class. I was miserable. The medical doctors tried different drugs, but they only made me feel like I was in a “cloud.” I was just not getting better.

A friend of mine convinced me to give a chiropractor a try. The adjustment didn’t hurt, it actually felt good. I got relief, and I soon was off all medication. It worked so well that I decided, then and there, to become a chiropractor myself. Now for my kids, Hayden and Henry. They have been under chiropractic care their entire lives. And, unlike most other kids in their class, they never get the “common” childhood illnesses like ear infections, asthma and allergies. In fact, they have never taken a drug in their lives. And they are now 19 and 21!

It’s strange how life is, because now people come to see me with their back problems and stomach problems. They come to me with their headaches, migraines, chronic pain, neck pain, shoulder/arm pain, whiplash from car accidents, asthma, allergies, numbness in limbs, athletic injuries, just to name a few. If drugs make people well, then those who take the most should be the healthiest, but that simply isn’t the case. With chiropractic we don’t add anything to the body or take

Dr. Taajes with his sons anything from it. We find interference in the nervous system and remove it thus enhancing the healing capacities of the body. We get tremendous results…it really is as simple as that. Here’s what some of my patients had to say:

“I have had a problem with migraines as well as low back pain. Even after seeing doctors and other health professionals, the pains remained. After coming to Dr. Joel, they have helped tremendously. They even take away my migraines. They’re great!” (Judy E.) “I came in pending laser surgery for two herniated discs. Over a few months here the need for surgery subsided, and the pain has subsided to a mild discomfort with occasional morning stiffness. Over all, I feel better visit after visit. It’s a gradual process.” (Jaime O.) Several times a day patients thank me for helping them with their health problems. But I can’t really take the credit. Find out for yourself and benefit from an AMAZING OFFER. Look, it shouldn’t cost you an arm and a leg to correct your health. You are going to write a check to someone for your health care expenses, you may as well write one for a lesser amount for chiropractic. When you bring in this article between August 2, 2017 through

September 6, 2017, you will receive my entire new patient exam for $27. That’s with x-rays, exam, report of findings…the whole ball of wax. This exam could cost you $ 350 elsewhere. Great care at a great fee…

Please, I hope that there’s no misunderstanding about quality of care just because I have a lower exam fee. You’ll get great care at a great fee. My qualifications… I’m a graduate of Northwestern College of Chiropractic who regularly goes to monthly educational chiropractic seminars. I’ve been entrusted to take care of tiny babies to neighbors that you may know. I just have that low exam fee to help more people who need care.

My staff and my associate Dr. Rogers and I are ready to see if we can help you. Our office is both friendly and warm and we try our best to make you feel at home. We have a wonderful service, at an exceptional fee. Our office is called REDWOOD CHIROPRACTIC. Our office is located at 937 Lakeville Street, Petaluma, phone number is 707-763-8910. We would love to help you. Call Alex, Phoebe, Christine or Brenda today for an appointment. We can help you. Thank you.

– Dr. Joel Taatjes

redwoodchiropractic.com

AUGUST 2-8, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Dear Friend, I wanted to let everyone know what happened while I was in college. It was a moment that changed my life forever. But before I tell you about my experience, I wanted to tell you my story from the start. Let me start by explaining the photo in this letter, I’m the guy in the middle, Dr. Taatjes. You know when I meet people in town and they usually say, “Oh yeah, I know you, you’re Dr. Taatjes. You’ve been in Petaluma for years…” Well, that’s me.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI A N | AUGUST 2-8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Utility Bill Baloney Dave Canny (“Letters,” July 26) can pitch it however he wants. PG&E manipulated a massive increase in its charges to residential users this year. The CPUC is more or less owned by PG&E and the “interest groups” that were supposedly involved in the rate changes clearly had only one interest in mind: PG&E’s!

The most I’ve ever paid for utilities in previous years, in far colder month’s than last winter’s, was $220. This year our bill was more than $330 one month and has been high since then. I’ve written to everyone from state senators to the Better Business Bureau to PG&E itself about this. The answer is always the same as the one Canny pitches. The changes are legal and were made to “encourage energy conservation.” Baloney! The changes are the way PG&E is collecting the huge fine they paid after

THIS MODERN WORLD

the San Bruno fire. Is no one connecting the dots on a fine they were forbidden to collect from their consumers? I don’t use PG&E for gas or electric. Sonoma Clean Power and Tiger Gas both confirmed (as did PG&E) that my costs had not risen for the energy itself. The huge increase in my bill was from the “tiers” adjustment PG&E made for delivery. In their responses to me, PG&E always avoided mentioning “delivery” charges. Strange omission!

By Tom Tomorrow

The extra hundred bucks charged this winter was entirely a result of the “tier” adjustments, which reduced bills for big power users (the “interest groups”) and “may” increase some bills for residential users. Or simply stated, “Let the little guy pay our fines—forever after!” For starters, we need a truly independent CPUC.

ARTHUR HILLS Santa Rosa

Violator Kenneth Bareilles has a track record for destructive land use in Humboldt County (“Battle for Felta Creek,” July 26). It’s a shame that he can (apparently) continue to get CDF approvals for logging after his record of violations. It appears he is holding Felta Creek hostage and essentially demanding a buyout, or else he will log in an extremely sensitive area. The following is some recent history from up here in Humboldt: http://bit. ly/2hi7EaU

HUMBOLDTER

Via Bohemian.com

Make America Grate I think your paper, its extreme left politics and proponents of cannabis are prime examples of the decline of our society (“What Would Trump Do?” July 5). It’s no wonder that your paper gets smaller while the Sonoma County Gazette is bursting at the seams!

PAT MORRIS Sonoma

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


It’s Only Rational Join others to solve climate change BY ANN HANCOCK

D

o you worry a lot about climate change and want to do something that really makes a difference? If yes, then I invite you to join us this month for an information session about our new climate initiative.

A team of us has been meeting weekly for months to design a program that brings to the climate movement what we believe has been missing: the synthesis of powerful solutions with powerful fellowship. This initiative was sparked by the book, Don’t Even Think About It: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Ignore Climate Change. The author, George Marshall, asserts that cognitively we are mostly passive in the face of the climate crisis. After 16 years of being a full-time climate activist, I find that Marshall’s book makes complete sense. Climate change is a wicked problem with no straightforward solution. Many variables create the problem, risks are mostly in the distant future, no one specifically is at fault, we don’t notice it on a day-to-day basis, and the crisis progresses slowly. If we were rational, we’d consider the evidence and then act. But we are not solely rational. In fact, Marshall explains that our rational brain has a much smaller role in decision-making than our emotional brain. This is why statistics, graphs and information are ineffective for converting climate-change deniers into climate-change believers. Fortunately, Marshall offers ideas for what we can do. We’ve used his ideas in designing our initiative dedicated to nothing less than ensuring the future of our children and all life. If you’re curious, please join us for an information session at which we’ll describe our initiative, including the prototype training program that starts in September. Participants of the training program will build knowledge, hope and resolve; connect with like-minded folks, take action and have an impact; review the basic science of climate change; practice how to speak and listen in an engaging, inspiring way and learn about real solutions and how to make them happen. Information sessions are Aug. 17, 24 and 31. To sign up, go to climateprotection.org/climate-action-training. Ann Hancock is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Climate Protection. Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

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Paper THE

SMELLS FISHY Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross says support of U.S. fisheries is one of his top priorities. So where is the support for beleagured West Coast crab and salmon fishermen?

Fish or Cut Bait Trump administration leaves California fishermen waiting for federal relief BY TOM GOGOLA

N

orth Coast congressman Jared Huffman joined a group of fishermen at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco on Monday to commemorate the opening of the commercial salmon season in regional waters.

He also called out the Trump administration and Congress for

their ongoing refusal to release disaster-relief funds to crabbers and fishermen hard-hit by closures and the near collapse of the California salmon fishery. Those fishermen, says Huffman in a statement, “have faced several seasons of economic hardship, including closures, delays and a continued lack of much-needed disaster funding from the federal government.” Meanwhile, the 2017 salmon

season is predicted to be the worst ever. In April, the California Fish and Game Commission reported “historically low numbers of fall-run and winter-run Chinook salmon,” which prompted the agency to limit or close the fishery through the end of the year. Huffman, D-San Rafael, is the ranking Democrat on the Congressional Water, Power, and Oceans Subcommittee. He pushed the previous Congress

to spend about $140 million to help fishermen affected by the Dungeness crab closure last year and historically low salmon yields in recent years. The House recently voted to provide $20 million in disaster assistance, while a failed Senate proposal, offered by coastal Democrats, would have sent $150 million to West Coast fishers. A federal fishery disaster was declared for the 2016 Klamath River salmon fishery and the 2015–2016 California Dungeness and rock crab fishery, but Congress has failed to make good on disaster funding. The ongoing failure of the GOP-led Congress to sign off on the disaster monies has raised the specter of a politicized administration and congress putting the screws to blue-state California’s blue-collar fishermen. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross weighed in on fisheries management on behalf of the commercial industry in New Jersey, where Trump enjoys the support of fellow Republican Gov. Chris Christie—but has been silent on the plight of California fishermen. Noah Oppenheim, director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations, a statewide group, raised the political alarm on the disaster funds months ago when a $1 trillion federal budget released by the White House contained zero dollars to help California fishermen. It’s a $300 million– $350 million problem for California, in terms of overall economic impacts, he says, adding that he’s hopeful that the tone in Congress has shifted on the disaster declaration, and “there is a path forward in the coming months in a sort of broader Western-disaster appropriations bill.” Even as the senate knocked back Democrats’ push for a $150 million appropriation, he says the tone has shifted and that at least one key Republican has signaled willingness to help the ) 10 fishermen.


