Page 1

SERVING SONOMA & NAPA COUNTIES | MAY 10-16, 2017 | BOHEMIAN.COM • VOL. 39.01

BASH IN THE CLOUDS

A

NIMBUS ARTS KEEPS NAPA CREATIVE P15

FREIGHT TRAINS P8 SALMON AND LITERATURE P12 POD PEOPLE P20


Preferred

G R E E N M U S I C C E N TE R

SEASON HIGHLIGHTS “THE HEART AND SOUL QUEEN OF NEW ORLEANS” co th a

C O.

BR

G

nor

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠ ♠♠♠

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠ ♠♠♠

st

IRMA THOMAS AND THE PRESERVATION HALL LEGACY QUINTET

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠ ♠♠♠

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

JUST ANNOUNCED! THE 2017–18 SEASON IN WEILL HALL

IN

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠

2

EW

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 AT 7:30 P.M.

GARRISON KEILLOR – "JUST PASSING THROUGH" FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 AT 7:30 P.M.

ACADEMY OF ST. MARTIN IN THE FIELDS CHAMBER ENSEMBLE

CHANTICLEER – AN ORCHESTRA OF VOICES “SOLDIER” FRIDAY, JANUARY 12 AT 7:30 P.M.

LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO FRIDAY, JANUARY 26 AT 7:30 P.M.

RENÉE FLEMING, SOPRANO

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3 AT 7:30 P.M.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15 AT 3 P.M.

THE MIRÓ QUARTET WITH JEFFREY KAHANE, PIANO

DUBLIN IRISH DANCE “STEPPING OUT”

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2017 AT 7:30 P.M.

– AN EXTRAVAGANZA OF SIGHTS & SOUNDS OF IRISH CULTURE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23 AT 7:30 P.M.

MARIINSKY ORCHESTRA WITH

ANNE-SOPHIE MUTTER, VIOLIN LAMBERT ORKIS, PIANO

VALERY GERGIEV, CONDUCTOR & DENIS MATSUEV, PIANO FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3 AT 7:30 P.M.

LES ARTS FLORISSANTS WITH WILLIAM CHRISTIE, CONDUCTOR

FRIDAY, MARCH 2 AT 7:30 P.M.

SALIF KEITA

SUNDAY, MARCH 11 AT 7 P.M.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10 AT 7:30 P.M.

TANGO BUENOS AIRES

DIRECT FROM BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 12 AT 3 P.M.

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA AND CHORALE: HANDEL’S MESSIAH SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10 AT 3 P.M.

EIGHTH BLACKBIRD

THURSDAY, APRIL 19 AT 7:30 P.M.

V I E W T H E C O M P L E T E L I N E U P AT

GMC.SONOMA.EDU

1 . 8 6 6 . 9 5 5 . 6 0 4 0


Bohemian

Amazing!*

Sunday, May 28th!

3

Doors open at 12:00 pm

Editor Stett Holbrook, ext. 202

News Editor Tom Gogola, ext. 106

Arts Editor Charlie Swanson, ext. 203

Copy Editor Gary Brandt, ext. 150

Contributors Ben Adams, Rob Brezsny, Richard von Busack, James Knight, Chris Rooney, David Templeton, Tom Tomorrow

Intern Amelia Malpas

Design Director Kara Brown

Art Director

* that’s what some of our clients say!

• Color, Cuts, Extensions • Organic Spray Tan • Full Body Waxing • Make-Up Applications • Eyelash Extensions

Tabi Zarrinnaal

Production Operations Manager Sean George

Senior Designer Jackie Mujica, ext. 213

Layout Artist

707.978.2399

428 Larkfield Center, Santa Rosa

Gary Brandt

Sonoma County’s One and Only Music and Oyster Festival

Featuring: Dirty Cello, One Grass Two Grass, The Sam Chase $20 presale tickets and more info at: oysterpalooza.brownpapertickets.com

BBQ Oysters, Smoked Brisket Tacos, Seafood Gumbo, Fried Chicken

Rocker Oysterfeller’s

14415 Hwy One, Valley Ford

Advertising Director Lisa Marie Santos, ext. 205

Bienvenidos

Advertising Account Managers Augusto León, ext. 212 Mercedes Murolo, ext. 207 Lynda Rael, ext. 204

Celebrate Mother’s Day at the Best Mexican Restaurant!

Sales Operations Manager Deborah Bonar, ext. 215

Publisher Rosemary Olson, ext. 201

CEO/Executive Editor Dan Pulcrano NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN [ISSN 1532-0154] (incorporating the Sonoma County Independent) is published weekly, on Wednesdays, by Metrosa Inc., located at: 847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404. Phone: 707.527.1200; fax: 707.527.1288; e-mail: editor@bohemian.com. It is a legally adjudicated publication of the county of Sonoma by Superior Court of California decree No. 119483. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, National Newspaper Association, California Newspaper Publishers Association, Verified Audit Circulation. Subscriptions (per year): Sonoma County $75; out-of-county $90. Thirdclass postage paid at Santa Rosa, CA. FREE DISTRIBUTION: The BOHEMIAN is available free of charge at numerous locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for one dollar, payable in advance at The BOHEMIAN’s office. The BOHEMIAN may be distributed only by its authorized distributors. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.The BOHEMIAN is printed on 40 % recycled paper.

Published by Metrosa, Inc., an affiliate of Metro Newspapers ©2017 Metrosa Inc.

Cover design by Tabi Zarrinnaal.

MOTHER’S DAY

Unique Gifts and Unexpected Discoveries 2405 Magowan Drive, Santa Rosa Montgomery Village 707.528.7888

Best Mexican Sonoma

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

847 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Phone: 707.527.1200 Fax: 707.527.1288


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

4

Lavish Hi-Fi

a division of Lavish Automation

1044 4th Street, Santa Rosa 707.595.2020 | www.LavishHiFi.com Tues–Fri: 10–6:30pm | Sat: 10–6pm

FIND YOUR BLISS. CUSTOM ELECTRONIC DESIGN & INSTALATION ASSOCIATION

MEMBER

CLOUD NINE ‘Our mission,’ says Nimbus executive director Jamie Graff, ‘is to reach communities that need art,’ p15.

nb

‘The Pod People are coming. And they don’t care about free speech.’ A RTS P20

That’s Not an Ent FILM P22

Woman’s Woman’s Woman’s World MUSIC P23

A TASTE THAT

SHINES

BRIGHTER.

TASTE RE SPONSIBLY ©2017 Blue Moon Brewing Company, Golden, CO • ALE

The Future of Medical Diggidy Dank TH E NUG G ET P34 Rhapsodies & Rants p6 The Paper p8 Dining p12 Wineries p13 Swirl p14 Cover Feature p15

Culture Crush p19 Arts & Ideas p20 Stage p21 Film p22 Music p23 Clubs & Concerts p24

Arts & Events p28 The Nugget p34 Classified p35 Astrology p35


GOING BUSINESS OUT OF

SAVE UP TO

%

80

350 Coddingtown Ctr. • Santa Rosa MARA SHEPARD DJ - AD 1 - 9x4.84.indd 1

SALE CONTINUES

TAKE AN EXTRA

PLUS

with this card

% OFF*

OFF Mara Shepard

*Some item excluded

Monday - Friday 10 am to 9 pm Saturday 10 am to 8 pm Sunday 11 am to 6 pm

ALREADY REDUCED PRICES! Hurry in for best selections! THIS OFFER EXPIRES 5-14-17 5/1/17 1:49 PM

SPRING FLING

5 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Due to Health Issues, Mara’s Retiring & Closing Her Store!


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

6

Rhapsodies BOHEMIAN

Let It Rest Little is as Machiavellian as scoring political points off the tragic, legally justifiable shooting death of a teenager by a deputy doing his duty. Other than Andy Lopez’s family, no one grieves him more than Sgt. Erick Gelhaus (“Over a Barrel,” May 3). Sgt. Gelhaus saved lives. A less skilled marksman shooting eight bullets would have sprayed them into the other children. Apparently armed with

an automatic weapon bearing on two peace officers, Andy was hit seven times. Given the inhuman stress, that kind of weapon control is rarely seen even among weapons experts. Time should have been put into teaching Andy how to properly handle a gun, i.e., never point it at anyone; always carry it encased when not in use; guns are not toys; gun ownership has very strict, highly enforced rules; and guns require absolute responsibility. At least as much time as put into designing the caps and T-shirts “memorializing” Andy’s life.

THIS MODERN WORLD

Let Andy and his family, Sgt. Gelhaus and his family, and the community rest. Work on the real problems in our criminal justice system and society. Too many cunning, duplicitous, bad faith points have already been scored by people who don’t really care about Andy’s, Sgt. Gelhaus’ or your life.

CHRISTOPHER PATRICK MURPHY BERKHEIMER Guerneville

By Tom Tomorrow

Mother’s Milk Last week, the Washington Post published a major exposé of the U.S. dairy industry, concluding that megadairies scam consumers into paying extra for “organic” milk that isn’t. The timing, a few days before Mother’s Day, could not be more appropriate. Dairy cows, worldwide symbols of motherhood, never get to see or nurture their babies. The newborn calves are torn from their mothers at birth and turned into veal cutlets, so the dairy industry can sell their milk. The distraught mothers bellow for days, hoping in vain for their babies’ return. Instead, they are chained on a concrete warehouse floor, milked by machines, then impregnated artificially to renew the pregnancy and keep the milk flowing. When their production drops, around four years of age, they are ground into hamburgers. This Mother’s Day, let’s all honor motherhood and our natural compassion for animals by rejecting the dairy industry’s cruelty. Let’s replace cow’s milk and its products, laden with cholesterol, saturated fats, hormones, and antibiotics. Let’s choose delicious, healthful, cruelty-free, plant-based milk, cheese and ice cream products offered at our grocery store.

LARRY ROGAWITZ Santa Rosa

Bud System It seems to me that there is already more than enough wine industry. (“Branded Buds,” May 3). I’d like to see more food crops and, not just cannabis, but also other healing herbs and plants. Sonoma County could lead the nation in diversity, filling all the needs of a healthy population. And why not make it all organic while we’re at it?

LULY BETTENCOURT Via online

Write to us at letters@bohemian.com.


Rants

7

Congressman Thompson, it’s time to ditch the Donald BY TOM GOGOLA

A

fter this week’s Senate hearings with former acting Attorney General Sally Yates, how can any Democrat in Congress continue to pledge to work with the crooked Trump on an issue dear to them? That’s been the party line from Rep. Mike Thompson, the “Blue Dog� Democrat who represents Napa and parts of Sonoma County (including Santa Rosa), and has explicitly promised that he’ll work with Trump if the White House comes up with an infrastructure bill that would deal with the nation’s horrible roads and bridges. Trump’s been pimping a possible $1 trillion build-out in the face of disapproval of such spending from the hard-right House Freedom Caucus. Democrats like Thompson have embraced the idea. The upshot of the Senate hearing is that the picture is clear, and unsettlingly so, that Trump’s inner circle had contacts with Russia during the campaign, and that his former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, was actively working against American interests, and getting paid for it, when he interacted with Russian officials and then lied to the vice president about it. Former director of national intelligence James Clapper reiterated his agency’s findings that it was obvious the Russians really wanted Trump to win. We also learned from the hearing that Obama warned Trump against hiring Flynn two days after the election, but Trump did it anyway—and then blamed Obama for not properly vetting Flynn in the first place. Despite Trump’s abject disrespect for Thompson’s fellow Democrat Obama, and Trump’s ongoing attempt to smear the former president at every available occasion, Thompson continues to hold out hope that he can work with Trump on an infrastructure plan. He’s consorting with a felony-level impeachable thug in doing so. Before the hearing this week, Trump tweeted some aggressive hostility about Sally Yates that a CNN panel correctly identified as an attempt to intimidate a witness, which can be construed as a federal crime. But since everyone’s become so inured to Trump’s rolling display of vulgar impunity to norms of decency or the law—Hey, fix a few potholes and we’ll be cool? I don’t think so. It’s time for Thompson to ditch the “I’ll work with him even as I disagree with . . .� posture, even if it costs the congressman votes among that portion of his constituency that supported Trump and keeps sending the conservative Blue Dog back to Washington. Tom Gogola is the news editor of the ‘Bohemian.’ Open Mic is a weekly feature in the ‘Bohemian.’ We welcome your contribution. To have your topical essay of 350 words considered for publication, write openmic@bohemian.com.

707.576.0861tXXXXCVDPNTBOUBSPTB

Find the perfect mortgage

We are a premier lender offering a variety of programs to address your specific needs: • • • •

Fixed and adjustable rate loans Purchase or refinance Programs to finance homes on acreage Mortgage programs for self-employed borrowers

• Low down-payment programs for first-time home buyers • Home equity loans and lines of credit (HELOC)

Visit a branch today to get started: 700 Trancas Street Napa (707) 227-9300

201 3rd Street Santa Rosa (707) 591-8000

Learn more: www.RabobankAmerica.com/Mortgage All loans subject to credit approval.

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Shun Him


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

8

Paper THE

DEBR IEFER Freitas & ICE Jerry Threet has been taking a lot of grief from police accountability activists as head of Sonoma County’s Independent Office of Law Enforcement Review and Outreach, but he did manage to leverage a change in the Sonoma County Sheriff’s Office (SCSO) policy toward noncitizens who commit crimes. As first reported in the Press Democrat on May 2, Freitas said he would release prisoners to Immigration and Customs Officials under guidelines set out by the Obama-era 2013 Trust Act, which, as reporter Martin Espinoza noted, was supported by immigrant-rights groups. The Trust Act set out conditions under which detainees could be released to ICE—and also under which conditions they could not. Based on Threet’s recommendation, reported the PD, the SCSO will no longer contact ICE for non-serious crimes such as driving without a license, as Freitas pledged to abide the standards of the 2013 act.

TANKER SORE Will the freight train ever come ’round the bend?

Freight Not?

SMART poised to roll down the track while planned freight service stumbles along BY CHRIS ROONEY

H

ere’s a question: If the regional transportation goal is to eliminate gridlock on Highway 101, why doesn’t a plan for expanded freight service enjoy the same support as the long-delayed SonomaMarin Area Rail Transit (SMART) commuter train?

Doug Bosco, an investor and lawyer for Northwestern Pacific Railroad, sounded nonplussed over the phone the night before a significant hearing before the California State Supreme Court in late April. If anything, Bosco, the former North Coast congressman, sounded mildly annoyed. “We’ve won in every court we’ve been in,” he said, referring to ongoing efforts to bring freight service to the North Coast.

This latest legal scrum wasn’t itself the source of Bosco’s annoyance, but the $1 million in legal fees and the ongoing obstacles to reviving freight train service in Northern California. “As a practical matter, this is a difficult undertaking,” says the state’s North Coast Railroad Authority (NCRA) executive director Mitch Stogner on the notion of reviving a successful freight industry in ) 10

Freitas had previously written to ICE to offer assistance to the federal agency as it warned of the Trust Act’s potential legal implications to the SCSO. In a May 7, 2014, letter to Craig Meyer, an assistant field director at the ICE office in San Francisco, Freitas noted that court cases that had been filed in the aftermath of the act’s passage had clarified that “local law enforcement agencies are free to disregard ICE detainers,” and highlighted that the court orders also suggested “that local law enforcement agencies may be exposed to potential civil rights actions for honoring ICE detainers, absent a showing of probable cause for detention.” Freitas went on to inform Meyer that, given the risk of civil lawsuits, the SCSO would not honor ICE detainers absent proof of probable cause—such as an arrest warrant. Then he offered to help ICE establish probable ) 10 cause: “If you would The Bohemian started as The Paper in 1978.


Saturday May 13 ONLY!

Treasure Mom this Year!

707.836.1840 MarkShimizuDesign.com 9070 Windsor Road • Windsor

9

Mother’s Day Gift Inspirations C LOT H I NG | J E W E LRY SC A RV E S | ACC E SSOR I E S

195 N Main Street, Sebastopol 707.824.4300 Open Mon–Sun | 10 to 6 silkmoon.org

Dog Training the Natural Way Offering: • group classes • private sessions • boot camp

Mother’s Day Special

an intensive 3 week in board program with unlimited owner follow-up

Training Evaluations always FREE by appointment 707.322.3272 We have over 40 years of experience training dogs and their people. From helping you raise a well adjusted puppy to resolving serious behavioral issues—our expertise gets RESULTS! incrediblecanine.com

Mention this ad to receive complimentary foot soak.

707.861.3562 • Downtown Sebastopol • JaiyenSpa.com THAI MASSAGE | SWEDISH | AROMATHERAPY | DEEP TISSUE | GIFT CARDS

Holistic Family Dentistry Dr. Marie Mallory, DDS

May 1-14

MOTHER’S DAY SALE!

20% off Body Bar + Skincare* • Custom facial elixirs at the Body Bar • Clinical-grade, organic essenƟal oils • BeauƟful, whole-plant skincare

*cannot be combined with other discounts or promoƟons

www.farmacopia.net Santa Rosa 707.528.HERB

Trained in Germany and in the U.S., Dr. Mallory provides preventive, restorative, cosmetic, endodontic and ALF orthodontic dentistry with gentle impeccable care for children and adults. Healthy Alternatives— Quality Supplements Mercury-Free/Metal-Free By Appointment: Monday–Wednesday 8–1, 2–5 Thursday 9–5 1820 Sonoma Ave, Doctors Park Suite 76 | Santa Rosa 707.542.7800 | DrMallory.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Vintage Collection from J. Matthews Estate Jewelers

Psst! Want to be the favorite this Mother's Day? I have the answer.


