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CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

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Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Pave It Your fawning ode to this idiocy (“A Square Is Born,” May 17) shows that you are just in it for whatever advertising revenue you can get, this time from businesses around this public park. But not a word about the disruption to traffic: Mendocino Avenue is the main north-south thoroughfare aside from 101. In 1967, saner minds ran the city and made room in this underused park for important traffic connecting the south of Santa Rosa with the north. Now such traffic must

wind its way around several left and right turns, slowing traffic and greatly adding to the noxious exhausts of slowmoving, often-stopped vehicles as they navigate the many turns. It’s a testimony to the greed and shortsightedness of whoever is running Santa Rosa right now. Instead of attracting folks to local businesses, it will drive them to the 101 freeway. Money is, of course, always an object, but instead of leaving well-enough alone, with two parks instead of one,

THIS MODERN WORLD

any intelligent traffic planner or civic leader could have opted for an underground extension of Mendocino Avenue to allow free movement of vehicular traffic and expanding the park above back into its native big-square configuration. Think of Geary and Masonic boulevards in San Francisco. No doubt, some local politicians will add to their bank accounts from local businesses hoping to capitalize on increased business.

ERIC W. KRITZ Graton

By Tom Tomorrow

Climate Apocalypse Polar bears in sunglasses lolling on melting land masses Penguins in sombreros driving fossil-fuel Camaros And if all the rising seas don’t fall, we’ll never see any atolls at all Greenland is so green now that it’s filled with nudists In Iceland, further south, there frolic the lewdest In America, once the Garden of Eden, between its shining seas, a desolate desert scene Might it be caused by corporate greed? Could that just be the reason why? Nah! A Chinese hoax! Pay it no heed, we all know how scientists lie Just ask our current president, now there’s a really stand-up guy

VERN SHIPLEY Santa Rosa

Let It Fly As proud, patriotic Americans, we flew the Stars and Stripes on Jan. 20 to commemorate the inauguration of President Donald J. Whatsisface. Only it flew upside-down, to acknowledge the dire crisis our country was in on that dark day and will be in for the next four years. On that day, I saw two other American flags flying upside-down in our west Petaluma neighborhood alone. Ever since I can remember, we always flew the American flag on June 14, which is Flag Day. This June 14, that tradition will continue, even though it is slightly tarnished by President Whatsisname’s 71st birthday. And again, we will fly our flag upside-down. What better way to honor our beloved flag and at the same time, say “Happy Birthday, President Shitgibbon”?

BOB CANNING Petaluma

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


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huge endangered blue whale washed up on the Marin coast a couple of weeks ago, a majestic female that had birthed a couple of whale-pups over the years, then got hit by a commercial ship and died. The beached whale provided an apt metaphor for the fate of the 2016 electoral vote loser—and also for the priorities of the minority-president “winner.” One of the great and odious right-wing talking points of our time centers on this idea that Democrats and liberals care more about the rights and plights of sad-faced animals than about people, since liberals and Democrats support abortion rights and are therefore, as Eric Trump noted, a bunch of subhumans. “They’re not even people,” says the big-game-slaying cretin. Well, it’s true that Democrats and liberals generally care more about protecting animals than do Republicans and conservatives (though it’s not true that we’re not people). You don’t have to take the Bohemian’s word when it comes to the animal kingdom’s best friends on the political spectrum—just take a gander at the man in the White House, who clearly hates animals, or at least sees them as nothing more than a pesky and irrelevant impediment to MAGA. The White House resident decided this week that endangered whales should just go ahead and die, when he ordered federal fish officials to toss a regulation designed to help keep nontargetedspecies from dying in commercial gill-nets off the California coast, where the targeted species is swordfish, and yet where lots of mammals and turtles get hung up and die. The message from the White House is as clear as it is revolting: marine mammals are disgusting pigs, turtles and porpoises and dolphins are a bunch of losers for getting caught in the nets, and if there’s a reporter on the beat who doesn’t like that version of events in the fake-news American crackup gone to hell in a hand basket of crooked deal-making—well, maybe Montana’s newly minted Trumpian congressman, a real big-game slayer himself, will punch the reporter in the face to set him straight—straight out whale on him.

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Black Jade by Mason K ay

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Paper THE

SORRY, CHARLIE Many Americans gave up on tuna after concerns of mercury, but Sausalito’s Safe Catch

tests every fish to ensure that levels are very low.

Can Do

Safe Catch aims to redeem canned tuna from mercurial bad rap BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

he seas are dying, say activists, scientists and watchers-of-theapocalypse.

Some point to rising levels of toxins in the ocean and an array of environmental imbalances that have put whole species of aquatic life at risk of extinction. Others quote that scary part of Revelation that predicts one-third of the fish in the ocean will die,

along with, by the way, one-third of its ships. In the midst of all this aquatic doom-and-gloom, a small company headquartered in Sausalito is offering a much more optimistic view of the future of our oceans, along with a strong call to change our relationship with the sea, and the tasty creatures that live in it. “I’m not sure it’s accurate to say the seas are dying,

but they are definitely very seriously challenged,” says Sean Wittenberg, co-founder and president of Safe Catch, a fast-rising, ecologically minded and slightly quirky company producing canned and cooked tuna that is as nutritious for consumers as it is respectful of the oceans in which those fish are caught. “Certain parts of the ocean are more challenged than others, because of the impact of

industrial pollution, and because of reckless human behavior.” Wittenberg and his Safe Catch co-founder, Bryan Boches, are fully aware of the ironies and challenges of launching an environmentally friendly cannedtuna company. Still, both founders see the sustainable harvesting of fish as an important effort that—assuming industry practices and consumer attitudes change— brings a number of powerful plusses to counter its many minuses. It comes down to the fact that healthy fish is healthy protein. “The healthiest things on earth to put in your body still come from the ocean,” Wittenberg says. “There are plenty of healthy fish in the sea. You just have to be willing to pass on those that aren’t.” And the healthier the oceans become, the safer the food we pull from it. Currently, Safe Catch produces a whole line of highend, ecologically minded, healthconscious tuna products, packed in attractive cans and pouches bearing the lofty admonition “Eat Pure. Live Pure,” and the remarkably specific promise, “Made for Elite Athletes, Kids and Pregnancy.” Each can carries a lot of printed information—short statements, positive affirmations and little icons identifying that the tuna was caught using dolphin-safe methods, with lines and poles; that it was hand-cut, sushi-grade fish when it was placed in the can; that it was cooked in its own juices; and, before any of that, that it was tested to the highest level of any canned tuna brand on the market. “We’ve performed a million mercury tests to date,” Wittenberg says. “And that’s just the beginning.” There was a time when tuna was among Americans’ favorite foods. But when reports of mercury levels in the canned variety began to become common, and doctors warned of mercury’s dangers— especially to pregnant women— American consumption of tuna plummeted. According to Wittenberg, Safe Catch is the only brand of tuna


restore populations of fish that are being unsustainably harvested by other companies; and, to a degree, put tuna back into the American consciousness as a healthful and relatively inexpensive staple. “This actually all started,” Wittenberg says, “because my mom had mercury poisoning when I was a kid, and she became very sick. Before then, we ate a lot of tuna. Everyone ate a lot of tuna.”

‘We might be able to bring confidence back to the shelves.’ He recalls his mother sending him to school every morning with a paper bag lunch. “There was always an apple or some other piece of fruit, a juice box, something sweet once in a while, and a sandwich,” he says. “And two days a week, that sandwich was tuna fish. Then my mom got sick. Then she read an article in Prevention magazine, talking about how pregnant women and children were at risk of mercury poisoning, and that so much of our tuna had become contaminated, we simply can’t trust any of it anymore. I remember my mom saying, ‘Well, Sean, you just lost 40 percent of your lunches.’ She never made tuna sandwiches again.” During their time developing the company’s testing tools, Wittenberg and Boches worked with fisherman in Honolulu, Chile, the Philippines and throughout the continental United States and Canada. “We established some very good relationships, gained some knowledge of the seafood supply chain,” Wittenberg says. “So in 2013, when we decided to transform ourselves from a testing company into a product

company, we had a pretty good idea who we wanted to work with, and how the industry functioned.” They created a plan that set out how their fish would be acquired and tested, placed into cold storage and shipped to Thailand, where the cooking and canning is done on manufacturing lines reserved solely for Safe Catch products. “It was a pretty steep learning curve,” he says. “But we threw ourselves out there and learned how to do it. . . . It was tough, but we’re pleased with where we’ve arrived.” Now the cans are on the shelves at thousands of locations, from health-food stores to grocery chains. They’ve used social media to get the word out, of course, and recruited major “influencers” around the world—elite athletes, scientists, actors, authors, moms and kids—to lend their own name and brand to tell people about Safe Catch. And then there are the upsidedown cans. “When you are doing as much as we are, and you are as poor as we are, you have to communicate about your product in any and every way you can,” Wittenberg says. “The best way to do that is on the grocery store shelves. We just have a lot to say, a lot of information we want to get out there, so we say it on our labels. And by turning the can upside-down, we can put a label on the top, and use it to say more stuff. That’s the reason for the upside-down can.” And perhaps, metaphorically— it’s also a symbol of Safe Catch’s push to turn the industry upsidedown as well? “That’d be nice, but it’s going to take more than one company in California,” Wittenberg says. “We’ve enjoyed some success, definitely. And the industry is watching. So who knows? The product is catching on, so to speak, with health and wellness customers. We might be able to bring confidence back to the shelves, and put more tuna back in kids’ lunch bags.” Safe Catch, 85 Liberty Ship Way, Ste. 203, Sausalito. 415.944.4442. safecatch.com.

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that tests the mercury level of every fish before buying, cooking and canning it. Most companies test one or two fish out of a larger batch. This is not effective: two fish of the same size, caught at the same time, could have wildly varying levels of mercury. As Wittenberg explains, the FDA has set a mercury limit in fish of 1.0 parts per million—meaning that mercury is safe as long as it’s consumed at that level or lower, according to the government. But that’s not good enough for Wittenberg and Boches. Safe Catch set its own, stricter mercury limits, which the company says are between three and 10 times stricter than the government’s, depending on the fish and the product. Safe Catch’s wild albacore tuna, for example, is held to a safety standard of .3 ppm (three times stricter), while its Safe Catch Elite Wild Tuna must meet a standard of .1 ppm (10 times stricter that the FDA). Using those standards, the company rejects an average of one out of every three tuna it tests—leaving one to ask, what happens to those other fish? “They end up in the marketplace, probably purchased by some other company,” Wittenberg says. “If they’ve made it as far as testing, we know they’re basically good fish. They’re just not good enough for us.” Before Safe Catch was called Safe Catch, it was a technology company devoted to developing new forms of testing fish for mercury levels. The process they developed, Wittenberg says, is a proprietary product, details of which he cannot legally reveal in too much detail. Wittenberg and company set out to perfect the process more than a decade ago, then began presenting the new technology to seafood companies, offering to test and certify their catches. Safe Catch was then a testing company, but after a number of big tuna companies passed, the team decided to take the knowledge and the testing device and swim in a different direction. The company’s goals are manifold: to produce healthier tuna and do it in a way that might


Dining Brian Cary

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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FORWARD AND BACK Chef Shane McAnelly wants to revive some of the timeless dishes he learned to cook in culinary school at his new restaurant.

New Classics

Healdsburg’s new Brass Rabbit reinvents old-school standards BY FLORA TSAPOVSKY

L

obster thermidor, lamb Wellington and Peking duck a l’orange aren’t exactly cutting-edge, but Healdsburg chef Shane McAnelly wants to give the classic dishes and others like them their due at his new restaurant, the Brass Rabbit.