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Oppenheim organized the Huffman press conference Monday. “Right now, California salmon fishermen and crab fishermen are the blue-collar, workingclass industry on the coast of California.” he says. “They are the coal miners of California.” The disaster declaration was made by the Obama administration’s Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker. The current administration has made no effort to conceal its zeal to roll back any and all Obamaera regulatory achievements. Instead, it appears that thousands of commercial fishermen in California are being left to twist in the wind of a mendacious administration and a commerce secretary who have demonstrated a willingness to politicize fishery regulations. Fisheries experts across the country expressed dismay at Ross’ recent intervention on a decision made by the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, which oversees fishery management for states from New York to Delaware. That was one of eight regional councils established under the landmark federal MagnusonStevens Act, which empowers and authorizes regions to create crossstate fisheries councils to sort out regulations and fishing seasons in their respective waters. In June, the billionaire Ross weighed in on an ongoing battle in New Jersey over regulations guiding the summer flounder season. Ross’ move—reportedly the first time a commerce secretary had acted to overrule a regional council since they were created in 1993—had a direct benefit to a fleet of New Jersey recreational open boats (and recreational fishers generally) who have balked for years at the council’s across-the-board bag-and-size limits. At his confirmation hearing in January, Ross spoke of an industry in need of a boost in

order to maximize production: “Given the enormity of our coastlines, given the enormity of our freshwater, I would like to try to figure out how we can become much more self-sufficient in fishing and perhaps even a net exporter.” Once he was confirmed, Ross issued a statement that put fisheries-management in his top 10 priorities. The United States imports some 85 percent of all seafood consumed in the country. It’s hard to see how the country could become a net exporter when the federal government won’t pay out disaster funds to the very individuals whose job it is to harvest the salmon and the crabs. By contrast, at the time of the federal disaster declaration for Dungeness crabs in 2015, an official from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) highlighted the agency’s commitment to sustainable fisheries and the workers who harvest the fish. (NOAA is a sub-agency of the Commerce Department). Ross is also overseeing an agency now reexamining a number of federal marine sanctuary and national monument set-asides enacted under Obama, including ocean areas added to the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary and Farallon Islands in 2015. Those popular set-asides are now under review by the Department of Commerce. The Ross-ordered review is supported by energy and commercial fishing interests. Nobody is arguing that opening these grounds to fishing or offshore drilling will save the California salmon fishery from collapse, or prevent another season-killing outbreak of domoic acid in the state’s Dungeness crabs. A domoic acid outbreak devastated the fishery in 2015, and every indication is that the salmon season this year is going to be a bust. It started 10 weeks later than usual, says Oppenheim, “and all signs point to a severely diminished catch compared to previous seasons.”


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SPOTLIGHT ON SONOMA

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Local Color The entry to Sonoma along Highway 12 passes through the Springs area, home to a diverse population facing gentrification.


Today, there are 285 registered tattoo artists in Sonoma County. But he is a standout.

Art is more than skindeep for Shotsie Gorman BY TOM GOGOLA

I

t’s a sunny late morning at the Tarot Art & Tattoo Gallery in Sonoma as Shotsie and Kristine Gorman open shop. Kristine puts out the sign and folds the big LGBT flag over the banner. Lights flicker on, and she gives a quick tour of the gallery and multiple enclaves in the space. Shotsie is in the lobby speaking

of “the place of shining death, I am impenetrable,” not describing the shop per se, but the art of the tattoo across history, mythology and fact. We scoff at death, he says, or at least the young people do, where the tattoo can function as “true armor” in a harsh and uneasy world and even amid a growing and unwelcome commodification of the ancient ritual. “It is a conscious move into the killing off of the old person,” he says. “Tattooing is death and

resurrection,” he adds, expressing the human-primitive need to mark the body as the whole self transforms. The Gorman philosophy embraces poetry and the mythology and reverence for ancient traditions and cultures. But he’s not putting a face tattoo on anyone, or a hand tattoo—and will talk long and hard to any 18-yearold who might want a big red rose tattooed on the top of their hand, if they are willing to listen.

SPOTLIGHT ON SONOMA

Needlework

13 NO RTH BAY B O H E MI A N | B O H E MI A N.COM

MAKING A POINT When Shotsie Gorman began his career, tattooing was illegal in 10 states.

“Are you independently wealthy?” he asked one such customer. Think about that future job interview, he counsels. “You’re 18 and you want to mark yourself,” says Gorman. “I understand that. And I have a responsibility as a tattoo artist.” Once, a young person came in and wanted the George Santayana quote, “Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.” The only problem was, he had the quote wrong and attributed it to the wrong guy, instead of the Spanish philosopher and author. “‘It’s not Albert Einstein’s quote,’ I told him!” The lad responded, “I don’t care!” “I do,” Gorman said. “There’s no way I am tattooing this.” Gorman is known in the trade for his oversize portraits and reputation as a renaissance man. Plus, he once got fired by tattoo legend Spider Webb. He has been inking, writing, painting and sculpting since the 1970s, and of late has noted the growing popularity of text-driven tats among younger ritual-seekers— Biblical quotes or lines from songs or some Rumi on the tricep. “We are looking at a digital culture,” he says. “People don’t read; they want to become books. I think that is what the text has become.” Some may be misguided in their selection, he says, but everyone shares a “hunger for some sense of reality and emotional truth,” even if sometimes it’s from a cheesy pop song. Gorman wears slick twotone shoes and a short-sleeved bowling shirt, revealing lots of tattoos of his own. He’s also an award-winning poet whose practice is to put the text to the printed page; a 1999 collection from Proteus Press is called The Black Marks He Made. Gorman studied with poet Mark Doty and cites the Beat legend Allen Ginsberg as providing the foundational moment of poetry awareness. Gorman went to see Ginsberg as a teen at a New Jersey place called the Bottom


SPOTLIGHT ON SONOMA

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Shotsie Gorman ( 13 of the Barrel Cafe. In those days, “you’d get beat up talking about poetry,” says the 65-year-old, citing its “effeminate connotation,” and as he watched Ginsberg performing onstage, thought: “This guy is going to get killed.” Gorman describes his father as a stoic policeman. When he was 12, he counseled his son to keep his artistry under wraps. “‘Don’t tell your friends you’re an artist,’ he told me.” Ginsberg continued with his reading and the young Gorman— he says he was 13—saw how “real courage is letting your real feelings forward. That place that scares you—that’s where the poetry is.” In 1991, Gorman published a poem about the death of his grandfather which took the Ginsberg Award in a poetry competition. Gorman lived in Lower Manhattan in his early 20s and went to the big city with visions of being a famous sculptor. Tattooing was outlawed in 10 states at the time and illegal inking could get a person two years in jail. He was an actor (“I waited tables”), a painter (“I was an electrician”) and a sculptor (“I built walls, dry-wall”). He vividly recalls the fear of that first tattoo. A woman had given birth to triplets and one of the husband’s brothers decided to commemorate the event with a tattoo of three roses and a snake. “My hand was shaking so badly, recalls Gorman who says he has been “haunted by dreams, bloodsoaked dreams” about tattoosgone wrong. “What did I just do?!” The Gormans moved to Sonoma in 2007—after leaving New Jersey for Sedona and then trying out Petaluma. The Sonoma Square was welcoming, Gorman recalls, people came up to the newcomers with their newborn. Gorman, a widower, has two older children from his first wife. “It felt right,” says Gorman of Sonoma. Kristine waves out at Sonoma Highway and the various nearby businesses and hills, the great Mexican restaurant El Molino is

next door and she heralds this part of town as the “gateway to the Hamptons.” Their shop is in Boyes Hot Springs, an unincorporated area northwest of Sonoma that has long been neglected but is undergoing a major remodel with sidewalks, streetlights and other improvements. The Gormans have all sorts of plans including a couple’s night package of Tarot and wine and food and tattoos and art. “Boyes is going to become a hippie commercial zone,” says Gorman. “In 10 years, this will be the more useful plaza.” He’s one of 285 registered tattoo artists in Sonoma County, but likely the only one who has tattooed members of the Allman Brothers, Murphy’s Law and Talking Heads— let alone appeared on the Geraldo Rivera show. The healing vibe is allpresent at the TAT Gallery, as Gorman shares stories of his most-memorable tattoos. In one story, a man and his father were estranged for years. One day the son looked at a newspaper and there’s his firefighter dad on the front page, a big photo of him rescuing two children from a burning building. The son came to Gorman’s shop with the photo of his hero dad and said, “I want this.” Gorman shows a photo of the large back tattoo. The image winds up on a firefighter’s tattoo website called strikethebox.com; the dad saw the tattoo and knew the work was on his son’s body. Dad called his son. “That tattoo reunited that guy and his father,” Gorman recounts with a humble grin. “That’s a privilege, living as a creative person and then it’s elevated to a different place. That’s what led me to tattooing and that’s why I am still in it.” The Tarot Art & Tattoo Gallery is hosting a daylong event on Aug. 5, from noon to 7pm, to introduce Dancing Mama Boutique, the gallery’s guest artist through December.


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BENICIA TUE Sept. 5 & 12 3:30 - 4:15pm Benicia Veterans Hall 1150 First Street VOB (Voices of Beat) 4:15 - 4:45pm Beginners Rhythm Class SANTA ROSA WED Sept. 6 Double Session 4:00 - 5:30pm The Glaser Center 547 Mendocino Avenue New members enroll online at VOENA.org or at rehearsal

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Local Knowledge SPOTLIGHT ON SONOMA

Juan Hernandez, executive director of La Luz, talks tacos and income disparity Describe your perfect day in Sonoma? I drive into town from Santa Rosa and the scenic Bennett Valley Road. No perfect day in Sonoma without Barking Dog Roasters. Then I head into La Luz Center and check in with the staff. Then head out to enjoy the lunch options in Sonoma. I usually meet with community partners to deepen the connections and relationships to better serve our community. On those days where we have evening community meetings happen, I get to enjoy connecting with the Springs residents and then head to the Springs and go to the La Bamba taco truck, where you can find tourist and locals alike. Where is your favorite place to eat in Sonoma and why? My favorite place to eat in Sonoma is Mary’s Pizza Shack on Highway 12 for lunch. It is still affordable and the Mary’s salad with grilled chicken is great. Where do you take first-time visitors to Sonoma? In typical Sonoma fashion, I take first-timers winetasting. I start out at Muscardini Winery, skip on over to the Hamel Winery. Then I end up at Robledo Winery. If the owner Reynaldo Robledo or son, Larry, are available, we head out with one of them to the square for dinner at the Grille. After that, we walk through the square to the Swiss Hotel to sip on the El Verano cocktail. By then the music usually starts to bump at B&V Whiskey Bar and Grill we dance for about 30 minutes and end up at Town Square for a night cap.


Local Knowledge ( 11

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If you could change one thing about Sonoma what would it be? I’d change the income disparity between those who dine in our fine restaurants and stay in the top hotels, and those who work in them. I find it incredibly sad that the workers serving the wealthiest locals and tourists can barely afford to live in Sonoma. Parents don’t make enough money to cover such high rents and have enough to feed and clothe their children. One little medical emergency or injury throws everything off.

Things to Do in Sonoma SVMA Art Night

Sonoma City Party

Presented by the Sonoma City Council and now in its 21st year, the Sonoma City Party is the best way to indulge in and simultaneously give back to the town’s vibrant community, businesses and nonprofit organizations. Everything at the party is local, starting with the music. The evening features popular cover band Riptide, led by vocalist Kenny Goodwin, rocking out with classic hits. Blues-rock outfit Junior Boogie also takes the stage, fronted by soulful singer Codi Binkley and featuring guitarist Peter Albin and drummer Dave Getz. Modern salsa band N’Rumba

rounds out the bill. New to this year’s party, all food and beverage options are provided by the city’s nonprofits and all proceeds go directly back into the community. Friday, Aug. 18, at Sonoma Plaza, First Street East, Sonoma. 5:30–10pm. sonomacityparty.com.