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

10 Trains ( 8 northwestern California. The authority was born in 1989 via the North Coast Railroad Authority Act, Stogner says, to provide for continued rail service in the region. Along the way, the state purchased lines or arranged deals with rail owners to eventually create a connection from Schellville (outside of the city of Sonoma) to Willits. At one time, there was bipartisan support to finance the act, but the project was dealt its first blow when Gov. George Deukmejian nixed a funding bill; the project was eventually awarded $500 million to restore the train lines in 2007 under Gov. Schwarzenegger. Freight service was set to begin in 2009 until a lawsuit filed by Novato stopped the train in its tracks. “We’ve had our share of disappointments, but we’ve not given up,” Stogner says. “It’s just a struggling little freight entity.” The agency inked a five-year deal in 2006, and a 99-year lease with the railroad was signed in 2011; the freight service dates back to 1907, but has historically been subjected to a litany of financial setbacks, multiple operators and serial stoppages in service. Under the lease, Northwestern Pacific would be forced into a partnership with SMART, as the two would have to share the tracks. The respective railroads have relied on the same marketing materials to sustain public support: they claim to be a safer and more environmentally sound means of transport than cars and trucks. “Trains are much more effective than trucks,” Bosco says, as he cites the federal regulations ensuring safe rail transit, adding that trains emit “far less pollution” than trucks. The similar marketing posture is about the only thing the two rail companies have in common. SMART is funded by a voterapproved quarter-cent tax, and has had unwavering support despite budget overages and

delays in service. A who’s who of Sonoma and Marin county officials comprise SMART’s governing board. The freight game isn’t so cushy. “It all depends on getting customers,” Bosco says, explaining that Northwestern Pacific can only gradually expand northward as the SMART tracks are finalized, and paying customers materialize. “Now that SMART is built, we can pick up customers,” Bosco says. “It’s a slow process.” It will likely take up to five years to extend the freight route—currently functional from Schelville to Novato and up to Windsor—as far north as Cloverdale. For freight customers, rail is a viable alternative to trucks. Bosco says one dairy-feed client from Petaluma has already saved $1 million in transportation expenses. There’s a joint-operating agreement between the commuter and freight lines, mostly agreeable but with maybe a tinge of sibling rivalry. “The challenge has been to share the line,” Stogner says. The two services have to coordinate maintenance and repair responsibilities, and determine a schedule to allow them both to flourish. “Freight runs predominantly in the evenings, and does not currently conflict with SMART’s operating schedule,” says SMART spokesperson and marketing director Jeanne Mariani-Belding. The plan is that SMART will rule the rails during the commuter hours; the freight service gets some track time in the middle of day, but primarily runs in the wee hours—currently Sunday through Thursday from 3am to 6am. The two rail companies did have one public spat. Late last year, Northwestern Pacific allowed some cars to be parked on the tracks near its Schellville headquarters. Locals sounded an alarm— what’s in those mysterious cars that never go anywhere? Tanker cars filled with liquefied petroleum gas were being stored in the area, a lucrative practice

that the rail relies upon to goose its revenue. The issue: the tracks in that area are owned by SMART, leading to a dispute that was finally resolved in February. Stogner says safety was never much of a concern—the area is surrounded by remote dairy land, and the cars are heavily reinforced. “There’s not much that people can do to them,” he says, short of someone using “an Uzi or something akin to that.” It’s also a common practice to store product on the track. “There’s never been a problem,” he says, adding that, after a legal standoff, “it was handled amicably.” The squabble did engender a further question: while it was legislated that SMART would own those tracks near Schellville, shouldn’t they be the freight train’s responsibility, since they’re the ones using the track? “It is a little bit nonsensical,” Stogner says. “They have no plans to ever use [the tracks]”—and that the freight rail is the only one that uses that branch. “[SMART has] no immediate plans for any changes there,” says Mariani-Belding. And then there’s the final obstacle, so far, for Northwestern Pacific: the aforementioned appearance in California Supreme Court. This conflict has nothing to do with SMART, but with the Friends of the Eel River and Californians for Alternatives to Toxics, which filed the suit and wants to apply state safety standards that are in place for a high-speed commuter rail in central California to the freight trains—when Northwestern Pacific is under federal authority. Bosco says it’s “very unusual not to uphold” federal authority and pledged to go to the Supreme Court if necessary. “It really is a federal issue.” But Northwestern Pacific has already lost. Regardless of the outcome, they’re out more than $1 million in legal fees, with no SMART-style quarter-cent tax to rely on to offset the mounting legal costs.

DEBRIEFER

(8

like to meet to discuss possible other methods of providing probable cause, I would be happy to meet,” Freitas wrote. The SCSO rejected any implication that Freitas had been working with ICE to assist the agency in deporting noncitizens charged with minor offenses. “The letter specifically states that we are no longer going to accept ICE detainers without probable cause,” says SCSO spokesman Sgt. Spencer Crum via email. “If there was another way to establish the probable cause without a warrant we would be willing to listen to Mr. Meyer’s ideas as we would consult with any other law enforcement agency. To this day, we reject all ICE detainers and will only hold people who we’d otherwise release if we have a valid warrant signed by a judge.”

Potopoly A state Senate budget subcommittee met May 4 to discuss the implementation of Proposition 64. A rider bill to last year’s voter-approved legalization would address taxation and other issues, but the sticking point, says California Growers Association executive director Hezekiah Allen, is a proposed repeal of Section 26051, which gives officials latitude to deny canna-biz applicants if they are concerned they might “create or maintain monopoly powers.” Proposition 64 protects local growers with a five-year window to grow their business and protect their flowers from corporate takeover. Section 26051 covers a range of deniable factors: Applications can be rejected if authorities believe they would encourage underage use or adult abuse; violate environmental protection laws; or contribute to the black market. By every indication, the repeal-26051 effort is not being pushed by children, criminals, addicts or illicit streamside growers. Hmmm . . . —Tom Gogola


11 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

CLASSIC PANZANELLA SALAD WITH GRILLED CHICKEN


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

12

Dining ROAD SCHOLAR Greg Brummett has been selling his smoked salmon along West County

roads for 35 years. Always with a cute dog, too.

Fish Stories

Greg Brummett offers salmon, conversation on Highway 12 BY STETT HOLBROOK

G

reg Brummett’s roadside smokedsalmon business is open on weekends, except when it’s not.

If he’s open and you decide to buy his applewood-smoked fish, that’s great. If not, that’s OK too. It’s not a moneymaker for him. But that hasn’t stopped him from running the business for the past 35 years. Brummett, 73, is as much

a fixture of the West County landscape as apple orchards and Pinot vineyards. He wants to sell you his smoked salmon, but he’s just as happy to sit in his trailer and read esoteric fiction in a worn, easy chair with his shelter dog, Nudge, in his lap. Mainly he likes to talk. “I just like interaction with people,” he says. Right now he’s reading Where I Live Now by Lucia Berlin. (“She’s real good,” he says.) He’s also working on California’s Over by

Louis B. Jones. (“It’s been a year reading it. It’s very lush.”) His current favorite is Nord by LouisFerdinand Céline. (“He’s a crazy son of a bitch. A real anarchist.”) “[Henry] Miller stole all his slang from Céline,” Brummett says. Until last year, Brummett’s squat, green trailer, with its signature salmon-smoking-apipe sign, was a weekend fixture on Highway 1 just south of the Russian River near Jenner. But Caltrans gave him the boot,

so now he parks his trailer on Highway 12 west of Sebastopol. It’s right across the street from his home and where he smokes his Alaskan salmon. (Local salmon is too expensive and sporadically available, he says.) He liked his former location better because it was easier for cars to get on and off the highway. He also misses the drive up Highway 1. But Brummett is adaptable, and so is Nudge, a once anxious and yappy terrier who’s now a friendly, sweet dog who climbs out the window of his trailer to meet customers as they open up the coolers that hold the smoked salmon. Nudge will soon be featured wearing a Superman cape on Brummett’s new business cards. Brummett likes to put his dogs on his cards in crazy get-ups. His current cards have a photo of his former dog Photoshopped on a hang glider soaring above the mouth of the Russian River and Goat Rock. A previous set of business cards depicted another late dog on a surfboard. Because, why not? The salmon, by the way, is dry-brined and hot-smoked—it’s pleasantly salty-sweet. I think the jerky-like end pieces are best. The thicker pieces can be rather dry. Brummett’s is a cash-only business, but Brummett will often float credit to customers who come up short. “You can pay me the rest in February,” he told one. When Brummett worked as a checker at various grocery stores, he loved the express lane best. “It was short and quick. You get the best stories because they don’t stick around very long,” he says. Those are the interactions he has now with his salmon customers. He spends Monday through Friday alone, reading and smoking salmon. Come the weekend, he craves conversation. “You gotta do something,” he says. As I prepare to leave with a package of smoked salmon, Brummett offers a rough quote from another favorite writer (after Henry Miller), Saul Bellow: “The last of the human freedoms is to choose your attitude in any set of circumstances.”


Most reviews by James Knight. Note: Those listings marked ‘WC’ denote wineries with caves. These wineries are usually only open to the public by appointment. Wineries in these listings appear on a rotating basis.

SONOMA COUNTY J Vineyards & Winery

Save the sit-down, threecourse food and wine pairing in the Bubble Room for a special occasion, like, “Hey, it’s Sunday.” Weekend program offers deceptively wee courses that change every six weeks to feature seasonal produce. Diverse and intense flavors, matched with sparkling wine, Pinot and Chardonnay, sure to amuse anyone’s bouche. New: Legacy Lounge and Terrace Tasting.11447 Old Redwood Hwy., Healdsburg. Open daily 11am–5pm, regular tasting $20. Bubble Room, Friday– Sunday, 11am–3pm, $75. 888.594.6326.

Pellegrini Family Vineyards Why not take

Olivet, and find some of the area’s best Pinot Noir and old vine Zinfandel. Family-owned winery offers well-priced Pinot from its Olivet Lane vineyard in the barrel room; local St. George cheese yours for the munching. Tasting appointments can generally be arranged upon sticking one’s head through the cellar door. 4055 West Olivet Road, Santa Rosa. Open 10:30am–4:30pm by appointment. No fee. 707.545.8680.

Timber Crest Farms

Animal labels abound at Peterson Winery’s expanded tasting room adjacent the cellar. Is that a Jackalope, or is that just the Dry Creek Valley Zinfandel? Also on hand is Papapietro-Perry and the six Family Wineries of Dry Creek. Dashe Cellars crafts mainly powerful Zinfandels and other reds. At Kokomo Winery, it’s about the reds. Also look for Mietz Cellars, Lago di Merlo and Collier Falls. 4791 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg. Tasting rooms generally open daily from around 11am to 4:30pm. 707.433.0100. 707.431.7568.

Wine Guerrilla Comrade,

it brings glory to the revolution

Happy Mother’s Day

The Bay View Restaurant

Sunday, May 14, 2017 ~ 10:30am – 7:00pm

Children under 12 half price ~ Complimentary Mimosa Cocktail

FIRST COURSE to inform you that this artistic, quixotic all-Zinfandel brand now has its own spacious tasting room in downtown Forestville. I’d say that these screw-capped but definitely serious Zins are worthy of cellaring, but that would be so bourgeois. 6671 Front St., Forestville. Daily, 11am–5pm. Tasting fee, $10. 707.887.1996.

MARIN COUNTY Bacchus & Venus A

trendy place for beginners and tourists. Great place to learn the basics. 769 Bridgeway, Sausalito. Open daily, noon– 7pm. 415.331.2001.

Heidrun Meadery This

is not your fæder’s mead: flower varietal, regional, méthode champenoise sparkling mead on a farm made for the bees. 11925 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes Station. By appointment only, Monday– Friday. 415.663.9122.

Point Reyes Vineyards

The tasting room features many varietals but the main reason to go is for the sparkling wines. Open Saturday–Sunday, 11am–5pm. 12700 Hwy. 1, Point Reyes. 415.663.1011.

NAPA COUNTY Bouchaine Vineyards

Venerable producer of estategrown Burgundian style wine in the rustic wind-scraped hills of Carneros. Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier with a coolclimate, cherry-skin crispness that nearly crunches in the mouth, and Chardonnay with a “mouth of butter.” Patio service in fair weather, cozy hearthside tasting in cooler days; good-humored hospitality throughout. 1075 Buchli Station Road, Napa. Open daily, 10:30am–4:30pm; tasting fee $20–$30. 707.252.9065.

Charles Krug Winery Founded 1861, and owned

by the Peter Mondavi family since only 1943, Krug is among Napa’s most historic wineries. Taste award-winning Sauvignon Blanc and reserve Cab in the newly restored Redwood Cellar in the original stone winery. Ask about the Johannisberg Riesling. 2800 Main St., St. Helena. Tasting daily, 10:30am to 5pm. Fees vary; complimentary for “Napa neighbors.” 707.967.2229.

Soy-Ginger Marinated Salmon Carpaccio • Eggplant Parmigiana Buffalo Mozzarella and Parma Prosciutto • French Onion Soup Spring Salad

MAIN COURSE

Served with a Baker’s Basket of Assorted Breads and Muffins (until 3:00 pm)

Bay View Benedict • Crab Cake Benedict • Eggs Florentine Rancher’s Breakfast • Steak & Eggs • Lobster Ravioli Grilled King Salmon • Grilled Filet of Angus • Grilled Filet Hitchcock

DESSERT

Meyer Lemon Cheesecake • Crème Brûlée Chocolate Zucotto Cake • Mixed Berry Tiramisu 707.875.2751 • InnattheTides.com 800 Hwy One, Bodega Bay

Frog’s Leap Winery

A good story is nearly as important as good wine; Frog’s Leap does a neat job on both. As you wind through the vineyard, the frog pond and the rustic 1884 winery, your tour guide finds bottles along the way, like Easter eggs. Dry-farming, who knew, can produce a beverage more thirst-quenching than water. 8815 Conn Creek Road, Rutherford. Daily, 10am–4pm. Tastings, $20; tours Monday–Friday, $20. 707.963.4704.

Inglenook Vineyard

What’s new at Inglenook? Very little. The iconic stone building, robed in green vines, appears exactly as it did in 1890. But that’s news, and all thanks to owner Francis Ford Coppola. Still living up to Gustave Niebaum’s dream of fine wine to rival France, the oncebeloved Inglenook is putting out the goods once again. 1991 St. Helena Hwy., Rutherford. Daily, 10am–5pm. Reservations for tour and tasting ($50) recommended; none required for bistro and exhibits. 707.968.1161.

Trefethen Winery An estate winery that won fame in “the other Paris tasting” in the 1970s, and garnered sustainability honors in the 2010s, Trefethen is open for business despite damage suffered by their historic old winery building in the Napa earthquake. Cab, Chard, a nd superb Dry Riesling. 1160 Oak Knoll Ave., Napa. Open daily by appointment. Tasting fee, $25–$35. 866895-7696.

THE DRIVE’S

CALIFORNIA WINE COUNTRY

Named “BEST CITY OR REGIONAL PROGRAM” at the 2016 Taste Awards in Los Angeles WEDNESDAYS AT 5:00 ON KSRO 1350 AM AND 103.5 FM The Drive 3 TO 6, WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS ON KSRO To become a Drive sponsor contact Cathy Ratto at cathy.ratto@yahoo.com

/JAXONDRIVE

Craft Beer! • Full Bar

• Happy Hour Twice Daily

K&L

BISTRO

3pm–6pm & 9:30pm–11pm

• laTe nigHT Bar menu • oysTer Bar • ouTDoor HeaTeD paTio • Dog FrienDly • BruncH 11am–4pm, sat & sun • open Daily 11am–11pm

119 South Ma in Street | SebaStopol, Ca 707.823.6614 | klbiStro.CoM

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH EMI A N.COM

Wineries

13


Fresh everyday, local, always Franco

Odd Campanian Legendary Aglianico is a rare find in California BY JAMES KNIGHT

A FR

We are a long-standing purveyor to Sonoma County restaurants. Shop in our store or local retailer.

papas and pollo now open for

CO AMERIC AN

breakfast @ 8am daily

AN

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

14

YOUR LOCAL BAKERY

707.545.7528 202 W. 7th Street, Santa Rosa Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri 8:30–4:00 Sat 8:00–2:30 • Closed Wed & Sun

HAPPY HOUR EVERY DAY

DRAFT BEERS 4–6PM

local • organic • seb-mex 915 gravenstein hwy s. sebastopol 707.829.9037

The Sonoma-County Style ramen is as delicious as ever. —Stett Holbrook, Bohemian Editor

Happy Hour

3:30-5:30 $ 3 yakitori & Izakaya Newly expanded patio and bar

707.52NYPIE 707 70 7.52NYPIE 52NYPIE

7 0 7. 5 2 6 . 9 7 4 3

www.NEW-YORK-PIE.com 65 Brookwood Ave, Santa Rosa

6948 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol 707.827.3609 | www.ramengaijin.com

Nightly Local Music 5:30–8:30 Daily & 12:30–3:30 Sat & Sun

Dine in or Order

Out!

3381 CLEVELAND AVE, SANTA ROSA JUST NORTH OF TRADER JOE'S

SIMPLYVIETNAMEXPRESS.COM 707.544.4585

5700 Gravenstein Hwy N. Forestville 707.887.3344 • RussianRiverVineyards.com

glianico—just the name is so lovely. Listen to it as pronounced by a native Italian speaker: Aglianico. The g is silent, not hard as in “Grenache,” and the accent falls on the second a, but more like a woman’s sigh—c’mon, this is Italian we’re talking about—than an exclamation.