“When you’re in a culinary school, this is the stuff you do,”

says McAnelly, who also runs the four-year-old Chalkboard nearby, “and you don’t see them anymore. It’s fun to prepare these dishes and share them with people who never had them before. They’re classic for a reason.” While the name Brass Rabbit was inspired by British gastropubs, McAnelly says the concept is “classic Americana fine dining, seasonal with a California edge.” That might sound like a lot of

restaurants, but the difference, McAnelly says, is to mix the classics with local ingredients. “In the Wellington, for example, instead of beef, we’re using local Sonoma lamb,” he says. “When we serve a beef bourguignon, we make it using a traditional Julia Child recipe, but add fresh radishes and asparagus from the Chalk Hill farm.” The lobster thermidor ($46), an impressive dish ordered by many

on the night of my visit, is adorned with hackleback caviar provided by a young San Francisco venture—the Caviar Company—run by two sisters not yet in their 30s. The same caviar decorates the delicate eggs mimosa appetizer ($8), two deviled eggs filled with crème fraîche– whipped yolk and chives. “We had to have deviled eggs on the menu,” McAnelly says. Right next to the throwback party snack, and alongside a crispy toast with a heap of traditional rabbit rillettes ($10), is a creamy, tangy and rich salad made of burrata, coal-roasted beets and grilled avocado ($13). “Burrata by Di Stefano, out of Pomona, is the best domestic burrata I’ve ever had,” McAnelly says, “so I want to keep it throughout the year.” The avocado, what McAnelly calls “a stand-out Californian ingredient,” had to be on the menu, too, he says. “I like to char avocado, as it’s so creamy and buttery, and its meatiness comes out when you grill it.” The six-foot, Argentinian-style wood-burning grill is the centerpiece of the open kitchen, and features a rotisserie and plancha (griddle); it’s responsible for one of the best chicken dishes I’ve had in the North Bay. The lemony, chimichurri-rubbed halfchicken ($24) arrives with a fresh stone fruit and panzanella salad comprising crispy, grilled sourdough chunks, nectarines, plums, pickled onion and salty feta. The chicken skin is wonderfully crispy and the meat tender and juicy; the salad is a summery celebration that complements the savory chicken perfectly. “You won’t always find chicken on fine dining menus,” says McAnelly. “But there are a couple of markets here that sell grilled chicken, and they were my inspiration. The chicken doesn’t usually look pretty, but when you bite into it, the flavor is crazy good.” This casual, flavor-first approach to reinvented classics helps the Brass Rabbit stand out in a town filled with good restaurants. The Brass Rabbit, 109 Plaza St., Healdsburg.707.473.8580.


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TS ©P N

All-American grape flies its freak flag BY JAMES KNIGHT

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Port maker Bill Reading found it by chance when he learned that one of his major sources for Petite Sirah and other red wine grapes also grows five acres of Norton. “In 2012 I bought a ton, and have been buying a ton a year ever since then,” Reading says. “I love the story behind it, and I really like the characteristics it exhibits.” The story behind the Norton grape has more twists and turns than the story of Zinfandel, which

some Norton supporters see as an usurper of the grape’s rightful claim as America’s “heritage grape.” Put author Todd Kliman’s Wild Vine on your reading list if you’ve got the leisure time; published in 2010, the book follows a quirky cast of characters, both historical and contemporary, from the cruel farce of the Virginia Company’s vinicultural efforts at Jamestown through the recent sortof-resurgence of the Norton grape. The who, again? Long story short, a despondent young Virginia doctor and amateur botanist named Daniel Norton set out to accomplish what no less a green thumb than Thomas Jefferson failed to do: create an all-American wine that could hold its own against the great wines of France. Somewhere around 1820, Norton tried to hybridize native grapes with a Vitis vinifera cultivar from Burgundy—not an unusual preoccupation, since long before hybrids were considered as a solution to the fungal diseases and root louses that invaded European vineyards and then California, would-be vintners wished to tame the “foxy” flavor of native grapes. But one experiment went awry when “rogue” pollen from nearby Vitis aestivalis produced the seed of a grape that Norton called, with 19th-century frankness, the “Seedling.” Listed in a nursery catalogue in 1822, the Norton vine was later taken up in Missouri, where a wine industry thrived until Prohibition. Norton wines were served at the White House and won top prizes in European competitions. When the business picked up again in California, nobody cared about Norton anymore, and the five acres grown by Heringer Estates, a fourth-generation operation in Clarksburg, doesn’t even register on official acreage reports. Norton has a reputation for producing big wines, and it’s not short on anthocyanins. “It’s fascinating how quickly it takes on the color of the skins,” Reading says. His Sonoma Portworks Aris Clarksburg Norton Port ($38) shows late-summer arbor aromas of grapes, figs and dates, and a sweet, earthy tobacco note. Any fan of traditional port would go wild for this.


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HERE WE GO AGAIN The 233-mile Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline will start

in Malin, Ore., and snake beneath five major rivers on its way to Coos Bay.


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With memories of Standing Rock still fresh, a proposed fracked gas pipeline in Oregon threatens West Coast water BY WILL PARRISH

O

n a rainy weekday afternoon last November, about 20 people from Northern California joined a 200-person rally outside the Oregon capitol in Salem. They had assembled partly in support of the struggle against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in North Dakota. In the weeks prior, police on the northern Great Plains had inflicted beatings on anti-DAPL protesters, shot hundreds with concussion grenades and rubber bullets, and even deployed military-surplus equipment such as armored vehicles and a long-range acoustic device, a noisy crowd-control device that reportedly shattered at least one person’s eardrums.

The main focus of the Salem demonstration, however, was an infrastructure project similar to the DAPL but much closer to home. Spurred by the newfound ability to extract vast shale deposits from the Rocky Mountains’ western slopes via hydrologic fracturing (fracking), a Canadian oil and gas company named Veresen has proposed to ship natural gas from the Rockies west to Asian markets via a newly constructed liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal in Coos Bay, Ore., where gas would be chilled and liquefied for easier and cheaper storage and transport. Known as the Jordan Cove Energy Project, it would be the first Pacific Coast LNG terminal. The terminal would be supplied by the 233-mile Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline, which would originate at a natural gas transport hub near Malin, Ore., and snake beneath five major rivers on its way to Coos Bay. One river beneath which the pipeline would be plumbed is the

mighty Klamath, which rises in southern Oregon and meets the ocean roughly 240 miles away at the Humboldt-Del Norte county lines. At the rally, indigenous people from the Klamath Basin talked about building a stronger interstate alliance against the project. “We gotta help our neighbors, the Oregonians!” a Hoopa Valley tribal member who identified herself as Missy, and who resides outside the Northern California river town of Orleans, proclaimed into a bullhorn. “They may not know they need our help. But they need our help!” Missy then pondered whether opposition to the Jordan Cove Energy Project would require a direct-action campaign similar to the one at Standing Rock. “I look at what’s going on over at Standing Rock, and it makes me scared. But if we have to do the same thing here, will you do that with us here?” she asked. The crowd let out an affirmative whoop.

Frack Attack The nationwide boom in horizontal fracturing (or “fracking”) has fostered numerous proposals to push oil and natural gas out to coastal ports through newly constructed pipelines, but resistance to these plans is also increasing, in part because thousands of people who visited Standing Rock last fall returned home and took up local fights. In 2016, the Federal Energy Regulation Commission (FERC) twice rejected Veresen’s applications to build the Jordan Cove Energy Project. Leaders of Donald Trump’s administration, however, have vowed to see the project through. At a presentation to the Institute of International Finance forum in Washington on April 20th, Gary Cohn, director of the White House National Economic Council (and former Goldman Sachs president), vowed that Trump will step up approvals for LNG export terminals in the name of boosting the U.S. economy, and then specifically referred to the Jordan Cove project. “The first thing we’re going to do is we’re going to permit an LNG export facility in the Northwest,” Cohn said. California has a critical link to the Jordan Cove project: the 680mile Ruby Pipeline, completed in 2011, which delivers the natural gas from the Rocky Mountain gas fields—the Jonah Field in ) 16

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Pipelines and Battle Lines


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16 Pipeline ( 15 Wyoming, the Piceance Basin in Colorado, the Uintah Basin in northern Utah—to Oregon. Northern California’s main electricity supplier, PG&E, is one of three companies that helped build the Ruby Pipeline and remains a part owner of it. PG&E’s network of pipelines deliver Ruby Pipeline gas to the North Bay and other regions of the Golden State. The Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline, too, would tie into the Ruby Pipeline, without which the Jordan Cove Energy Project could not be built. Opponents of the Jordan Cove project are mounting increasing pressure on Oregon’s elected officials to stop the project, but even the state’s Democratic Party leaders have either embraced the project or stood aside. So far, a combination of grassroots opposition and questionable economics have combined to delay the project, and now many opponents are talking about the possibility of mounting a massive direct action civil disobedience campaign. Perry Chocktoot, a tribal council member of the Klamath Tribes in Chiloquin, Ore., says that indigenous people from throughout the region will be increasingly asserting themselves in the struggle from this point forward. “If this thing gets approved,” he says, “we’re going to call tribes from all over the U.S., Mexico and Canada, to ask for solidarity.”

A Long Time Coming The struggle concerning the Jordan Cover project has been ongoing for more than a decade. The Federal Energy Regulation Commission first considered Jordan Cove in 2007. Back then, it was proposed as an import project, which would have funneled gas from Russia or the Middle East to consumers on the West Coast, especially California. In 2009, FERC issued a permit, but vacated the decision in

2012 as import prospects sank. Then the meltdown at Japan’s Fukushima power plant created a different opportunity. After the disaster, Japan and other Asia Pacific countries began phasing out nuclear power and replacing it mostly with LNG. In 2013, a Veresen subsidiary resubmitted an application to FERC that reenvisioned Jordan Cove as an export terminal that could ship 1 billion cubic feet of gas a day. That’s enough to meet 8 percent of Japan’s current demand. A March 2016 FERC order denying the application noted that Veresen and its partner at the time, Williams Companies of Oklahoma, failed to prove that adequate demand for its product exists in Asia and also noted the “significant opposition from directly-impacted landowners.” In September, Trump alluded to the Jordan Cove project on the campaign trail, during a speech to an oil and gas drilling conference in Pittsburgh, FERC's failure to support it as an alleged example of “the Obama/Clinton restriction agenda.” In February, Trump appointed Veresen CEO Don Althoff as a member of his “infrastructure team” that is developing recommendations on moving major building projects more quickly through regulatory reviews. He is in the process of nominating three new members to the five-member FERC, one of whom, Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commissioner Robert Powelson, a Republican, has stated that people opposing pipeline projects are engaged in a “jihad.” For most of the past decade, landowners along the pipeline right-of-way have been the backbone of an opposition movement to it. This opposition runs the political gamut and includes conservatives concerned with private property rights and the damage to the land. “This company, Veresen, has no concept of what the land means to us,” says Bill Gow, who labels himself a reluctant Donald Trump supporter and who owns a 2,500acre ranch in Myrtle Creek, Ore., which the pipeline would cut through. “We didn’t choose to live

WATER DEFENDER Perry Chocktoot, tribal council member of the Klamath

Tribes in Chiloquin, Ore., says he will rally tribes against the pipeline.

in these places for the money, but that’s all the company cares about.” Opponents note the economic damage the project would wreak on landowners along the pipeline route, as well as the far greater number of jobs that would result from investments in renewable energy. Moreover, the Jordan Cove terminal would be built in a region vulnerable to tsunamis and earthquakes, while the pipeline, full of high-pressure gas, would pass through an area with a high risk of wild fires. The pipeline would also entail a 100-foot-wide linear clear cut across more than 60 miles of mature second- and old-growth forests. Other critics cite climate change as an overriding concern. Since the turn of the millennium, the planet has burned through global temperature records, meaning the sorts of harrowing scenarios climate scientists have long predicted—such as rising seas that swallow up cities, more wrathful storms and droughts, and an accelerating decline in global biodiversity—are increasingly close at hand or

already occurring. While natural gas is often touted as a cleaner burning energy source than coal, fracking wells have been documented to leak substantial amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas that makes gas-fired electricity a worse contributor to the global climate crisis than coal. By giving Western producers access to the world’s largest gas market (consisting of Japan, the biggest consumer, South Korea, Taiwan and other Asia-Pacific countries), the Jordan Cove project could set off a new drilling boom on public lands, particularly in the Piceance Basin of the Rocky Mountains. In a shocking announcement last July, the U.S. Geological Service deemed the western Colorado gas basin to have the second largest reserve of recoverable natural gas in the United States. The announcement thrilled the region’s political and business leaders, who are increasingly clamoring for the Jordan Cove project’s approval.