Red & White Ball

Billy Joel once sang, “A bottle of red, a bottle of white, whatever kind of mood you’re in tonight.” In Sonoma, you can choose both at the annual Red & White Ball, which raises funds for Sonoma Valley public schools while offering a dazzling evening of wine, food and dancing. The ball sparkles with a bubbly reception, farmto-table menu of catered food and the region’s finest wines. Dinner tickets are already selling fast, though the ball also features live music from nine-piece dance band Pop Rocks and late-night attractions that can be enjoyed on their own with a separate ticket. Saturday, Aug. 26, at Sonoma Plaza, First Street East, Sonoma. 5–10pm. $40 for dance only, $200 for dinner and dance. svgreatschools.org.

Sonoma Plein Air

There are few locations better suited for painting outdoors than Sonoma, and nationally recognized artists once again flock to the town for the 15th annual Sonoma Plein Air Festival. The weeklong event is hosted appropriately enough by the Sonoma Plein Air Foundation, whose mission is to support art in education with grant and scholarship

programs that have brought millions of dollars into Sonoma Valley schools. This year’s Plein Air Festival will see artists taking over the town to paint landscapes and city scenes from around the region. Special events include the Quick Draw event happening as part of the Sonoma Farmers Market and the art show & sale capping off the event in Sonoma Plaza. And don’t miss the annual Plein Air Gala, with dinner and an art auction, taking place at Buena Vista Winery. The week runs Monday through Saturday, Sept .11–16. For details and tickets, visit sonomapleinair.com.

Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival

California’s oldest festival and one of Sonoma Valley’s biggest parties, the Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival is back for its 120th year of commemorating Sonoma’s grape harvest and tight-knit community with a weekend of live music, food, wines and family activities. The event kicks off with an opening-night gala boasting dancing and dining under the stars, with a costume contest to celebrate this year’s theme, “Honoring Our Heritage.” The rest of the weekend features the traditional grape stomp, a light-up parade, popular 5K and 12K races and more. With a focus on local culture and history, this vintage fest is organized by local volunteers and benefits several Sonoma County nonprofits and projects. Sept. 22–24 at Sonoma Plaza, First Street East, Sonoma. valleyofthemoon vintagefestival.com.

SPOTLIGHT ON SONOMA

Every summer, the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art invites the community to the hands-on Art Night event, and this year’s offering is getting into the spirit of the Bay Area’s ongoing Summer of Love 50th anniversary celebrations. The SVMA Summer of Love Art Night also tips its hat to the Fab Four and hosts an array of Beatles-inspired fun. Sonoma-based Beatles cover band Rubber Soul will provide the soundtrack, and Sonoma’s Prohibition Spirits will serve signature cocktails, while guests move (and groove) about the museum and engage in a Magical Mystery Tour–styled stroll through several art-making stations. Friday, Aug. 4, at Sonoma Valley Museum, 55 Broadway, Sonoma. 6–9pm. $25. Tickets include bites and drinks. svma.org.

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What do you know about Sonoma that others don’t? I spend most of my time in the Springs area of Sonoma Valley. What I know is that the Springs is quickly changing and becoming gentrified. Though many positive changes are happening, I am afraid gentrification may be a result of the changes and the Springs loses its unique identity.


Swirl

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 2-8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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| SonomaWineCountryWeekend.com

Old Mold Sonoma meets Bordeaux at G&C Lurton Vineyards BY JAMES KNIGHT

SUMMER SUSTAINABILITY

Hog Island Oyster Company and Chef Joseph Zobel of Peter Lowell’s Sunday, August 20, 2017 – 10am–11am

One of the Bay Area’s premier oyster farmers will share how they raise their delicious oysters and discuss the health and ecosystem benefits of aquaculture. Topics include identifying oyster varieties, shucking techniques and recipes.

TwoXSea with Kenny Belov and Chef Natalie Goble of Handline Sunday, September 17, 2017 – 10am–11am

Learn about McFarland Springs Trout—a farmed trout using a nearly pure vegetarian diet of algae and plant based products. Discover how they developed a better system for farmed fishing that does not deplete other resources, is beneficial and produces delicious and nutritious product. Cost: $10 • Ticket: summersustainabilityseries.brownpapertickets.com

located in the old Foster’s Freeze in South Sebastopol • handline.com • daily 11–10pm • 707.827.3744

Y

ou’ll find some real Old World wines at the new G&C Lurton tasting room in downtown Healdsburg, and I don’t mean that as an approving nod to the winemaking style—I mean the real, old deal.

It’s easy enough these days to speak of Old World vs. New World wines. You don’t even have to know your Right Bank from your Left Bank; just a nod and a wink will do, and identification of the positive attributes of “Old World” wines as, very loosely speaking, dirt and rocks (minerality, for extra points) while raising an eyebrow at the

questionable characteristics of “New World” wines, which include such villains as fruit and flavor. Boo, flavor—(all together now) booo! What isn’t easy is teasing out the thorny issue of style vs. region—is Old World style strictly a matter of place, or winemaking? This tasting room offers a unique insight into that issue. Owners Gonzague Lurton and Claire Villars-Lurton both operate seveal chateaux in Bordeaux, France, and make wine from their Trinite Estate in Sonoma County. In Swirl, we last met up with this Chalk Hill vineyard when it was owned by Chateau Felice over a decade ago. Planted with a mix of varieties then, the vineyard has gone completely to Bordeaux varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot since the Lurtons acquired it. While they own several big-name chateaux, their Healdsburg outpost is a modest affair, sharing a new tasting room space on Healdsburg Avenue with Sanglier Cellars, the Rhone-centric boutiquers I visited in 2014. I am so New World, I had to lean in to glean the thickly accented story as told by tasting room manager Pascal Guerlou, who knew the Lurtons back in Bordeaux, where he ran a wine shop, and ran into them again at the FrenchAmerican school in Santa Rosa. Old World, New World—small world. But the big surprise is how Old World the Chalk Hill wines smell and taste—even the richer, cassisinflected 2013 Acaibo ($69) could pass, while the muted 2014 Amaino Trinite Estate Sonoma County ($49) and the more barnyardy 2013 Amaino had me wondering if they import the very barrels from France to achieve this effect. Nope. Just try the real Old World wines for comparison, like the ethereal, perfumed 2009 Chapelle de Bages ($39), the “second wine” of the Haut-Bages Liberal estate. Despite the Old World style the Sonoma County wines do, indeed, display—these are in the real old mold. G&C Lurton Vineyards, 422 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. Open daily, 11am–6pm. $15–$29. 707.473.8556.


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C O TAT I

Sweet Insight

The 2015 documentary ‘That Sugar Film’ sounds like a treat, until you realize that it’s not all Candyland when it comes to refined sugar. Like the documentary Super Size Me, where Morgan Spurlock stuffed his face with high-fat foods from McDonald’s, That Sugar Film follows Australian actor Damon Gameau as he delves deep into the world of sugar in our food supply, and reveals that even the healthiest-looking snacks are loaded with the unhealthy sweetener. That Sugar Film screens with a panel discussion of health experts on Friday, Aug. 4, at Songbird Community Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati. 7pm. $10 donation. 707.795.2398.

P E TA L U M A

Musical Legacy

Marking a decade of supporting music programs in Petaluma schools, the Petaluma Music Festival has achieved status as a major North Bay affair, and this year’s lineup is stacked. Headlining the festival is Chris Robinson Brotherhood, who play off their forthcoming studio album, Barefoot in the Head. The rest of the lineup is a baker’s dozen of beloved Bay Area acts and musicians, and the festival boasts family-friendly activities, all-star silent auction items and fine foods and drinks to enhance the musical offerings on Saturday, Aug. 5, at Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds, 175 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma. 11:30am. $50 and up; kids 12 and under, free. petalumamusicfestival.org.

S A N TA R O S A

New Brews

The Sonoma County Fair is back this week with all the rides, food, live music and horse racing that everyone loves, though the event is not resting on its laurels, and debuts a new one-day celebration of beer and cider this year at the inaugural NorCal Brew Fest. Over 50 purveyors, large and small, from throughout Northern California and the country, will offer unlimited tastings while they compete for the judges’ approval. A ticket to the NorCal Brew Fest also gets you into the fair to enjoy the full experience on Saturday, Aug. 5, at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Road, Santa Rosa. 1pm. $55. 707.545.4200.

ST HELENA

Chili Dust-Up

In the world of cooking competitions, chili is the great equalizer. Chefs, winemakers, farmers, firefighters and every other kind of connoisseur are gathering this weekend in Napa Valley to put their chili to the test in the Rutherford Chili Ball. Hosted by the Rutherford Dust Society, a collective of the region’s vintners and farmers, this popular event heaps delicious helpings of chili upon the masses. Kids’ activities, live music, beer, wine and other barbecue favorites are also on hand Sunday, Aug. 6, at Pestoni Family Estate Winery, 1673 St. Helena Hwy., St. Helena. 4pm. $45 and up; kids 6 to 12, $15; kids five and under, free. 707.963.0544.

—Charlie Swanson

BRIDGES OF MUSIC Songwriter Jessie Bridges shares her craft in a performance and discussion on Thursday, Aug. 3, at Priest Ranch Winery in Yountville. See Concerts, p24.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 2-8, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 2-8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Arts Ideas A COLORFUL LIFE ‘I want to get under the viewer’s skin,’ says Chester Arnold.

Dark Matter

Sonoma artist Chester Arnold finds inspiration in darkness BY JONAH RASKIN

C

hester Arnold, perhaps the most impassioned and technically proficient California painter today, was born in Santa Monica and educated at the College of Marin and the Art Institute in San Francisco. For the past 25 years, he and his wife have lived in Sonoma. On Arnold’s first visit to

Sonoma, he and his wife bought cheese at Vella, a baguette at the Basque Bakery and then enjoyed a picnic on the grounds of General Vallejo’s old estate. They caught the Sonoma bug, bought a house and settled down. Then Arnold rolled up his sleeves and got to work. He hasn’t stopped. His paintings are in the di Rosa Preserve, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Pasadena Museum of California

Art and the San Jose Museum of Art. Yes, there are other great artists right here in our midst, including Bob Hudson, William Wiley and Bill Allan, but no one captures the contemporary Zeitgeist with more feeling than Arnold. Over the past quarter of a century, he has painted pictures that some of his Sonoma neighbors find puzzling, if not down right irritating. If so, that’s

probably Arnold’s intention—or at least part of it. “I want to get under the viewer’s skin,” he says during an interview at the Sunflower Cafe, where he sips a cappuccino and sketches in one of the many notebooks that he quickly fills with ideas that pour out of his head all day long. With the publication of Evidence: Paintings by Chester Arnold 1989–2017, a new paperback book (Kelly’s Cove; $20) that offers 100 reproductions of his canvases, most of them in color, Arnold’s friends and neighbors have the opportunity to cast their critical eyes on a body of work that depicts a civilization going to wrack and ruin. “People ask me why I paint dark subjects,” Arnold says. “It’s something I have thought about a lot. I’ll say this: my subjects come from a well of humanity that’s deep inside me. The painters I admire, like Honoré Daumier and Vincent van Gogh, created beauty from the dark side. . . . I feel like a street fighter.” Indeed, Arnold is not an artist who wears gloves and a top hat, and he doesn’t think of himself as an aesthete. Arnold’s most formative years were spent in Germany, near the peak of the Cold War, when his father worked as a spy for the United States. Not surprisingly, there’s something Germanic, and Northern European, too, about his temperament and his outlook on life. His ancestors came from Germany, Denmark and Holland. Moreover, from 1957, when he was five years old, to 1969, when he was 17, he soaked up a vast reservoir of almost all things German. Nearly everywhere Arnold looked he saw reminders of fascism and bombing by the Allies. When he returned to the United States, he felt like an outsider, though he brought with him


Jonah Raskin is the author of ‘Natives, Newcomers, Exiles, Fugitives: Northern California Writers and Their Work.’