Sangiovese says, “Here I am!” But Aglianico laments, “Where are you?” Where is Aglianico, indeed. Trailing even such Cal-Ital grapes of mixed success as Sangiovese and Barbera, Aglianico has a tenuous hold on just a few acres of soil in Sonoma and Napa counties. Grown in Campania, in the vicinity of Naples, Aglianico is “arguably Southern Italy’s greatest darkskinned grape,” according to Jancis Robinson and Hugh Johnson’s World Atlas of Wine. As the principal ingredient in legendary Falernian wine, Aglianico commanded such high prices in the early Roman Empire that some observers suspected more was sold than was produced. In my search for Aglianico, I reached out to Healdsburg’s DaVero Farms & Winery, where they are happy to point to a map to demonstrate the latitudinal sisterhood of Sonoma and Southern Italy—ergo, we should be growing the same grapes. Last year, they made 18 different Italian varietal wines, but, alas, no Aglianico even here. Late-ripening Aglianico is said to produce finely on volcanic soils. Say, do we have any of those around here? That aren’t already covered with Cabernet Sauvignon? Ah well, Aglianico. In St. Helena Cab country, brave Benessere Vineyards makes a little 2014 Napa Valley Aglianico ($56), along with its other Italian varietals. In Healdsburg, a winery with even deeper Italian roots opts to hold its wine back a few years: the upcoming release from Seghesio Family Vineyards, the 2009 Alexander Valley Aglianico ($38), wears its 30 months in oak well. Sweet oak, blackberry and black cherry float over furry tannins, spicing the palate with Zinfandel-like accents. It’s a challenge to get the extraction from the thick-skinned, late-ripening grapes just right, says winemaker Ted Seghesio. “It’s not for the faint of heart.” The Jacuzzi Family Vineyards 2014 Tracy Hills Aglianico ($28) is evocative of some forgotten arbor of grapes overgrown with blackberries, and rhubarb chocolate cordial, if there is such a thing. Not awesomely tannic, this might be nice with something Cal-Ital, like pizza with figs and goat cheese, or just quiet contemplation of an ancient savor. The Tracy Hills AVA, by the way, is a fancy way of saying the Central Valley west of Modesto. But just listen to how it sounds in Italian.


15

Photos courtesy Nimbus Arts

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

HANDS ON Nimbus Arts offers classes of all kinds in St. Helena and beyond.

Cloud Cover Nimbus champions the arts in uncertain times BY CHARLIE SWANSON

I

n any discussion about Napa Valley culture, the first two words that invariably come up are “wine” and “food.” But there’s a third dimension to the region— the arts—that has been steadily expanding in scope and inspiring residents and visitors to enjoy and embrace their creative side.

At the forefront of this cultural dimension is Nimbus Arts, a nonprofit arts center based in St. Helena that offers eclectic art classes for students and engages with the community through public projects and installations. As Nimbus prepares for its annual Nimbash fundraising event on May 13—the valley’s biggest art party of the year—along with a summer filled with art camps, the close-knit community

of artists and organizers involved in the nonprofit reflect on the center’s history and its two-fold impact on the cultural landscape of the North Bay. “Our mission is to reach communities that need art,” says executive director Jamie Graff. “But our other big mission is to support local artists, to make life feasible for them here, because they’re such an asset to the community.” Nimbus first took shape in 2005 after founder Dana Johnson’s daughter spent a week in a children’s hospital. While there, Johnson saw art projects

in the hospital’s playroom that helped alleviate the stress of the situation. After her daughter’s recovery, Johnson sought to share her experience with the community at large, and recruited Graff to form Nimbus. “It started out just trying to explore what the community wanted from an arts center,” says Graff, who spent 12 years as a winemaker before Johnson approached her. One of the group’s earliest offerings was a sculpture camp, which Graff says involved studying and creating clouds through sculpture. ) 16


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

16 Nimbus ( 15

“What’s important about that one is it’s where our name came from,” says Graff. “And it was also the model that would become the Nimbus style to teaching a multidisciplinary approach to creativity.” From the early days of painting and drawing classes, Nimbus grew organically, and as Graff found more and more local artists to work with, the center’s ability to teach other disciplines expanded. “We had a group of people here [in St. Helena] committed to making it work,” Graff says. Today, the center boasts metal, ceramics, glass and other media classes from nearly 40 artists. “We have a think-tank style of developing our programs,” Graff

adds. “We get the artists together for meals, and have conversations about the directions of the center; it’s a really dynamic, creative way to do it as a team.” Graff calls the Napa Valley art scene bohemian and says the region’s artists have an ability to tap into people’s imagination with creative flair. “Everybody here knows everybody; seamstresses, painters, musicians. It’s a really close-knit community. You don’t have to go far if you need something from someone. It’s a really supportive environment.”

The Family Anne Pentland has been living and working in Napa Valley for the last 25 years, teaching

and making art, and organizing projects for the Napa Valley Wine Auction, the Calistoga Education Foundation and Safari West in Santa Rosa, among other groups. Graff recruited Pentland while she was teaching after-school classes in Calistoga. Pentland, coming up on 11 years at Nimbus, is now the resident artist. She designs a lot of the programming and collaborations with groups like Mariposa, a prevention program of the Napa County Office of Education that empowers Latina youth in middle and high school to break the cycle of violence through the creation of large murals in locations like downtown Napa and the St. Helena elementary school. “The magic of Nimbus is that

we are really a family,” Pentland says. “We’re a lot of artists doing different things, but when we come together there’s a synergy and the sum is greater than the parts.” Nikki Ballere Callnan echoes that statement. A ceramicist who takes inspiration from natural forms and found objects, Ballere Callnan runs NBC Pottery with her husband, Will, and creates custom works for clients like the Restaurant at Meadowood. She has also taught at Nimbus since the satellite days. “Where we live is a very special place. We are lucky enough to have a lot of people in the community who support art,” says Ballere Callnan. “Like a cat, Nimbus has always landed on its


Artistic Vitality

feet. We just want to share our passion, and Nimbus, when you’re there, you’ve found home.”

Hidden Gems While art is largely supported by locals, tourists and visitors still struggle to see the creative side of Napa Valley when they swirl at the wineries and nosh at the restaurants. “When I first moved here, I wasn’t sure we were going to see any art,” says artist and graphic designer Nick Cann. “We soon found out that there were thousands of artists in the valley, but you don’t hear much about it. Nobody talks about it; they just do it.” After working in Los Angeles as a freelance set and costume designer and living in Sausalito

“Art, at its core, is another form of communication,” Pentland says. “In this day and age, when everyone is so connected and you have the whole world at your fingertips, literally, to have a deeper understanding or sense of your world in all of its forms and formats is important. Art is another way of processing your world, and for me, creativity is one of the most important aspects of living.” Pentland also notes that children learn in a variety of modalities. “Some are visual learners, some are auditory learners. So art and creativity is another format for children to learn,” she says. As a nonprofit, Nimbus partners with several grant-donating organizations, such as the Clif Bar Family Foundation, and private individuals in the region to fund its programs and pay its artists a fair rate for their time and talent. In the last few months, ) 18 the political climate

Nova Group Inc. Presents

Saturday, May 13, 2017 Yountville, CA

Comedian, Actor, Writer & Director

Tickets at www.tinyurl.com/

NapaBirbigs

17 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

for many years, Cann and his wife moved to Napa Valley to retire. But he says he’s nowhere near retirement, teaching classes at Nimbus and inspiring students to pursue their passion. Like many of the artists working for Nimbus, Cann credits the center with providing a place where artists can make a living and express themselves at the same time. “It’s a lot more than meets the eye,” he says of the arts community. “The schools encourage art, but they really don’t tell young people all the possibilities for careers in art, from interior design to industrial design and all the rest. I consider it my job to let the students, and their parents, know that there is a future in the arts if they want to do it.” In addition to the center’s calendar of classes, Nimbus, located on St. Helena’s Main Street across from the Napa Valley Wine Train’s rail line, is open for visitors to schedule customizable art experiences like one-on-one classes. “We encourage them to come in with a crazy, fantastical idea,” Ballere Callnan says, “and then let them see it happen.”


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

18

CH AR L E S M . S C HU L Z M U S E U M A ND RESEA RCH CEN TER

Nimbus ( 17

Meet Guest Cartoonist

Art Roche

Enter a wacky world of medieval mystery and runny noses in the hilarious new illustrated novel for middle-grade readers, The Knights of Boo’Gar.

Saturday, May 20 1:00 pm

Fans of series like Captain Underpants and Adventure Time will love the slapstick humor and zany storyline, while discovering that even the most unlikely people can be heroes.

SEE, ART MAKES YOU SMILE Jamie Graff, center, and the Nimbus staff

aren’t afraid to dirty some aprons in the name of art.

2301 Hardies Lane Santa Rosa, CA 95403 (707) 579-4452

schulzmuseum.org

GRAND OPENING

531 FIFTH STREET, SANTA ROSA

SATURDAY, MAY 13 6PM - 10PM FOOD • BEER • MUSIC TH

FEATURING THE WORKS OF WEST COAST ARTISTS ZOLTRON ELAINE PENWELL BLUNT GRAFFIX AND MANY MORE /AGENTINKGALLERY @AGENTINKGALLERY

AGENTINKGALLERY.COM

has not been encouraging for the arts, with the president eager to cut funding for the National Endowment of the Arts and further limit the potential for public schools to teach extracurricular classes like art. Still, the staff at Nimbus see these times as an opportunity to further the conversation about the importance of art in our daily life. “In fact, as a result of the current national dialogue, there is a greater spotlight on arts and arts in education,” Pentland says. “I think this is when Nimbus has to work harder to keep art at the forefront of our community and keep it alive,” says Ballere Callnan. “Everyone at Nimbus is passionate. We do art seven days a week. Sure, you gotta work a little bit harder these days, but that’s what you do when you love what you do.”

Nimbash Nimbash is a unique event, says Graff. “I really want the community to understand who we are through the event, and doing an auction just didn’t feel like enough.” With that inspiration, Nimbash

opens the fundraising evening with an interactive art party for guests that includes various hands-on activities, demonstrations, silentauction items and live music. “We have trouble getting everyone out of that party when it’s over,” Graff says. During dinner, an art fashion show and gallery of new works displays top-notch creations from artists like St. Helena’s Baker Sisters. The annual event adopts a different theme each year, and this year’s theme of “Street Art” will drive the creative output. After the fashion show, a live auction and a dance party cap off the night. For anyone looking to become involved in Nimbus’ programs, the center offers two seasons of classes open to everyone in the North Bay and beyond. Graff also says that any artists in the area who are interested in working with the center simply need to call her up. “I’m always eager to get new people involved.” Nimbash happens on Saturday, May 13, at the Barn at St. Helena Montessori School, 880 College Ave., St. Helena. 5:30pm. $150 and up. nimbusarts.org.


Throwback Horror

CLOVERDALE When the original ‘Invasion of the Body Snatchers’ was released in 1956, America was a country of sock-hops, soda jerks and drive-in movies. Now, more than 60 years later, Body Snatchers remains one of the most memorable horror films to come out of the era of McCarthy and the Cold War, and the term “Pod People” still generates shivers down the backs of those who saw it. This week, the film lovers at Alexander Valley Film Society are dialing the clock back and presenting the film in true 1950s fashion, with a drive-in screening of the movie on Friday, May 12, at the Citrus Fairgrounds, 1 Citrus Drive, Cloverdale. Gates open at 6:30pm. $15–$60. avfilmsociety.org.

Space Mom

YOUNTVILLE/ ST HELENA Chemist, physician and former NASA astronaut Anna Lee Fisher became the first mom in space when she flew aboard Discovery in 1984. Her highly decorated career has inspired generations, and her empowering stories have made her a popular figure at events around the country. This week, Fisher is in the Napa Valley for a pair of appearances. First, she’ll be in conversation with her daughter, Emmy-winning newswoman Kristin Fisher, on Friday. Then, she appears at a screening and panel discussion of the film Hidden Figures on Saturday. Catch Fisher on May 12 at 7pm at the Napa Valley Museum (55 Presidents Circle, Yountville; $10–$20; 707.944.0500) and on May 13 at 2pm at Cameo Cinemas (1340 main St., St. Helena; $8–$15; 707.963.9779).

Home-Style Helping

RIO NIDO The Clean River Alliance is all about talking trash—in the Russian River, that is. After seeing the flow of garbage that heads out into the ocean after heavy rains, founder Chris Bokate developed the alliance to remove trash from the lower Russian River and prevent it from devastating the local environment. This week, the Clean River Alliance is raising funds with an old-fashioned spaghetti cook-off that features family fun and lots of food. Vote for your favorite sauces, dance to the tunes of Midnight Sun, enter to win door prizes, bid on silent auctions and sign up to help the alliance on Saturday, May 13, at the Rio Nido Roadhouse, 14540 Canyon Two Road, Rio Nido. 4pm. $10–$20. cleanriveralliance.org.

Amazing Ink

S A N TA R O S A Graphic designer Curt Barnickel is a collector and creator of screen-printed works of art, and his eye for exceptional pieces is on display at his new Agent Ink Gallery in downtown Santa Rosa. Featuring limited-run posters and apparel, Agent Ink’s walls are adorned with works by some of the best poster artists and screen printers from around the world. This week, Agent Ink officially unveils its eclectic collection with a grand opening that lets you feast your eyes on new releases by several famed West Coast artists. Food, beer, wine and live music will also be on hand for the party on Saturday, May 13, at Agent Ink Gallery, 531 Fifth St., Santa Rosa. 6pm. Free admission. agentinkgallery.com.

—Charlie Swanson LOL Comedian, writer and ‘Daily Show’ co-creator Lizz Winstead speaks at the In Celebration of Mother Luncheon on May 12 in San Rafael. See Events, p30. i

19 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Crush CULTURE

The week’s events: a selective guide


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

20

Arts Ideas RUN AWAY, RUN AWAY! Dana Wynter and Kevin McCarthy respond calmly and collectedly

in the original 1956 ‘Body Snatchers.’

American Pod Pod People and the culture of dissent in the Trump era BY TOM GOGOLA

T

he other day, I was driving through Petaluma, flipping through the radio, and there was Rush Limbaugh, engaging with a man who had called in to let him know that he didn’t believe anything he saw on the news anymore. Not a darn thing. It’s all fake news.

Say it, man, say it! Limbaugh cooed to the man. The Pod People are coming!

Defiant in their ignorance, pugnacious in their reactionary outbursts, the Trump invasion has snatched the body politic from the grasp of a culture-war victory and is pulling out the stops to enforce a platform of rote subjugation to whatever nutbag edict emerges from the White House. Just in time, this week the Alexander Valley Film Society is airing the original ’50s-era Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and Charlie Swanson has the details in the Crush column (p19). Body Snatchers was subjected

to the politics of Hollywood editing, and wound up as both a critique of the Joseph McCarthy, anti-communist witch hunts, and a critique of the potential for American totalitarianism courtesy of the Russians. The more things change . . . The film has something of a happy ending—Hoover’s FBI arrives in time to keep the pods and the Pod People out of the big cities—where, in our recent election, voters by and large did not turn out for Trump and the FBI was less than helpful.

The 1978 remake of the film stars Donald Sutherland and takes on the post-’60s cultural shift toward “Me-ism,” and does not have a happy ending—but it’s a great, scary ending. The Pod People are victorious in the remake—victorious in their mandate to enforce a monoculture sameness, and in San Francisco, no less. The original version arrives in Sonoma County amid a national convulsion over free speech in the Trump era, where, for example, high-media supporters such as Ann Coulter blast Berkeley’s recent and reasonable decision to cancel her appearance after she refused to accept security demands made by the university. It comes as “heritage”supporting citizens arrive in New Orleans to stand by cultural signifiers of the Confederacy and make free speech arguments about the expressive content of a Robert E. Lee statue. And it comes as the White House just told federal agencies that the house TV channel is now Fox News, turn off that CNN—fake news. The Pod People are coming! And they don’t care about free speech. Indeed, the queen-bee of the Pod hive-mind violently opposes the free speech rights of those she disagrees with. When the misguided Marin native John Walker Lindh joined the Taliban, Coulter noted that “we need to execute people like [him], in order to physically intimidate liberals.” When domestic terrorist Timothy McVeigh blew up a federal building, Coulter noted, “My only regret with Timothy McVeigh is he did not go to the New York Times building.” The Pod People are coming! Keep an eye out for this nasty, invasive species in our parts. It’s a real killer. Break out the RoundUp if you need to, desperate times require desperate measures.


Kevin Berne

BIZARRE BEAUTY Rushi Kota and Jason Kapoor anchor the superb ‘Guards at the Taj.’

Royal ‘Taj’

Rajiv Joseph’s most recent play a rewarding challenge BY DAVID TEMPLETON

T

here are works of art that are exciting and captivating to experience, but which quickly lose their initial spark of pleasure, diminishing in brightness the more you think of them. Guards at the Taj, by Rajiv Joseph (Bengal Tiger at the Baghdad Zoo), does the exact opposite. It leaves one a bit stunned and baffled, then gradually begins to reveal its own weird wisdom and audacious genius in the hours and days after.

That’s the effect that director Jasson Minadakis’ bizarre and beautiful new production at Marin Theatre Company had on me,

‘Guards at the Taj’ runs Tuesday– Sunday through May 21 at Marin Theatre Company. 397 Miller Ave., Mill Valley. Times vary. $20–$58. 415.388.5208.