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Climate Defenders In the absence of federal legislation to scale back the United States’ outsized role in causing and perpetuating the global climate crisis, the West Coast has emerged as one of the world’s most significant climate-change battlegrounds. In recent years, California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia have faced a spate of new fossilfuel infrastructure projects, but grassroots opposition has helped defeat most of them. Eric de Place, director of the Seattle-based Sightline Institute, a climate-change think tank, conceives of the Pacific Northwest as a “thin green line,” since it stands squarely between Asia’s voracious energy markets and huge fossil-fuel deposits in North America’s interior. Since 2010, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia have faced proposals for ) 18

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If built, the project would pull 438 billion cubic feet of natural gas per year out of the ground— almost twice the amount Oregon as a whole consumed in 2015. Construction unions wield enormous power within Oregon’s Democratic Party. They highlight that the project would bring about 150 permanent jobs to the economically stagnant Coos Bay region, also paving the way for a significant expansion of the city’s port through dredging. It would also create an estimated 930 jobs during its four-year construction phase. “There are thousands of qualified pipefitters, electricians, laborers, sheet metal workers, ironworkers and boilermakers across Oregon that will benefit from this work, receiving good wages with benefits for three years of construction,” says John Mohlis, Oregon State Building and Construction Trades Council executive secretary. The port of Coos Bay was among the world’s largest shipping areas for lumber in the 1970s and ’80s, and the promise of new jobs at the declining port has elicited enthusiastic support from area business leaders. Jody McCaffree, a landowner outside of Coos Bay, sees the targeting of this economically depressed area as deliberate, saying that the Jordan Cove consortium chose Coos Bay because the residents in the pipeline route have fewer resources to oppose the project than places like the San Francisco Bay Area, which has larger ports than Coos Bay but doesn’t have “the large environmental groups or the resources like you [find] in California to fight destructive projects like this. “Truth be known,” McCaffree continues, “Jordan Cove came to Coos Bay because every LNG import proposal in California— and there were quite a few at the time—had been derailed for some reason or another. The industry saw Coos Bay as easy pickings.” Most of Oregon’s elected leaders—including most Democratic Party officials, many of whom support measures to

reduce greenhouse gas pollution in other contexts—support the pipeline on economic grounds. Oregon’s State Land Board would need to issue Veresen a permit for the pipeline to be built through coastal Oregon. Gov. Kate Brown is a member of the Land Board and appoints its other two members, but she has largely stood aside as Veresen has attempted to muscle its way through state and local regulatory processes. “It’s incredibly frustrating for communities that are most impacted by this pipeline to see our state government saying they are ready to take action on climate change, but not taking a stand on what could be the largest source of climate pollution in the state,” says Hannah Sohl, executive director of the Medfordbased group Rogue Climate, a leading voice of opposition to the Jordan Cove project. Even Democratic U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, who co-sponsored a bill earlier this year to eliminate 100 percent of U.S. fossil fuel consumption by the year 2050, has tepidly supported the Jordan Cove proposal.


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Pipeline ( 17 roughly 25 LNG terminals, along with six coal export terminals, 15 oil-by-rail facilities and several major new oil and gas pipelines. A poor economic outlook dealt the fatal blow to many of these proposals, including all of the coal export proposals. De Place says “the Jordan Cove project is far from a slam dunk” for Veresen. That’s particularly the case, he notes, because it is competing for markets and investors with the swarm of British Columbia LNG export proposals, which are competing against it in a finite global market for LNG products. De Place hastens to note that the Obama administration was also not particularly friendly to the cause of reining in fossilfuel production. “If anything, the Obama administration was hostile to our cause,” de Place says. “Almost all of the victories we have won so far against new fossil-fuel infrastructure have been fought and won at the local level.” Still, the Trump administration’s loud support for the project had made Versen increasingly optimistic about the project’s chances. On Dec. 9, hours after FERC denied Veresen’s application to build the project, company lobbyist Ray Bucheger wrote a conciliatory email to three Colorado-based oil and gas industry executives with a stake in the project, which were obtained for this story through a records request. “We are currently evaluating our options, but I will say that we need Mr. Trump and his team now more than ever,” Bucheger stated. Veresen has announced that it will resubmit its application to FERC in August, and that it is optimistic about receiving federal approval in 2018 or 2019.

Indigenous Opposition As with the Dakota Access Pipeline and Keystone XL pipeline struggles, indigenous people are likely to play a key

role in the project’s outcome. The Karuk, Yurok and Klamath tribes have all passed resolutions opposing it. They note that it threatens cultural resources, traditional tribal territories and burial grounds. Numerous individual members of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe and the Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians have also come forward to oppose it. Within California, very few groups have defended water resources as strongly as Klamath Basin tribes, for whom the river’s storied fisheries form a basis of their survival as distinct cultures. Many have fought for years to remove four hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River. They had a major presence at the Dakota Access Pipeline struggle on the North Dakota plains, and around 75 traveled by bus to speak out at a series of open houses in Oregon in early March. They have expressed their concerns about the potential for damage to the river during both the pipeline construction process, as well as from potential leaks and spills. Sammy Gensaw, a 22-year-old Yurok fisherman from Klamath Glen, Calif., notes that indigenous people have developed long-term resilience that is now lending itself to the struggle against the global climate crisis. Indigenous people know what it’s like to be pushed to the edge of survival, he says, and because of climate change, existential threats are now something that all of humanity shares in common. “The first fight of my ancestors was to have blood flow though their veins and air in their lungs, because at one point, the U.S. government deemed it a crime to be native and punishment was death,” Gensaw says. “So my people know what it is to stand up for our very survival.” Will Parrish’s web site is at willparrishreports.com. Follow him on Twitter at @willparrishca.


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Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide

B O D E G A B AY & S A N TA R O S A

Peaceful Voyage

The original ‘Golden Rule’ peace ship set sail in 1958 to stop U.S. nuclear testing during the Cold War, becoming the first peacekeeping vessel. Recently recovered and restored by Veterans for Peace, the ship is back on the seas and docking in the North Bay this week to promote a new ban on nuclear weapons. The boat arrives on Thursday, June 15, and is open for tours, Friday–Saturday, June 16–17, at Spud Point Marina (1818 Westshore Road, Bodega Bay). The Golden Rule crew also speaks on how to stop nuclear war before it starts on Saturday, June 17, Veterans Memorial Building, 1351 Maple Ave., Santa Rosa. 7pm. $15. vfpgoldenruleproject.org.

S A N TA R O S A

Freak Flagship Event The region’s most rousing variety show, the North Bay Cabaret, celebrates three years of jaw-dropping entertainment this month with a blowout party featuring a lineup of acclaimed performers, including slam-poet showman Jaime DeWolf, seasoned fire dancer Deaja Girl on Fire and clown-without-borders Clay Mazing, for a Vaudeville-inspired array of music, spoken word, burlesque, bellydance and more. Live painting, an art gallery, raffle and other activities accompany the onstage action. After the big show, stay for an outdoor silent disco and indoor dance party. The North Bay Cabaret’s three-year anniversary happens on Friday, June 16, at Whiskey Tip, 1910 Sebastopol Road, Santa Rosa. 7pm. $20–$25. northbaycabaret.com.

SEBASTOPOL

Community Crawl Sebastopol is going to see a lot of foot traffic this weekend, as the inaugural Lit & Art Crawl of Sebastopol covers ground between the Barlow Center and Main Street. Venues like Copperfield’s Books and HopMonk Tavern will host author and poetry readings, while art receptions and parties take place at locations like Sebastopol Gallery, Kitty Hawk Gallery and Sebastopol Center for the Arts. In addition to these events, drink specials at several of the town’s pubs, coffeehouses and cafes will keep the crowds engaged on Saturday, June 17, in downtown Sebastopol, Main Street and Bodega Avenue. 1pm. Free admission. lit-art-crawl-sebastopol.com.

P E TA L U M A

Let’s Get Eggcited The North Bay’s agricultural bounty is on full display at the annual SonomaMarin Fair, this year themed “Great Eggspectations” and featuring an eggcellent array of animal contests, garden exhibits, chef demonstrations and farm-fun activities. The fair also features the requisite carnival rides, games, food, the famous World’s Ugliest Dog Contest and concert performances from Tower of Power, Jana Kramer, Loverboy, John Michael Montgomery and the daylong Fiesta Latina. The Sonoma-Marin Fair opens Wednesday, June 21, at 175 Fairgrounds Drive, Petaluma. Gates open at noon. $12–$18 (includes concerts and unlimited rides). sonoma-marinfair.org.

—Charlie Swanson

IT’S PRONOUNCED ‘FRONKENSTEEN’ The late Gene Wilder stars in two classic Mel Brooks’ films, ‘Young Frankenstein’ and ‘Blazing Saddles,’ screening at the CULT Film Series on June 15 in Santa Rosa. See Film, p28.


Miller Oberlin

DRIVE ON Melissa Claire stars in ‘Becky’s New Car,’ one of the best of a varied bunch of new shows.

Spice World

‘Becky’s New Car’ leads diverse group of current plays BY DAVID TEMPLETON

I

f variety is the spice of life, then Sonoma County theater lovers are facing one spicy smorgasbord of wildly different plays. 6th Street Playhouse presents a rare revival of the 1968 musical George M! featuring the sensational singing and dancing of Joseph Favalora as mercurial Broadway legend George M. Cohan, with a strong assist from Abbey Lee as Josie Cohan. George M! is nostalgia squared, a dancefilled staging of an old-fashioned show, with spirited performances of beloved chestnuts, from “Give My Regards to Broadway” to “I’m a Yankee Doodle Dandy.” Rating (out of 5): A very different theatrical story, Ruggero Leoncavallo’s classic opera Pagliacci is now playing at

In terms of variety, the freshest of the pack is Steven Dietz’s marvelous Becky’s New Car, directed by Carl Jordan for Sonoma Arts Live. Hilarious and heartfelt, this inventive tale of a woman’s car-themed midlife crisis is crammed with twists, turns, laughs and tears. As Becky, torn between the life she loves and a new possibility she never dreamed possible, Melissa Claire is wonderful. Excellent supporting performances are delivered by Matt Witthaus as Becky’s stunningly understanding husband, and Mike Pavone as the wealthy car buyer who throws her a world-class curve. Sweet and surprising, Becky is one of the best shows of 2017. ‘George M!’ runs through July 9 at 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W. Sixth Street, Santa Rosa. 6thstreetplayhouse.com. ‘Pagliacci’ and ‘Rhapsody of Fools’ run through June 25 at Cinnabar Theater, 3333 N. Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma. cinnabartheater.org. ‘Becky’s New Car’ runs through June 25 at Andrews Hall, 276 E. Napa St., Sonoma. sonomaartslive.org.