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valuable Old World skills that have served him well in academia for nearly 50 years. When he started out, Arnold’s art didn’t provide him with a living. For a time, he made money delivering the San Francisco Chronicle. When gallery owners such as Catharine Clark in San Francisco became fans of his work, he made money by selling paintings. Now, at the Sunflower Cafe he shows me how he works. The first step is to take a notebook, turn it upside down and start from the back. Arnold is left-handed; working “backwards,” as he calls it, makes more sense than starting at the beginning of a notebook and going forward. Perhaps this way of sketching also explains his unconventional outlook on life and art. “I start with a skeleton of an idea and then add color,” Arnold explains. “While I work with ideas and while I’m am stirred by politics, I also work intuitively. The topic chooses me. There’s a metaphor built into the best work I do, and a certain tension between the real and the abstract.” Arnold opens Evidence and describes the stories he means to tell in his paintings, though most of them speak for themselves. He stops on pages 68 and 69, slightly more than halfway through the book, and looks at a work titled A Natural History of Destruction that’s 18 inches high and 72 inches wide. “It’s a portrait of the city of Dresden after the Allies bombed it in 1945,” Arnold says. “But it could be most any city destroyed by war.” On page 105, the painting titled Counterclockwise shows a group of men walking in a circle inside a brick structure without windows. “We’re all prisoners of our own ignorance,” Arnold says. Now it’s nearly noon and he’s itching to get back to his notebook. Ideas have been calling him all morning. “The most exciting part of my life was when I first discovered the world of art,” Arnold says. He’s still making discoveries and getting excited about creating art from darkness.


Stage

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SKINNY KITTY TEA HOUSE

(2017 BLACK ROCK CITY CAMP FUNDRAISER)

+ DJ ZACK DARLING, INI, ENERGY ALCHEMIST, DJ CHANGO B $10–15/DOORS-SHOW 9/21+

FRI AUG 4

THE GREAT BINGO REVIVAL

THIS AIN'T YOUR GRANDMA'S BINGO $10/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/ALL AGES

SAT AUG 5

CABARET DE CALIENTE:

BLACK LIGHT BURLESQUE BALL $15–120/DOORS 9/SHOW 10/21+

GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU AUG 3 •COUNTRY LINE DANCE EVERY 1ST AND 3RD THURSDAY 7PM / ALL AGES / $10 FRI AUG 4 • JIMMY SMITH BAND AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE

MON AUG 7

SAT AUG 5 • STAGEFRITE AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE

ARKAINGELLE & SURPRISE GUESTS $10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

SUN AUG 6 • DAVID THOM INVITATIONAL BLUEGRASS JAM EVERY 1ST & 3RD SUNDAY—OPEN JAM 3PM INVITATIONAL 5PM /ALL AGES / FREE

REGGAE ON THE RIVER AFTERPARTY W/ MARLA BROWN, WED AUG 9

SONNY LANDRETH + DANNY CLICK

$25/DOORS 7/SHOW 7:30/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

Latest ‘Star Wars’ chapter spoofed with original songs

BY DAVID TEMPLETON

A

ctor and writer Brittany Law—a “life-long Star Wars fan”—was thinking about Episode VII: The Force Awakens when a bizarre idea occurred to her at roughly the speed of light.

“I was watching the movie,” Law recalls, “and I suddenly realized, ‘This would make a great musical!’” She was as serious as a Mynock chewing on a power cable. “It just seemed interesting to think of what songs the different characters would sing at key moments,” Law says. “I loved the idea of Kylo Ren singing a ballad about being pulled back and forth between the light and dark side

of the Force, or Rey singing about missing her parents. It’s perfect material for a musical.” It took Law a year and a half, but now, thanks to a perfect-fit collaboration with Healdsburg’s Redwood Theatre Company— and a successful IndieGogo campaign—The Farce Awakens: A Musical ‘Star Wars’ Parody has opened with a series of free performances in Healdsburg. “It’s got the same plot and same characters as The Force Awakens,’” explains Law, “except that it’s a comedy instead of a drama—with songs.” The cast of 11 includes Law as the heroine, Rey, Kot Takahashi as Poe Dameron, Ezra Hernandez as Kylo Ren, and Isaiah Carter as Finn. The theater company, which lighting designer Trevor Sakai describes as “very DIY,” has devised clever and gleefully silly effects to take the place of the movie’s eye-popping visuals. “The Storm Troopers use super soakers for blasters,” Sakai says. “But we did get our hands on some truly impressive light sabers,” he adds. According to Law, one need not have seen the original film to appreciate the humor of the play. “You can be only vaguely familiar and still enjoy yourself,” she says. “Even if you’ve never seen any of the Star Wars films, you can appreciate it as an entertaining take on sciencefiction genres. “It’s pretty funny too,” she adds, “and every joke comes from a place of love. The Farce Awakens is our way of celebrating our love of Star Wars.” ‘The Farce Awakens’ runs Friday– Sunday (with one Thursday, Aug. 10) through Aug. 13, at Redwood Theatre Company, 440 Moore Lane, Healdsburg. Thursday–Saturday, 7:30pm; Sunday, 2pm. All seats are free, but reservations strongly recommended. redwoodtheatrecompany.com.


NATIVE BORN Justin Altamura and

Thomas Fine trade guitars for synths on new album.

Move the Needle Napa duo Native Sons dial it in

BY CHARLIE SWANSON

B

oth born and raised in Napa, Thomas Fine and Justin Altamura have been musically attached at the hip since Fine gave Altamura his first guitar lesson. Together, the pair have toured nationally in rock band the Iron Heart, and now the duo are taking a new direction in electro-pop outfit Native Sons, starting with a debut release, Super American, out Friday, Aug. 4. As performers, Altamura and Fine got their first taste of the big stage in 2013, when the folks behind the original incarnation of the BottleRock Music Festival approached the pair two weeks before the event and asked if they could fill a spot in the lineup.

‘Super American’ is available Aug. 4 on www.ntvsns.com and all major streaming and download services.

23

FRIDAY, SEPT 8 SAN FRANCISCO TRIBUTE TO TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS

PETTY THEFT

with VSquared

SATURDAY, SEPT 9

VICIOUS RUMORS POWER METAL LEGENDS! FRIDAY, SEPT 29

FAITHFULLY

RELIVING THE GLORY DAYS OF JOURNEY with VSquared SATURDAY, SEPT 30

THE ATOMIC PUNKS

A TRIBUTE TO EARLY VAN HALEN, THE DAVID LEE ROTH ERA with VSquared FRIDAY, OCT 20

METAL SHOP THE PREMIER 80’S ROCK EXPERIENCE! with The Butlers

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 2-8, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Music

Though they didn’t exactly have a band at the time, they agreed, feverishly wrote seven rock songs under the name the Iron Heart and opened the inaugural festival. “I had to go to a psychiatrist,” jokes Fine. “It was completely bizarre, absolutely surreal. I basically blacked out, but we got through it.” From that first set, the Iron Heart became a touring act for three years, though all the while Fine and Altamura tinkered with making synth-heavy pop like the music they grew up on. “That kind of sound was always in us,” says Fine. In 2016, Fine and Altamura put the Iron Heart on hiatus to focus on electronic exploits under the name Native Sons. “We sat down and said let’s push this thing forward, work with the best people, and make it the best we can,” Altamura says. To that effect, they built their own recording studio and used their connections to hire producers Chris Garcia (Adele), Shawn Harris (the Matches) and Jason Carmer (Kimya Dawson) to work on the seven-song album. They also worked with Sonoma County composer Charlie Foltz, who produces and licenses electronic music to companies like Samsung and Nike. Super American is a sophisticated blend of pop, dance, rock and new wave in the vein of M83 and Phil Collins. The album’s single, “Lay Your Lover Down,” a darkly textured gem, has already been heard on over a hundred college radio stations this year, and the pair plan to do extensive touring in the fall to support the record. “We’re prepping to do it big,” Fine says. “We want to make the needle move.” Even with eyes on the horizon, Native Sons still see themselves as local guys. “We have a love and appreciation of the scene,” says Fine. “Napa keeps calling us back, this is our home. “We would love to contribute to the place that’s nearest to our hearts.”


Music

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 2-8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24

Concerts SONOMA COUNTY George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic Revolutionary funk and R&B figure is back in the North Bay. Aug 4, 8:30pm. $69 and up. Mystic Theatre, 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Diana Krall

Grammy Award-winning jazz pianist and vocalist performs as part of her latest world tour. Aug 4, 7:30pm. $29 and up. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. 866.955.6040.

Petaluma Music Festival Tenth annual benefit for music programs in local schools features Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Poor Man’s Whiskey, Scott Law, T Sisters, Royal Jelly Jive and many others. Aug 5, 11:30am. $50 and up. Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds, 175 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, petalumamusicfestival.org.

MARIN COUNTY HTK Trio

www.Quality-Documents.com

Organist and Jerry Garcia collaborator Howard Wales joins Terry Haggerty (Sons of Champlin) and Kevin Hayes (Roy Rogers) for a throwback concert party. Aug 6, 8pm. $20$22. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Summer Nights Outdoor Music Festival

Pegasus Theater Company presents

11th Annual Short Play Festival 7 Short Plays by Greater Bay Area Playwrights

Mt. Jackson Masonic Hall 14040 Church St (entrance on 3rd), Guerneville August 11 through August 27, 2017 pegasustheater6.brownpapertickets.com 1-800-838-3006

Celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love with cocktails, picnic dinners, kids’ activities and live music from Melvin Seals & JGB. Aug 5, 7pm. $25 and up/ kids free. Osher Marin JCC, 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Summertime: Bernstein on Broadway Five renowned singers take the stage to sing the most famous songs from Leonard Bernstein’s most celebrated musicals in celebration of his 100th birthday. Aug 5, 7:30pm. $25. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur. 415.924.5111.

NAPA COUNTY Jessie Bridges

Indie-folk singer and

songwriter (and daughter of actor Jeff Bridges) shares her laidback style in a special “Master Craftsman Series” performance. Aug 3, 6:30pm. $25. Priest Ranch Tasting Room, 6490 Washington St, Yountville. 707.944.8200.