21

52 W. 6th Street, Santa Rosa, CA 95401

Hot Summer Guide

LOCAL Alternative to the Big Banks NOT behaving like a Wall St. bank for 56 years!

May 24

Not-for-profit financial co-op that delivers all the conveniences, savings, loans … but none of the remorse

Call to advertise 707.527.1200

Locally earned dollars stay LOCAL! Guerneville Healdsburg Napa Santa Rosa Sebastopol

HERE FOR GOOD! 707//546-6000

comfirstcu.org

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Stage

anyway. There will surely be those who have a very different reaction to Joseph’s uncomfortably funny, heartbreakingly horrifying, Monty Python–tinged retelling of a certain gruesome ancient folktale about the famous Taj Mahal. In other words, it’s not for everybody. In fact, Guards is as polarizing a piece of stagecraft as I’ve seen in years. But for those who, like me, hunger for something different and who don’t mind a few hundred gallons of fake blood, then MTC’s twisty assault on its viewers’ hearts, heads and souls could easily become one of the most memorable and important theatrical experiences of 2017. There is not much more I can say without spoiling Joseph’s carefully crafted storytelling. So if you’re already inclined to check the play out, please stop reading and go buy your tickets now. For the rest, allow me to reveal these few details. The Taj Mahal, built in in India in the mid-1600s, is widely considered the most beautiful palace ever built. In Joseph’s inspired takeoff on a (probably) fictional myth, a pair of lowly guards—played brilliantly by Jason Kapoor and Rushi Kota—must stand watch outside the Taj during its construction. The ruling shah has decreed that none may look upon it before completion, on pain of death, and that no other structure shall ever surpass its beauty. In fact, he has devised a brutal plan to assure that none of its builders will ever attempt its equal. Then things get really messy. What follows is underscored by a brilliant verbal give and take between our two hapless heroes, delivered with modern, f-bombdropping, Cheech-and-Chong-ish parlance that’s as refreshingly funny as it is achingly endearing. Guards is a challenging, offputting and amazing theatrical fable, one that you won’t, and shouldn’t, soon forget. Rating (out of 5):


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

22 ®

Film

BRINGING THE BEST FILMS IN THE WORLD TO SONOMA COUNTY

Schedule for Friday, May 12 – Thursday, May 18

DINE-IN CINEMA

Bargain Tuesday - $7.50 All Shows Bargain Tuesday $7.00 All Shows Schedule forFri, Fri,April Feb -16th 20th Thu, Feb 26th Schedule for –– Thu, April 22nd

Schedule for Fri, June 22nd•- Salads Thu, June Bruschetta • Academy Paninis Soups • 28th Appetizers Award “Moore Gives •Her BestNominee Performance 8 Great BeersBest on Tap + Wine by theFilm! Glass and Bottle Foreign Language

In Years!” – Box Office Foreign Language Film!Stone “RawBest and Riveting!” – Rolling Demi MooreWITH DavidBASHIR Duchovny WALTZ A MIGHTY HEART (1:00) THE 3:00 5:00 7:00 9:15 RR (12:30) 2:45 JONESES 5:00 7:20 9:45 PG-13 No Passes (12:30) 2:40 4:50 Including 7:10 9:20 2 Academy BestRActor! (1:00 2:00Award 4:00 Noms 5:00) 7:00 8:00 9:45 “A Triumph!” – New “A Glorious Throwback ToYork The Observer More Stylized, THE WRESTLER Sat: Work (2:00 at Decades 2:15, 5:00 at 5:10) Painterly Of Past!” – LA (12:20) 5:10 9:45 R Times LA2:45 VIE EN 7:30 ROSE Wed: No (2:00 5:00) or 8:00 (12:45) 3:45 6:45 9:45 PG-13 THEAward SECRET OF KELLS 10 Academy Noms Including Best Picture! (1:00) 7:00 9:00 NR Thu:3:00 No 5:00 (5:00) or 8:00 SLuMDOG MILLIONAIRE “★★★★ – Really, Truly, Deeply – “Superb! No One4:00 Could Make This Believable (1:15) 7:10 9:40 R One of This Year’s Best!” – R Newsday If It Were Fiction!” – San Francisco Chronicle

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY 2

SNATCHED

ONCE (12:45 3:00 5:10) 7:20 9:30 8 Academy Award Noms Including

PRODIGAL SONS R (1:00) 3:10 5:20 Best Picture, Actor7:30 & Best9:40 Director! (2:20) 9:10 Best NR No 9:10 Show Tue or Thu MILK “Haunting and Hypnotic!” – Rolling Stone “Wise, Humble and Effortlessly (1:30) 4:10 6:45 Funny!” 9:30 R – Newsweek PG-13

KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD THE GIRL THE TATTOO PleaseWITH Note: No 1:30 ShowDRAGON Sat, No 6:45 Show Thu Please Note: No 1:30 Show Sat, No 6:45 Show Thu WAITRESS (1:15 4:15) (1:10) 7:10 4:30 9:50 7:30 No NR Passes

(1:30) 7:10 9:30 Best R Picture! 5 Academy Award4:00 Noms Including

NORMAN: FROST/NIXON

“★★★1/2! AnFROST/NIXON unexpected Gem!” – RISE USA Today THE MODERATE AND (2:15)Mysterious, 7:20 R GREENBERG “SwoonlyFALL Romatic, Hilarious!” TRAGIC OF A NEW YORK FIXER (12:00) 9:50 R – Slant5:00 Magazine REVOLuTIONARY ROAD (1:20 4:10) 6:50 9:15 R “Deliciously unsettling!” PARIS, JE T’AIME (11:45) 4:45 9:50– RLA Times (1:15)GHOST 4:15 7:00 9:30 R PG-13 THE Kevin Jorgenson presents the WRITER California Premiere of (2:15) 7:157:10 PG-13 (1:30 4:20) 9:55

THE LOST CITY OF Z

PuRE: A BOuLDERING FLICK

Michael Moore’s Feb(1:45 26th at 7:15 7:15 9:40 THE Thu, MOST DANGEROuS 4:15) COLOSSAL

SICKO MOVIES IN MORNING MAN INTHE AMERICA Starts Fri, June 29th!

THE CIRCLE

Starts Fri, June 29th! (1:20 4:00) 9:30 Fri, Sat, Sun &PENTAGON Mon 7:00PAPERS DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THENow Advance Tickets On Sale at Box Office! 9:50 AM (12:10) 4:30 6:50 6:50 Show Tue or Thu FROZEN RIVER (12:00) 2:30 NR 5:00No7:30 10:00 R 10:15 AM VICKY Their CRISTINA BARCELONA First Joint Venture In 25 Years! CHANGELING(1:00 3:45) 6:45 9:30 10:20 AM Venessa RedgraveAND Meryl CHONG’S Streep Glenn CloseAM CHEECH 10:40 RACHEL GETTING MARRIED HEYSHORTS WATCH THIS 2009 LIVE ACTION (Fri/Mon Only)) 10:45 AM EVENING 10:45 Sat, Apr17th at 11pm & Tue, Apr 20th 8pmAM 2009 ANIMATED SHORTS Only) Starts Fri,(Sun June 29th!

THEIR FINEST

= Met Opera Live in HD =

DER ROSENKAVALIER

Sat, May 13 9:30 Wed, May 17 12:30 6:30

5/12–5/18

Honorable

3 Generations PG13

11:00-1:30-4:00-6:30-8:40

FRIDAY MAY 12TH GATES OPEN AT 6:30 MOVIE STARTS AT 8:15 FOR DETAILS AND TICKETS: WWW.AVFILMSOCIETY.ORG

ANNUAL SUPPORT FOR ALL AVFS PROGRAMS:

Truman NR 10:45-4:45 Weds 5/17 only: 10:45 Risk NR 3:45 Norman R 10:15-1:00-3:30-6:00-8:30 The Dinner R 1:30-7:00 The Lost City of Z PG13

1:45-7:15, Sun 5/14 only: 7:15, Weds 5/17 only: 1:45

Their Finest R 11:00-4:15 Gifted PG13 10:30-1:15-6:15-8:30 The Royal Ballet: Jewels Sunday 5/14 @1pm, Wednesday 5/17 @6:30pm

551 SUMMERFIELD ROAD • SANTA ROSA 707.525.8909 • SUMMERFIELDCINEMAS.COM

Snatched • Their Finest Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Smurfs: The Lost Village Bistro Menu Items, Beer & Wine available in all 4 Auditoriums

SHOWTIMES: ravenfilmcenter.com DR. STEVEN UNGERLEIDER & MS. JOANNA RICE

707.525.8909 • HEALDSBURG

INSCRUTABLE ALIEN Vin Diesel provides the voice for adorable twig

with limited vocabulary.

Space Ball

Violence, carnage all in fun in ‘Guardians’ sequel BY RICHARD VON BUSACK

T

he summer blockbuster season starts with a bang. Our heroes in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 are pursued by the Sovereign, a gilded, genetically engineered race of stuck-ups with a lot of money for bounty hunters. Thanks to the light fingers of the thieving yet endearing Rocket (voiced by Bradley Cooper), the gang is chased by a sky full of drones operated by the golden aristos with arcade-like video game controls and vintage sound effects.

Rescue comes from an omnipotent old hippie named Ego (Kurt Russell), a self-declared “small-g god.” This omnipotent beardo is the real father of “Star-Lord” Peter Quill (Chris Pratt). Ego owns a planet that looks like million-dollar van-art, with orderly little creeks and fountains. But even with his newly gotten brawn, Pratt has to do more heavy lifting as an actor than he can sometimes handle. The dad-and-son bonding is interspersed with the continuing quarrel between space-princess Gamora (Zoe Saldana) and her evil sister, Nebula (Karen Gillan), an iridescent creature with an enameled head. As played by the improbably gigantic Dave Bautista, Drax is the funniest interstellar muscle since Adam Baldwin in Serenity. He gets the best comeback in a movie full of them when he answers Quill’s scoff “You sound like an old woman” with “Because I’m wise?” Baby Groot, the simple little sprout, is fairly adorable as he’s coached through the process of planting an atom bomb. The sequel shares the first Guardian’s taste for impalement, with a series of closeup reaction shots of the transfixed, as when bluebruiser Yondu (Michael Rooker) launches a fire arrow that leaves glowing tracers as it speeds through the chests of a small army of men. Even when the victims are murderous space pirates who deserve it, there’s an unsettling amount of barbaric glee in these movies. To enjoy them, you have to accept their argument that it’s not about violence—it’s all about fireworks. Ah, summer. ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ is playing in wide release in the North Bay.


ALL EARS Pamela Rose (bottom center) introduces lesser-known female musicians to new audiences.

Matrons of Music

Pamela Rose’s new show celebrates blues women BY CHARLIE SWANSON

G

rowing up, vocalist and songwriter Pamela Rose didn’t want to be Doris Day; she wanted to be Aretha Franklin. The San Francisco–based jazz and blues star celebrates several powerful female figures of music this weekend with her new show, “Blues Is a Woman,” that features a genre-spanning selection of music performed by a stellar ensemble. Best known for her long-touring project “Wild Women of Song: Great Gal Composers of the Jazz Era,” Rose has spent the last two years creating “Blues Is a Woman” to shine a spotlight on often overlooked women singers and songwriters. “Blues is thought of as a man’s world,” Rose says. “But the history shows that women really were the early popularizers of the form.” Rose points to long-forgotten

‘Blues Is a Woman’ happens on Sunday, May 14, at Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma. 7:30pm. $15–$30. 707.763.8920.

23

FRIDAY JUNE 9

HOUSE OF ROCK 1 YEAR ANNIVERSARY WITH THE RETURN OF

BLUE OYSTER CULT

Don't Fear The Reaper ~ I'm Burning for You ~ Godzilla

FRIDAY, JUNE 16 ROCK GUITAR GOD George Lynch

LYNCH MOB “Wicked Sensation”

RECORD LIKE A PRO AT RSU RECORDING & FILMWORKS

STATE OF THE ART AUDIO AND FILM PRODUCTION CONTACT JARED @ 707.694.1785 FOR RATES & INFO

WE’RE HERE TO HELP YOU HELP YOURSELF. We provide treatment for:

Heroin, Oxy, Roxy, Norco and other Opiates using Methadone. • • • •

Subutex/Suboxone available Providing Treatment since 1984 Confidentiality assured MediCal accepted

SANTA ROSA TREATMENT PROGRAM

1901 Cleveland Ave Suite B • Santa Rosa 707.576.0818 • srtp.net

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Music

vaudeville and minstrel-show stars like Ma Rainey and Ida Cox, who toured the country at the turn of the 20th century, singing the earliest forms of blues and developing the genre’s emotional impact. From there, stars like Nina Simone and Etta James dominated charts in their time, though they rarely got the accolades that male contemporaries like B. B. King or Muddy Waters received. Rose seeks to reintroduce these women to audiences with the new show, which traverses several eras of music, from boogie-woogie and big-band songs, to early R&B and even psychedelic protest songs made famous by vocalists like Janis Joplin. “I knew when I wrote this show, I wanted an ensemble piece that was much more theatrical,” Rose says. In that vein, she recruited a cast of players to bring the blues to life. Her longtime accompanist, pianist Tammy Hall, joined the project as musical director, and theatrical director and writer Jayne Wenger took over staging duties. Rose also assembled a band that includes guitarist Pat Wilder, bassist Ruth Davies, drummer Daria “Shani” Johnson and saxophonist Kristen Strom. Together the band has developed “Blues Is a Woman” into an engaging and inspirational concert experience that includes visuals and a rich theatrical arch, and Rose hopes to tour the show in the way she toured “Wild Women of Song” nationally for several years. Just as women informed the lexicon of blues, Rose also notes that blues informed generations of women. “These songs have always been about freedom,” Rose says. “Blues really changed all American music, especially for women. It presented a very different view of what a woman could be: fierce, raw, feisty and independent. It made you feel that you were not the only one to feel that way. “You were not alone. And that feels good.”


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

24 707.829.7300 230 PETALUMA AVE | SEBASTOPOL

OPEN MIC NIGHT

EVERY TUES AT 7PM WITH CENI FRI MAY 12 AN EVENING WITH

WONDERBREAD 5 $25/DOORS 8/SHOW 9/21+

SAT MAY 13

AN EVENING WITH

CASH'D OUT

$15–18/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

MON MAY 15

MONDAY NIGHT EDUTAINMENT

HIP HOP 101 WITH DJ BALL-D $10/$5 B4 10:30/DOORS-SHOW 10/21+

WED MAY 17

SONGWRITERS IN THE ROUND SERIES (EVERY 3RD WEDNESDAY)

$8/DOORS 7:30/SHOW 8/ALL AGES

THU MAY 18

THE MAGIC BEANS + THE MELT

$8–10/DOORS 7/SHOW 8/21+

FRI MAY 19

CHAM

+ SHINEHEAD, KINGSTON 12 HIFI, DJ JACQUES $20/DOORS 9/SHOW 9:30/21+

WWW.HOPMONK.COM Book your

WEDNESDAY

TODD SNIDER

THURSDAY

GEOGRAPHER

FRIDAY

FOREVERLAND

AMERICAN TAXI MAY 10 GREAT ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+ POUND SHADOW MAY 11 NINE ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

MAY 12

ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

SATURDAY DANNY CLICK & THE HELL YEAHS ALLEN & MARS HOTEL, MAY 13 STU ELLIOTT PECK ROCK• DOORS 8:30PM • 21+

JACK INGRAM

FRIDAY

LIN WILSON MAY 19 JAMIE COUNTRY• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SATURDAY

THE ITALS

HORIZON MAY 20 SOL REGGAE• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

SATURDAY

ROBIN TROWER

VINE MAY 25 STRANGE ROCK• DOORS 7:30PM • 21+

ALBOROSIE

FRIDAY

MAY 26 YELLOWMAN REGGAE• DOORS 8PM • 21+ 6 ⁄2 Buster Poindexter, 6 ⁄3 Arann Harris, 6 ⁄10 Jackie Greene and Friends, 6 ⁄15 Lee Fields & the Expressions, 6 ⁄16 Wonder Bread 5, 6 ⁄17 Cory Feldman, 6 ⁄18 SuicideGirls: Blackheart Burlesque, 6 ⁄24 Igor and The Red Elvises, 6 ⁄30 NRBQ, 7 ⁄14 Saved By The 90s, 7 ⁄21 TREVOR HALL, 7 ⁄26 Colin Hay

WWW.MYSTICTHEATRE.COM 23 PETALUMA BLVD N. PETALUMA, CA 94952

next event with us, up to 250, kim@hopmonk.com

Lunch & Dinner Sat & Sun Brunch

Din n er & A Show

Fri

May 12 SAT, MAY 13 LIVE NATION PRESENTS

Lewis Black

Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlán

Brunch Buffet 10AM–3PM Also Serving

Mother’s Day Dinner 5PM–8PM Sat

May 19

WED, JUNE 14

Sun

#IMOMSOHARD Mom’s Night Out: Summer Break Tour

Sat

Julianne and Derek Hough

Move—Beyond —Live On Tour

John Maxwell

May 14 Mother’s Day

Mother’s Day Matinee!