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Stage

Cinnabar Theater. Impressively directed by Elly Lichenstein, with co-direction from James Pelican, Pagliacci follows a hard-luck company of actors, torn apart by jealousy and bitterness. Under the strong musical direction of Mary Chun, the show features a remarkable company of first-rate opera singers, including baritone Julio Ferrari as the villainous Tonio, the soprano Julia Hathaway (amazing) as the tragic actress Nedda, and tenor Mark Kratz as the iconic clown-turnedmurderer Pagliacci. It’s one of Cinnabar’s most successful and entertaining opera productions in years. Paired with Pagliacci is the brilliant 20-minute, clown-themed one-act Rhapsody of Fools, written and performed by Christina Lewis, James Pelican and Lluis Valls. An inspired bit of physical comedy, it gives us three hapless backstage crew members, attempting to set up for an opera presentation, ultimately forced to improvise an opera of their own—with a bit of help from the rock band Queen.


Film

BOOKSHELF AUTHOR SERIES

Meet Peter Coyote Saturday, June 24

n

2:00 pm

©2017 PNTS

NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22

2301 Hardies Lane Santa Rosa, CA 95403 (707) 579-4452 schulzmuseum.org

In celebration of the exhibition, It Was a Dark and Stormy Night

Meet actor and writer Peter Coyote, who will read from and sign his latest book, The Rainman’s Third Cure: An Irregular Education, about mentors and the search for wisdom.

Running now through September 10, 2017

Back from Dead

Coyote has acted in over 120 films and is an Emmy award-winning narrator of over 170 documentary films.

‘The Mummy,’ another franchise that won’t die BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

Tickets are free with Museum admission and available starting at 10:00 am on the day of the event.

®

T

he Mummy is a title to reckon with, and this re-re-remake isn’t committed enough to be really bad. Under Alex Kurtzman’s flavorless direction, almost every character is a pain—even the ornery good girl (Annabelle Wallace) seems to have fading hopes of her own importance to the plot.

6/16–6/22

Honorable

Paris Can Wait PG13

11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-8:40 BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Friday, June 16 – Tuesday, June 20

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd Schedule for Fri, June 22nd•- Salads Thu, June Bruschetta • Paninis • Soups • 28th Appetizers

Academy Award “Moore Gives Her BestNominee Performance In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 THE (12:30) 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:20 9:45 RR 50th Anniversary Restoration (12:30) 2:40Noms 4:50 7:10 9:20 2 Academy Award BestROnly! Actor! (1:10 5:15) 7:15 NR Including One Week “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Painterly Work Of Decades Past!” – LA (12:20) 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE5:10 EN 7:30 ROSE (12:45) 3:454:50) 6:45OF 9:45 PG-13 R THEAward SECRET KELLS (12:20 2:35 7:10 9:35 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:00 NR SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One Could Make This 4:00 7:10 R Believable One of (1:15) This Year’s Best!”9:40 – Newsday (11:50 2:10 4:25) 9:10Chronicle G If It Were Fiction!” – San 6:50 Francisco

8 Great BeersBest on Tap + Wine by theFilm! Glass and Bottle Foreign Language

MONTEREY POP

THE BOOK OF HENRY CARS 3

ONCE 8 Academy Award Noms Including PRODIGAL SONS R (1:00) 3:10 5:20 Best Picture, Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu

WONDER WOMAN MILK (1:00 4:00) 7:00 9:55

MILK – Rolling Stone “Haunting and Hypnotic!” “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly Funny!” (1:30) 4:10No 6:45 9:30 R – Newsweek PG-13 Passes THE GIRL THE TATTOO Please Note: 1:30 Show Sat, PleaseWITH Note: No No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No No 6:45 6:45 Show Show Thu Thu WAITRESS

WAITRESS (1:10) 4:30 7:30 NR (1:30) 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award4:00 Noms Including “★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – USA Today

MY COUSIN RACHEL

FROST/NIXON (12:45 3:00 5:15) 7:30 9:35 PG-13

(2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “Swoonly Romatic, Hilarious!” (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine

PARIS CAN WAIT

REVOLuTIONARY ROAD

“Deliciously LA Times (12:30PARIS, 2:45unsettling!” 5:00) 7:15 9:20 PG JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– R (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R THE Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:15 PG-13

The Book of Henry

PG13 10:45-1:15-3:45-6:15-8:40 Dean PG13 10:30-12:45-3:15-6:00-8:15 Thurs 6/22 only: 10:30-12:45-3:15 My Cousin Rachel PG13 10:30-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30 I, Daniel Blake R 1:30 A Quiet Passion PG13 4:00 The Wedding Plan PG 11:00 The Lost City of Z PG13 6:45 No show times on Thurs 6/22! The Hero R Sneak Preview Thur 6/22 @7pm! Opens Friday 6/23! Beatriz at Dinner R Sneak Preview Thurs 6/22 @7:15pm! Opens Friday 6/23! 551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

ROUGH NIGHT

A BOuLDERING FLICK (12:30 PuRE: 2:50 5:10) 7:25 9:45 R No Passes Michael Moore’s Feb 26th at 7:15 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROuS

SICKO MOVIES THE MORNING MAN IN AMERICA THEIN MUMMY

Starts Fri, June 29th! Fri,4:50) Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE PAPERS (12:15 2:30 7:20 9:40 Advance Tickets On Sale Now at BoxPG-13 Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 10:15 R AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! 10:20 AM CHANGELING (3:00) 9:15 Final Week! Venessa Redgrave Meryl Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH AND CHONG’S 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

Bistro Menu Items Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

(1:30 4:15) 7:10 9:55

FOR SHOWTIMES: 707.525.8909

IT COMES AT NIGHT

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY 2 PG-13

TOMB RAIDER As far as mummies go, Princess Ahmanet is better-looking than most.

RAVENFILMCENTER.COM HEALDSBURG

The sacred ancient text The Mummy is based on is Tom Cruise Script A1, “The Menschification of Tom Cruise,” in which our boyman must learn to be nice to other people instead of just standing around grinning, amazed at his own naughty mischief. Nick Morton (Cruise) and Chris Vail (Jake Johnson) are U.S. soldiers in Iraq doing a little archaeological looting. After being shot at by some insurgents, Morton and Vail request an air strike, and the drone’s bomb crater reveals a tomb. Inside is Middle-Kingdom Princess Ahmanet (Sofia Boutella), wrapped alive, tossed into a sarcophagus far from home in Mesopotamia. The military hauls the cursed mummy to a museum in London. There, Ahmanet gets out and goes on the town, sucking all the life out of passersby. Trailing her is Dr. Henry Jekyll (a not-bad Russell Crowe), as bearded, baleful and tweedy as Professor Quatermass. The doctor, and his companion Hyde (yes, that Jekyll and Hyde)— copper-green of face, shiny like a fly’s abdomen—are heads of a secret organization that studies and captures monsters. The 1990s Brendan Fraser movies are now the official Mummy flicks of so many childhoods. Thus it’s probably a doomed effort to recall the 1932 Boris Karloff version, and far less to recall the 1960s Hammer remakes starring His Magnificence, Christopher Lee. There’s nothing Zeitgeisty in this version, despite the Iranian prologue. True, the dead princess is alluring in her diaphanous linens, seen in desert-sunset-lit flashbacks, but Boutella, never stays lovely enough to kindle any love and Cruise doesn’t take the bait. Kurtzman, apparently, prefers the kid fodder of zombies—rot instead of romance. ‘The Mummy’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.


MUSIC WITH A VIEW The scenery

and great lineup of bands at Huichica are hard to beat.

Vine Time

Huichica Festival pulls off a winner BY STETT HOLBROOK

I

don’t know if it’s true, but I once heard a quote attributed to the Clash’s Mick Jones after he attended a Blue Öyster Cult concert in the 1980s. “They could fit more people in here, if everyone weren’t wearing bell bottoms,” said the peg-legged punk rocker in what I imagine was a droll tone. That quip, real or not, came to mind as I attended Gundlach Bundschu Winery’s excellent Huichica Festival this past Saturday. The two-day event drew the skinny-jean masses to see a compelling lineup of indie rock/ folk bands. But in spite of the crowds, it wasn’t crowded. The spacious winery and vineyard venue allowed fans to get as close to the four stages as they liked

23

FRIDAY, JUNE 16

ROCK GUITAR GOD George Lynch TH I S Y A FRI D

LYNCH MOB

“Wicked Sensation” SPECIAL GUESTS Feather Witch

TH FRIDIS AY

RECORD LIKE A PRO

AT RSU RECORDING & FILMWORKS

STATE OF THE ART AUDIO AND FILM PRODUCTION

SUMMER RECORDING PACKAGES AVAILABLE!

CONTACT JARED @ 707.694.1785 FOR RATES & INFO

NO RTH BAY BO HE M I AN | JU NE 14-2 0, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM

Music

or to spread out and have a quiet picnic amid rows of ripening vines with bottles of GunBun wine in hand while still hearing tunes wafting in the air. That’s my kind of festival. But the real fashion statement wasn’t skinny jeans or ironic kitten T-shirts, but the noise-cancelling headphones hipster parents had clapped on their kids’ ears. The headphones—and the kids—were everywhere. There were kidfriendly activities (hula hoops, boat races, garland making), but really the kid-friendliest activity was just being able to walk about with ease and enjoy the great music. The all-ages, laid-back crowd gave the event a feel-good vibe that reminded me of a summer day on the grass in Golden Gate Park, but with well-chosen food and beverage trucks to keep everyone fed and lubricated. While I couldn’t stay to enjoy a full day of music, I heard some great stuff. The schedule and short sets were designed so that there was little overlap between one band and another. Very thoughtful. I discovered a great new band playing in the Old Redwood Barn stage—the Cool Ghouls. Their ringing, compulsively rocking song “Sundial” is still playing in my head. I heard the excellent Darren Wareham, former frontman of Galaxie 500, a late ’80s, early ’90s lo-fi, post-punk pioneer I somehow missed on their first go-round. How is it that I never heard the great song “Tugboat” before? There was a twangy 1970s rock vibe that ran through several bands best showcased by Beachwood Sparks and the Tyde. Both bands are part of my personal summer soundtrack now. Parking was a breeze. It was a bit of a hike from the outer vineyard parking lot to the venue, but the south facing views of Sonoma Valley made it pleasant walk. If you didn’t want to walk, yellow school buses ferried festival-goers to the entrance. Too bad the winery doesn’t allow camping during the event. I’d come back next year and stake out a spot so I could enjoy the full lineup of what is my new favorite music festival.


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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Music

FRI JUN 16

Midnight Band SAT JUN 17

Super Kool Thangs

Concerts

FRI JUN 23

Sugar Foot

SAT, JUNE 17

SAT JUN 24

Julianne and Derek Hough

FRI JUN 30

TWO SHOWS!

Move—Beyond— Live on Tour

UB 707 Igniters

SUN, JULY 16

SAT JUL 1

Project 4 Band

Sabrina Carpenter The De-Tour

ALL SHOWS 9PM

special guests

Happy Hour $

Alex Aiono & New Hope Club

Mon–Fri 4–6pm

4 WELL DRINKS + SELECT BEER & WINE MON, SEP 11

Steve Winwood

SONOMA COUNTY Cotati Jazz Festival

Thirty-seven years young, the festival includes performances by the Sidemen, Jami Jamison Band and others, with crafts, raffle, food and family fun. Jun 17, 12pm. Free admission. La Plaza Park, Old Redwood Highway, Cotati, cotatijazz.com.

Country Summer Music Festival

Northern California’s largest country-music weekend features Darius Rucker, Thomas Rhett, Justin Moore and others. Jun 16-18. $79 and up. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, countrysummer.com.

Lynch Mob

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

George Lynch, former lead guitarist of Dokken, fronts this longtime outfit. Local rockers FeatherWitch open. Jun 16, 7:30pm. $35-$45. Rock Star University House of Rock, 3410 Industrial Dr, Santa Rosa. 707.791.3482.

MARIN COUNTY Chris Robinson’s Hootenanny Heroes 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

THURSDAY

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI THU JUN 15

JUN 16

AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS !!