Music in the Vineyards

Month-long, nationally acclaimed chamber music festival showcases the finest classical musicians in the picturesque settings of Napa’s wineries and venues. Aug 4-27. Napa Valley, various locations, Napa, musicinthevineyards.org.

Slap Frost Summer Vacation

Massive hip-hop show features Southern California rising star Gavlyn, Bay Area artists Z-Man, Vocab Slick and Sonny Ruckus and Napa’s Kadin Yeahmon. Aug 6, 7pm. $10-$15. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Annie O’s Music Hall Aug 9, Friendship Commanders. 120 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.542.1455.

Atlas Coffee Company Aug 4, 7pm, Spiritual Cramp with Casual Hex. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.526.1085.

Craig Corona. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Charles M Schulz Museum

Aug 5, 11am, songs from “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” with the 6th Street Playhouse. Free with admission. 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa. 707.579.4452.

Coffee Catz

Aug 4, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. Aug 5, 2pm, bluegrass jam. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

Flamingo Lounge

Aug 4, the Zins. Aug 5, No Doubt About It. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Green Music Center

Through Aug 5, pianoSonoma Music Festival. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, pianosonoma.org.

Guerneville Community Church

Aug 6, 2pm, Jimmy Cramer. 14520 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.2514.

Guerneville Plaza

Aug 3, 7pm, Rockin’ the River with the Jean Genies. 16201 First St, Guerneville, rockintheriver.org.

Gundlach Bundschu Winery

Aug 5, 6:30pm, Sean Hayes with Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra. 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

Hood Mansion Lawn

Aug 4, 7pm, Funky Fridays with Frobeck. 389 Casa Manana Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.833.6288. funkyfridays.info.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Bergamot Alley

Aug 8, Dirty Revival. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

Aug 2, Skinny Kitty Tea House. Aug 4, the Great Bingo Revival. Aug 5, Cabaret De Caliente’s blacklight burlesque ball. Aug 8, open mic. Aug 9, Sonny Landreth. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

The Big Easy

HopMonk Sonoma

Aug 3, Mike Saliani and Mike Hellman. Aug 4, Lee Presson & the Nails. Aug 9, T Moran and Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.7163.

Brewsters Beer Garden Aug 3, Bluegrass & Bourbon with Bloomfield Bluegrass Band. Aug 4, Train Wreck Junction. Aug 5, Tom Finch Band. Aug 6, Groove Session. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

Cellars of Sonoma

Aug 5, John Pita. Aug 6, 2pm,

Aug 4, 5pm, David Hamilton. Aug 4, 8pm, the Straw Wattles. Aug 5, 1pm, Dan Martin. Aug 6, 1pm, Silver Lake 66. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

Aug 5, Kevin Fitzsimmons Trio with Chris Amberger, Aaron Garner and Francis Vanek. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Ives Park

Aug 2, 5pm, MaMuse and Michael Capella Band. Aug 9, 5pm, Pepperland and


Bohemian Highway. Willow Street and Jewell Avenue, Sebastopol, peacetown.org.

25

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Aug 5, Down Dirty Shake with Cabbagehead and Timothy O’Neil. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

FRIDAY

GEORGE CLINTON &

FUNKADELIC AUG 4 PARLIAMENT FUNK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SATURDAY IRIEFUSE, CLEAR CONSCIENCE $HORT, DJ JACQUES AUG 19 DOLLAR REGGAE/ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

Lagunitas Amphitheaterette

JUDITH OWEN FEAT THE

Aug 7, 4:20pm, James McMurtry. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

LEGENDARY LELAND SKLAR AUG 20 FUNK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

Lagunitas Tap Room

AUG 26

Aug 2, Misner & Smith. Aug 3, Rick Shelley. Aug 4, Tom Finch. Aug 5, Los High Tops. Aug 6, Lazyman. Aug 9, Lipbone Redding. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Luther Burbank Center for the Arts

Aug 6, Colbie Caillat. 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.3600.

Main Street Bistro

Aug 2, Vernelle Anders. Aug 3, Wild Janie Roberts Jazz Band. Aug 4, Levi Lloyd Blues Band. Aug 5, Bad Ass Boots. Aug 6, Frankye Kelly. Aug 8, Mac & Potter. Aug 9, Ginetta’s Vendetta Jazz Trio. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Montgomery Village Shopping Center

Aug 5, 12pm, Super Huey. Aug 6, 1pm, Gator Nation. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room

Aug 5, 5:30pm, the Jami Jamison Band. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Aug 4, Christian Foley-Beining Group. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater

Aug 4, the Axiom Collapse with Cyborg Octopus and Without Prejudice. Aug 5, Manzanita Falls with Trebuchet and Lungs and Limbs. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Aug 3, 6:30pm, Amy Hogan Trio. Aug 5, 6pm, the Buzz Unplugged. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

SUNDAY

Remember Abilene

TALKING DREADS

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SEP 2 SUNDAY

SEP 3

It was over a year ago when Santa Rosa indie-rock band Manzanita Falls finished up the recording of their sophomore album, but like many selfreleased endeavors, delays kept the record shelved—until now. This week, the band unveils the long-awaited Abilene on Aug. 5 at the Phoenix Theater in Petaluma.

An ambitious expansion of the band’s emotional indie-rock style, Abilene was born out of tragedy; namely, the band’s 2012 brush with death when their touring vehicle flipped and rolled on the highway in Abilene, Texas. Lyrically, the new album is a deeply intimate look inside songwriter Jeremy McCarten’s process of coming to terms with the crash and other recent experiences with death in his family. McCarten and the rest of the band create a Brian Eno–inspired wall of sound, incorporating haunting reverb and pulsing rhythms. Yet rather than becoming mired in self-pity or sorrow, Manzanita Falls use Abilene as a statement of perseverance and strength which proves that what doesn’t kill you can only make you stronger. Manzanita Falls perform with fellow indie bands Trebuchet, Lungs and Limbs and Heatwarmer on Saturday, Aug. 5, at Phoenix Theater, 201 Washington St., Petaluma. 8pm. $10. 707.762.3565.—Charlie Swanson

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Aug 5, Jerry Garcia celebration with the Thugz. Aug 6, Dgiin. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

) 26

ROCK• DOORS 7PM • 21+

REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

AKAE BEKA (FKA MIDNITE) REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

MARTIN BARRE OF JETHRO TULL

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

AMY HELM

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

9/6 Ana Popovic, 9/8 Hell's Belles, 9/9 Royal Jelly Jive w/ Sol Horizon & El Radio Fantastique, 9/10 Shaggy, 9/13 Les Nubians “Up Close & Personal Tour”, 9/14 An Evening with Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra, 9/16 The Highway Poets w/ Kingsborough and John Courage Trio, 9/21 Jim Avett plus The Highway Women

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Sebastiani Theatre

thu soul GRease Aug 3 8pm/Dancing/$5 fri boheMian hiGhway Aug 4 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 sAt the dReaM faRMeRs Aug 5 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

aRt Reception with Music

tue Aug 8 by fRench oak Gypsy band 6–9pm

JAZZ CONCERT: RICHARD HOWELL & SUDDEN CHANGES

thu captain paisley Aug 10 8pm/Dancing/$5

Tickets sebastianitheatre.com Sebastiani Theatre and Readers’ Books

sAt sideMen featuRinG Aug 19 peteR welkeR 8:30pm/$10

Sat, Aug 19, 7:30pm $25

Vintage Film Series

Aug 5, Pato Banton & the Now Generation. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

THURSDAY

SEP 1

Manzanita Falls get personal on new album

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

DAVID COOK

AUG 31

Redwood Cafe

Aug 3, Soul Grease. Aug 4, Bohemian Highway. Aug 5, the Dream Farmers. Aug 6, 5pm, Gypsy Kisses. Aug 7, David Wax Museum. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

SATURDAY

THE MISFITS (1961)

Mon, August 14 7:00pm $10 Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

fri stand up coMedy! Aug 11 8:30pm/$10/18+ fri afRo funk expeRience Aug 18 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

thu honey b & the cultiVation Aug 24 8pm/Dancing/$10 fri zulu speaR Aug 25 8:30pm/Dancing/$12 Adv/$15 DOS sAt thuGz Aug 26 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 2-8, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey


26

Music ( 25

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | AUGUST 2-8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Aug 5, Joe Valley Band. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

FEATURING THE SAN FRANCISCO MIME TROUPE FREN C G Y P S Y H OA K BAND

OT Z I N I YO L L O PAQ U T FOLKLORIC BALLE

Sonoma Cider

Aug 4, the Dixie Giants. 44F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Sonoma Speakeasy

NEW POLITICAL SATIRE

plus sandy & RichaRd RiccaRdi (progressive musical parody) KaRym sánchez (spoken word) • KalaiKoil (south indian dance troupe) a native ameRican ceRemony will begin the event less talk, more music ! but there will be some speakers on

Building the Resistance Movement network with 50+ organizations

see ProgressiveFestival.org for details and to reserve space for a booth tamales (vegan and chicken), beans, rice, other goodies & drinks available

Sunday, a uguSt 6, 12-5 pm FREE! walnut park, petaluma blvd south & d street, petaluma

Cosponsors: The Peace & Justice Center of Sonoma County • KPFA 94.1FM, kpfa.org • KBBF 89.1FM Comité VIDA • Project Censored • Media Freedom Foundation • Sonoma County Gazette • The Bohemian Co-produced by The Petaluma Progressives and Occupy Petaluma • 707-763-8134

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Outside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din ner & A Show

Aug 11 Buck Nickels and Loose Change Fri

Soulful, Original, Country 8:00 / No Cover

Sat

Aug 12 Shana Morrison 8:30

Santos Aug 18 Todos Cantina Americana 8:00 / No Cover Fri

Aug 19 Unauthorized Sat

e D a nc ! 8:30 Party

Rolling Stones Aug 26 The Overcommitments Sat

Rock and Funk Dance 8:30

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

BBQS ON THE LAWN 2017

Sun

Aug 6

the subdudes

Aug 13 Asleep at the Wheel plus Sun

Lipbone Redding

Sun

Aug 20 Petty Theft Sun

Aug 27 Pablo Cruise Sun

Sep 3 Mon

Chuck Prophet & The

Mission Express plus Maurice Tani

Sep 4 Sons of Champlin Sun Sep 10 “Uncle” Willie K Sun Sep 17 Soul Ska/Beso Negro

BBQ online ticketing at www.ranchonicasio.com Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Aug 2, the Acrosonics. Aug 3, Jim Caroompas. Aug 4, 6:30pm, Bruce Gordon. Aug 4, 8pm, Scarlett Letters. Aug 5, 5:30pm, the Marks Brothers. Aug 5, 8pm, the Smart Fellers. Aug 6, 5pm, Wine Country Blues Band. Aug 6, 8:30pm, Sonoma blues jam. Aug 8, American roots night. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Starling Bar

Aug 6, Aiden Eljumaily. 19380 Hwy 12, Sonoma. 707.938.7442.