SAT, JUNE 17

Welcome Back

Original and Vintage Blues 8:00 / No Cover e Sat Dancy! 13 May Soul Ska Shake It Up! 8:30 Part

Rant, White & Blue Tour

SUN, MAY 14

Outside Dining 7 Days a Week

Chuck Prophet

and the Mission Express

Magnetic Singer, Songwriter, Guitarist 8:30

Todos Santos

May 21 Cantina Americana 5:00 / No Cover

Marcia Ball

May 27 Dinner Dance! 8:30

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

BBQS ON THE LAWN 2017 Opening Memorial Day Weekend

Sun

May 28

The Blues Broads plus

The Sons of the Soul Revivers 29 May Family Fun with Mon

Wonderbread 5

Online ticketing available at ranchonicasio.com

707.546.3600 lutherburbankcenter.org

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Reservations Advised

415.662.2219

On the Town Square, Nicasio www.ranchonicasio.com

Music

Glaser Center

Concerts Clubs & SONOMA COUNTY Venues

Green Music Center

Blues Is a Woman

Green Music Center Schroeder Hall

San Francisco educator and vocalist Pamela Rose’s newest theatrical concert celebrates women blues artists from Ma Rainey to Bonnie Raitt. May 14, 7:30pm. $15$30. Cinnabar Theater, 3333 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.763.8920.

King Tuff Songwriter Kyle Thomas royally rocks out in an old redwood barn. May 14, 7pm. $27. Gundlach Bundschu Winery, 2000 Denmark St, Sonoma. 707.938.5277.

MARIN COUNTY Jimmy Dillon Band Mill Valley guitar hero celebrates the album release of “Live at Sweetwater” with several special guests. May 13, 8pm. $24-$27. Sweetwater Music Hall, 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Melvin Seals & JGB Seals serves up a tasty mix of funk, rock and jazz on his Hammond B-3 organ alongside the talented players of the Jerry Garcia Band. May 12-13, 8pm. $30. Terrapin Crossroads, 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

NAPA COUNTY Boz Scaggs Legendary frontman performs benefit concert for the Oxbow School’s Mondavi Scholarship Fund, which provides students the opportunity for intensive art experiences. May 13, 6pm. $125 and up. The Culinary Institute of America at Copia, 500 First St, Napa. 707.967.2530.

SONOMA COUNTY Arlene Francis Center

May 11, Sabertooth Zombie with Acrylics and Slow Bloom. May 12, Plan 9 with Death N Taxes and the Happys. May 13, 3pm, Clothing Swap show with Hawai’Fi, Tyler McCourtney and others. 99 Sixth St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.3009.

May 14, 3pm, the Occidental Community Choir Spring Concert. 547 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa. 707.568.5381. May 12, SSU Symphonic Wind Ensemble & Concert Band. 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

May 11, SSU Musical Theatre Scenes. May 13, 3pm, “The Multifaceted Brahms” with contralto Emily Marvosh. May 14, 3pm, Benjamin Beilman. 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

HopMonk Sebastopol

May 11, Dave Hamilton. May 12, Amha Selassie Baraka. May 13, the Tahoes. 3688 Bohemian Hwy, Occidental. 707.874.9037.

May 12, Wonderbread 5. May 13, Cash’d Out. May 15, Monday Night Edutainment with DJ Ball-D. May 17, Songwriters in the Round. 230 Petaluma Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.7300.

The Big Easy

HopMonk Sonoma

Barley & Hops Tavern

May 11, Feinstein, Brooker and Lipp (Not a Law Firm). May 12, the Melt. May 13, Foxes in the Henhouse with the Mike Saliani Band. May 14, Total Rex. May 16, Derek Booker & the Mellow Fellows. May 17, Wednesday Night Big Band. 128 American Alley, Petaluma. 707.776.4631.

Brewsters Beer Garden May 12, 5pm, the Smiling Iguanas. May 13, 3pm, Soulshine Band. May 14, 3pm, Todos Santos. 229 Water Street N, Petaluma. 707.981.8330.

Cellars of Sonoma

May 14, 2pm, Ricky Alan Ray. 20 Matheson Ave, Healdsburg. 707.578.1826.

Center for Spiritual Living

May 12, Tao of Music with Bodhi Setchko. 2075 Occidental Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.546.4543.

Congregation Ner Shalom

May 14, 4pm, Mother’s Day concert with Zoe Lewis. 85 La Plaza, Cotati. 707.664.8622.

El Verano Inn

May 13, Bowie Forever Tribute Show. 705 Laurel Ave, El Verano. 707.935.0611.

Pete Yorn

Flamingo Lounge

Songwriter plays an intimate solo acoustic concert, with optional VIP experience available. May 12, 7:30pm. $30 and up. JaM Cellars Ballroom at the Margrit Mondavi Theatre, 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.880.2300.

Geyserville Gun Club Bar & Lounge

May 12, the Igniters. May 13, Orquesta Borinquen. 2777 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.545.8530.

May 13, Buck Thrifty. 21025 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville. 707.814.0036.

May 12, 5pm, Clay Bell. May 12, 8pm, Dawn Angelosante and Tony Gibson. May 13, 1pm, Craig Corona. May 13, 8pm, Kyle Williams. May 14, 1pm, Nate Lopez. 691 Broadway, Sonoma. 707.935.9100.

Hotel Healdsburg

May 13, Christian FoleyBeining with Tom Hayshi and Todd Smith. 25 Matheson St, Healdsburg. 707.431.2800.

Jack London State Park

May 14, 2pm, Mother’s Day concert with the Jack London Piano Club. 2400 London Ranch Rd, Glen Ellen. 707.938.5216.

Jamison’s Roaring Donkey

May 14, Sam Chase and Ben Morrison. 146 Kentucky St, Petaluma. 707.772.5478.

Jasper O’Farrell’s

May 12, Hype It Up with DJ Konnex and DJ Jacalioness. May 13, KNGSPRNGS and Gabriel Francisco. 6957 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol. 707.829.2062.

Lagunitas Tap Room

May 10, the Coffis Brothers. May 11, Friends the Band. May 12, Hot Grubb. May 13, Jinx Jones. May 14, Sherita Perez. May 17, Cave Clove. 1280 N McDowell Blvd, Petaluma. 707.778.8776.

Main Street Bistro

May 10, Matt Silva and Nikki Otis. May 11, Lynne Billig. May 12, Susan Sutton Jazz Trio. May 13, Levi Lloyd & the 501 Blues


25

CRITIC’S CHOICE

Mc T’s Bullpen

May 12, DJ MGB. May 13, Citizen Flannel. May 14, George Heagerty. May 15, DJ MGB. 16246 First St, Guerneville. 707.869.3377.

Murphy’s Irish Pub

May 12, Deluxe. May 13, Kevin Russell & His So Called Friends. 464 First St E, Sonoma. 707.935.0660.

Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room

May 13, 5:30pm, T-Luke & the Tight Suits. 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood. 707.933.9305.

Mystic Theatre

May 10, Todd Snider and Great American Taxi. May 11, Geographer with Nine Pound Shadow. May 12, Foreverland. May 13, Danny Click & the Hell Yeahs with Stu Allen & Mars Hotel and Elliott Peck. 23 Petaluma Blvd N, Petaluma. 707.765.2121.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Through May 13, the Occidental Community Choir Spring Concert. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Phoenix Theater

May 12, the Freak Accident with Roadside Bombs and Lucky Ol’ Bones. May 13, Thought Vomit with Skitzo and EveryDayFreak. May 14, Legal Disaster and Drinking Water. 201 Washington St, Petaluma. 707.762.3565.

Pongo’s Kitchen & Tap May 11, 6:30pm, Hannah Miller. 701 Sonoma Mountain Pkwy, Petaluma. 707.774.5226.

Ray’s Deli & Tavern Wed, 6pm, Levi Lloyd and friends. 900 Western Ave, Petaluma. 707.762.9492.

Redwood Cafe

May 10, Blue Doria. May 11, I-Trinity and the POI Band. May 13, belly dancing night. May 14, 3pm, Celtic Fiddle Music. May 14, 6pm, Irish jam session. 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.795.7868.

The Reel Fish Shop & Grill

May 12, Kevin Russell & His So Called Friends. May 13, Loosely Covered. 401 Grove St, Sonoma. 707.343.0044.

Sonoma Valley Women’s Club

May 13, 7:30pm, “Women

Dance Fever Napa electronic outfit loves the ’80s Skylight Motion Picture sounds like something out of a flashy 1980s movie. The new Napa-based electronic dance trio utilize the era-appropriate synthesizers and effects for a jazzy, melodic and beat-driven pop that would have taken the charts by storm in the decade of Miami Vice and New Order. This week, Skylight Motion Picture premieres their debut, self-titled EP, with a dance party in Napa that also features San Francisco electronic wizards Vice Reine. Made up of Napa-based wine-industry professionals, Skylight Motion Picture was founded by keyboardist Ezekiel Hampton and drummer Joel Quigley as a bedroom project done in the after hours. The two focused on creating swirling synth-pop that carried emotional weight. Soon after their initial sessions, they brought in singer and

bassist Lamar Engel to add those lyrical dimensions to their music, and the trio recorded their debut at Napa’s Humanitas Wines over the last year. The EP boasts hookfilled pop sensations as well as spacey, atmospheric gems for a truly cinematic texture. Skylight Motion Picture’s flashback of sound pumps with energy on Thursday, May 11, at Silo’s, 530 Main St., Napa. 7pm. $10–$15. 707.251.5833.—Charlie Swanson

Composers” with Vox Populi Choir. 574 First St E, Sonoma.

Spancky’s Bar

May 12, Union Jack & the Rippers. May 13, Joose. 8201 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati. 707.664.0169.

Stumptown Brewery May 14, AllwaysElvis Outta Rehab Mama’s Day Show. 15045 River Rd, Guerneville. 707.869.0705.

Twin Oaks Roadhouse May 12, Trainwreck

) 26

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Band. May 14, Willie Perez and Carol Shumate. May 16, Mac & Potter. May 17, Matt Silva and Nikki Otis. 16280 Main St, Guerneville. 707.869.0501.


Sebastiani Theatre Vintage Film Series:

Music ( 25 Junction. May 13, Domenic Bianco and Fontaine Classic. May 15, the Blues Defenders pro jam. 5745 Old Redwood Hwy, Penngrove. 707.795.5118.

United Church of Christ

May 13, 2pm, Cinnabar Singers Spring Concert. 825 Middlefield Dr, Petaluma.

Whiskey Tip

May 13, Iriefuse with DJ Dinga & Sizzlak and Dollar $hort. 1910 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa. 707.843.5535.

MARIN COUNTY

THELMA & LOUISE (1991) Monday, May 15

THE HEATH BROTHERS JOE LOVANO QUARTET BOBBY HUTCHERSON TRIBUTE BAND KENNY GARRETT QUINTET HENRY BUTLER SOLO PIANO JOHN SANTOS QUARTET DJANGO ALL-STARS DAVE STRYKER QUARTET PACIFIC MAMBO ORCHESTRA LAVAY SMITH AND HER RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS AND MANY MORE!

primary logo for all uses above 1.25” width

GREAT EXPECTATIONS (1946) Monday, June 12

Doors 6:30pm | Movie 7:00pm Movies call 707.996.2020 Tickets call 707.996.9756 SONOMA sebastianitheatre.com

Wed 5 ⁄10 • Doors 7pm ⁄ FREE

Free Industry Night with

DJ Troubleman – No Cover & Drink Specials Thu 5 ⁄11 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17 Adv–$22 DOS

The Sam Chase & T Sisters with Sat 5 ⁄13 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $24–$27

Jimmy Dillon Band

brother thelonious

®

belgian style abbey ale co th a

nor

C O.

BR

G

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠ ♠♠♠

st

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠ ♠♠♠

♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠ ♠♠♠

E WI

N

"Live At Sweetwater" Album Release Party Thu 5 ⁄18 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $18–$20

CO U

A

Y

SO

OM

NT

N

carpe diem vita brevis

secondary logo for all uses 1.25” width and smaller

Doors 6:30pm | Movie 7:00pm

Ben Morrison of The Brothers Comatose ♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠ ♠♠♠♠ ♠♠♠

NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

26

CALIFORN

IA

REPUBLIC

A G R I C U LT U R E INDUSTRY R E C R E AT I O N

Dangermuffin

Big John’s Market

94.1 KPFA

Bohemian

KRCB North Bay Public Media

Costeaux French Bakery Hotel Healdsburg Healdsburg Sotheby’s

The Press Democrat SpoonBar Sonoma Magazine Wells Fargo

On sale now healdsburgjazz.org or phone 24/7: 800-838-3006 Also available at Levin and Cº. 306 Center St., Healdsburg

with Grahame Lesh & Elliott Peck (of Midnight North & Terrapin Family Band)

Sat 5 ⁄20 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $18–$20

Marble Party

"Sometimes a Great Ocean"

Album Release Party with Book of Birds Tue 5 ⁄23 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–$19

Leslie Mendelson "Love & Murder" Album Release Party feat Steve McEwan, Andy Hess, Ethan Eubanks & very special guests with

Sunny Ozell

Wed 5 ⁄24 • Doors 7pm ⁄ $17–$22

"Long May You Run"

Shakey Zimmerman celebrates Bob Dylan's 76th Birthday with special guest James Nash with

Jennifer Mydland

www.sweetwatermusichall.com 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley Café 388-1700 | Box Office 388-3850

College of Marin James Dunn Theatre

May 11, the Golden Gate Brass Band. May 14, 3pm, “Dazzling Debuts” with College of Marin Symphony Orchestra. 835 College Ave, Kentfield, marin. edu.

Corte Madera Library May 11, 7pm, Golden Gate Flute Choir Concert. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Fenix

May 10, pro blues jam with Wayne “Guitar” Sanders. May 11, Tracy Cruz. May 13, Project 4 Band. May 14, 11:30am, Mother’s Day Brunch with George Cole. May 14, 6:30pm, Tribute to Luther Vandross with Greg Ballad. May 16, Kevin Russell and friends. 919 Fourth St, San Rafael. 415.813.5600.

HopMonk Novato

May 11, Country Line Dancing. May 12, Cash’d Out. May 13, Ras I Trinity. 224 Vintage Way, Novato. 415.892.6200.

Iron Springs Pub & Brewery

May 10, Matt Jaffe & the Distractions. May 17, Fly by Train. 765 Center Blvd, Fairfax. 415.485.1005.

JB Piano Company

May 13, 7pm, Tribute to Bill Evans with jazz pianist Dick Fregulia. 540 Irwin St, San Rafael. 415.456.9280.

Marin Center Showcase Theatre

May 12-13, Mayflower Chorus Spring Show. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium May 16, Sewer Band Spring Concert. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.473.6800.

Marin Country Mart

Marinfidels. May 14, 5pm, Orquesta la Moderna Tradicion. May 16, Noel Jewkes and friends. 305 Harbor View Dr, Sausalito. 415.331.2899.

19 Broadway Club

Smiley’s Schooner Saloon

May 14, 12:30pm, Folkish Festival with the Shots. 2257 Larkspur Landing Circle, Larkspur. May 11, IrieFuse and the Heritage Band. May 12, 5:30pm, Damir & Derek. May 12, 9pm, Lucky Drive with Bubba’s Taxi. May 13, the Wild Kindness with Yeah Sure Whatever and Light Magic. May 14, Agents of Change. 17 Broadway Blvd, Fairfax. 415.459.1091.

No Name Bar

May 12, Michael Aragon Quartet. May 13, Michael LaMacchia and April Grisman. May 14, 3pm, Flowtilla. May 14, 8:30pm, Doug Nichols and friends. May 15, Kimrea & the Dreamdogs. May 17, Tin Whiskers. 757 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.1392.

Novato Copperfield’s Books

May 13, 6pm, the New American Songbook Project. 999 Grant Ave, Novato. 415.763.3052.

Osher Marin JCC

May 13, Blame Sally. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael. 415.444.8000.

Osteria Divino

May 10, Jonathan Poretz. May 11, Passion Habanera. May 12, Marcos Sainz Trio. May 13, Parker Grant Trio. May 14, Gabrielle Cavassa. May 16, Suzanna Smith. May 17, Dan Zemelman Trio. 37 Caledonia St, Sausalito. 415.331.9355.

May 11, Hunter & the Dirty Jacks. May 12, Felsen. May 13, Killer Whale. May 14, James Patrick Regan. 41 Wharf Rd, Bolinas. 415.868.1311.

Sweetwater Music Hall May 11, the Sam Chase with T Sisters and Ben Morrison. May 14, Doclands Afterparty with Steve Kimock and friends. 19 Corte Madera Ave, Mill Valley. 415.388.3850.

Terrapin Crossroads

May 13, Aaron Redner and friends. May 14, Midnight North with Phil Lesh. May 15-16, Phil Lesh & the Terrapin Family Band with Eric Krasno. May 17, Edge of the West with Buddy Cage. 100 Yacht Club Dr, San Rafael. 415.524.2773.

Throckmorton Theatre May 17, 12pm, Ian Scarfe and James Jeffe. 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. 415.383.9600.

Trek Winery

May 12, Plausible Deniability. May 13, Role Models. 1026 Machin Ave, Novato. 415.899.9883.

NAPA COUNTY Blue Note Napa

May 10, Ricky Ray. May 11, San Geronimo. May 16, Wanda Stafford. May 17, EMK. 4 Bayview St, San Rafael. 415.457.3993.

May 10, Sherri Roberts. May 11, the Oakland Stroke. May 12, Paula West. May 13, Jelly Bread. May 14, 3 and 7pm, Mother’s Day Celebration with Clairdee & Her Band. May 16, Jules Leyhe. May 17, Holly Bowling plays Phish & the Grateful Dead. 1030 Main St, Napa. 707.603.1258.