SATURDAY

MELVIN SEALS & JGB $30/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

FRI JUN 16

TIMOTHY O'NEIL BAND + MR DECEMBER, THE CRUX DUO $10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SAT JUN 17

MANZANITA FALLS

+ PHOSPHENE, TINY PYRAMIDS $10/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

MON JUN 19

LEE FIELDS &

EXPRESSIONS JUN 15 THE SOUL• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ FRIDAY

JUN 17

WONDER BREAD 5 ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

COREY FELDMAN ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

SUICIDEGIRLS: BLACKBURLESQUE JUN 18 HEART BURLESQUE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ SUNDAY

TUESDAY

JUN 20

THE CRYSTAL METHOD EDM• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

IGOR AND THE RED JUN 24 ELVISES ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ SATURDAY

THE WBLK DANCEHALL MASSIVE

JUN 30

FRIDAY

NRBQ

GAPPY RANKS

FRIDAY

SAVED BY THE 90S

MNE SINGERS SERIES WITH $10–15/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED JUN 21

SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND SERIES (EVERY 3RD WEDNESDAY)

$8/DOORS 7:30/SHOW 8/ALL AGES

THU JUN 22

MYSTIC ROOTS BAND CD RELEASE EVENT !!

$13/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

JUL 14

ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

7 ⁄25 Ozomatli, 7 ⁄21 TREVOR HALL, 7 ⁄26 Colin Hay, 7 ⁄28 Jonathan Richman, 7 ⁄29 JD Souther, 7 ⁄31 Kabaka Pyramid , 8 ⁄4 George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, 8 ⁄19 Cali Roots presents IrieFuse, Clear Conscience, Dollar $hort, DJ Jacques from WBLK, 8 ⁄20 Judith Owen, 8 ⁄26 David Cook, 8 ⁄31 Talking Dreads

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

Celebrated roots-rock songwriter and his revolving door of Bay Area musicians takes the stage in the Grate Room. Jun 16, 8pm. $40. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Langhorne Slim & Sara Watkins

Nashville-based folk troubadour and Los Angelesbased bluegrass pop star perform their ramblin’ tunes. Jun 15, 8pm. $27-$32. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Mill Valley Music All-Stars

Ensemble returns to play “The Last Waltz” in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Band’s final concert in San Francisco. Jun 17, 8pm. $20$35. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

NAPA COUNTY Donavon Frankenreiter Veteran songwriter and

part-time surfer plays his newest batch of laidback and sentimental folk-pop with a special mystery guest. Jun 16, 8pm. $22. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Taj Mo

Legendary musicians Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’ share the stage and perform from their new collaborative album. Jun 15, 8pm. $55-$85. Uptown Theatre, 1350 Third St, Napa. 707.259.0123.

Clubs & Venues SONOMA COUNTY Aqus Cafe

Jun 14, the Aqus Jazz Project. Jun 16, Desi & the Mish. Jun 17, Redwood Highway Ramblers. Jun 18, 2pm, Kenneth Roy Berry. Jun 21, West Coast Songwriters Competition. 189 H St, Petaluma. 707.778.6060.

Barley & Hops Tavern

Jun 15, Hilary Marckx. Jun 16, Aidan Eljumaily. Jun 17, Burnside. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

Bergamot Alley

Jun 20, Aqua Velvets. 328-A Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.433.8720.

The Big Easy

Jun 15, Miss Moonshine. Jun 16, Shake Baby Shake and Chris Laterzo. Jun 17, Cabbagehead and Chris Laterzo. Jun 18, the Sidemen. Jun 20, Bobby Jo Valentine. Jun 21, Adam Miller Quintet. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Brewsters Beer Garden Jun 15, 5pm, JimBo Trout. Jun 16, 5pm, Firewheel. Jun 17, 3pm, Foxes in the Henhouse. Jun 18, 3pm, Matt Lax. 229 Water St N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

Coffee Catz

Jun 16, 3:30pm, PR Jazz Duo. 6761 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.6600.

El Verano Inn

Jun 17, 9pm, Fly by Train. 705 Laurel Ave, El Verano. 707.935.0611.

Flamingo Lounge

Jun 16, Midnight Band. Jun 17,

Super Cool Thang. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

Gaia’s Garden

Jun 14, Felicia McFall. Jun 16, Duo Guiliani. Jun 21, Haute Flash Quartet. 1899 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.544.2491.

Guerneville Library

Jun 17, 2pm, Los Gu’achis. 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.9004.

Healdsburg Plaza

Jun 20, 6pm, Coffis Brothers & the Mountain Men. 217 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.431.3301.

Hood Mansion Lawn

Jun 16, 7pm, Funky Fridays with Volker Strifler. 389 Casa Manana Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.833.6288.

HopMonk Sebastopol

Jun 15, Melvin Seals & JGB. Jun 16, Timothy O’Neil Band with Mr December and the Crux duo. Jun 17, Manzanita Falls single release show. Jun 19, Monday Night Edutainment with Gappy Ranks. Jun 21, Songwriters in the Round. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

HopMonk Sonoma

Jun 16, 8pm, Erica Sunshine Lee. Jun 17, 1pm, Shelby, Texas. Jun 17, 8pm, Missy and Heine Andersen. Jun 18, 1pm, Kyle Williams. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

Jun 17, the Gentlemen Soldiers. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Lagunitas Tap Room

Jun 14, US Elevator. Jun 15, Travis Hayes. Jun 16, Michael Brown Band. Jun 17, Sin Silver. Jun 18, Roy Book Binder. Jun 21, TV Mike & the Scarecrows. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Bistro

Jun 15, Susan Sutton. Jun 16, Greg Hester Jazz Combo. Jun 17, Brulee. Jun 18, Eric Wiley. Jun 20, Mac & Potter. Jun 21, Willie Perez. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.

Mc T’s Bullpen

Jun 16, DJ MGB. Jun 17, Stone Peoples Medicine. Jun 18, 4pm, Barbara Olney and friends. Jun 18, 9pm, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Montgomery Village Shopping Center

Jun 15, 5:30pm, Spencer Day. Jun 17, 12pm, Petty Theft. Jun 18, 1pm, Buck Ford. 911 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.545.3844.


Jay Blakesberg

Thu 6/15 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $27 Adv/$32 DOS

Langhorne Slim & Sara Watkins Fri 6/16 • Doors 8pm ⁄ 25– 28 $

$

Bonnie Hayes & Friends Sat 6/17 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $22–$25

with

Big Sam's Funky Nation

ANGELEX feat Angeline Saris from

Zepparella and Lex Razon of Vinyl

Thu 6/22 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $25–$30 ⁄All Ages/Seated

Matt Schofield

Fri 6/23 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $22 Adv/$27 DOS

Mustache Harbor

Sat 6/24 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $60 Adv–$65 DOS An Evening with Joey Burns and John

Convertino of Calexico

Sun 6/25 • Doors 6pm ⁄ $35–$40

THE WEIGHT BAND

feat members of The Band, Levon Helm Band & Rick Danko Group performing songs of THE BAND with Moonalice

Tue 6/27 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $19–$22

MEETING OF MINDS Blues guitar legends Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’ collaborate

onstage as TajMo on June 15 at Napa’s Uptown Theatre. See Concerts, adjacent page.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

Jun 16, Tudo Bem. Jun 17, Dave Hamilton. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Mystic Theatre

Jun 15, Lee Fields& the Expressions. Jun 16, Wonderbread 5. Jun 17, Corey Feldman & the Angels. Jun 18, Suicide Girls. Jun 20, the Crystal Method. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Northwood Restaurant

Rio Nido Roadhouse

Jun 17, 6pm, Ten-year anniversary party with Weekend at Bernie’s, Levi Lloyd and others. 14540 Canyon 2 Rd, Rio Nido. 707.869.0821.

Ruth McGowan’s Brewpub

Jun 17, Manzanita Moon. 131 E First St, Cloverdale. 707.894.9610.

Sonoma Cider

Jun 15, 8:30pm, the Thugz. 19400 Hwy 116, Monte Rio. 707.865.2454.

Jun 16, Robert Herrera and Ian Scherer. 44F Mill St, Healdsburg. 707.723.7018.

Phoenix Theater

Sonoma Speakeasy

Jun 17, the Rinds with the Quitters and Modern Enemy. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap Jun 15, 6:30pm, Alec Fuhrman. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern

Jun 16, 6:30pm, Marty O’Reilly solo. Wed, 6pm, Levi Lloyd and friends. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Redwood Cafe

Jun 14, DJ Loisaida birthday celebration. Jun 15, Midnight Sun Massive. Jun 16, Hot Grubb. Jun 17, 3pm, Shawna Miller student recital. Jun 17, 8:30pm, the Thugz. Jun 18, 5pm, Gold Coast Jazz Band. Jun 19, open mic with DJ Loisaida. Jun 21, Irish set dancing. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

Jun 14, the Acrosonics. Jun 15, Plan Be. Jun 16, 6:30pm, Bruce Gordon. Jun 16, 8pm, Three on a Match. Jun 17, 6pm, Full Circle. Jun 17, 8pm, the Poyntlyss Sistars. Jun 18, 5pm, Lynne O & the Riots. Jun 18, 8:30pm, acoustic blues jam. Jun 20, American roots night with Lou Rodriguez and friends. 452 First St E, Ste G, Sonoma. 707.996.1364.

Trentadue Winery

Jun 15, 5pm, the Hots. 19170 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.433.2768.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse Jun 15, Levi’s Workshop. Jun 16, Weekend at Bernie’s. Jun 17, the Jones Gang. Jun 18, 3pm, David Thom Invitational Bluegrass Jam. Jun 19, the Blues Defenders pro jam. Jun 20, open mic. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

Whiskey Tip

Jun 16, North Bay Cabaret three-year anniversary. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

Gappy Ranks & 7th Street Band with Rocker-T

Thu 6/29 • Doors 7pm ⁄ 25– 27 Aoife O'Donovan (SOLO) with Victoria George Wed 6/30 • Doors 8pm ⁄ $25 $

$

The Purple Ones

Outside Dining 7 Days a Week

Din n er & A Show

Rivertown Trio Jun 16 The with Julie Barnard Fri

8:00 / No Cover

Rancho Allstars Jun 17 The with Special Guest Johnny Rawls Sat

Soul-BluesAward Winner 8:30 The Ultimate Tribute to Fleetwood Mac Jun 24 Fleetwood Mask 8:30 Sat

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

BBQS ON THE LAWN 2017

Sun

“Blues and Rock & Roll Hall of Famer” Jun 18 Elvin Bishop and Father’s special guest Master Soul Man Day Johnny Rawls

Castro and the Jun 25 Tommy Painkillers and special guest Sun

Ron Thompson & The Resistors

★ ★ 4TH OF JULY WEEKEND ★ ★

Our Annual Beatle Q with Jul 2 The Sun Kings Sun Tue

The Zydeco Flames (of course!) Rowan’s Jul 9 Peter Annual Birthday Bash Jul 4 Sun

with The Rowan Brothers Jul 16 Ruthie Foster Family Band plus Volker Strifler Sun

Insatiable Tribute to Prince

BBQ online ticketing at www.ranchonicasio.com

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

On the Town Square, Nicasio

Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

www.ranchonicasio.com

Windsor Town Green

Jun 15, 6pm, Great Wide Open. 701 McClelland Dr, Windsor, townofwindsor.com.

MARIN COUNTY Ali Akbar College of Music

Jun 17, Indian Classical Music. 215 West End Ave, San Rafael. 415.454.6372.

Belvedere Community Park

Jun 18, 3:45pm, Phil Claypool with the Marin Men’s Chorus. 450 San Rafael Ave, Belvedere.

City Green

Jun 17, 5pm, Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra. 901 Sherman Ave, Novato. novato.org.