Theatre Square

Aug 6, 3:30pm, the Del Novas. 151 Petaluma Blvd, Petaluma, theatre-district.com.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse

Fri 8/4 • Doors 8pm ⁄ 18– 24 • All Ages $

Fleetwood Mask

The Ultimate Fleetwood Mac Tribute Sat 8/5 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $40–$44 • 21+ Robert Randolph and The Family Band with Sam Ravenna Sun 8/6 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $20–$22 • All Ages

HTK Trio feat Howard Wales (Hooteroll with

Jerry Garcia), Terry Haggerty (Sons of Champlin) & Kevin Hayes (Roy Rogers) - Celebrate "Hooteroll" with FOG feat Brian Melvin

Tue 8/8 • Doors 6pm ⁄ 15– 22 • All Ages $

$

Canopy of Redwood High School Summer Celebration

with McKinley Clemons Wed 8/9 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $30–$67 • All Ages

Celebrating the life of Jerry Garcia

with Live Dead ‘69 Thu 8/10 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–$20 • All Ages

Shinyribs

with The Bitter Diamonds

Fri 8/11 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $27–$32 • 21+

Tainted Love

The Best of the 80’s Live! Thu 8/17–Sat 8/19 • ⁄ $40–$45 • 21+

Steve Kimock & Friends 3-Night Residency

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

Insalata’s

Aug 3, 5:30pm, Parker Grant. 120 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, San Anselmo. 415.457.7700.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

Aug 9, Ted P birthday celebration. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marconi State Historic Park Aug 6, 1pm, Marconi Summer Music Series. 18500 Hwy 1, Marshall, marconiconference. org.

Marin Art & Garden Center

Aug 3, 5pm, Kenya Baker Trio. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

Marin Country Mart

Aug 4, 6pm, Friday Night Jazz with Jeff Derby Quartet. Aug 6, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with Blithedale Canyon. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

Aug 3, country line dancing. Aug 4, Jimmy Smith Band. Aug 5, Stagefrite. Aug 6, 3pm, David Thom Bluegrass Jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Marinwood Community Park

Viansa Winery

Aug 2, the Damon LeGall Band. Aug 3, Joose. Aug 4, 5:30pm, Danny Montana and friends. Aug 4, 9pm, First Fridays reggae with Broken Silence Sound System. Aug 5, 5:30pm, Michael Brown and friends. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Aug 5, 12pm, Rhyme & Reason. Aug 6, 12pm, Acoustic Soul. 25200 Arnold Dr, Sonoma. 707.935.4700. $

with Charlie Hunter Trio and John Lester. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Windsor Town Green

Aug 3, 6pm, Tommy Castro & the Painkillers. 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor, townofwindsor. com.

MARIN COUNTY Fenix

Aug 2, pro blues jam with the Fenix Band. Aug 3, the Minks. Aug 4, Reed Fromer Band. Aug 5, Eric Wiley Band. Aug 6, 11:30am, Sunday brunch with Sam Peoples and Lynne Billig. Aug 6, 6:30pm, singer showcase with Lilan Kane. Aug 9, pro blues jam with Wayne “Guitar” Sanders. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

George’s Nightclub

Aug 4, Rex Suru & Cherubim Vibes. Sat, DJ party. Sun, Banda Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato

Aug 3, Celina Ventanilla with Adam Miller Quintet. Aug 4, AZ/DZ and the Butlers. Aug 6, 5pm, cookout concert

Aug 4, 6pm, David Luning Band. 775 Miller Creek Rd, San Rafael. 415.479.0775.

19 Broadway Club

No Name Bar

Aug 4, Michael Aragon Quartet. Aug 6, 3pm, Flowtilla. Aug 7, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. Aug 8, open mic. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Osteria Divino

Aug 2, Jonathan Poretz. Aug 3, Jeff Denson’s Open Sky Trio. Aug 4, Ken Cook Trio. Aug 5, Walter Earl Trio. Aug 6, Smith Dobson Trio. Aug 8, Gabrielle Cavassa. Aug 9, Joan Getz with Chris Huson. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Aug 2, Moonglow Trio. Aug 3, Donna D’Acuti. Aug 8, John Hoy. Aug 9, Lorin Rowan. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Aug 2, the Weissmen. Aug 3, Highway Poets. Aug 4, Swoop Unit. Aug 5, Sucker MCs. Aug 6, Matt Bolton. Aug

7, open mic. Aug 8, Fresh Baked Blues. Aug 9, the New Sneakers. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Piccolo Pavilion

Aug 6, 5pm, oMega LIVE. Redwood and Corte Madera avenues, Corte Madera. 415.302.1160.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Aug 3, the Blank Tapes Duo. Aug 4, Grateful Bluegrass Boys. Aug 5, the Asteroid No 4. Aug 6, Erica Sunshine Lee. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall Aug 3, A Van Morrison Experience. Aug 4, Fleetwood Mask. Aug 5, Robert Randolph & the Family Band. Aug 6, 11am, brunch show with Colin Cotter. Aug 7, open mic with Austin DeLone. Aug 8, Canopy. Aug 9, Live Dead ‘69. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

Aug 2, Jerry Garcia celebration with Phil Lesh and friends. Aug 3, Ross James’ Cosmic Thursday. Aug 4, Top 40 dance party with the Rowan Brothers and friends. Aug 6, 3:30pm, “Stories & Songs” with Phil Lesh and friends. Aug 6, 7:30pm, Midnight North. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre Aug 6, 5:30pm, Nathan Bickart Trio. Aug 7, Summer Singing Workshop. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Beringer Vineyards

Aug 5, 12:30pm, Taylor Brown. 2000 Main St, St Helena, 866.708.9463.

Blue Note Napa

Aug 2, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. Aug 3, Tommy Igoe Band. Aug 5, Janiva Magness. Aug 9, Parlor Social. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Goose & Gander

Aug 6, 1pm, Kenya B Trio. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Pioneer Park

Aug 3, 6:30pm, Superlicious. 1308 Cedar St, Calistoga. 707.942.2838.

Uptown Theatre

Aug 5, ABBA: the Concert. 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.


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Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center

Aug 3

Robert Allen Fine Art, “Landscapes: Four Points of View,” group show features works on paper and canvas by Regina Case, Wendy Schwartz, Peter Loftus and Connie Smith Siegel. 5:30pm. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.2800.

Aug 4

Chroma Gallery, “Sightings,” juried photography show aims the lens at life’s often overlooked textures, patterns and juxtapositions. 5pm. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Aug 5

Agent Ink Gallery, “Summer of Love Art Exhibition,” psychedelic art experience includes new prints and several artists on hand. 6pm. 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.595.1372. Aqus Cafe, “The Bird Show,” high-flying art. 3pm. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Arts Guild of Sonoma, “Jennifer Whitfield Exhibition,” award-winning artist shows her mixed media works, including her latest water color and pastel creations. 4pm. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. 707.996.3115. Sebastopol Senior Center, “Senior Center Art Show,” local artists Virginia Fenley and Cheryl Traendly show their vibrant works. 4pm. 167 High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.2440.

Aug 6

Thockmorton Theatre “Driven to Extinction” exhibition of works by San Francisco sculptor Cynthia Jensen. 2pm. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Aug 8

Redwood Cafe, “August Art Show,” exhibit is curated by Eolah Bates. 6pm. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Through Aug 29, “FAUNA,” paintings and mosaics by Stacey Schuett display in Heron Hall. 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.527.9277.

Neon Raspberry Art House

Through Aug 13, “Moon Glow,” Rebekah Erev’s original gouache paintings use abstract cultural symbolism to invoke commonality and obscurity in our everyday experience of the divine. 3605 Main St, Occidental. Sat-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.874.2100.

Petaluma Arts Center

Through Aug 5, “The Face of Petaluma,” photography exhibit shows portraits of the town’s citizens. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.

ReFrame Gallery

Through Aug 13, “Hidden in Plain Sight,” photographer Sara Downing’s debut solo exhibit charts her unconventional path toward expression. 6790 McKinley St Ste 180, Sebastopol. 707.861.3476.

Riverfront Art Gallery

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY 33 Arts

Through Aug 21, “Beyond Recognition,” paintings by Jack Vernon. 3840 Finley Ave, Bldg 33, Santa Rosa. 415.601.5323.

Art Museum of Sonoma County

Through Aug 27, “Eye Fruit: The Art of Franklin Williams,” show of unconventional art from the introspective and innovative 20th-century artist is curated by noted art historian Susan Landauer. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. Tues-Sun, 11 to 5. 707.579.1500.

Calabi Gallery

Through Aug 19, “Forty Years of Ray Jacobsen,” a retrospective of the Sonoma Valley artist. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

City Hall Council Chambers

Through Aug 24, “Jim Davidson:

Globe Trotter,” Sonoma County photographer shows images of everyday life from around the world. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Graton Gallery Through Aug 20, “Stormy Weather,” politically charged paintings by Mylette Welch and sculptures by the late Richard Benbrook resist and protest against today’s toxic political climate. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Hammerfriar Gallery Through Aug 16, “Beneath the Sea Ice,” exhibit features paintings from Lily Simonson’s three-month trip to Antarctica. 132 Mill St, Ste 101, Healdsburg. Tues-Fri, 10 to 6. Sat, 10 to 5. 707.473.9600.

Joseph Jewell Wines Through Aug 31, “Asian Rhapsody,” photos and collages by Deborah and Gerald Huth are inspired by travels in Asia. 6542 Front St, Forestville. Thurs-Mon, 11 to 5. 707.975.4927.

Through Sep 3, “Showin’ on the River” juried show features work by member and invitational artists. 132 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. Wed, Thurs and Sun, 11 to 6. FriSat, 11 to 8. 707.775.4ART.

Sculpturesite Gallery

Through Aug 4, “Kinetic Sculpture in 4 Movements,” new sculptures by artists Jeff Kahn, Jeffery Laudenslager, Troy Pillow and John Tyler. 14301 Arnold Dr, Ste 8, Glen Ellen. Thurs-Mon, 10:30am to 5:30pm. 707.933.1300.

Sebastopol Gallery

Aug 2-30, “Teri Sloat & Stacey Schuett Show,” the artists display in the gallery’s windows as part of the gallery’s ten-year anniversary. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

The Spinster Sisters Restaurant

Through Aug 7, “Andrea Kendall Solo Show,” painter and fiber artist builds layered compositions of atmospheric and organic forms. 401 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7100.

David Allen Studio

RECEPTIONS

ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER The San Francisco Mime Troupe gets political with their new show, ‘Walls,’ performed at the Progressive Festival in Petaluma on Aug. 6. See Theater, p29. Steele Lane Community Center

Through Aug 10, “North Bay Industries Activity Center Showcase,” see mixed-media works from adults living at the Rohnert Park Rehabilitation Center. 415 Steele Ln, Santa Rosa. Mon-Thurs, 8 to 7; Fri, 8 to 5. 707.543.3282.