Peri’s Silver Dollar

Ca’ Momi Osteria

Panama Hotel Restaurant

May 10, the New Sneakers. May 11, Mark’s Jam Sammich. May 12, Afroholix. May 13, Go by Ocean. May 16, the Bad Hombres. May 17, the Elvis Johnson Soul Revue. 29 Broadway, Fairfax. 415.459.9910.

Presidio Yacht Club May 12, the 7th Sons. 600 Sommerville Rd, Sausalito. 415.332.2319.

Rancho Nicasio

May 12, John Maxwell. May 13, Soul Ska. 1 Old Rancheria Rd, Nicasio. 415.662.2219.

Sausalito Seahorse

May 11, the Merlins. May 12, Cole Tate Band. May 13, the

May 12, the Honey Toads. May 13, the LoWatters. 1141 First St, Napa. 707.224.6664.

First United Methodist Church May 12, Holly Near. 625 Randolph St, Napa.

Jarvis Conservatory

May 13, 4pm, Mazdak Khamda. 1711 Main St, Napa. 707.255.5445.

Silo’s

May 11, Skylight Motion Picture with Vice Reine. May 12, Garage Band 101 for Adults. May 13, Heartless. May 17, David Kelleher. 530 Main St, Napa. 707.251.5833.


27

Brought to you with generous support from Jaquard Products, Fresh Jagua and I Dream of Henna

A weekend of Sacred Body Art with Henna and Jagua

Melissa Adams Henna Mystic

~ Fri. - Sat. - Sun. Genesis Crowley Henna by Genesis Henna Djinn I~Dream of Henna June 16 -18, 2017 ~ Jayna Manoushe Belly Dance ~ In Sonoma County at the Beautiful Isis Oasis Sanctuary! 20889 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville, CA 95441

All the Henna & Jagua You Can Use! • Swag Bag! • Vendors! • Design and Resource Book! • Camping/Dorms! • Free Natal Chart!

Registration is Now Open! www.theunveiledme.com

FRI MAY 12

Igniters

FREE LOCAL LIVE MUSIC GIGS LIVE MUSIC. NEW STAGE AND SOUND. NEW DANCE FLOOR. NEW AIR CONDITIONING. SUDS TAPS - 18 LOCAL & REGIONAL SELECT CRAFT BEERS & CIDERS. EATS NEW MENU, KITCHEN OPEN ALL DAY FROM 11AM ON. CHECK OUT OUR FRIED CHICKEN SANDWICH W/CORN ON THE COB. DIGS DINING OUT-DOORS. KIDS ALWAYS WELCOME - NEW KID’S MENU. RESERVATIONS FOR 8 OR MORE. HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-6PM. $2 CHICKEN TACOS. $3 HOUSE CRAFT BEERS. WEEKLY EVENTS MONDAYS • BLUES DEFENDERS PRO JAM TUESDAYS • OPEN MIC W/ROJO WEDNESDAYS • KARAOKE

SPECIALIZING IN FEMININE HEALTH PRODUCTS All products on our menu are handcrafted, organic, tested & made by women in the industry

ALTERNATIVE HEALTH CARE COLLECTIVE / DELIVERY 707.228.5514 info@greenheart215.com

greenheart_215

CALENDAR THU MAY 11 • COUNTRY LINE DANCE (EVERY 2ND THURSDAY) 7PM / ALL AGES / $10 FRI MAY 12 • TRAIN WRECK JUNCTION AN EVENING WITH 2 SETS! 8PM / 21+ / FREE SAT MAY 13 • DOMENIC BIANCO, THE FONTAINE CLASSIC 8PM /21+ / FREE CHECK OUT OUR FULL MUSIC CALENDAR www.TwinOaksRoadhouse.com Phone 707.795.5118 5745 Old Redwood Hwy Penngrove, CA 94951

SAT MAY 13

Santa Rosa Salsa Presents: I-TrInITy & The P.O.I. Band

thu with special guests PrIncess haIle may 11 and dJ reBel 8pm/$10 fri sTand UP cOmedy! may 12 8:30pm/$10 sat may 13 Belly nIghT 8pm/$5 thu rIver cITy Band may 18 8pm/Dancing to classic cover tunes/$5 fri rOckIn’ JOhnny BUrgIn may 19 8:30pm/$10 sat rhyThm rangers may 20 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 thu hOUr Of TOwer may 25 8pm/Dancing/$10 fri dylan Black PrOJecT may 26 with special guest dJ lOIsaIda 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 sat levI llOyd may 27 8:30pm/Dancing/$10

greenhOUse

fri jun 2 cd release ParTy 8:30pm/$10 fri Uncle wIggly jun 3 8:30pm/Dancing/$10 Advance Tickets Available at Eventbrite & Redwood Cafe resTaUranT & mUsIc venUe check OUT The arT exhIBIT vIsIT OUr weBsITe, redwOOdcafe.cOm 8240 Old redwOOd hwy, cOTaTI 707.795.7868

Orquesta Borinquen FRI MAY 19

Rotten Tomatoes SAT MAY 20

UB 707 FRI MAY 26

Sugarfoot SAT MAY 27

Stereo Bounce

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

the unveiled me


NORTH BAY BOH E MI AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

28

Arts Events RECEPTIONS May 12

Art Museum of Sonoma County, “Eye Fruit: The Art of Franklin Williams,” show of unconventional art from the introspective and innovative 20th century artist is curated by noted art historian Susan Landauer. 6pm. 425 Seventh St, Santa Rosa. 707.579.1500. Cavallo Point Lodge, “Wonder & Awe,” renowned artist and award-winning filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg shows his 2D and 3D moving images, created as fine art for digital screens. 6pm. 601 Murray Circle, Sausalito. 415.339.4700. Gallery 300, “Hineni (Here I Am),” new works by Jennifer Hirshfield focus on women’s issues during these political times, including actual images painted from the recent Women’s March in San Francisco. 5pm. 300 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.332.1212. Journey Center, “Root2Bloom,” local artist Alana Ciena Tillman displays vibrant botanical and wildlife art. 5pm. 1601 Fourth St, Santa Rosa. 707.578.2121. Napa Main Library, “The World of Lady M,” Karen

Galleries SONOMA COUNTY 33 Arts

Through May 30, “In Honor of Motherhood,” local nonprofit Better Beginnings hosts a mixedmedia art show dedicated to mom. 3840 Finley Ave, Bldg 33, Santa Rosa. 415.601.5323.

Arts Guild of Sonoma

Through May 29, “Small But Grand,” group show of small works. 140 E Napa St, Sonoma. Wed-Thurs and Sun-Mon, 11 to 5; Fri-Sat, 11 to 8. 707.996.3115.

BackStreet Gallery

Through May 28, “A Search

Nagano exhibits pieces from her ongoing body of work, a visual representation to her Japanese culture. 6pm. 580 Coombs St, Napa. 707.253.4070. Napa Valley Museum, “Like Mother Like Son,” Napa Valley mother-son duo of artists Phoebe and Geoff Ellsworth display in the spotlight gallery. 4pm. “Sound Maze,” interactive installation created by composer and inventor Paul Dresher includes a dozen original musical instruments to experience. 5pm. 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville. 707.944.0500.

May 13

Agent Ink Gallery, “Agent Ink Gallery Grand Opening,” avid collector Curt Barnickel showcases limited-edition screen prints, rock-art posters, apparel and stickers. 6pm. 531 Fifth St, Santa Rosa. 707.595.1372. Jupiter Moon Art & Gifts, “It’s All Good,” artist Deni Marrone presents mixed-media paintings in a retrospective art show that draws from a lifetime of inspiration. 4pm. 507 S Main St, Sebastopol. 707.634.6304.

for a Road & a Search for Freedom,” artist Kristen Throop collects all six of her various artistic series’ for a deeper exploration. behind 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. Sat-Sun, noon to 5pm and by appointment. 707.568.4204.

Calabi Gallery Through May 31, “Retrospective of Robert P McChesney,” the Bay Area-based master of abstract art gets a showing that spans his 60-year career. 456 10th St, Santa Rosa. TuesSun, 11 to 5. 707.781.7070.

Christie Marks Fine Art Gallery Through Jun 10, “Aging with Attitude,” photography series by John Martin shows models

ages 60 and over dressed in fearless fashion. 312 South A St, Ste 7, Santa Rosa. Thurs-Sun, noon to 5, and by appointment. 707.695.1011.

Chroma Gallery

Through May 27, “Nature Unbound,” juried exhibit of a wide range of art interprets and reacts to the awesome powers of nature. 312 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.293.6051.

Graton Gallery

Through May 28, “Transparency,” group show is all about glass. 9048 Graton Rd, Graton. Tues-Sat, 10:30 to 6; Sun, 10:30 to 4. 707.829.8912.

Healdsburg Center for the Arts

Through May 14, “Art of Gastronomy II,” exhibit celebrates the bounty of Sonoma County food and its wine industry in the context of art. 130 Plaza St, Healdsburg. Daily, 11 to 6. 707.431.1970.

IceHouse Gallery

Through May 10, “Daily Patterns, Daily Prayers,” solo exhibition of new art works by Tracey Rolandelli features watercolors, sketches, oil and acrylic paintings on a wide range of subject matter. 405 East D St, Petaluma. 707.778.2238.

Occidental Center for the Arts

Through May 14, “The Spring Equinox: When Day and Night Are Equal,” group exhibit honors the significance of the spring equinox with works that express the power and beauty of new beginnings. 3850 Doris Murphy Ct, Occidental. 707.874.9392.

Paul Mahder Gallery

Through May 21, “Natural Occurrence,” solo show by artist Barry Masteller features layered paintings that build upon themselves like geological formations. 222 Healdsburg Ave, Healdsburg. 707.473.9150.

Petaluma Arts Center

Through May 20, “theNeuwPolitic,” over 50 artists representing Northern and Central California explore the current political climate as each individual artist envisions it. 230 Lakeville St, Petaluma. Tues-Sat, 11 to 5. 707.762.5600.


Sebastopol Library

May 16-Jun 17, “Collage in Three Acts,” mixed-media collage artist Cynthia Poten creates three sequences tracing human history from early consciousness to our present crises. 7140 Bodega Ave, Sebastopol. Mon-Tues, 1 to 5 and 6 to 9; Wed-Sat, 1 to 5. 707.823.7691.

The Spinster Sisters Restaurant

Through Jun 5, “s+oryprobl=m :: alternate route,” installation from mixed-media artist CK Itamura turns fragile objects into emboldened beacons of encouragement. 401 South A St, Santa Rosa. 707.528.7100.

University Art Gallery Through May 21, “BFA 2017 Exhibition,” paintings, photography, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking and more is on display. Sonoma State University, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park. Tues-Fri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, noon to 4. 707.664.2295.

Upstairs Art Gallery

Through May 28, “Dreamscapes,” paintings by Dee Andreini possess ethereal qualities. 306 Center St, Healdsburg. Sun-Thurs, 11 to 6; Fri-Sat, 11 to 9. 707.431.4214.

MARIN COUNTY Art Works Downtown

Through Jun 3, “Abstracticum,” San Rafael artist Mark Olson experiments with color and time in the Underground Gallery, and “Stories to Tell, features a art installation by Cynthia Tom in the Founders Gallery. Reception, May 12 at 5pm. Through Jun 2, “Paper as Voice,” Bay Area artists use innovative techniques, concepts and compositions to feature paper as the prominent “voice” of their work in the 1337 Gallery. Reception, May 12 at 5pm. 1337 Fourth St, San Rafael. Tues-Sat, 10 to 5. 415.451.8119.

Bay Model Visitor Center

Through May 20, “Vanishing Species,” award-winning artist Rita Sklar explores the

wonders of nature and the decline of many beautiful creatures. Beverly Mayeri’s art highlighting endangered species also shows. 2100 Bridgeway, Sausalito. 415.332.3871.

Corte Madera Library

Through Jun 1, “Painting Music & More,” showing of exuberant abstracts by Guillermo Kelly and intimate landscapes by Heidi Hafer. 707 Meadowsweet Dr, Corte Madera. 707.924.6444.

Desta Art & Tea Gallery

Through May 18, “East West Rhythmical Harmony,” featuring mixed-media works by modern Chinese and French impressionism expert Anita Wong and acrylics by eclectic California artist Elizabeth Geisler. 417 San Anselmo Ave, San Anselmo. Mon-Sat, 10 to 6 415.524.8932.

Gallery Route One

Through May 14, “Rising to the Surface,” Inverness artist Zea Morvitz exhibits large-scale drawings of found objects in the center gallery, with a Lucid Art Residency and Mary Mountcastle Eubank’s mixedmedia sculptures in the annex. 11101 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station. Wed-Mon, 11 to 5. 415.663.1347.

Marin Center Redwood Foyer Gallery Through Jun 2, “Animalia Musicale: A Chorus of Critters,” artist Leslie Lakes paints images of animals over musical score sheets. Proceeds benefit Enriching Lives through Music. 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael. 415.499.6800.

MarinMOCA

Through May 20, “Altered Book & Book Arts Exhibition,” annual show displays the work of 150 Bay Area artists who reconstruct and rework books into unique pieces of art. 500 Palm Dr, Novato. WedFri, 11 to 4; Sat-Sun, 11 to 5. 415.506.0137.

O’Hanlon Center for the Arts

Through May 25, “Luminosity,” artwork by Jeremy Thornton explores light and space in nature. 616 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Tues-Sat, 10 to 2; also by appointment. 415.388.4331.

Robert Allen Fine Art

Through May 31, “Landscapes Reimagined,” works on canvas by Amy Donaldson, Beatrice Findlay, William Leidenthal and

John Maxon. 301 Caledonia St, Sausalito. Mon-Fri, 10 to 5. 415.331.2800.

The Room Art Gallery

Through May 31, “Modern Masters,” the gallery that houses works by Picasso, Matisse, Dalí and more paints the walls black and display contemporary artists in a significant showing. 86 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley. Mon-Fri, 10 to 6; Sat, 10 to 4. 415.380.7940.

The Studio Shop

Through May 22, “Alchemy,” artists Dominique Caron and Martine Jardel team up for a two person gallery show. 244 Primrose Rd, Burlingame. MonFri, 10am to 6pm; Sat, 10am to 5:30pm 650.344.1378.

Tricia George Studio & Gallery

Through May 28, “For the Sake of Wildlife,” acrylic and mixed-media artist tunes into the spirituality of local animals and birds. 122 Paul Dr, B1, San Rafael. 415.577.5595.

NAPA COUNTY

• relief from tension headaches, & sinusitis • improves mobility in neck & shoulders

complimentary brow wax with appointment

Margery Smith

CMT# 62066

707.536.1797 margerysmith.massagetherapy.com

Your vision… my resources, dedication and integrity… Together, we can catch your dream.

Realtor Coldwell Banker

Suzanne Wandrei

Eco Green Certified

cell: 707.292.9414 www.suzannewandrei.com

Caldwell Snyder Gallery

Through May 15, “Gregory Kondos: Recent Paintings,” the artist is considered one of the world’s foremost landscape painters. 1328 Main St, St Helena. Open daily, 10 to 6. 415.531.6755.

Comedy

stromboli • organic greens fresh dough daily • calzones deep dish • gluten-free option hand tossed pizza, fired on stone

280 South Main Street, Sebastopol 707.634.6530 • hippizzazz.com Mon, Wed, Thu 11am–12am, Fri & Sat 11am– 2am Sunday 11am–11pm (Closed Tues)

Laugh Lounge 45

Comedian, writer, actor and director Mike Birbiglia performs at benefit show for two Napa nonprofits each celebrating 45 years of service, with optional afterparty. May 13, 8:30pm. $65-$125. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville, 707.944.9900.

Standup Comedy Night

Featuring the best comedians from the North Bay and beyond. May ) 12, 8:30pm.

30

Effective anti-aging products by GM Collin

Mary Lia Skin Care

Esthetic Services in the Coastal Redwoods

707.486.8057 maryliaskincare.com

FAMILY OWNED LOCAL INGREDIENTS OPEN LATE

Healing with Laughs

Standup star Michael Pritchard headlines a benefit comedy show to support Marin veterans in need. Food, drinks, raffle prizes and more included. May 13, 2pm. $25. Elk’s Lodge, 1312 Mission Ave, San Rafael, 415.971.4841.

29

Treat Yourself

Ayurvedic Indian Head Massage

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Through May 28, “Windows Round Robin,” Sebastopol Gallery celebrates its 10th anniversary with a rotating exhibit of members’ works in the window. 150 N Main St, Sebastopol. Open daily, 11 to 6. 707.829.7200.

Spring into Mental Health with mindful life coach

Susan J. Hirshfield, PhD

MINDFUL LIFE TRANSITIONS Life Coaching for a better tomorrow

707.569.0616 | mindfullifetransitions.com

Point of View #18 by Robert P. McChesney, 1997

Sebastopol Gallery

456 Tenth St, Santa Rosa • Tue–Sat 11–5 707.781.7070 • calabigallery.com


NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

30

2017

Lo Coco’s

Voted Best Italian restaurant of the North Bay.

C u c i n a R u s t ic a

A E

( 29

$10. Redwood Cafe, 8240 Old Redwood Hwy, Cotati, 707.795.7868.

—North Bay Bohemian

Dance Festival de Primavera

Cali Calmécac students mesmerize with their colorful costumes and beautiful choreography. May 10, 6:30pm. $6.50. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa 707.546.3600.

Just Dance Academy

Spring performance. May 14, 2pm. $22-$27. Marin Center’s Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 10 Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael 415.473.6800.