Fenix

Jun 14, pro blues jam with Wayne “Guitar” Sanders. Jun 15, Haulin Oats. Jun 16, Sugar Rush. Jun 17, the Overcommitments. Jun 18, 11:30am, Father’s Day Brunch with Sam Johnson. Jun 20, James Harman Band. Jun 21, Pro Blues Jam with the Bobby Young Project. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

Gabrielson Park Jun 16, 6:30pm, the

) 26

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE CALENDAR THU JUN 15 • LEVI’S WORKSHOP EVERY 2ND THURSDAY 8PM / 21+ / FREE FRI JUN 16 • WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT JUN 17 • THE JONES GANG AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SUN JUN 18 • DAVID THOM INVITATIONAL BLUEGRASS JAM EVERY 1ST & 3RD SUNDAY—OPEN JAM 3PM INVITATIONAL 5PM /ALL AGES / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

i-taweh (roots/reggae from Jamaica) wed jun 14 with special Guest dJ loisaida 8pm/Dancing/$10 thu MidniGht sun MassiVe jun 15 8pm/Dancing/$10 fri hott GRubb jun 16 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 sat the thuGZ jun 17 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 thu captain paisley jun 22 8pm/Dancing/$5 fri MR. blackwell and the jun 23 Mba’s 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 sat jun 24 dGiin 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 lee tafaRi

thu jun 29 acoustic to Vinyl (atV) 8pm/Dancing/$10

pRide celebRation

fri 7pm/Dancing/$10 jun 30 Fundraiser for Russian River Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence thu jul 6 buZZy MaRtin 8pm/$5 fri MisneR & sMith jul 7 8:30pm/$10 sat foxes in the henhouse jul 8 7:30pm/$10 RestauRant & Music Venue check out the aRt exhibit Visit ouR website, Redwoodcafe.coM 8240 old Redwood hwy, cotati 707.795.7868

25 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch


Music ( 25

26 NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Daniel Castro Band. Anchor St, Sausalito.

George’s Nightclub

Jun 16, Tupac Turn Up Show. Jun 17, DJ party. Jun 18, Banda Night. 842 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.226.0262.

HopMonk Novato

Jun 15, Rock Candy and the Role Models. Jun 16, the Cheesballs. Jun 17, Fog Swamp and the Incubators. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

SAN GERONIMO

Barranca #18 by Robert Pearson McChesney, 1978

July 2

THE SEXTONES July 9

ORDINARY SONS 1–4pm Every Sunday this Summer thru 9/24 NO COVER Live music, cocktails & food outside in our garden @goosegandernapa

1245 Spring St, St. Helena 707.967.8779

Father’s Day BBQ SUNDAY • JUNE 18 • 12–3PM Celebrate Dad and bring your family! Unlimited Mesquite Grilled BBQ Pork Ribs, Chicken, and Tri Tip Sides • Special Raw Bar serving fresh shucked Tomales Bay oysters & ceviche 45 Adults / 20 Kids 12 and under 21780 Highway 1, Jenner • 707.847.3231 Full Menu: coastkitchensonoma.com $

$

Town Center Corte Madera

Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar

Unity in Marin

Jun 16, Lady D. Jun 17, Kimrea & Dreamdogs. Jun 18, Wall of Rhythm. 250 Entrada Dr, Novato. 415.883.9477.

Jun 16, 3:30pm, Music Without Borders with Juan L Sanchez. 164 Donahue St, Marin City. 415.332.6157.

San Anselmo Library

Marin Country Mart

Sausalito Seahorse

19 Broadway Club

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com

Jun 14, 12pm, RossoRose Duo. Jun 21, 12pm, Allegra Chapman. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Marin Art & Garden Center

Jun 18, 11am, Father’s Day BBQ with Big Brother & the Holding Company. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. 415.461.5700.

June 25

Rancho Nicasio

Throckmorton Theatre

Jun 14, Soulbillies. Jun 21, Parlor Parade. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

Marin City Library

THE DIVA KINGS

Jun 14, the New Sneakers. Jun 15, Liquid Green. Jun 16, Culann’s Hounds. Jun 17, 3pm, Soul Saturdays. Jun 17, 9pm, El Cajon. Jun 18, Grateful Sundays. Jun 19, open mic. Jun 20, the Bad Hombres. Jun 21, Elvis Johnson’s soul review. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Jun 18, 2pm, the Fourth Son. 100 Corte Madera Town Center, Corte Madera. 415.924.2961.

Jun 16, 6pm, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

June 18

Peri’s Silver Dollar

and friends. Jun 19, Grateful Monday. Jun 20, Scott Law & Ross James’ Cosmic Twang. Jun 21, Scott Law and friends perform New Riders of the Purple Sage. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Jun 16, the Rivertown Trio. Jun 17, the Rancho Allstars with Johnny Rawls. Jun 18, 4pm, Father’s Day with Elvin Bishop. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

GOOSE G GANDER

Jun 15, Deborah Winters. Jun 20, Wanda Stafford. Jun 21, Bryan Gould Trio. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

Jun 14, TDK. Jun 15, Koolwhip. Jun 16, 5:30pm, Todos Santos. Jun 17, KnightressM1 with Musavi. Jun 18, 4pm, Dale Alstrom’s Jazz Society. Jun 19, open mic. Jun 20, Rockit Science. Jun 21, songwriters in the round with Danny Uzi. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

Old Corte Madera Square

Jun 18, 5pm, Corte Madera Big Band. Redwood and Corte Madera avenues, Corte Madera. 415.302.1160.

Osteria Divino

Jun 15, Passion Habanera. Jun 16, Barrio Manouche. Jun 17, Walter Earl Trio. Jun 18, Brian Moran Duo. Jun 20, Pedro Rosales Con Quimba. Jun 21, Jonathan Poretz. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

Pacheco Plaza

Jun 16, 6pm, Dr Loco’s Rockin’ Jalapeño Band. 366 Ignacio Blvd, Novato.

Panama Hotel Restaurant

Jun 14, Kurt Huget and friends.

Jun 16, Kitka Trio. 110 Tunstead Ave, San Anselmo. 415.258.4656.

Jun 15, Toque Tercero flamenco night. Jun 16, Cecilia’s farewell night. Jun 17, the Brigham Brothers. Jun 18, 5pm, Mazacote. Jun 19, open mic with Judy Hall and friends. Jun 20, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

Trek Winery

Jun 17, Rick Kelly. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883. Jun 21, 7pm, Steven Halpern Solstice Sound Healing Concert. 600 Palm Dr, Novato. 415.475.5000.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

Jun 15, Mipso. Jun 17, Kellie Fuller & the Wayne de la Cruz Trio. Jun 20, Sweet Hayah. Jun 21, Lavay Smith & Her Red Hot Skillet Lickers. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Jun 17, Nate Lopez. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

Deco Lounge at Capp Heritage Vineyards

Jun 17, Westerly. 1245 First St, Napa. 707.254.1922.

Jun 15, DJ Samir Neffati. Jun 16, Roses & Cigarettes. Jun 17, Luvplanet. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Downtown Joe’s Brewery & Restaurant

Sweetwater Music Hall

Goose & Gander

Jun 16, Bonnie Hayes and friends. Jun 17, Big Sam’s Funky Nation with Angelex. Jun 18, 12pm, “Keith Moon: The Real Me” with Mick Berry. Jun 1819, Crossroads Music School concert. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Taste of Rome

Jun 17, the 7th Sons. 1000 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.7660.

Tennessee Valley Cabin

Jun 16, 6:30pm, Marble Party. 60 Tennessee Valley Rd, Mill Valley.

Terrapin Crossroads

Jun 14, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs. Jun 16, Top 40 Friday dance party. Jun 18, Scott Law

Jun 16, Crayzed. 902 Main St, Napa. 707.258.2337. Jun 18, 1pm, the Diva Kings. 1245 Spring St, St Helena. 707.967.8779.

Pioneer Park

Jun 15, 6:30pm, Kingsborough. 1308 Cedar St, Calistoga. 707.942.2838.

River Terrace Inn

Jun 15, Timothy O’Neil. Jun 16, Sean Carscadden. 1600 Soscol Ave, Napa. 707.320.9000.

Silo’s

Jun 15, John Brazell with BrowderSister. Jun 16, Papa Joe & the New Deal. Jun 17, the Cripple Creek Band. Jun 18, 2pm, Sundays on the Plaza with Doug Houser. Jun 21, songs and stories with Wesla Whitfield and Mike Greensill. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.


RECEPTIONS Jun 16

Sebastopol Center for the Arts, “Blue,” juried show is dedicated to the shades and meanings of the color blue. 6pm. 282 S High St, Sebastopol. 707.829.4797.

Jun 17

Gallery One, “Summer Small Works Invitational,” Donna DeLaBriandais, Lynn Davis, Joyce Kelly, Judy Klausenstock, and Joanne Tepper exhibit. 5pm. 209 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.778.8277. The Meadows at Oakmont, “New Views,” artist Blake Sherlock shows and sells new mosaic light paintings made from salvaged windows, as well as vases and other objects. 11am. 6392 Pine Valley Dr, Santa Rosa.

Jun 21

Marin Community Foundation, “Rising Stars,” exhibit includes seven artists who have been awarded an annual grant from the Pirkle Jones Fund. 5pm. 5 Hamilton Landing, Ste 200, Novato.

SONOMA COUNTY Calabi Gallery Through Jun 17, “Retrospective of Robert P McChesney,” the Bay Area-based master of abstract art gets a showing that spans his 60-year career. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

City Hall Council Chambers Through Jun 29, “Art at the Edge,” works by artists from ArtFlare Gallery. 100 Santa Rosa Ave, Ste 10, Santa Rosa. 707.543.3010.

Gallery 300 Through Jun 17, “Hineni (Here I Am),” new works by

Jennifer Hirshfield focus on women’s issues during these political times, including actual images painted from the recent Women’s March in San Francisco. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. Sat, 12 to 5; and by appointment. 707.332.1212.

Jupiter Moon Art & Gifts

Through Jun 24, “It’s All Good,” artist Deni Marrone presents mixed-media paintings in a retrospective art show that draws from a lifetime of inspiration. 507 S Main St, Sebastopol. hours vary 707.634.6304.

Sebastopol Library

Through Jun 17, “Collage in Three Acts,” mixed-media collage artist Cynthia Poten creates three sequences tracing human history from early consciousness to our present crises. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. Mon-Tues, 1 to 5 and 6 to 9; Wed-Sat, 1 to 5. 707.823.7691.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

Through Jun 18, “Memory & Resistance: The Work of Joseph DeLappe,” several key works from the artist cross the realms of protest art, gaming, technology and new media. 551 Broadway, Sonoma. WedSun, 11 to 5. 707.939.SVMA.

MARIN COUNTY Desta Art & Tea Gallery Through Jun 22, “Horizon Lines,” featuring contemporary artist Alan Mazzetti, who specializes in abstracted landscapes and cityscapes. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6 415.524.8932.

Gallery Route One

Through Jun 25, “Real / Abstract,” Geraldine LiaBraaten’s photos challenge their subject’s context in the center gallery, with a memorial retrospective of Betty Woolfolk and Andrew Romanoff’s paintings also showing. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. WedMon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Art & Garden Center

Through Jun 25, “The Way Home,” tapestries by Sue Weil colorfully conjure places and

people. 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross. 415.455.5260.

Comedy Comedy in the Plaza

Master of ceremonies Brian Copeland hosts an evening of fun with comedians Greg Proops and Jann Karam. Jun 21, 6:30pm. Free admission. Mill Valley Depot Plaza, 87 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley.

Meanwhile in Marin

Improv Marin’s summer blockbusters series come up with hilarity on the spot. Fri, Jun 16, 8pm. $15. West End Studio Theatre, 1554 Fourth St, San Rafael, improvmarin.com.

Professor Hoffman’s Hump-day Comedy Circus

Variety show boasts highenergy comedy with several splashes of something extra. Wed, Jun 14, 8pm. $10-$15. 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa. profhoffcomedy.com.