MARIN COUNTY Bolinas Museum

Through Aug 13, “Art We Wear,” exhibit shows decorated clothing of the counterculture expression from the 1960s to now. 48 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. Fri, 1 to 5; Sat-Sun, noon to 5; and by appointment. 415.868.0330.

College of Marin Fine Art Gallery

Through Aug 5, “Breathless,” photographer Polly Steinmetz celebrates life through portraits of ordinary animals in death. 835 College Ave, Kentfield. 415.485.9494.

Gallery Route One

Through Aug 6, “In the Mix,” Gallery Route One’s annual members’ exhibit features a dynamic array of art and media. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Society of Artists

Through Aug 5, “Something Old, Something New,” show celebrates the relationship between the old and new, beginnings and endings and youth and age. 1515 Third St, San Rafael. Wed-Sun, Noon to 4pm. 415.464.9561.

MarinMOCA

Through Aug 13, “Light,” artist member group show explores light in several mediums, while “Intertwined” exhibits of woven glass by artists-in-residence Demetra Theofanous and Dean Bensen. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. Wed-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

Osher Marin JCC

Through Aug 25, “This Is Bay Area Jewry,” photo essay exhibition shows the diverse local community through intimate portraits. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Town Books

Through Aug 30, “Painting Explorations,” group show of acrylic and oil paintings by local artists. 411 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Tues-Sat, 10am to 4pm 415.526.3791.

Villa Marin

Through Aug 30, “Waterworks,” Marin County Watercolor Society’s group show interprets water through visuals and textures. 100 Thorndale Dr, San Rafael. 415.492.2408.

NAPA COUNTY Caldwell Snyder Gallery Through Aug 16, “Melissa Chandon & Matt Rogers,” two California artists display in a joint exhibition of recent paintings. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Napa Valley Museum

Through Aug 20, “Sound Maze,” interactive installation created

by composer and inventor Paul Dresher includes a dozen original musical instruments to experience. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. Wed-Sun, 11 to 4. 707.944.0500.

Comedy Punchline Palooza

Standup comedian Amy Miller headlines a night of laughs. Aug 4, 8pm. $20. Palooza Gastropub, 8910 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 707.833.4000.

Skits Under the Stars

Transcendence Theatre Company hosts a night of art and music open to the community. Aug 9, 6pm. Free. Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room, 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 707.933.9305.

Standup Comedy at Laugh Cellar

Comedians Aiko Tanaka, Juan Carlos and Justin Lockwood take the stage. Aug 4, 7pm. $20. The Laugh Cellar, 5755 Mountain Hawk Way, Santa Rosa, 707.282.9319.

Tuesday Night Live

See standups Quinn Dahle, Susan Jones, Nathan Habib, Liz Stone and others. Aug 8, 8pm. $17-$27. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Events Bodega Fire Big Event BBQ Thirty-seventh

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Arts Events


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annual event boasts the county’s shortest parade, tri-tip and chicken lunch, activities for all ages and live music by Highway Poets and others. Aug 6, 10am. Free admission/$8-$15 lunch. McCaughey Hall, 17184 Bodega Hwy, Bodega, 707.876.9438.

Forestville Hot Rod Show & BBQ Competition

Classic cars and cooking teams from around the North Bay gather for a feast and fundraiser for the nonprofit Forestville youth park. Aug 5, 11am. Free admission/$2 tastings. Forestville Youth Park, 7045 Mirabel Rd, Forestville, www.forestvilleyouthpark.org.

Napa Town & Country Fair

Fair is themed “Wheels & Squeals!” and features carnival rides, farm activities, exhibits and other fun. Aug 9-13. $10$13/kids and under are free. Napa Valley Exposition, 575 Third St, Napa, napavalleyexpo. com.

Progressive Festival

Christie Marks Fine Art FU N CTIO N A L A RT

Live music entertains and featured speakers inform on crucial issues surrounding social justice, environment and community. Aug 6, 12pm. Free. Walnut Park, Petaluma Boulevard and D Sreet, Petaluma, progressivefestival.org.

Sonoma County Fair

The fair’s theme of “Holidze” is highlighted, with concerts, carnival, hall of flowers, art, livestock and wine country horse racing. Aug 3-13. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.545.4200.

Summer of Love Art Night Jewelry by Roost

Annual event pays tribute to the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love with music by Rubber Soul, cocktails, artmaking projects and more. Aug 4, 6pm. $25. Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma, 707.939.SVMA.

The Traveling Spectacular

fine & fashion jewelry ~ handmade gifts 3927 24th St. • San Francisco • CA 94114 415.500.2257 • Daily 11am–6pm 146 N. Main St. • Sebastopol • CA 95472 707.829.3036 • Daily 10:30am–6pm Sundays 5pm www.artisanafunctionalart.com

312 So. A St. Santa Rosa Open for ArtWalk, 8/5 & 8/6 christiemarksfineart.com

Mobile vaudeville experience features dancing and acts performed to the music of the Oddjob Ensemble. Aug 5-6. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, 707.933.3010.

Walk for Animals

Napa Humane’s fun-filled

family event is a short stroll through downtown Napa that supports animals throughout Napa Valley. Aug 6, 7:30am. $35-$45. Oxbow Commons, McKinstry St, Napa, napahumane.org.

Film Chocolate & Cinema

Watch Harrison Ford whip around as Indiana Jones in “Raiders of the Lost Ark” while enjoying sweets and special bites. Aug 3, 7pm. $20-$25. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840.

Dave Made a Maze

4-6. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

That Sugar Film

Documentary reveals the truth about refined sugar and the business of healthy food, followed by discussion. Aug 4, 7pm. $10. Songbird Community Healing Center, 8297 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.2398.

Food & Drink

Producer John Charles Meyer presents and discusses the fantastical new independent film featuring puppetry, stopmotion animation and incamera optical illusions. Aug 3, 7pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Champagne Gala with SF Opera’s Adler Fellows

Dropka

Corner 103 Lobster Feed

Let’s Talk About Death

Fortitude Friday: Magnum Madness

Documentary following nomadic tribes in Tibet screens as part of Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival’s summertime “Best of the Fest” series. Aug 3, 7pm. $12. Sebastopol Center for the Arts, 282 S High St, Sebastopol, 707.829.4797. Screening of the film “Dying to Know,” about Timothy Leary and Ram Dass’ friendship, is followed by a discussion. Benefits local nonprofit Final Passages. Aug 8, 6:30pm. $5-$15. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, finalpassages.org.

Reaching for the Note

Documentary reveals composer Leonard Bernstein’s contributions to Broadway and his lasting influence on musical theater. Composer Ron Ramin speaks alongside the screening. Aug 3, 7:30pm. $7$11. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

The Road Not Taken

Local filmmaker and author Barbara McVeigh presents the film about former president Jimmy Carter’s solar-energy initiative in the 1970s. Aug 2, 7pm. Free. Community Media Center of Marin, 819 A St, San Rafael, 415.721.0636.

San Francisco Jewish Film Festival More than a dozen films from the 37th annual festival screen in the North Bay. Aug

Benefit gala funds opera education programs in Marin schools and previews the SF Opera ‘s upcoming season. Aug 6, 2pm. $50. San Domenico School, 1500 Butterfield Rd, San Anselmo. Sonoma wine producer teams with the girl & the fig for an old fashioned feast with all the fixings and an array of award-winning wines. Aug 4, 1pm. $85-$95. Suite D, 21800 Schellville Rd, Sonoma, 707.931.6141.

Enjoy a flight of Rutherford Cabernet Magnums and other special treats. Aug 4, 5pm. $25-$40. Provenance Vineyard, 1695 St Helena Hwy, Rutherford, 707.968.3633.

Healdsburg Farmers’ Market Tour & Lunch

Let a guide lead you around the market and enjoy a private meal. Aug 5, 10am. $85. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

NorCal Brew Fest

Inaugural tasting extravaganza features over 50 beers and ciders from across the country, happening in conjunction with the Sonoma County Fair. Aug 5, 1pm. $55. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.545.4200.

Rutherford Chili Ball

Family-friendly event is back by popular demand with cookoff competitions, kids activities, silent auction and live music by Sandy Gellar Band. Aug 6, 4pm. $15-$45/kids under 5 are free. Pestoni Family Estate Winery, 1673 Saint Helena Hwy, St Helena, 707.963.0544.


Tomatoes: The Spanish Way

Wags, Whiskers & Wine Gala

Enjoy fine local wines and beer, a gourmet dinner, auctions, live music and lots of animals from Sonoma Humane Society in this fundraising gala. Aug 4, 5:30pm. $175. Trentadue Winery, 19170 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville, 707.577.1911.

Lectures Degas, Impressionism & the Paris Millinery Trade Illustrated art lecture by docent Marsha Holm. Aug 8, 7pm. Corte Madera Library, 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera, 707.924.6444.

Marin Shakespeare Company Presentation

Actors Richard Pallziol, Jackson Currier and Patrick Russellas talk about stage combat and comedy in “The Three Musketeers,” playing at Dominican University’s Forest Meadows Amphitheater. Aug 8, 7pm. Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera, 415.927.0960.

Readings Aqus Cafe

Aug 7, 6:15pm, Rivertown Poets, with Andrena Zawinski and Phyllis Meshulam, followed by open mic. 189 H St, Petaluma 707.778.6060.

Book Passage

Aug 2, 7pm, “The Marriage Pact” with Michelle Richmond. Aug 3, 7pm, “The Readymade Thief” with Augustus Rose. Aug 4, 7pm, “Gardening on California’s Coast” with Julie Monson. Aug 5, 1pm, “Slipsliding by the Bay” with Barbara McDonald. Aug 5, 7pm, Mystery Author Panel with She Writes Press. Aug 6, 1pm, “Well Nourished” with Andrea Lieberstein. Aug 6, 4pm, “The Trial of Prisoner 043” with Terry Jastrow. Aug 7, 7pm, “The Goddesses” with Swan Huntley. Aug 8, 7pm, “The Gentleman”

Book Passage By-the-Bay

former cannery. Through Aug 5. Shakespeare in the Cannery, 3 West Third St, Santa Rosa, shakespeareinthecannery.com.

Katie Ketchum Solo Show

Paul Mahder Gallery

National Endowment recipient performs excerpts from three of her one-woman-musicals about historical figures Mary Cassatt, Clara Schumann and Mary Magdalene. Fri, 7:30pm. through Aug 11. $20. Dream Portal Studio & Gallery, 500 N Main St, Sebastopol, 707.827.3288.

Readers’ Books

Lovers, Liars & Thieves

Aug 8, 6pm, “The Epic Crush of Genie Lo” with FC Yee. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300. Aug 6, 2pm, “Poised For Retirement: Moving from Anxiety to Zen” with Louise Nayer. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg 707.473.9150.

Aug 3, 7pm, “Stories Make the World” with Stephen Most. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

Aug 6, 2pm, “Happiness” with Heather Harpham. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Raven Players present an exciting collection of the best of Shakespeare’s famous wordplay and swordplay. Through Aug 5. $10-$25. Bear Republic Brewing Company, 345 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg, 707.433.6335.