Looking Beyond

LoCoco’s is everything an Italian restaurant should be—boisterous, busy, fun, with excellent authentic food of the best quality: fresh seafood, meats and pasta.

707- 52 3 -2227

SERVING L UNCH & D INNER

H ISTORIC R AILROAD S QUARE , 117 FOURTH STREET, SANTA ROSA

Showcase of new dance works from Broadway choreographer Dylan Smith, Afro-Congolese artist Pierre Sandor Diabankouezi, SRJC faculty and students. May 12-14. $12-$15. Burbank Auditorium, SRJC, 1501 Mendocino Ave, Santa Rosa 707.527.4307.

R ATED

Events Books on Stage

the

of best e m ia boh

Novelist, memoirist and contributor to “Los Angeles Magazine” and “This American Life” Bernard Cooper reads from his work and discusses his creative process. May 11, 7pm. Cloverdale Performing Arts Center, 209 N Cloverdale Blvd, Cloverdale, 707.829.2214.

n ’s

ay th b nor the

2005

G IFT C ERTIFICATES AVAILABLE L OC OCOS. NET

A Brush with Japan

• Full service auto repair • STAR certified smog station • Energy efficient operations • Reduce, Reuse, Recycle learn more…greentechautomotive.com With increased awareness of the environment and conservation, GTA delivers responsible, low impact repair alternatives. 5% DISCOUNT on labor for Go Local Rewards Card holders A CLEAN APPROACH TO A DIRTY JOB

707.545.7076

501 BARHAM AVE SANTA ROSA MON–FRI 8AM–5PM • NOW OPEN SAT Certified Green Business

OIL CHANGE SPECIAL plus a FREE Seasonal Check-up

$

24

99

Inspection includes: • Inspect Brakes • Inspect Lights • Inspect Tires • Inspect Belts & Hoses • Inspect All Fluid Levels • Plus…Road Test! Shop supplies & taxes extra. Most cars/light trucks. Oil change includes up to 5qts of motor oil & new oil filter. Cannot combine with any other offer. Offer expires May 31, 2017.

greentechautomotive.com

ArtStart fundraising event at a private house features sake tasting, tea ceremony, Shakuhachi Flute by Elliot Kalle and large brush painting by Mario Uribe. May 12, 5pm. $75-$125. ArtStart, 716 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.2345.

Celebration of Women

Proceeds benefit women’s health and wellness programs at Sonoma Valley Hospital. May 11, 11am. Sold-out/waitlist only. Hanna Boys Center, 17000 Arnold Dr, Sonoma, 707.935.5331.

Chimera Anniversary Party

Makerspace celebrates a year in its new location with beer and wine, live music, art

and maker demos and more. May 13, 6pm. Free admission. Chimera Arts & Maker Space, 6791 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, chimeraarts.org.

museum admission. May 14. Free. Charles M Schulz Museum, 2301 Hardies Lane, Santa Rosa, 707.579.4452.

Color Me Rad

Napa Valley’s biggest art party of the year benefits Nimbus Arts and features art activities, fashion show, live auction and more. May 13, 5:30pm. $150 and up. The Barn at St Helena Montessori School, 880 College Ave, St Helena, nimbusarts.org.

Come As You Art

Petaluma Radio Players

Fun-filled 5K run includes lots of folks tossing colored powders for a festive affair. May 13, 8am. $15-$45. Sonoma County Fairgrounds, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd, Santa Rosa, colormerad.com. Come dressed as your favorite artist, performer or piece of art and celebrate the center with live music by Vitamin Girl, food and fun. 21 and over. May 13, 6pm. $100. Sonoma Community Center, 276 E Napa St, Sonoma, 707.938.4626.

The French Market

Outdoor antique market features vintage, retro and antique furniture, decor, clothing, jewelry, housewares and more. Crepes and live music add to the ambiance. Sun, May 14, 9am. Free admission. Marin Civic Center, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, goldengateshows.com.

In Celebration of Mother Luncheon

Center for Domestic Peace hosts nationally recognized comedian Lizz Winstead, cocreator of “The Daily Show,” in a keynote talk at this annual meeting of business and community members. May 12, 11am. Peacock Gap Country Club, 333 Biscayne Dr, San Rafael.

Lafont 30th Anniversary

Trunk show honors the French eyewear company’s 30 years in North America. May 13. Rims & Goggles, 606 Strawberry Village, Mill Valley, 415.383.9480.

Laguna Open House

Take a self-guided nature walk or a guide-led tour of the historic house and barn. May 13, 10am. Free. Laguna de Santa Rosa Environmental Center, 900 Sanford Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.527.9277.

Marin Open Studios

This well-loved, self-guided event spans two weekends and features over 250 artists in their studios. Guides available at marinopenstudios.org. Through May 14. Marin County, various locations, Marin.

Mother’s Day at the Schulz Museum All mothers receive free

Nimbash

Enjoy a preview of the company’s slate of radio plays, as well as an encore performance of “The Railroad Detectives.” May 11, 7pm. Free. Hotel Petaluma, 205 Kentucky St, Petaluma, petalumaradioplayers.com.

Field Trips Family Night Hike & Campfire

Environmental science educator-led hike in the Marin Headlands is followed by campfire including s’more roasting, campfire skits and fun sing-alongs. Sat, May 13, 6pm. $12. NatureBridge at Golden Gate, 1033 Fort Cronkhite, Sausalito, 415.332.5771.

Introduction to the Coastal Prairie

Hike through and learn about the most diverse and endangered native grassland in North America. May 13, 9:30am. $20. Shell Beach Parking Area, Hwy 1, Jenner, stewardscr.org.

Little Carson Falls Hike

Naturalist-led hike lets you view the popular waterfall safely. May 16, 10am. Azalea Hill Parking Lot, Bolinas-Fairfax Rd, Fairfax, marinwater.org.

Mother’s Day Picnic

Guided nature walks, great views and a lunch provided by the Marin Audubon Society. Reservations required. May 14, 12pm. $28. Martin Griffin Preserve, 4900 Shoreline Hwy 1, Stinson Beach, marinaudubon.org.

Mother’s Day Bioluminescence Paddle Tour

Give mom the gift of a unique guided kayaking experience in Tomales Bay with Point Reyes Outdoors May 14, 6:30pm. $94. Miller Beach Launch at Nick’s


31

CHUCKLES FOR A CAUSE Comedian and filmmaker Mike Birbiglia performs in

Yountville on May 13 to raise funds for two Napa Valley nonprofits. See Comedy, p29.

Cove, 23240 Hwy 1, Marshall, 415.663.8192.

Mother’s Day Yoga in the Vineyards

All-level class honors Mother Earth, followed by winetasting flight and bites. May 14, 9:30am. $30. Martin Ray Winery, 2191 Laguna Rd, Santa Rosa, mollyvogelyoga.com.

Film DocLands Documentary Film Festival

Noncompetitive festival showcases documentary films in a variety of genres and content, while also building connections and partnerships to invigorate the world of nonfiction filmmaking. May 10-14. Smith Rafael Film Center, 1118 Fourth St, San Rafael, 415.454.1222.

Heist: Who Stole the American Dream?

Timely documentary explores how both major political parties destroyed consumer protection and organized labor while moving wealth to a small group of elites. May 11, 7pm. by donation. Peace & Justice Center, 467 Sebastopol Ave, Santa Rosa, 707.575.8902.

Hidden Figures

Former NASA astronaut Anna Lee Fisher is on hand for the screening of the recent

film about African-American women’s contribution to the space race. May 13, 2pm. Cameo Cinema, 1340 Main St, St Helena, 707.963.9779.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

Alexander Valley Film Society presents a drive-in movie screening of the 1956 sci-fi film. May 12, 6:30pm. $15-$50. Citrus Fairgrounds, 1 Citrus Dr, Cloverdale, avfilmsociety.org.

La La Land

Last year’s Hollywood musical screens on the Green Music Center’s lawn. May 13, 7pm. Free. Green Music Center, 1801 East Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 866.955.6040.

Thelma & Louise

Ridley Scott’s 1991 drama starring Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis screens as part of the Vintage Film Series. May 15, 7pm. $10. Sebastiani Theatre, 476 First St E, Sonoma, 707.996.9756.

Tickling Giants

Documentary on one man’s comedic turn during Arab Spring events in Egypt is presented by Seventh Art Stand, a nationwide act of cinematic solidarity against Islamophobia. May 10. Rialto Cinemas, 6868 McKinley St, Sebastopol, 707.525.4840.

Turning the Tide

Documentary By Tiburon historian David M Gotz retells

the Saving of Richardson Bay, one of the earliest environmental preservation efforts in Marin County. May 11, 7pm. Free. Tiburon Town Hall, 1505 Tiburon Blvd, Tiburon.

A Will for the Woods

Documentary follows musician and psychiatrist Clark Wang as he prepares for his own green burial. Followed by discussion. May 10, 6:30pm. $10. Sebastopol Grange Hall, 6000 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol.

Food & Drink

RUSSIAN RIVER RACE

Saturday June 3, 2017 - 11-4pm Johnson’s Beach, Guerneville FREE River Race Party

Costume Contest, Beer, Wine, Food & Fun!

Music by CAHOOTS

4 and 8 Mile Races - Kayaks, Canoes & SUPs FOR BENEFIT: All proceeds go to Russian Riverkeeper’s Trash Removal & Educational Programs

FOR REGISTRATION AND INFO: www.greatrussianriverrace.com

LIST PRESENTS

Aged to Perfection

Annual fundraiser is a wine and food event by and for the local community featuring North Bay wineries, restaurants and caterers. May 13, 5pm. $65. Sebastopol Senior Center, 167 High St, Sebastopol, 707.829.2440.

DEVA PREMAL

MITEN WITH MANOSE

ArtQuest Speakeasy Dinner & Dance

Support local art students while you dine on food by Franchetti’s Wood Fire Kitchen and Village Bakery, sip on local libations, then dance to the sounds of Swing Fever. May 12, 6pm. $75. Paradise Ridge Winery, 4545 Thomas Lake Harris Dr, Santa Rosa, 707.528.9463. )

32

FRI, JUN 2ND

SAT, JUN 3RD

SCOTTISH RITES HALL

SONOMA STATE UNIV.

OAKLAND

ROHNERT PARK

ALISTpresents.com

NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

THE GREAT


32

A E

( 31

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

Chappellet Winery Private Reserve Train

Winemaker Cyril Chappellet pairs selections with a threecourse meal and discusses tasting notes. May 13, 6:30pm. $269 and up. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstry St, Napa, 800.427.4124.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Falkirk Mansion

A gallery of art, artisan market, flowers and gifts and a scrumptious brunch make for mom’s special day. May 14, 11am. $12-$32. Falkirk Cultural Center, 1408 Mission Ave, San Rafael, 415.485.3438.

Mother’s Day Brunch at Sally Tomatoes

Full-service brunch includes fresh carved meats, eggs Benedict and unlimited Champagne. May 14. $14-$26. Sally Tomatoes, 1100 Valley House Dr, Rohnert Park, 707.665.0260.

Mother’s Day Brunch at the FARM

Family-style brunch features the region’s finest seasonal ingredients in a beautifully appointed setting. May 14, 10am. $85. FARM at Carneros Inn, 4048 Sonoma Hwy, Napa, 888.400.9000.

Mother’s Day Celebration at Left Bank

Word to your Mother

Bring Mom to a fun meal with specials and more. May 14, 10am. Left Bank Brasserie, 507 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.3331.

An old-fashioned Mother’s Day tea party with light refreshments. May 14, 1pm. $10. 33 Arts, 3840 Finley Ave, Bldg 33, Santa Rosa, 415.601.5323.

www.uberoptics.com

PETALUMA

Stewart Cellars Spring Soiree

Food, live music, and lots of wine are on hand for this inaugural event. May 13, 1pm. $35. Stewart Cellars, 6752 Washington St, Yountville, 707.963.9160.

Taste & Tales of Terra Madre

Four-course spring dinner includes live music and fundraising for Slow Food Sonoma County. May 13, 5:30pm. $85. Odd Fellows Hall, 21027 Geyserville Ave, Geyserville, 707.276.6067.

To Blend or Not to Blend That is the question, as this wine seminar looks at Cabernet Sauvignon and the Red Bordeaux varieties. May 13, 10am. $210. Silver Oak Cellars, 915 Oakville Crossroad, Oakville.

Veuve Clicquot Mother’s Day Weekend Special weekend includes a dinner on Friday, a poolside happy hour with bubbles and oysters, and a Veuve Clicquot Mother’s Day brunch. May 12-14. Meritage Resort, 875 Bordeaux Way, Napa.

Yoga & Beer

Beginner-friendly Vinyasa style yoga class goes well with drinking fine craft beer. Sun, May 14, noon. $12. Cooperage Brewing Co, 981 Airway Ct, Santa Rosa, 707.293.9787.

Mother’s Day Tea

Unique Frames • Digital Rx Lenses • Sunglasses • Adjustments & Repairs

19 Kentucky St.

you through the process, then select the top blend. May 13, 10am. $90. Alexander Valley Vineyards, 8644 Hwy 128, Healdsburg, 707.433.7209.

707-763-3163

Mother’s Day Weekend at Muscardini Treat mom to a relaxing afternoon with wine, oysters, gourmet grilled cheese and mountain views. May 13-14, 1pm. Muscardini Cellars Tasting Room, 9380 Sonoma Hwy, Kenwood, 707.933.9305.

Mum’s the Word

Workshop features chef Kara Lind of Kara’s Cupcakes, creating a dessert-based meal paired with 2014 Ellie’s Cabernet Sauvignon. May 14, 12pm. $150. Hall Winery, 401 St Helena Hwy S, St Helena, 707.967.2620.

Spring Bash Wine Blending Party

Winemaker Kevin Hall will lead

For Kids Soundsational Celebration

Create musical instruments and explore sound experiments. May 13, 2pm. Free/ ticket required. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville, 707.944.0500.

Lectures Bird Language Day with Peter Bergen

Part of the Nature Connections program series at the preserve. Check for times. May 13. Martin Griffin Preserve, 4900 Shoreline Hwy 1, Stinson Beach, egret.org.

Coffee & Conversation with Creative Sonoma Get information on the county

agency’s work supporting the arts and hands-on assistance on how to build your profile in its directory. RSVP requested. May 15, 6pm. Chimera Arts & Maker Space, 6791 Sebastopol Ave, Sebastopol, creativesonoma.org.

Creating an Alzheimer’s Inclusive Society

The last program in a four part Alzheimer’s Community Education series. May 13, 10:30am. Civic Center Library, 3501 Civic Center Dr, San Rafael, 415.473.6058.

First Mom in Space

Launch Mother’s Day Weekend with American astronaut Anna Lee Fisher, in conversation with her news correspondent daughter Kristin Fisher. May 12, 7pm. $10-$20. Napa Valley Museum, 55 Presidents Circle, Yountville, 707.944.0500.

Let’s Stop Pretending

Artist Kristen Throop talks about her fairy tale-inspired works. May 14, 1pm. BackStreet Gallery, behind 312 South A St, Santa Rosa, 707.568.4204.

Luminarias

Healdsburg Literary Guild presents authors Vanessa Hua and Shanthi Sekaran in conversation with Oscar Villalon, managing editor of the San Francisco literary journal ZYZZYVA. May 11, 7pm. $15. Healdsburg Shed, 25 North St, Healdsburg, 707.431.7433.

The Music of the Summer of Love

Dennis McNally, biographer and former publicist of the Grateful Dead, talks about the Summer of Love and his exhibit of photos and ephemera at the California Historical Society. May 16, 7pm. Larkspur Library, 400 Magnolia Ave, Larkspur, 415.927.5005.

The Myth of Male Power

Interactive discussion is focused on how each gender can best solve issues unique to their own sex in a spirit of empathy and active listening. May 11, 6pm. $20. Institute of Noetic Sciences, 101 San Antonio Rd, Petaluma, favors.org.

The Power of the Wounded Healer

Panel discussion touches on healing through many types of suffering. May 13, 10am. Free. USF Santa Rosa Campus, 416 B St, Santa Rosa.

What’s on a Label

Talk is part of the library’s


Healthy Living series. May 15, 6pm. Guerneville Library, 14107 Armstrong Woods Rd, Guerneville, 707.869.9004.

Book Passage

May 10, 1pm, “Hourglass: Time, Memory, Marriage” with Dani Shapiro. May 10, 7pm, poetry with José Gutiérrez and Dean Rader. May 11, 1pm, “Ginny Moon” with Benjamin Ludwig. May 12, 7pm, “The Girls” with Emma Cline. May 13, 4pm, “Love & Death in Burgundy” with Susan C Shea. May 13, 7pm, “Filling Her Shoes” with Betsy Graziani Fasbinder. May 15, 7pm, “The Evolution of Beauty” with Richard Prum. May 16, 7pm, “A Little Book on Form” with Robert Hass, co-presented with Marin Poetry Center. May 17, 7pm, “Sweetbitter” with Stephanie Danler. 51 Tamal Vista Blvd, Corte Madera 415.927.0960.

Book Passage By-the-Bay

May 13, 1pm, “Fierce Kindness” with Melanie SalvatoreAugust. May 13, 4pm, “The Secret Life of Clowns” with Jeff Raz. May 16, 6pm, “A Dog’s Way Home” with W Bruce Cameron. 100 Bay St, Sausalito 415.339.1300.