Zipline Improv Theater Delightful improvised scenes and stories are inspired by your suggestions. Jun 17, 8pm. $15. Occidental Center for the Arts, 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental, 707.874.9392.

Dance Move Beyond

Acclaimed dance siblings Julianne and Derek Hough are back in town with a new amazing stage production. Jun 17, 4pm. $69-$99 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Paradise Ridge Winery Jun 18, 5pm, Margaret Jenkins Dance Company, interacting with sculptures, dancers perform choreographed show and invite the audience to discuss and collaborate. $90/ kids 12 and under are free. 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa 707.528.9463.

Events Father’s Day at the Museum

Dads receive free admission. Jun 18. Charles M Schulz

Tour the food bank, get information and apply to help provide weekly groceries to men, women and children living with HIV and other illnesses in Sonoma County. Tues, Jun 20, 5:30pm. Food for Thought, 6550 Railroad Ave, Forestville, 707.887.1647.

Fresh Paint

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art hosts a celebration of pop art with music, dancing, dinner and more to benefit the museum. Jun 17, 5:30pm. $250. Hanna Boys Center, 17000 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, 707.939.7862.

Golden Rule Peace Ship Floating project of Veterans for Peace sails into the North Bay for a series of events and tours focused on anti-nuclear action. Jun 15-17. Spud Point Marina, 1818 Westshore Rd, Bodega Bay, vfpgoldenrule.org.

#IMOMSOHARD Live Mom bloggers Kristin Hensley and Jen Smedley bring their uniquely hilarious outlook to the North Bay as part of a national tour. For mature audiences only. Jun 14, 8pm. $41 and up. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Lit & Art Crawl of Sebastopol

Many shops and restaurants welcome local authors and artists to present readings and exhibits of work. Jun 17, 1pm. Free. Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books, 138 N Main St, Sebastopol, lit-art-crawlsebastopol.com.

Pride Picnic

The Spahr Center invites Marin’s LGBTQ community and allies to bring blankets and a picnic lunch for a familyfocused event with guest speakers, live music, treats for kids and more. Jun 17, 11:30am. Free admission. Lagoon Park, Marin Civic Center, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, 415.457.2487.

Geometric Movements

Sculpture and dance intertwine in Santa Rosa For more than 30 years, San Francisco’s acclaimed Margaret Jenkins Dance Company has redefined the limits of choreography with such innovative projects as the ongoing Site Series (Inside Outside), in which the company’s experimental dancers must adapt to and incorporate unusual environments into their work. This weekend, the company does just that when they present Dancing in the Sculpture, a new show set among the dozen massive outdoor metal sculptures on display as part of the Voigt Family Sculpture Foundation’s exhibit “Geometric Reflections” at Paradise Ridge Winery’s hillside gallery Marijke’s Grove. For this unique recital, each dancer from the company has chosen a different piece of sculpture to perform with. After the choreographed presentation, the audience will be invited to join the dancers to discuss the creative process, a long-standing staple of the dance company’s vision for using art as a conversation starter. Margaret Jenkins Dance Company’s “Dancing in the Sculpture” takes place on Sunday, June 18, at Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Drive, Santa Rosa. 5pm. $90; kids 12 and under, free. celebratesculpture.com.—Charlie Swanson

Sit, Stay, Sparkle

Benefit for Canine Companions includes food, wine and brews, live and silent auctions, assistance dogs, puppies and more. Jun 17, 5pm. $100. Canine Companions for Independence, 2965 Dutton Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.577.1700.

Sonoma-Marin Fair Annual fair offers a theme of “Great Eggspectations” and features livestock, food, wine, exhibits, carnival rides, the world’s ugliest dog contest and

concerts from Tower of Power, Loverboy and others. Jun 21-25. $10-$15 admission. Petaluma Fairgrounds, 100 Fairgrounds Dr, Petaluma, sonoma) marinfair.org.

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NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Galleries

Food for Thought Volunteer Orientation

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CRITIC’S CHOICE David Bazemore

Arts Events

Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.579.4452.


NORTH BAY BOH EMIAN | JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

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A E

ADULT FOSTER FAMILY California Mentor is seeking adult foster families with a spare bedroom to support an individual with special needs. Receive a monthly payment (up

( 27

Steampunk to Speakeasy

Petaluma Museum Association’s annual fundraising gala features music from the Stompy Jones Band, hors d’oeuvres and cocktails, auction items and prizes for best steampunk or Prohibition dress. Jun 17, 6:30pm. $50$60. Hotel Petaluma, 205 Kentucky St, Petaluma. petalumamuseum.com.

StoryNights

to $3,000) and

Performers, actors, comics and writers take to the mic for a night of personal stories told live. Jun 14, 7:30pm. $18. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

ongoing support.

The Unveiled Me

As a Mentor you become a teacher, an advocate and a friend. Information sessions are held weekly. California MENTOR is the state’s most experienced Family Home Agency (FHA), providing family home services for hundreds of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Share your heart. Share your home.

Family Home Agency

Diane at (707) 544-5282 ext.2510 www.MentorsWanted.com

ILLING TIME ! IT’S GR v i a t l cu te ho me We carry the best Cast Iron Pans by Finex—goes from the oven, stovetop or grill. Made in Oregon. We have your summertime grilling needs here at Cultivate Home.

186 N. Main St #120 • Sebastopol • Open Daily 10–6 www.cultivatehome.com • 707.824.1400

Weekend devoted to the ancient body art of Henna and Jagua is for both beginners and professionals, and includes supplies, resources, classes and special performances. Jun 16-18. $50 and up. Isis Oasis, 20889 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. theunveiledme.com.

Film Airplane!

Classic comedy screens. Jun 17, 7:30pm. $8. Rio Theater, 20396 Bohemian Hwy, Monte Rio, 707.865.0913.

Big Trouble in Little China

Drive up, tune in to 88.3 FM and relive the classic family moviegoing experience, this week screening John Carpenter’s ‘80s fantasy set in San Francisco. Jun 17, 9pm. Free admission. North Bay Mobile Drive-In, 520 Palm Dr, Novato.

CULT Film Series

Take your dad to see two of Mel Brooks’ best comedies, as “Young Frankenstein” and “Blazing Saddles” screen back to back. Jun 15, 7pm. $10. Roxy Stadium 14 Cinemas, 85 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.525.8909.

Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde

discussion that helps us live in the moment. Benefits local nonprofit Final Passages. Jun 14, 6:30pm. $10. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

conversation, with Champagne reception and full dinner included. Jun 18, 4:30pm. $150. Sebastopol Community Center, 390 Morris St, Sebastopol, 707.823.1511.

Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise

Father’s Day Dining at Left bank Brasserie

Summer movie and discussion series opens with a documentary on the American icon. Jun 21, 6:30pm. Free. Diesel Bookstore, 2419 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur, 415.785.8177.

All-day specials for dad accompany the regular menu. Jun 18. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.3331.

Michelangelo: Love & Death

Prime rib and draft beer specials will make dad happy. Jun 18. Rickey’s Restaurant & Bar, 250 Entrada Dr, Novato, 415.883.9477.

Exhibition Screen series covers the Renaissance artist’s life of work. Wed, Jun 14, 1 and 7pm. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840. Exhibition Screen series covers the Renaissance artist’s life of work. Sat, Jun 17, 1pm and Wed, Jun 21, 6:15pm. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

Monterey Pop

Documentarian DA Pennebaker’s cinéma-vérité masterpiece about 1967’s Monterey Pop Festival is fully restored and bursting with classic music. Jun 18, 4:15 and 6:30pm. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Now is the Time: Healthcare for Everybody

Mill Valley Seniors for Peace hosts a film screening and discussion. Jun 14, 7pm. Free. The Redwoods, 40 Camino Alto, Mill Valley., 415.383.2741.

Restless Creature

Documentary on American ballerina Wendy Whelan screens twice. Jun 15, 4 and 7pm. $10. Jarvis Conservatory, 1711 Main St, Napa, 707.255.5445.

Waterwalk

Film about a father and son on a wild 1,000-mile journey screens with actor Robert Cicchini in attendance. Jun 17, 5:45pm. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.9779.

Silent film from 1921 screens with a live musical score performed by the Invincible Czars. Jun 17, 7pm. $7-$15. Lark Theater, 549 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.924.5111.

Food & Drink

Let’s Talk About Death

KQED radio talk show host Michael Krasny and author Jane Smiley engage in

Screening of the film “Griefwalker” is followed by a

Author Dinner Talk

Father’s Day Dinner at Rickey’s

Father’s Day Food & Wine Pairing

Red wines and BBQ go together for Dad’s big day. Jun 18, 1pm. $15. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, 707.933.3010.

Father’s Day Grilling & Wines

Discover the perfect wines for your summer cookouts and get stocked up. Jun 17, 10am. $20. Dutton-Goldfield Winery, 3100 Gravenstein Hwy N, Sebastopol, 707.827.3600.

Father’s Day on the Wine Train

Treat dad to a culinary and wine experience aboard the train for lunch or dinner adventures. Jun 18. $166 and up. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa, 800.427.4124.

Father’s Day Pig Roast at Meadowcroft Wines Whole suckling pig prepared by master griller Adam de la Montanya and housemade sides prepared by chef Darby Tarantino. Jun 18, 12pm. Cornerstone Sonoma, 23570 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, 707.933.3010.

Food As Medicine Wellness Series

Holistic nutrition consultant Thais Harris speaks on how gut health affects overall health and wellbeing. Jun 19, 6:30pm. $10. Sonoma County Healing Academy, 6741 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, 707.799.8080.

Lambert Bridge Chef’s Table Series Vibrant menu of locally grown ingredients prepared by chefs Casey and Patrick Van Voorhis of Healdsburg’s Spoonbar. Jun 16-18. $125. Lambert Bridge Winery, 4085 Westside Rd, Healdsburg, 707.431.9600.


Magical Mystery Tours

Pancake Breakfast

Enjoy the scenery and the flapjacks for a Father’s Day breakfast near the top of Mt Tam. Jun 18, 9am. $5-$10. West Point Inn, 100 Old Railroad Grade Fire Rd, Mill Valley, 415.388.9955.

Sensory Exploration of California Olive Oil Learn all the ins and outs of extra virgin olive oil with experts from the California Olive Oil Council. Jun 15, 5:30pm. $35. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

Summer of Love Luncheon

Wear flowers in your hair and feast on delicious eats with music by the Tina Carella Duo. Jun 15, 11:30am. $8-$10. Whistlestop, 930 Tamalpais Ave, San Rafael, 415.456.9062.

Lectures Dancing with the Spanish Lady

Learn about the Spanish Flu’s impact on World War I. Jun 17, 6:30pm. $15. Art Museum of Sonoma County, 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa, 707.579.1500.

Finding Your Inner Monk in Everyday Life Explore the contemplative and monastic dimensions of daily life. Jun 17, 9:30am. $25. Journey Center, 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa, 707.578.2121.

Is It Dyslexia?

Informational seminar that will shine new light on helping correct the debilitating effects of dyslexia. Registration required. Jun 17, 2pm. Free. Glaser Center, 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.928.4054.

Women’s Cannabis Business Development Workshop Night of professional networking features guest speakers and a raffle. Jun 20, 6pm. $25-$35. West Sonoma Inn and Spa, 14100 Brookside, Guerneville, womenscbd.org.

World Religion Series

Meet Zen Buddhist, Rev Shokuchi Deirdre Carrigan, and

bridge a deeper understanding of the religion. Jun 20, 1:30pm. Free. Whistlestop, 930 Tamalpais Ave, San Rafael, 415.456.9062.