Man of La Mancha

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

North Bay Stage Company presents the acclaimed Quixotic musical that’s a play within a play. Through Aug 6. $36. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Theater

The Music Man

Aug 3, 7pm, “The Goddesses” with Swan Huntley. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Circus Vargas

Goggles, gears and gadgets set the stage for the original retrofuturistic production, Steam Cirque, with pre-show kids’ activities. Aug 2-13. $17 and up. The Village at Corte Madera, 1618 Redwood Hwy, Corte Madera, circusvargas.com.

Clybourne Park

SRJC’s Summer Rep Theatre Festival presents the awardwinning and razor-sharp satire about the politics of race. Through Aug 5. $15-$25. Newman Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, summerrep.com.

The Foreigner

Hilarity ensues when a British demolition expert visiting a rural Georgia fishing lodge learns a series of bizarre revelations about his fellow lodge guests. Suggest for mature audiences. Aug 4-13. $12-$22. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale, 707.829.2214.

In the Mood

The musical adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” opens an experimental summer of works in the the ruins of a

29 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | AUGUST 2-8, 2017 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Chef Camila Loew shows you how to prepare a tapas-style menu to take advantage of the seasonal abundance of tomatoes. Aug 5, 10am. $95. Ramekins Culinary School, 450 W Spain St, Sonoma, 707.933.0450.

with Forrest Leo. Aug 9, 7pm, “Science in the Soul” with Richard Dawkins. $32. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Throckmorton partners with Oakland School for the Arts for a new take on the classic musical. Through Aug 6. $15$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

SF Mime Troupe

Tony Award-winning performs a new show, Walls, as part of the Petaluma Progressive Festival. Aug 6, 4pm. Free. Walnut Park, Petaluma Boulevard and D Sreet, Petaluma.

Sing Me a Murder

See and sing in the newest dinner show from Get a Clue Productions, a fully functioning karaoke bar with deadly competition. Reservations required. Sat, Aug 5, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor, getaclueproductions.com.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Treatment Pro a s o R gr a ta n a m S GET YOUR LIFE BACK! Do you or someone you care about rely on prescription or opioid pain medication or heroin to get through the day? Ask the following questions: • Have they ever given up activities to use them? • Are they spending more time on activities to get them? • Have they ever used them despite negative consequences? If the answer to any of these questions was YES, they may have unintentionally become opioid dependent. Help might be closer than you think.

For more information on opioid dependence and its treatment, please call

707-576-0818 or visit www.srtp.net

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM 1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B, Santa Rosa


THE

NORTH BAY BOH EMI A N | AUGUST 2-8 , 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

Nugget

Dabbing Doubts Think twice before you dab

BY PATRICK ANDERSON

O

nce upon a midsummer’s eve in 2014 at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, I found myself among the masses, waxing poetic about the virtues of cannabinoid therapeutics when I came across what was dubbed “Dab City.” Entering the gates of this pop-up metropolis, I witnessed a dystopian future: the inebriated stumbling aimlessly about, consuming cannabis in such large quantities it rivaled a spring-break bender with cringeworthy hip-hop providing the soundtrack to patients receiving medical care from paramedics for overingestion. Clearly, smoking was no longer what it used to be. A “dab” refers to a concentrated cannabis extract. These extracts are created through solvent-based processes such as CO2 (safe) or butane (not recommended due to residual solvent issues) or

through nonsolvent practices used pressure and heat (known as “rosin”). They are generally inhaled using glass pipes, referred to as “rigs,” that are heated using a hand-held blowtorch or an electrical heating device. Dabbing is an excellent way to rapidly ingest large amounts of cannabinoids, namely THC. That stated, there are several major concerns regarding this cultural expression of cannabis consumption. First is the prevalence of butane extracts. Even within scientifically constructed closed-loop systems, there is evidence of residual solvent in extracts produced in this fashion. It is highly recommended that user explore safer extract methods. Second is the temperature at which people dab. Generally it appears that most practices involve excessive heat for larger “hits” and bigger exhaled “clouds.” THC and most terpenes (the aromatic compounds that convey unique sensory effects) have a boiling point of 314 degrees Fahrenheit. When heated beyond this point, terpenes will degrade, reducing the entourage effect and resulting in having to consume more to get the same effect. Third, and the most important, is that scientific study demonstrates that chronically excessive THC consumption results in downregulation of endocannabinoid system receptors. A National Center for Biotechnology Information study titled “Care and Feeding of the Endocannabinoid System,” states that a downregulated receptor “is not functional.” This could result in clinical ECS deficiency, signs and symptoms of which are lethargy, metabolic disorders, migraines and depression. Fortunately, down-regulation is reversible through abstinence— and responsible use of marijuana. Patrick Anderson is a lead educator for Project CBD.


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ARIES (March 21–April 19) In my astrological opinion, your life in the coming days should draw inspiration from the ancient Roman festival of Saturnalia, a six-day bout of revelry that encouraged everyone to indulge in pleasure, speak freely and give gifts. Your imminent future could (and I believe should) also have resemblances to the yearly Doo Dah Parade in Pasadena, which features a farcical cavalcade of lunatics, like the Shopping Cart Drill Team, the Radioactive Chicken Heads, the Army of Toy Soldiers and the Men of Leisure Synchronized Nap Team. In other words, Aries, it’s an excellent time to set aside your dignity and put an emphasis on having uninhibited fun; to amuse yourself to the max as you experiment on the frontiers of self-expression; to be the person you would be if you had nothing to lose. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

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It’s time to Reinvent the Wheel and Rediscover Fire, Taurus. In my astrological opinion, you’ll be wasting your time unless you return to the root of all your Big Questions. Every important task will mandate you to consult your heart’s primal intelligence. So don’t mess around with trivial pleasures or transitory frustrations that won’t mean anything to you a year from now. Be a mature wild child in service to the core of your creative powers.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Writing in The Futurist magazine, Christopher Wolf says that the tradition of eating three hearty meals per day is fading and will eventually disappear. “Grazing” will be the operative term for how we get our fill, similar to the method used by cavemen and cavewomen. The first snack after we awaken, Wolf suggests, might be called “daystart.” The ensuing four could be dubbed “pulsebreak,” “humpmunch,” “holdmeal” and “evesnack.” In light of your current astrological omens, Gemini, I endorse a comparable approach to everything you do: not a few big doses, but rather frequent smaller doses; not intense cramming but casual browsing; not sprawling heroic epics but a series of amusing short stories. CANCER (June 21–July 22) The RIKEN Institute in Japan experiments with using ion beams to enhance plant growth. In one notable case, they created a new breed of cherry tree that blossoms four times a year and produces triple the amount of flowers. The blooms last longer, too, and the trees thrive under a wider span of temperatures. In the next 11 months, Cancerian, you won’t need to be flooded with ion beams to experience a similar phenomenon. I expect that your power to bloom and flourish will be far stronger than usual. LEO (July 23–August 22) Leo actor Robert De Niro once observed that most people devote more energy to concealing their emotions and longings than to revealing them. Is that true about you? If so, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to hide less of yourself and express more. There’ll be relatively little hell to pay as a result, and you’ll get a boost of vitality. Don’t go overboard, though. I’m not suggesting that you unveil every last one of your feelings and yearnings to everyone—just to those you trust. Most importantly, I hope you will unveil all your feelings and yearnings to yourself. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) It has almost become a tradition: Each year at about this time, you seem to enjoy scaring the hell out of yourself, and often the heaven, too. These self-inflicted shocks have often had a beneficial side effect. They have served as rousing prompts for you to re-imagine the future. They have motivated and mobilized you. So yes, there has been an apparent method in your madness -- an upside to the uproar. What should we expect this time, my dear? A field trip to a crack house or a meth lab? Some fun and games in a pit of snakes? An excursion to the land of bad memories? I suggest something less melodramatic. How about, for example, a frolic with unruly allies in a future paradise that’s still a bit unorganized? LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Before grapes become wine, they have to be cleaned. Then crushed. Then macerated and pressed. The next phase is fermentation, followed by filtering. The aging process, which brings the grapes’ transformation to completion,

BY ROB BREZSNY

requires more time than the other steps. At the end, there’s one more stage: putting the wine in bottles. I’d like to compare the grapes’ evolution to the story of your life since your last birthday. You are nearing the end of the aging phase. When that’s finished, I hope you put great care into the bottling. It’s as important as the other steps.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Are you gearing up to promote yourself and your services? In my astrological opinion, you should be. If so, you could put the following testimonial from me in your résumé or advertisement: “[place your name here] is a poised overseer of nerve-wracking transitions and a canny scout who is skilled at tracking down scarce resources. He/she can help you acquire the information and enhancements you don’t quite have the power to get by yourself. When conditions are murky or perplexing, this plucky soul is enterprising and inventive.”

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21) Your eyes are more powerful than you realize. If you were standing on a mountaintop under a cloudless night sky with no moon, you could see a fire burning 50 miles away. Your imagination is also capable of feats that might surprise you. It can, for example, provide you with an expansive and objective view of your entire life history. I advise you to seek that boost now. Ask your imagination to give you a prolonged look at the big picture of where you have been and where you are going. I think it’s essential to your discovery of the key to the next chapter of your life story.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Love is your gritty but sacred duty. It’s your prickly prod and your expansive riddle, your curious joy and your demanding teacher. I’m talking about the whole gamut, Capricorn—from messy personal romantic love to lucid unconditional spiritual love; from asking smartly for what you desire to gratefully giving more than you thought you had. Can you handle this much sweet, dark mystery? Can you grow your intimacy skills fast enough to keep up with the interesting challenges? I think you can. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) There’s an eclipse of the moon coming up in the sign of Aquarius. Will it bring bad luck or good luck? Ha! That’s a trick question. I threw it in to see if you have been learning anything from my efforts to redeem astrology’s reputation. Although some misinformed people regard my chosen field as a superstitious pseudo-science, I say it’s an imaginative art form that helps us identify and transform our subconscious patterns. So the wise answer to my earlier question is that the imminent lunar eclipse is neither bad luck nor good luck. Rather, it tells you that you have more power than usual to: (1) tame and manage the disruptive and destructive aspects of your instinctual nature; (2) make progress in dissolving your old conditioning; and (3) become more skilled at mothering yourself. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

August is Good Hard Labor Month for you Pisceans. It’s one of those rare times when a smart version of workaholic behavior might actually make sense. Why? First of all, it could ultimately lead to a pay raise or new perks. Secondly, it may bring to light certain truths about your job that you’ve been unconscious of. Third, it could awaken you to the fact that you haven’t been trying as hard as you could to fulfill one of your longterm dreams; it might expand your capacity to devote yourself passionately to the epic tasks that matter most. For your homework, please meditate on this thought: Summoning your peak effort in the little things will mobilize your peak effort for the Big Thing.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

AUGUST 2-8, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Jean Elliot

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