Calistoga Copperfield’s Books

May 10, 4pm, “The Lost Kingdom of Bamarre” with Gail Carson Levine. May 12, 7pm, “Big Impact Landscaping” with Sara Bendrick. May 16, 4pm, “Gertie’s Leap to Greatness” with Kate Beasley. 140 Kentucky St, Petaluma 707.762.0563.

Point Reyes Books

May 12, 7pm, “Animals Strike Curious Poses” with Elena Passarello. May 15, 7pm, “Borne” with Jeff VanderMeer. 11315 Hwy 1, Pt Reyes Station 415.663.1542.

San Rafael Copperfield’s Books

May 13, 2pm, “‘Round Midnight” with Laura McBride. 850 Fourth St, San Rafael 415.524.2800.

Santa Rosa Copperfield’s Books

May 10, 7pm, “Pantsuit Nation” with various authors. 775 Village Court, Santa Rosa. 707.578.8938.

Sebastopol Copperfield’s Books

May 13, 7pm, “The Last Days of Cafe Leila” with Donia Bijan. 138 N Main St, Sebastopol 707.823.2618.

Studio 333

May 11, 7pm, Why There Are Words, seven authors read on the topic of “Suggestible.” 333 Caledonia St, Sausalito 415.331.8272.

May 12, 7pm, “The Light We Lost” with Jill Santopolo. 1330 Lincoln Ave, Calistoga 707.942.1616.

Theater

Healdsburg Copperfield’s Books

Valley Players presents the madcap comedy about three actresses navigating their show biz dreams in a wonderland of American theater. Through May 11. $20. Napa Valley Performing Arts Center at Lincoln Theater, 100 California Dr, Yountville, valley-players.com.

May 16, 6pm, “The Book of Summer” with Michelle Gable, followed by a reception at Thumbprint Cellars. 104 Matheson St, Healdsburg 707.433.9270.

Napa Bookmine

May 11, 7pm, “Live Your Happy” with Maria Felipe. May 12, 7pm, “The Weight of Him” with Ethel Rohan. 964 Pearl St, Napa 707.733.3199.

Napa Bookmine at Oxbow

May 13, 12pm, “Escargot” with Dashka Slater. 610 First St, Shop 4, Napa. 707.726.6575.

Osher Marin JCC

May 16, 7pm, “She Is Wisdom: A Celebration of the Feminine Divine” with Miki Raver. 200 N San Pedro Rd, San Rafael 415.444.8000.

Anton in Show Business

The Bob O’Klock Variety Hour

A wild and crazy homage to the great TV variety shows of the ‘60s and ‘70s. May 12-13. $20. Raven Theater, 115 North St, Healdsburg, 707.433.3145.

Boom!

Traditional masked theater and live music come together for a unique circus spectacular. Through May 13. Throckmorton Theatre, 142 Throckmorton Ave, Mill Valley, 415.383.9600.

Disney’s Tarzan

The famous jungle hero swings

into action in this memorable theater experience for all ages, with music, choreography and high-flying aerial acrobatics. Through May 21. $16-$30. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Lane, Rohnert Park, 707.588.3400.

33 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Readings

Petaluma Copperfield’s Books

Guards at the Taj

As the Taj Mahal is unveiled, childhood friends Humayun and Babur must carry out a task that tests their friendship in this hilarious and heartbreaking fable making its Bay Area premiere. Through May 21. $10$37. Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller Ave, Mill Valley, 415.388.5208.

Guys & Dolls in concert North Bay Stage Company sings the score from the classic gangster musical comedy. Through May 14. $36. Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, 50 Mark West Springs Rd, Santa Rosa, 707.546.3600.

Maple & Vine

Intriguing comedy concerns a community of burned-out professionals and nostalgic suburbanites who collectively turn back the clock to the 1950s. Through May 21. $10$20. College of Marin Kentfield Campus, 835 College Ave, Kentfield, 415.457.8811.

A Masterpiece of Comic…Timing

Bay Area premiere of playwright Robert Caisley’s newest and funniest work to date. May 12-28. Studio Theatre, 6th Street Playhouse, 52 W Sixth St, Santa Rosa, 707.523.4185.

The Music Man

Stapleton Theatre Company celebrates 10 years with resident director Bruce Vieira reprising his first show. Through May 14. $16-$22. The Playhouse, 27 Kensington Rd, San Anselmo, 415.258.4640.

Power Lines

Three short plays debut in this festival. Through May 13. Ives Hall room 119, SSU, 1801 E Cotati Ave, Rohnert Park, 707.664.4246.

The BOHEMIAN’s calendar is produced as a service to the community. If you have an item for the calendar, send it to calendar@bohemian. com, or mail it to: NORTH BAY BOHEMIAN, 847 Fifth St, Santa Rosa CA 95404. Events costing more than $65 may be withheld. Deadline is two weeks prior to desired publication date.

Best Criminal Lawyer • DUI • Misdemeanors • Felonies

We also handle: • Major personal injuries • Wrongful death

1510 Fourth Street, Santa Rosa www.adamsfietz.com • 707.999.9999


THE

NORTH BAY BOH EM I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BO H E M I AN.COM

34

Nugget

Fork in the Road What is the future of adult use? BY BEN ADAMS

O

ne of the big questions facing those who wish to participate in the emerging cannabis industry is whether to focus on the medical market or the adultuse market. The medical market in California is relatively mature, with existing infrastructure and patients used to going to the dispensary. However, it remains to be seen how that system survives the adultuse market which comes online Jan. 1, 2018. Right now, in order to go to a dispensary and buy medical cannabis, one must get a recommendation from a doctor. Though this is a not a particularly difficult process, it still takes time and money—usually less than $100. When the adult-use market opens, one will be able to buy medical cannabis with a driver’s license. So who will go to a medical dispensary? Customer loyalty will only go so far if the adult-use market is more convenient.

I see two scenarios in which the medical-market survives. First, I expect a difference in how medical and adult-use cannabis is taxed. If the tax difference is significant, people may still find value in getting a recommendation and buying medical cannabis. Second, it is possible that the medical system obtains higher grades of cannabis, at least initially. While many Californians use cannabis, the adultuse market remains in its infancy, and it’s unclear how the industry will respond to this new system. One concern is that, in either system, it is possible that the cost of cannabis will increase—or plummet. I think that this is a real tension in the system. There is no question that the cost of growing and producing is about to go way up. The draft of state regulations is out, and it is estimated that compliance will be hundreds of dollars per pound. Will growers operate on a much thinner margin, or will they try to pass those increases on to consumers? Will the average consumer be willing to pay $20 a gram, as has happened in other states? Given the availability of cannabis, and the right to grow six plants, I think consumers will push back. This may lead to a race to the bottom in pricing. I think all of these problems are solvable. The market will mature and many of these questions will be answered. My fear is not that some people won’t be successful; my fear is that most of the people I know in the cannabis industry now will not be in it within a few years. To me the system seems to favor wealth and capital. Most small producers, unless they can find a niche market quickly or are doing it as a hobby, will soon find the cost of production too high to make a living. Again, I think this is a short-term problem, but by the time it gets sorted out, most of the small producers will have been driven out. Ben Adams is a local attorney who specializes in cannabis law and compliance.


BOHEMIAN

sales and technical Blentech HospitalistPLACE AN AD: Phone: 707.527.1200, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:30pm applications support Corporation Physician Fax: 707.527.1288 | Email: sales@bohemian.com

Music Lessons With Dustin Saylor 15 years experience

Guitar. Song Writing. Vocals. call or text: 818.268.3317

Seeks to fill the following positions in Santa Rosa, California: (1) Process/Applications Engineer (job code PAE) to develop process solutions to industrial food manufacturing challenges. 25% travel, with 5% being international; and (2) International Sales & Technical Account Manager (job code ISTAM) to provide

for product lines. Travel 35% to Europe, Asia, and Oceania. To apply, submit resume to khamilton@blentech. com Please reference appropriate job code in subject line.

Pacific Inpatient Medical Group, Novato, CA. Job location: Santa Rosa, CA. Assess and examine patients, review past medical history, and request and/or perform/recommend diagnostic tests and ..................................... examinations deemed necessary to obtain all Win Free Stuff possible information bohemian.com/ related to each case. Email CV to leilanig@ northbay/freeStuff farallonmed.com.

&

Alternative Health Well-Being SUBOXONE

Thursday 4–6pm

available for Safe Oxy, Roxy, Norco, Vicodin, and Other Opiate Withdrawal!

STACS

175 Concourse off Airport Blvd.

SUBOXONE Treatment and counseling services

B12HappyHour.com Dr. Moses Goldberg, ND Dr. Dana Michaels, ND 707.284.9200

Confidential Program. 707.576.1919

Thai Massage & Body Work

THE ILLUSION OF FAMILIARITY

A video Presentation on the Life, Teaching, and Living Spiritual Presence of Avatar Adi Da Samraj “The offerings of Adi Da are sacred and direct transmissions of Reality itself and have the power to transform your relationship to yourself, the world, and the Divine.” — Dustin DiPerna, author, Streams of Wisdom

FRIDAY • MAY 19 • 7 PM 5 Donation •$

Finley Center, 2060 W College Ave, S.R., Maple Room Adidam.org

Enjoy the Moment

Classic massage by a unique gentleman. Women, men, couples.

Since 1991. Aft/eve appts. Santa Rosa 707.799.4467(C) or 707.535.0511 (L) Jimmy

B12 SHOT HAPPY HOUR

Professional Thai massage therapy by Natalie 707.308.4169 2635 Cleveland Ave # 7 Santa Rosa $

5 OFF

with this ad

Great Massage

By Joe, CMT. Swedish massage, 18 years experience. Will do outcalls. 707.228.6883 ....................................

A Safe Place For Healing

Holistic, tantric, mature masseuse. Private, unhurried, heart centered. Free consultation with Session. Please call in advance for appt. 707.793.2188.

Tell Me When You’ve Had Enough!!

$1.00 min. for excellent Therapeutic massage. Introductory & Vets. discounts. 30 + years experience. colingodwinmassage. org 707.823.2990 Mon–Sat 10–10 ....................................

Full Body Sensual Massage

With a mature, playful CMT. Comfortable incall location near the J.C. in Santa Rosa. Soothing, relaxing, and fun. Gretchen 707.478.3952. Veterans Discount. ....................................

Chris Henderson, ND, L.Ac.

Naturopathic Medicine & Acupuncture, Pain Management, Weight loss, Vitamin B12 Injections. Napa & Calistoga. 707.942.1250.

Astrology For the week of May 10

ARIES (March 21–April 19) The process by which Zoo Jeans are manufactured is unusual. First, workers wrap and secure sheets of denim around car tires or big rubber balls, and take their raw creations to the Kamine Zoo in Hitachi City, Japan. There the denim-swaddled objects are thrown into pits where tigers or lions live. As the beasts roughhouse with their toys, they rip holes in the cloth. Later, the material is retrieved and used to sew the jeans. Might this story prove inspirational for you in the coming weeks? I suspect it will. Here’s one possibility: You could arrange for something wild to play a role in shaping an influence you will have an intimate connection with. TAURUS (April 20–May 20)

“Kiss the flame and it is yours,” teased the poet Thomas Lux. What do you think he was hinting at? It’s a metaphorical statement, of course. You wouldn’t want to literally thrust your lips and tongue into a fire. But according to my reading of the astrological omens, you might benefit from exploring its meanings. Where to begin? May I suggest you visualize making out with the steady burn at the top of a candle? My sources tell me that doing so at this particular moment in your evolution will help kindle a new source of heat and light in your deep self—a fresh fount of glowing power that will burn sweet and strong like a miniature sun.

GEMINI (May 21–June 20) Your symbol of power during the next three weeks is a key. Visualize it. What picture pops into your imagination? Is it a bejeweled golden key like what might be used to access an old treasure chest? Is it a rustic key for a garden gate or an oversized key for an ornate door? Is it a more modern thing that locks and unlocks car doors with radio waves? Whatever you choose, Gemini, I suggest you enshrine it as an inspirational image in the back of your mind. Just assume that it will subtly inspire and empower you to find the metaphorical “door” that leads to the next chapter of your life story. CANCER (June 21–July 22) You are free to reveal yourself in your full glory. For once in your life, you have cosmic clearance to ask for everything you want without apology. This is the later you have been saving yourself for. Here comes the reward for the hard work you’ve been doing that no one has completely appreciated. If the universe has any prohibitions or inhibitions to impose, I don’t know what they are. If old karma has been preventing the influx of special dispensations and helpful X-factors, I suspect that old karma has at least temporarily been neutralized. LEO (July 23–August 22) “I don’t want to be at the mercy of my emotions,” said Irish writer Oscar Wilde. “I want to use them, to enjoy them and to dominate them.” In my opinion, that may be one of the most radical vows ever formulated. Is it even possible for us human beings to gracefully manage our unruly flow of feelings? What you do in the coming weeks could provide evidence that the answer to that question might be yes. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you are now in a position to learn more about this high art than ever before. VIRGO (August 23–September 22) Africa’s highest mountain is Mount Kilimanjaro. Though it’s near the equator, its peak is covered year-round with glaciers. In 2001, scientists predicted that global warming would melt them all by 2015. But that hasn’t happened. The ice cap is still receding slowly. It could endure for a while, even though it will eventually disappear. Let’s borrow this scenario as a metaphor for your use, Virgo. First, consider the possibility that a certain thaw in your personal sphere isn’t unfolding as quickly as you anticipated. Second, ruminate on the likelihood that it will, however, ultimately come to pass. Third, adjust your plans accordingly. LIBRA (September 23–October 22) Will sex be humdrum and predictable in the coming weeks? No! On the contrary. Your interest in wandering out to the frontiers of erotic play could rise quite high. You may be animated and experimental in your approach to intimate communion, whether it’s with another person or with yourself. Need any suggestions? Check out the

BY ROB BREZSNY

“butterflies-in-flight” position or the “spinning wheel of roses” maneuver. Try the “hum-and-chuckle kissing dare” or the “churning radiance while riding the rain cloud” move. Or just invent your own variations and give them funny names that add to the adventure.

SCORPIO (October 23–November 21)

Right now the word “simplicity” is irrelevant. You’ve got silky profundities to play with, slippery complications to relish and lyrical labyrinths to wander around in. I hope you use these opportunities to tap into more of your subterranean powers. From what I can discern, your deep, dark intelligence is ready to provide you with a host of fresh clues about who you really are and where you need to go. (P.S.: You can become better friends with the shadows without compromising your relationship to the light.)

SAGITTARIUS (November 22–December 21)

You can bake your shoes in the oven at 350 degrees for 40 minutes, but that won’t turn them into loaves of bread. Know what I’m saying, Sagittarius? Just because a chicken has wings doesn’t mean it can fly over the rainbow. Catch my drift? You’ll never create a silk purse out of dental floss and dead leaves. That’s why I offer you the following advice: in the next two weeks, do your best to avoid paper tigers, red herrings, fool’s gold, fake news, Trojan horses, straw men, pink elephants, convincing pretenders and invisible bridges. There’ll be a reward if you do: close encounters with shockingly beautiful honesty and authenticity that will be among your most useful blessings of 2017.

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 19) Of all the signs of the zodiac, you Capricorns are the least likely to believe in mythical utopias like Camelot or El Dorado or Shambhala. You tend to be über-skeptical about the existence of legendary vanished riches like the last Russian czar’s Fabergé eggs or King John’s crown jewels. And yet if wonderlands and treasures like those really do exist, I’m betting that some may soon be discovered by Capricorn explorers. Are there unaccounted-for masterpieces by Georgia O’Keeffe buried in a basement somewhere? Is the score of a lost Mozart symphony tucked away in a seedy antique store? I predict that your tribe will specialize in unearthing forgotten valuables, homing in on secret miracles and locating missing mother lodes. AQUARIUS (January 20–February 18) According to my lyrical analysis of the astrological omens, here are examples of the kinds of experiences you might encounter in the next 21 days: (1) interludes that reawaken memories of the first time you fell in love; (2) people who act like helpful, moon-drunk angels just in the nick of time; (3) healing music or provocative art that stirs a secret part of you—a sweet spot you had barely been aware of; (4) an urge arising in your curious heart to speak the words, “I invite lost and exiled beauty back into my life.” PISCES (February 19–March 20)

Ex-baseball player Eric DuBose was pulled over by Florida cops who spotted him driving his car erratically. They required him to submit to a few tests, hoping to determine whether he had consumed too much alcohol. “Can you recite the alphabet?” they asked. “I’m from the great state of Alabama,” DuBose replied, “and they have a different alphabet there.” I suggest, Pisces, that you try similar gambits whenever you find yourself in odd interludes or tricky transitions during the coming days—which I suspect will happen more than usual. Answer the questions you want to answer rather than the ones you’re asked, for example. Make jokes that change the subject. Use the powers of distraction and postponement. You’ll need extra slack, so seize it!

Go to REALASTROLOGY.COM to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. Audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1.877.873.4888 or 1.900.950.7700.

35 NO RTH BAY BO H E M I AN | MAY 1 0 -1 6, 20 17 | BOH E MI A N.COM

Classifieds

FREE WILL


Oliver’s wants to wish all of our

amazing Moms a very happy Mother’s Day.

Real Food. Real People.®

9230 Old Redwood Highway • Windsor • 687-2050 | 546 E. Cotati Avenue • Cotati • 795-9501 | 560 Montecito Center • Santa Rosa • 537-7123 | 461 Stony Point Road • Santa Rosa • 284-3530

Profile for Metro Publishing

Nbb1719  

May 10-16, 2017

Nbb1719  

May 10-16, 2017