Sonoma-Mendocino Coast” with Thomas Cochrane. Jun 17, 7pm, “Chasing the Harvest” with Gabriel Thompson. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Readings

Vintners Inn Event Center

Book Passage

Jun 15, 7pm, “Love on Trial” with Kris Perry and Sandy Stier. Jun 16, 7pm, “The Templars’ Last Secret” with Martin Walker. Jun 17, 7pm, “Patterning Instinct” with Jeremy Lent. Jun 18, 4pm, “The Black Penguin” with Andrew Evans. Jun 19, 12pm, “The Sunshine Sisters” with Jane Green, a literary luncheon event. $55. Jun 19, 7pm, “Defectors” with Joseph Kanon. Jun 21, 7pm, “The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness” with Paula Poundstone. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Calistoga Copperfield’s Books Jun 17, 2pm, “Crooked” with Cathryn Jakobson Ramin. 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga 707.942.1616.

Many Rivers Books & Tea

Jun 15, 7:30pm, “The Soul of Uncertainty” with Mark Susnow. 130 S Main St, Sebastopol 707.829.8871.

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Jun 14, 12pm, “Lockdown” with Laurie R King. Jun 14, 7pm, “The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O” with Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland. Jun 16, 7pm, “Montana Men” series and “Hidden Falls” series with Jennifer Ryan and TJ Kline. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Readers’ Books

Jun 17, 2pm, “Evidence” with Chester Arnold. 130 E Napa St, Sonoma 707.939.1779.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

Jun 14, 1:30pm, “Lockdown” with Laurie R King. Jun 17, 2pm, “Dog As My Doctor, Cat As My Nurse” with Carlyn Montes de Oca. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

Jun 17, 7pm, “In This Moment” with Karma Brown. Jun 19, 7pm, “The Sunshine Sisters” with Jane Green. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books Jun 17, 2pm, “Shaping the

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Same

Jun 14, 7am, “Spellbound” with David Kwong, special breakfast event. 4350 Barnes Rd, Santa Rosa 707.575.7350.

High Quality Products

Theater

Same

Bold Moves

Off the Page Readers Theater performs the works of 11 local writers ranging from poignant to quirky to hilarious. Jun 16, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Subud Hall, 234 Hutchins Ave, Sebastopol.

Stellar Experience

Clue: The Musical

Who killed Mr Boddy, in what room and with what weapon? Find out in this musical adaptation of the popular board game. Through Jun 18. Lucky Penny Community Arts Center, 1758 Industrial Way, Napa, 707.266.6305.

Disney’s Beauty & the Beast

Bay Area’s most magical outdoor theater experience presents the timeless classic for their 104th season. Sun, 2pm. through Jun 18. $20$40. Cushing Memorial Amphitheatre, 3801 Panoramic Hwy, Mill Valley, 415.383.1100.

Private Lives

Sparks fly and hilarity ensues in this charming comedy, presented by Ross Valley Players. Through Jun 18. $15-$27. Barn Theatre, Marin Art and Garden Center, 30 Sir Francis Drake Blvd, Ross, 415.456.9555.

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See and sing in the newest dinner show from Get a Clue Productions, a fully functioning karaoke bar with deadly competition. Reservations required. Sat, Jun 17, 7pm. $68. Charlie’s Restaurant, Windsor Golf Club, 1320 19th Hole Dr, Windsor.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

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Mysterious tours to magical wineries along the Wine Road includes food pairings and other goodies. Sat, Jun 17. $125. Alexander, Dry Creek and Russian River valleys, various locations, Healdsburg, wineroad.com.


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The pot industry needs basic business acumen BY BEN ADAMS

I

was dealing with a debtor last week who had not responded to an offer to settle. Weeks had gone by, and I was feeling increasingly frustrated with the lack of response. Finally, I got an email that read, in part, “As you learned long ago, the cannabis industry doesn’t work on your timeline,” followed by more excuses. It was icing on the cake for how I feel lately.

In spite of all its promise, the cannabis industry is incredibly frustrating. After working with the industry for several years, I have yet to come across a single person with the business acumen or systems that a legitimate business requires. I’m sure they exist, but they haven’t presented themselves to me. I have been yelled at in my office for asking questions like “Who will pay for that?” and “What is the projected return?” and “What system is being proposed for

inventory control?” I have been fired by clients who tell me that I “don’t understand the cannabis culture” for asking such questions, and tell me that I have to wait for people to finish dabbing before a contract can be negotiated. At a business meeting! I know things are going to change. I have been railing against a system that seems designed to crush the little people at the expense of the wealthy. But the truth of the matter is that the cannabis industry needs a good shake-up. It is not just a lack of business acumen. The amount of outright theft and graft is staggering. There seems to be an entitlement mindset that allows partners to steal from each other. Employees steal from gardens. Customers steal from suppliers. It goes on and on. Those in the industry know exactly what I am talking about. Getting people to show up when they say, or to pay their bills is a constant challenge. I know many people who are getting out of the industry because of this. The ironic thing is that everyone in the industry acknowledges that it is filled to the brim with people who shouldn’t be there. Honestly, when 90 percent of the people (or more) are driven out by the new regulations, I will completely understand. I will even applaud the departure of many who have cheated and stolen from others. I don’t expect this article to make people more responsible, but I urge those in the industry to examine themselves and their business practices. Do you have what it takes operate a taxed and regulated business where you cannot do as you please with the effort and money of other people? Until the cannabis industry grows up, it will continue to alienate those few people who are actually honest and hard-working. Ben Adams is a Santa Rosa attorney familiar with the cannabis industry.


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For the week of June 14

ARIES (March 21–April 19) You have to admit that salt looks like sugar and sugar resembles salt. This isn’t usually a major problem, though. Mistakenly sprinkling sugar on your food when you thought you were adding salt won’t hurt you, nor will putting salt in your coffee when you assumed you were using sugar. But errors like these are inconvenient, and they can wreck a meal. You may want to apply this lesson as a metaphor in the coming days, Aries. Be alert for things that outwardly seem to be alike but actually have different tastes and effects. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

Here’s a possible plan for the next 10 days: Program your smart phone to sound an alarm once every hour during the entire time you’re awake. Each time the bell or buzzer goes off, you will vividly remember your life’s main purpose. You will ask yourself whether or not the activity you’re engaged in at that specific moment is somehow serving your life’s main purpose. If it is, literally pat yourself on the back and say to yourself, “Good job!” If it’s not, say the following words: “I am resolved to get into closer alignment with my soul’s code—the blueprint of my destiny.”

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Actress Marisa Berenson offers a line of anti-aging products that contain an elixir made from the seeds of a desert fruit known as prickly pear. The manufacturing process isn’t easy. To produce a quart of the potion requires 2,000 pounds of seeds. I see you as having a metaphorically similar challenge in the coming weeks, Gemini. To create a small amount of the precious stuff you want, I’m guessing you’ll have to gather a ton of raw materials. And there may be a desert-like phenomena to deal with, as well. CANCER (June 21–July 22) There are three kinds of habits: good, bad and neutral. Neutral habits are neither good nor bad but use up psychic energy that might be better directed into cultivating good habits. Here are some examples: a good habit is when you’re disciplined about eating healthy food; a bad habit is watching violent TV shows before going to bed, thereby disturbing your sleep; a neutral habit might be doing Sudoku puzzles. My challenge to you, Cancerian, is to dissolve one bad habit and one neutral habit by replacing them with two new good habits. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, cosmic forces will be on your side as you make this effort. LEO (July 23–August 22) “Dear Dr. Astrology: Good fortune has been visiting me a lot lately. Many cool opportunities have come my way. Life is consistently interesting. I’ve also made two unwise moves that fortunately didn’t bring bad results. Things often work out better for me than I imagined they would! I’m grateful every day, but I feel like I should somehow show even more appreciation. Any ideas?—Lucky Leo.” Dear Lucky: The smartest response to the abundance you have enjoyed is to boost your generosity. Give out blessings. Dispense praise. Help people access their potentials. Intensify your efforts to share your wealth. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Years ago,

a fan of my work named Paul emailed to ask me if I wanted to get together with him and his friend when I visited New York. “Maybe you know her?” he wrote. “She’s the artist Cindy Sherman.” Back then I had never heard of Cindy. But since Paul was smart and funny, I agreed to meet. The three of us convened in an elegant tea room for a boisterous conversation. A week later, when I was back home and mentioned the event to a colleague, her eyes got big and she shrieked, “You had tea with the Cindy Sherman.” She then educated me on how successful and influential Cindy’s photography has been. I predict you will soon have a comparable experience, Virgo: inadvertent contact with an intriguing presence. Hopefully, because I’ve given you a heads up, you’ll recognize what’s happening as it occurs, and take full advantage.

LIBRA (September 23–October 22) You’ll never get access to the treasure that’s buried out under the cherry tree next to the ruined barn if you stay in your command center and keep staring at the map instead

BY ROB BREZSNY

of venturing out to the barn. Likewise, a symbol of truth may be helpful in experiencing deeper meaning, but it’s not the same as communing with the raw truth, and may even become a distraction from it. Let’s consider one further variation on the theme: The pictures in your mind’s eye may or may not have any connection with the world outside your brain. It’s especially important that you monitor their accuracy in the coming days.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Maybe it wasn’t such a good idea to go gallivanting so heedlessly into the labyrinth. Or maybe it was. Who knows? It’s still too early to assess the value of your experiences in that maddening but fascinating tangle. You may not yet be fully able to distinguish the smoke and mirrors from the useful revelations. Which of the riddles you’ve gathered will ultimately bring frustration and which will lead you to wisdom? Here’s one thing I do know for sure: If you want to exit the labyrinth, an opportunity will soon appear.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

Over the years I’ve read numerous news reports about people who have engaged in intimate relations with clunky inanimate objects. One had sex with a bicycle. Another seduced a sidewalk, and a third tried to make sweet love to a picnic table. I hope you won’t join their ranks in the coming weeks. Your longing is likely to be extra intense, innovative and even exotic, but I trust you will confine its expression to unions with adult human beings who know what they’re getting into and who have consented to play. Here’s an old English word you might want to add to your vocabulary: “blissom.” It means “to bleat with sexual desire.”

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Your life in the coming days should be low on lightweight diversions and high in top-quality content. Does that sound like fun? I hope so. I’d love to see you enjoy the hell out of yourself as you cut the fluff and focus on the pith . . . as you efficiently get to the hype-free heart of every matter and refuse to tolerate waffling or stalling. So strip away the glossy excesses, my dear Capricorn. Skip a few steps if that doesn’t cause any envy. Expose the pretty lies, but then just work around them; don’t get bogged down in indulging in negative emotions about them. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) Inventor, architect and author Buckminster Fuller lived to the age of 87. For 63 of those years, he kept a detailed scrapbook diary that documented every day of his life. It included his reflections, correspondence, drawings, newspaper clippings, grocery bills and much other evidence of his unique story. I would love to see you express yourself with that much disciplined ferocity during the next two weeks. According to my astrological analysis, you’re in a phase when you have maximum power to create your life with vigorous ingenuity and to show everyone exactly who you are. PISCES (February 19–March 20) You have a

cosmic license to enjoy almost too much sensual pleasure. In addition, you should feel free to do more of what you love to do than you normally allow yourself. Be unapologetic about surrounding yourself with flatterers and worshipers. Be sumptuously lazy. Ask others to pick up the slack for you. Got all that? It’s just the first part of your oracle. Here’s the rest: You have a cosmic license to explore the kind of spiritual growth that’s possible when you feel happy and fulfilled. As you go through each day, expect life to bring you exactly what you need to uplift you. Assume that the best service you can offer your fellow humans is to be relaxed and content.

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

JUNE 14-20, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

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Basil Hayden’s BOURBON WHISKEY In 1796, Master Distiller Basil Hayden Sr. broke ‘the rules’ by mixing small grains into the mash of a traditional corn base. A Maryland transplant unafraid to stand out amidst the residing establishment, Basil conjectured that the spicy flavor of rye would be a striking

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June 14-20, 2017

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